Collectible Cookbooks

These cookbooks have been tested by time and in millions of kitchens. Here you’ll find recipes for every occasion and every palate, plus a dash of culinary history.

The Professional ChefThe Professional Chef, Seventh Edition
By the Culinary Institute of America
A reference work for cooking pros and serious home cooks since the 1950s appears in its seventh edition from John Wiley in October. The 1,056-page work has been redesigned with new color photography throughout, 1,400 photos in all. “The philosophy of cooking and the way of looking at the fundamentals of cooking have changed since we published the sixth edition in 1996,” says senior editor Pam Chirls, “and in this one, the visual aspect of cooking drives the content. If you’re making pasta, in the existing edition you get a written explanation and recipes. In the new edition, we have step-by-step photographs to help the reader function in the kitchen.” Pro Chef 7, as it is familiarly known, also includes more than 660 recipes with some 200 variations. (Publishers Weekly, July 2001)


Moosewood ClassicMoosewood Cookbook Classic
By Mollie Katzen
With its friendly style and full-flavored recipes, the original Moosewood Cookbook introduced millions of Americans to a more healthful, more natural way of cooking. Twenty years and more than two million copies later, it’s become America’s vegetarian cookbook. This sampling of Moosewood recipes offers more than twenty-five of Mollie Katzen’s personal favorites, from Cream of Broccoli Soup and Macedonian Salad to Eggplant Scallopini and Spinach-Ricotta Pie. Here, too, are luscious desserts such as Moosewood Fudge Brownies, Maple-Walnut Pie, and Lemon Moose. With original illustrations by Mollie Katzen, Moosewood Cookbook Classics brings you a taste of the best of vegetarian cooking.


Julia’s Menus for Special Occasions: Six Menus for Special Celebrations–From a Cocktail Party to a Buffet Dinner
By Julia Child
The aim of this cookbook is to take the intimidation out of cooking elegant and special dinners for big occasions, including a birthday party, a low-calorie dinner for conscientious dieters, a vegetarian feast, and a cocktail party for a crowd.


The First American Cookbook
Pictured here, the facsimile edition.

The First American Cookbook: A Facsimile of “American Cookery” 1796
By Amelia Simmons
Facsimile of the first American-written cookbook published in the United States contains authentic recipes for colonial favorites–pumpkin pudding, winter squash pudding, spruce beer, Indian slapjacks, and more.  Find early printings of American Cookery here.


Joy of Cooking
By Irma S. Rombauer
Illustrated by her daughter Marion Rombauer Becker
Originally self-published in 1931, THE JOY OF COOKING has been the right-hand of Americans in the kitchen for more than 75 years. Conceived by Irma S. Rombauer as a reaction to the difficulties of the Depression, JOY was meant to be a user-friendly guide for women unfamiliar with the kitchen, packed with everything the cook might need to know, from metric conversions to how to skin a squirrel (including tasteful but riveting drawings in the original edition). With its enormous wealth of recipes and easy-to-follow advice, this American classic continues to be popular.



This entry was written by and posted on November 2, 2007 at 1:38 pm, filed under Book Collecting and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink

One Response to “Collectible Cookbooks”

  1. Mark

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    Reply

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