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John-a-Dreams

New York: Robert Sloss Vol. 1, No. 1 (July 1896) to Vol. 2, No. 6 (June 1897), consisting of 9 out of 11 issues published (lacking vol. 1, nos. 4 and 5 [October/November and December 1896]). Octavos. All issues near fine, each featuring a repeating cover illustration of a dreaming man printed in red and black by John Sloan. Included with the set is the ultra-rare prospectus illustrated by Sloan and Tarkington from October 1895. John-a-Dreams is one of the most elusive and most sought-after of the little magazines of the 1890s. We cannot explain its elusiveness, but it is sought after because of the rare John Sloan cover illustration and because the issues are replete with contributions by the then-unknown Booth Tarkington. Tarkington was connected to the magazine because he was a friend and former Princeton classmate of the editor and publisher Robert Sloss. He contributed poetry to the monthly under the nom-de-plume "Cecil Woodford" and art under his own name. Like nearly all of the little magazines, John-a-Dreams struggled to survive. That it made it to its first anniversary is a tribute to the perseverance of Sloss. Tarkington said about John-a-Dreams "The death of that little magazine, on the staff of which I was supposed to be, was the greatest blow I ever sustained." A great file of a lovely product of the 1890s chapbook movement.. Original Wrappers. Near Fine. Illus. by John Sloan. Octavos.

$1300.00
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Dodge's Literary Museum

Boston: Ossian Dodge, 1853. Vol. 6, No. 1 (December 11, 1852) to No. 26 (June 4, 1853), comprising 26 issues in all, bound in quarter-leather and paper-covered boards. Small folio. Binding VG, solid, general wear, 2" missing from bottom of spine. Contents VG with the usual spotting and occasional toning. Ossian Dodge was a singer and comedian of modest renown until he bought his way into the history books by paying P.T. Barnum $625 for the first ticket to Jenny Lind's concert debut in Boston in 1850. From 1848 to 1854, he also published his Literary Museum. It was a typical literary weekly of the period, filled with second-rate fiction, poetry, and other miscellany. What makes this volume fascinating is the first appearance serialization of two works of fiction about African-Americans. The first serialization, entitled "The Faithful Slave," by Kentuckian Robert Morris, purported to be a fictionalized account of a true story that occurred in the late 1830's in Mississippi. Each of the eight installments is illustrated, including a bizarre, salacious head-piece of a bare-breasted Black woman in seductive recline. It tells the story of a house slave named Loogy, who exhibits a "spaniel-like devotion" to her master. She is falsely accused of stealing $20,000 dollars of her master's money. He whips her of course (the engraving of the whipping scene shows Loogy tied to a tree as the whip cuts "through her flimsy chemise") and then, when she still does not admit to the crime, sells her. Eventually, the true villain is exposed and the money found. Loogy is retrieved from her new slave master (who mistreated her) and the story ends with her happily reunited with her original owner. Dodge advertised this tale as "absolutely superior to Mrs. Stowe's late work." The second serialization, which ran through three issues, was entitled, "The Rising of '76 or the Negro's Dead Shot," by "(blank) Smith, Esq." It is a Revolutionary War romance set in Massachusetts, in which a Black slave named "Kit" figures as the hero. Both stories are fascinating political documents from the 1850's.. Quarter Leather & Paper Boards. See Description. Small Folio.


The World We Live In / The Literary Museum

Boston: John Hall Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 6, 1844) to Vol. 2, No. 24 (December [15] 1845), comprising 48 semi-monthly issues, bound in contemporary leather and cloth boards. Binding fair, well-worn, front hinge cracked but still sound. Contents VG, first and last two issues stained. Other issues have occasional browning or small tears. Title pages and indexes bound into the rear of each volume. John Hall, erstwhile editor and publisher of the Boston Weekly Magazine (1838-1841), established The World We Live In with new partner Andrew loud in response, they claimed, to requests by old subscribers to launch a similar effort. And that it was: light literature and poetry, both original and selected, news squibs, sheet music, etc., a typical literary and parlor magazine of the period. Highlights include articles on portrait painting among Indians, James Harper's election to the post of mayor of New York Hall, Andrew Jackson's funeral, and several pieces on Texas and the Sandwich Islands. The first volume contains two steel engravings, one of Boston Common (foxed) and one of a city street scene from the 1600s. The second volume contains four, including one depicting the cultivation of tea and the other a scene from the play "Paul Pry." Hall, the sole proprietor by 1845, rechristened the magazine The Literary Museum in April of that year, adding the long and grandiose sub-title: "A Repository of the Useful and Entertaining including the Wonders of Nature and Art, Tales of all Countries and all Ages, Travels, Adventures, Biography, etc." though the eclectic contents remained the same. Hall continued to publish the Museum until October of 1847.. Modern Leather & Cloth Boards. See Description. Large Quarto.


The Young People's Mirror

New York, 1848. Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 1848) to No. 12 (December 1848), comprising the first twelve of twenty-four issues, bound in brown quarter leather and marbled boards. Quarto. Binding good, with front hinge starting. Contents VG, fresh. In 1848, when The Young People's Mirror commenced, its editor, Benjamin Lossing, was a 35-year-old journalist and wood engraver. He created a well-illustrated and eclectic miscellany, which, despite the name, was intended to be a paper for the entire family. Highlights of this volume include illustrated articles on Chinese water craft (two parts), whale fishing, a profile of Albany with a half-page view, and more. There were also regular features on natural history and astronomy. Lossing had a keen appreciation of American history, which he conveyed through numerous articles, especially focusing on the American Revolution. It might have been his experience as editor of The Mirror that prompted him to approach Harper and Brothers about publishing a book on the American Revolution. The result, A Pictorial Field Book of the American Revolution, issued in parts from 1850 through 1852 was a publishing sensation that launched Lossing's long and distinguished career as an American historian. This volume was the property of Joseph B. Goodrich, whose name appears on the cover of the volume and is written at the top of the title page. In 1848, he was a ten-year-old boy living in South Scituate, MA. He would later fight in the Civil War as a private in the 18th Massachusetts Infantry and then make his living as a shoemaker, dying in Norwell, MA, in 1893. Only four US libraries hold the first volume.. Brown 1/4 Leather & Boards. See Description. Quarto.


Vanity Fair

New York, 1862. Vol. 5, No. 106 (January 5, 1862) to No. 131 (June 28, 1862), comprising 26 issues, a complete volume, bound in leather and marbled boards. Quarto. Binding VG, general wear. Contents VG, light rippling to lower quadrant of text block but no tide lines except on flyleaves. Index bound in. Highlights include covers that feature caricatures of famous Americans. Vanity Fair is widely regarded as the best American humor magazine prior to Puck. It was edited at various periods by Charles Godfrey Leland and Charles Farrar Browne ("Artemus Ward") and featured the political cartoons of HL Stephens. Vanity Fair is full of period humor that has aged gracefully, especially Ward's contributions, but its cartoons are perhaps its most important feature. Stephens, who is more widely known today as a early American children's book illustrator, drew political cartoons in the genteel mode of the British, but he could be savage when he chose to be. His series of caricatures of President Buchanan, for example, are merciless. He was impartial during the 1860 campaign but he became strongly pro-Union and nominally pro-Lincoln with the start of the Civil War. Many of his Lincoln cartoons in these volumes are classics and have been reprinted many times. Stephens' work reveals the schizophrenic nature of the Union movement, because he was also a racist, despising the African-African and his Abolitionist advocates. These volumes contain a good number of ugly cartoons on the slave question. One of the high points of this set is the series of caricatures of famous people that Stephens drew for the covers of the magazine beginning with volume 5. Personages caricatured include Horace Greeley, Henry Ward Beecher, William Cullen Bryant, Edwin P. Stanton, Artemus Ward, Parson Brownlow, Benjamin Butler, and others. Vanity Fair switched to monthly publication in January 1863, suspended publication after the February issue, and then resumed as a weekly on May 2, only to fold for good on July 4.. Leather & Marbled Boards. See Description. Quarto.


Vanity Fair

New York, 1860. Vol. 1, No. 1 (December 28, 1859) to Vol. 2, No. 53 (December 30, 1860), comprising 53 issues, a complete year, bound in red cloth. Quarto. Binding VG, sturdy, rear outer corner bumped. Contents generally VG, with library stamps to text block edges and title page, several short tears. Index bound in. Volume two does not have covers and advertisements bound in, which is common, since the covers didn't change during this period. Highlights include coverage of the 1860 campaign. Vanity Fair is widely regarded as the best American humor magazine prior to Puck. It was edited at various periods by Charles Godfrey Leland and Charles Farrar Browne ("Artemus Ward") and featured the political cartoons of HL Stephens. Vanity Fair is full of period humor that has aged gracefully, especially Ward's contributions, but its cartoons are perhaps its most important feature. Stephens, who is more widely known today as a early American children's book illustrator, drew political cartoons in the genteel mode of the British, but he could be savage when he chose to be. His series of caricatures of President Buchanan, for example, are merciless. He was impartial during the 1860 campaign but he became strongly pro-Union and nominally pro-Lincoln with the start of the Civil War. Many of his Lincoln cartoons in these volumes are classics and have been reprinted many times. Stephens' work reveals the schizophrenic nature of the Union movement, because he was also a racist, despising the African-African and his Abolitionist advocates. These volumes contain a good number of ugly cartoons on the slave question. One of the high points of this set is the series of caricatures of famous people that Stephens drew for the covers of the magazine beginning with volume 5. Personages caricatured include Horace Greeley, Henry Ward Beecher, William Cullen Bryant, Edwin P. Stanton, Artemus Ward, Parson Brownlow, Benjamin Butler, and others. Vanity Fair switched to monthly publication in January 1863, suspended publication after the February issue, and then resumed as a weekly on May 2, only to fold for good on July 4.. Red Cloth. See Description. Quarto.


George Silverman's Explanation in Atlantic Monthly

By Charles Dickens

Boston, 1868. Atlantic Monthly January through March 1868, each issue featuring an installment of Charles Dickens' "George Silverman's Explanation," complete. Octavos. All issues near fine, a beautiful set. "George Silverman's Explanation," published complete in three installments in the Atlantic Monthly, was one of the last pieces of fiction Charles Dickens wrote and unlike anything else from his pen. It came from a deep and dark place in his psyche, so deep and dark he himself didn't recognize it: "Upon myself it has made the strangest impression of reality and originality! And I feel as f I had read something (by somebody else) which I should never get out of my mind." (Introduction to The Mystery of Edwin Drood and Other Stories). It is an extraordinary tale. "George Silverman's Explanation" seems haunted by the ghosts of failure and a misspent life. It delves deep into its protagonist's guilt complex, and ultimately reveals him as a character destined never to be happy, for part of him is devoted to sabotaging any relationship he has with others. Surprising scarce, this is only the second set in such nice condition that we have handled. . Original Wrappers. Near Fine. Octavos.


Shoemaker Editorial Cartoon Set of Books

By Vaughn Shoemaker

Chicago, IL This is a complete set of seven hardbound collections of political cartoons by the great cartoonist Vaughn Shoemaker of the Chicago Daily News, all signed or inscribed. Each volume is approximately 90 pages and measures 7 ¾" x 9 ½". The books are in very good shape with occasional light edge wear. The lot includes: -- 1938: No. 1301 of 1,500 first edition copies; SIGNED by Shoemaker. -- 1939: SIGNED by Shoemaker. -- 1940: An unnumbered copy of a limited edition of 500. SIGNED by Shoemaker. -- 1941 and 1942: Laid in is a ALS by Shoemaker dated 1967. -- 1943 and 1944: INSCRIBED by Shoemaker. -- 1945 and 1946: No. 1086 of a first printing of 2,500; SIGNED by Shoemaker. -- Shoemaker (1965) (In good DJ): INSCRIBED by Shoemaker with a sketch.. See Description. See Description. Illus. by Vaughn Shoemaker.


Mrs. Grundy

New York, 1865. Vol. 1, No. 1 (July 8, 1865) to No. 11 (September 16, 1865), comprising eleven issues, lacking only the twelfth and final issue (supplied in facsimile) for a complete run. Quarto. Bound in old cloth. Contents VG, with fore-edge stain that is noticeable mainly in issues 7 and 8 (where it intrudes into text and images). Mrs. Grundy dodged the Civil War intentionally. Several of its projectors had been associated with Vanity Fair (1859-1863), which went to its grave in part because of war-related paper shortages. So they waited until the conclusion of the conflict to launch their weekly in the hope that a magazine much like Vanity Fair could flourish in a kinder post-war climate. Mrs. Grundy began auspiciously. It was edited by Dr. Alfred Carroll, who had been associated with The Lantern (1852-53) and was an artist as well (see the cover of Harper's Weekly, 1865) and Charles Dawson Shanly, a comic writer of note. The cover and many of the interior cartoons were by Thomas Nast (who won the $100 cover prize competition). Comic press veterans H. L. Stephens and Augustus Hoppin also contributed. Unfortunately for Mrs. Grundy, the days after the war were not appreciably more settled than those during the war. Perhaps a crusading weekly could have succeeded, but Mrs. Grundy was not a crusader. True to her namesake, she was more inclined to tut-tut. She supported Andrew Johnson's reconstruction policies, warned away France and England from threatening American interests in the hemisphere, was critical of railroad safety and accounting theft, celebrated the Fourth of July with appropriate decorum, and generally surveyed the American scene with bemusement and concern. The weekly needed 6,000 subscribers to be able to afford the $600 in expenses per issue. But it fell well short of that goal and perished with its twelfth issue. Mrs. Grundy began with such fanfare and crashed so quickly that its name always seems to appear on the lists of failed humor magazines. Despite being well-known, copies of it are quite scarce.. Old Cloth. See Description. Quarto.

$1200.00
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Cartoons by Will Dyson 1913

By Will Dyson

London, 1913. This is a copy of Cartoons by Will Dyson (London: 1913). Quarto. VG, with rough spine. Clean interior. A nice copy of Will Dyson's first collection of political cartoons from the London Daily Herald 1912-13.. Original Wrappers. VG, with rough Spine. Illus. by Will Dyson. Quarto.


Cartoons by Will Dyson 1914

By Will Dyson

London, 1914. This is a copy of Cartoons by Will Dyson (London: 1914). Folio. VG, with spine wear. Clean interior. A nice copy of Will Dyson's second collection of political cartoons from the London Daily Herald 1913-14. . Original Wrappers. VG, with Spine Wear. Illus. by Will Dyson. Folio.


The Masses

New York, 1916. Vol. 8, No. 3 (January 1916) to Vol. 9, No. 2 (December 1916), comprising 12 issues, bound in red cloth. Small folio. Binding VG-, nibbling and wear to edges, rebacked in black cloth with paper spine label. Contents VG, with some toning, wrinkling to the July issue, and offsetting to the July back cover. All covers and advertisements bound in. This volume is from the library of The New Masses and bears its stamp on the front fly. Highlights of this volume include covers by Frank Walts, Maurice Becker, and Hugo Gellert, cartoon art by Art Young, Boardman Robinson, Stuart Davis, Cornelia Barns, and essays by Max Eastman, John Reed, and many others. By all measures except the most mundane (profitability, advertising pages, circulation figures), The Masses was a great magazine: beautiful, intelligent, surprising, dynamic, deadly serious, laugh-out-loud funny, high-minded and frivolous. Nothing like it had ever been seen in America before it began publishing in its new form in December 1913. While Puck, Judge, and Life, America's leading political satire magazines, had been entertaining readers for nearly two generations, only occasionally did the first and the last of these (Judge almost never did) challenge its audience with a cartoon or an editorial that departed from the status quo. The Masses was beholden to these venerable mainstream magazines for the visual and comedic vocabulary they popularized. But the artists and writers of The Masses were more interested in subverting tradition than in extending it. For that task, they drew their inspiration from the artistic satire magazines of Europe, Simplicissimus and L'Assiette Au Buerre, and succeeded in bringing the bravura of those unconventional publications to America. The teens was socialism's glorious moment in America. The movement was the product of more than 100 years of agitation- perhaps beginning with Jefferson's warnings about the deleterious effects of urbanized culture - to curb the excesses of American capitalism. The American culture had wrestled with the coarser aspects of capitalism. Most Americans embraced the system enthusiastically, but they were not stone deaf to the stories of men who got rich on speculation during the civil war, to the ruthlessness of the robber barons, to the exploitation of immigrant and child labor and the brutal suppression of the labor union movement, to the abuse of privilege in the halls of government, to the exposes of the muckrakers and social workers. Slowly, converts were won in the fight for greater economic equity, in the fight for fairness. A great portion of the country was willing to embrace some sort of change, however cautious, exemplified by the elections of two reformers, Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson, to the presidency. A smaller, though growing, minority on the left wanted sweeping change. These radicals tended to gather under the socialist banner. It would be a mistake to suggest that the pre-world war I left was a monolith. But the unity of purpose in those pre-war days far surpassed any period since. That was because the evil - capitalism - was known in all of its destructive dimensions. Workers could feel its oppressive weight every day of their lives. Intellectuals and reformers could see the injustice all around them. The socialist vision, on the other hand, was just that - a vision, largely untested, but temptingly appealing. The vigor and élan of The Masses is due in great part to this dynamic: the writers and artists confronted a pervasive foe, a hulking target, a system that in its excesses was its own worst enemy. They had, in short, an endless source of inspiration. Were they required to propose alternatives to Rockefeller's henchmen gunning down mine workers and their families? The argument was academic. So, though the majority of Americans were skeptical, at minimum, of the sweet song of socialism, only the most mossback could defend the worst abuses of capitalism. History showed how the American left shattered as it responded to the Russian revolution, that is, when it was finally confronted with the reality of a Socialist state, but that story comes later, after The Masses was run from the stage. So this magazine spotlights that magical moment in the history of the American left, when it was resolute in its fight against evil and pregnant with glorious possibility. The Masses was perhaps the socialist movement's greatest gift to American culture.. Red Cloth Rebacked in Black. See Description. Small Folio.

$1500.00
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Ridgway's: A Militant Weekly for God and Country

New York, etc.: Erman Ridgway Vol. 1, No. 1 (October 6, 1906) to No. 19 (February 9, 1907), comprising 19 issues in all, a complete run, bound in the publisher's elaborate mock medieval full leather binding. Quarto. Binding VG, with general wear and a stain to the upper left. Contents near fine, with some toning. Erman Ridgway was the son of a prosperous Ohio doctor, a BMOC at Yale, and the successful publisher of Everybody's Magazine, which by 1906 had already created a sensation in the muckraking world with its long-running expose of Wall Street by Thomas Lawson. Ridgway then had lots of money. He decided to spend it on a new weekly, one that would be forthright in its advocacy for the people against the big interests. The unusual subtitle echoed Ridgeway's college years when the crowd at sporting events (with Ridgway often on the field) would stand up and chant "For God, for Country, and for Yale." Ridgway did not employ the reference to "God" in a religious sense but rather as an invocation of the good over the bad. Similarly, he did not mean "for Country" to be a shout of blind patriotism, but rather as a political statement that proclaimed that what was good for the many was good for all. So the weekly had an agenda: "We are prejudiced against fraud, bombast and charlatancy... We are prejudiced in favor of honor in public places, decency in private affairs, and the principle of the Golden Rule... We are only moderately terrified by that thunder-born anathema, "Muck-raker!", and we shall use the teethed implement where there is need and hope of abolishing muck... That we shall not please everyone is a regrettable certainty, but less regrettable in prospect than the possibility of being offenceless to all and, by that very token, dull, null and void." The full-page cartoon (by Life cartoonist William H. Walker) accompanying the editorial depicted Ridgway's Weekly as a knight in armor holding a sword labeled "fair play," ready to confront the Republican elephant, the Democratic donkey, the trusts and the corrupt politician. The first issue was a substantial 64 pages, full of features on national policy ("Must We Take Cuba?"), a capsule review of events of the week, a photo gallery, a page of humor by Gelett Burgess, a report from Washington, financial news, poetry, and fiction. Ridgway's Weekly is known to enthusiasts of literature because it published Joseph Conrad's political novel "The Secret Agent" in serialized form beginning in its first issue and continuing through ten more. Though The Secret Agent was among Conrad's poorest selling novels when it was published later in the year, many now hail it as a masterpiece. In 2008, the New York Times called it "the most brilliant novelistic study of terrorism." While Ridgway's Weekly boasted attractive cover art by Maynard Dixon, Dan Smith, and others and bright cartoons by Walker and his Life colleague F. T. Richards, it was not a particularly attractive magazine. Ridgway instead spent his money on content, establishing an elaborate network of editorial offices around the country, to give the magazine a local pulse and inform the whole. He chose to emphasize function over form. But the formula did not work. At the end, Ridgway maintained America was not interested in supporting an unattractive magazine. This may not have been merely a convenient excuse for his failure; he could have been right, since Ridgway's Weekly had everything else going for it. Still he had no regrets. Asked in 1910 if it was true that he lost $350,000 on the weekly, Ridgway replied, "I lost all we had. Otherwise I wouldn't have stopped." Complete runs are scarce. . Mock Medieval Full Leather. See Description. Quarto.


American Turf Register and Sporting Magazine

Baltimore, MD Vol. 1, No. 1 (September 1829) to Vol. 9, No. 12 (December 1838), comprising 108 issues [June, August, October, and December 1837 never published], bound in nine annual volumes of calf leather. Octavos. Binding leather is worn but stable. Spine labels are new. Contents VG with the usual foxing. The first sporting magazine in America, the American Turf Register and Sporting Magazine reflected the prevailing tastes of the era and was consequently primarily a horse racing journal, but it covered other sporting activities as well, especially hunting and fishing. It was a handsome magazine, well illustrated with steel engravings, stone lithographs, and, rarely, wood engravings. This set has a complete complement of 76 plates, 46 of which are of horses and 30 of which are of dogs, birds, hunting scenes and other subjects. Three of the plates fold out. In 1841, The Knickerbocker proclaimed that the Turf Register had no "superior in any country, for various merits, sporting, literary and pictorial." This was not the usual parochial puffery - the Turf Register was a great magazine, deserving of a far longer life than its 14 years. This scarce and desirable set is, depending on one's perspective, either enhanced or comprised by pencil (and, occasionally, pen) notations by the original subscriber, Peter Hall, detailing the pedigree of famous racing horses of the period. Hall, perhaps a member of the famous Hall family of horse breeders, may have made these notes to aid him in the buying and selling of horses or to make him a more informed bettor at the track. Also, bound in or laid in are a half a dozen articles, wood engravings, and leaflets pertaining to horseracing, all dating from the thirties and forties. Long runs of the American Turf Register in decent shape are quite un-common.. Calf Leather. See Description. Octavos.

$1800.00
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The Cultivator

Albany, NY Vol. 1, No. 1 (March 1834) to No. 12 (February 1835), comprising 12 issues, the complete first volume, bound in brown leather and marbled boards. Octavo. Binding good, well worn, but sound. Contents VG, with considerable foxing. The Cultivator was the official organ of the New York State Agricultural Society and its first editor was Jesse Buel, who had previously served under Luther Tucker on the Genesee Farmer. Buel's Cultivator was much like its progenitor, full of useful agricultural tips, news and reviews. It was also modestly illustrated with cuts of farm animals. In 1839 Tucker bought the Cultivator, merged it with his Genesee Farmer, and assumed its name. In 1865, Tucker again merged the Cultivator with his other publication, Country Gentleman, and the Cultivator lost its separate identity. Over its thirty-plus year life, it played a central role in New York state agriculture.. Brown Leather & Marbled Boards. See Description. Octavo.


Peterson's Ladies' Magazine

Philadelphia, 1872. Vol. 61, No. 1 (January 1872) to Vol. 62, No. 6 (December 1872), comprising 12 issues in all, the complete year, bound in black leather and cloth. Octavo. Binding is VG, with rubbing especially to the top and bottom of spine. Contents are near fine with the usual foxing. All double-page handcolored fashion plates (except December) and color needlepoint patterns present. Charles Peterson began his ladies monthly in January 1842 as a down-scale competitor to Godey's Lady's Book. While it was an immediate success, it didn't eclipse its rival until the 1860s. Then for more than a generation it was the leading fashion magazine in America, especially notable after the war for its double-page hand-colored fashion plates. It was published, like Godey's, until 1898.. Black Leather & Cloth. See Description. Octavo.


Peterson's Ladies' Magazine

Philadelphia, 1876. Vol. 69, No. 1 (January 1876) to Vol. 70, No. 6 (December 1876), comprising 12 issues in all, the complete year, bound in black leather and cloth. Octavo. Binding near fine, handsome. Contents are near fine with the usual foxing. All double-page handcolored fashion plates and color needlepoint patterns present. Charles Peterson began his ladies monthly in January 1842 as a down-scale competitor to Godey's Lady's Book. While it was an immediate success, it didn't eclipse its rival until the 1860s. Then for more than a generation it was the leading fashion magazine in America, especially notable after the war for its double-page hand-colored fashion plates. It was published, like Godey's, until 1898.. Black Leather & Cloth. See Description. Octavo.


Peterson's Ladies' Magazine

Philadelphia, 1873. Vol. 63, No. 1 (January 1873) to Vol. 64, No. 6 (December 1873), comprising 12 issues in all, the complete year, bound in red leather and cloth. Octavo. Binding is VG, with rubbing. Contents are VG, with the usual foxing; November fashion page with two long tears. All double-page handcolored fashion plates and color needlepoint patterns present. Charles Peterson began his ladies monthly in January 1842 as a down-scale competitor to Godey's Lady's Book. While it was an immediate success, it didn't eclipse its rival until the 1860s. Then for more than a generation it was the leading fashion magazine in America, especially notable after the war for its double-page hand-colored fashion plates. It was published, like Godey's, until 1898.. Red Leather & Cloth. See Description. Octavo.


Peterson's Ladies' Magazine

Philadelphia, 1884. Vol. 85, No. 1 (January 1884) to Vol. 86, No. 6 (December 1884), comprising 12 issues in all, the complete year, bound in black leather and cloth. Octavo. Binding is VG, with rubbing. Contents are near fine, with the usual foxing and some ghosting. All double-page handcolored fashion plates and color needlepoint patterns present. Charles Peterson began his ladies monthly in January 1842 as a down-scale competitor to Godey's Lady's Book. While it was an immediate success, it didn't eclipse its rival until the 1860s. Then for more than a generation it was the leading fashion magazine in America, especially notable after the war for its double-page hand-colored fashion plates. It was published, like Godey's, until 1898.. Black Leather & Cloth. See Description. Octavo.


The Casket

Philadelphia: Samuel Atkinson & Charles Alexander Vol. 2, No. 1 (January 1827) to Vol. 9, No. 12 (December 1834), bound in eight volumes of elaborately tooled calf and marbled boards. Light wear, generally quite handsome, two volumes have tender hinges. Contents near fine, with only light foxing. Well illustrated. The Casket, owned and edited by Samuel Atkinson and Charles Alexander, who also published the Saturday Evening Post, achieved, in Mott's words, "a wide popularity, and was said to be 'the most widely circulated monthly' in the country." (Mott/I/543) It was not a great magazine. As its name implies, much of its contents was reprinted from other magazines and newspapers. But it was attractive in an unpretentious way and it included a number of plates in each issue, the significance of which are only now being appreciated. Though the Casket styled itself a national magazine, the majority of plates were views of Philadelphia regional buildings and scenery. No other pre-Civil War magazine published so many city views as did the Casket. A sampling of the views from the first few volumes will convey a good idea of the whole: the Fairmount Waterworks; the Pennsylvania State Capitol; Passaic Falls, NJ; Catskill Mountain House at Pine Orchard, NY; the Port of Buffalo; Trenton Falls, NY; View Near Bordenton, NJ; the State Prison in Philadelphia; Harper's Ferry, VA; the US Capitol; the Philadelphia Public Library; the Schuylkill near the old Waterworks; the Hudson near West Point; the Delaware Water Gap; Pennsylvania University; Bank of the United States; the Erie Canal; the Old Court House, Philadelphia; Turner's Falls on the Connecticut River; the Lehigh Water Gap; Pennsylvania Hospital; St. Stephens Church; the Walnut Street Theater; Grey's Ferry; Arch Street Theater; the State House; Friend's Meetinghouse, Lower Merion, PA; Masonic Hall; City Hall, NY; Bowery Theater, NY; and many more. It is unusual to find a multi-volume run of a pre-1850 magazine in matching bindings. This is a particularly handsome set.. Tooled Calf & Marbled Boards. See Description. Octavos.

$1200.00
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