Remembering Stan Lee, Culture and Comic Legend

Fans around the world are mourning the death of Stan Lee, comic book titan. Born in 1922 to immigrant parents, Lee entered the comic book industry at a young age as a proofreader for Timely Comics. Born Stanley Martin Lieber, he adopted the pen name Stan Lee with the publication of his comic book debut, writing text filler for “Captain America Foils the Traitor’s Revenge” in Captain America Comics #3. In addition to the many comic books Lee would go … Continued


The Day of the Dead

Feliz Dia de los Muertos!

Some people are celebrating Halloween now, but there are others who are preparing to honor their friends, family, and even authors who have passed on in order to show respect to the impressions they left on the living who remember them. October 31st, November 1st and 2nd are considered the Days of the Dead or Dias De los Muertos, a holiday celebrated throughout Mexico, although there are festivities around the world that are similar.

The holiday is considered a time of remembrance, with celebrations of our loved ones, our ancestors, that have passed on to the “other side.”  There are often parties with dancing, food, parades, music, and altars–all done to honor those loved or admired who have passed from this earth.

Here in Asheville, North Carolina, there are several exciting events. A local tour bus company offers a Day of the Dead ride that goes through our Historic Riverside Cemetery (where Thomas Wolfe and O. Henry are buried) to a gathering with a beautiful ancestor altar at a local restaurant. There are dance parties in town, as well as more solemn vigils and grave decorating.

If this tradition spikes interest in the reader within you, I have taken the liberty of listing some lovely books and other items for sale at Biblio.com reflecting the beauty of this holiday. (more…)


Oscar Hijuelos (1951-2013)

Oscar Hijuelos at the Miami Book Fair International 1993
Oscar Hijuelos at the Miami Book Fair International 1993

Author Oscar Hijuelos passed away after a heart attack on Saturday at age 62 in New York.

Hijuelos was born to Cuban parents in New York and although he was often lauded as a Latino author, he did not appreciate being compartmentalized by ethnicity.  Even so, the common themes in his books are cultural assimilation in the “melting pot” of the United States, and he is listed as an inspiration by many younger Latino authors.

Best known for “The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love,” a novel that won him the 1990 Pulitzer Prize, Hijuelos was the first Latino to win that book award.  Hijuelos also was awarded the Ingram Merrill Foundation Award in 1983 and the Rome Prize in 1985 for his first published novel, “Our House in the Last World.”

Oscar Hijuelos wrote a memoir in 2011 that reminisced on the 1970’s in New York and his experience of being an aspiring Cuban writer, called “Thoughts without Cigarettes.

Our condolences are extended to his wife, author and poet Lori Marie Carlson.

Collectible editions of Oscar Hijuelos work are after the jump…

(more…)

Amber is the current marketing coordinator at Biblio. A lifelong love of the written word brought her to Biblio and she happily spends her days talking about books and delving into the wide world of antiquarian books.

You can also find her in the garden or writing about brewing and plant adventures at Pixie’s Pocket.


The Salmon Return

Salmon Fishing, Oregon City

This issue of Bibliology was curated by Michael Lieberman of BookPatrol.

 

The salmon are returning!

Here in the Pacific Northwest, this is the time of year that we celebrate the return of these determined creatures.

From a party at our neighborhood creek to a recent bash thrown by the Seattle Art Museum, the salmon take center stage.

For this offering we sample all things Salmon, from the historical to the visual with a sprinkling of the literary – Enjoy!

 

(more…)

Amber is the current marketing coordinator at Biblio. A lifelong love of the written word brought her to Biblio and she happily spends her days talking about books and delving into the wide world of antiquarian books.

You can also find her in the garden or writing about brewing and plant adventures at Pixie’s Pocket.


Labor in Literature

Happy (American) Labor Day from Biblio! Even though approximately 40% of Americans will be working on Labor Day, we hope you all get to enjoy some of the last bit of summer before that nip of fall hits the air. The plight of the working man and woman has long been a focus in literature, and we have collected some amazing works of fiction that showcase the struggles and triumphs of various labor movements.  Many of the books featured below are … Continued


Tolkien’s Prolific Pen

Tolkien 1916
J.R.R. Tolkien, circa 1916

Tolkien, the Master of Middle Earth

John Ronald Reuel Tolkien, or Ronald Tolkien to his friends and family, created as his life work the world of Arda, or Middle Earth. Tolkien shaped this world with incredible detail, depth and scope. The mythic layers of the stories of Middle Earth mimic in complexity those of our own world.

Tolkien wrote the heroic tales of the First Age as epic poems, inspired during his military service in the Lancashire Fusiliers in the trenches of World War I Europe. These poems and the stories evolved into The Book of Lost Tales, and later The Silmarillion, and set the stage for the events of the War of the Ring. Tolkien authored the stories of Frodo and the One Ring as a serial that was mailed to his son during the Second World War, and it is clear that the real tension of wartime and suffering inform the tales of conflict throughout Tolkien’s poetry and fiction. The events of Tolkien’s life and the drama of his stories overlap to provide a depth of history unlike any other fantasy series. Other authors have forged their own fantasy worlds but none wields the authority of Middle Earth.

(more…)


Books about Whistleblowers

Whistleblowers: Tattletales or Heroes?

The phrase “whistle-blowing” is everywhere you look these days. Some folks consider whistleblowers to be martyrs, and praise their choice to come clean with their secrets; others decry them as ‘traitors’ and ‘snitches.’

Today, Bradley Manning was sentenced to serve 35 years in prison for leaking classified documents while serving as an intelligence analyst in Iraq.  In the UK, the Guardian newspaper is being pressured by the prime minister’s aides to either hand over or destroy intelligence that was leaked by whistleblower Edward Snowden.  Gina Grey is still unemployed and struggling after exposing the wrongdoing at Arlington National Cemetery in 2010.

There is already a book about Manning and his difficulties since providing information to WikiLeaks.  At the top of this gallery, it joins the other tales of whistleblowers – brave people who have stood up to huge corporations, governments, and religious institutions, despite the danger to themselves and their lifestyles.

Do you have any other particularly good suggestions for other books on this topic, or the general theme of political ethics?

Amber is the current marketing coordinator at Biblio. A lifelong love of the written word brought her to Biblio and she happily spends her days talking about books and delving into the wide world of antiquarian books.

You can also find her in the garden or writing about brewing and plant adventures at Pixie’s Pocket.


Fools in Literature

The true origins of April Fool’s Day continues to be a mystery, but National Geographic offered this possible explanation: “Joseph Boskin, professor emeritus of American humor at Boston University, has offered his own interpretation of the holiday’s roots—as a prank.  In 1983, Boskin told an Associated Press reporter that the idea came from Roman jesters during the time of Constantine I in the third and fourth centuries A.D.   As the story goes, jesters successfully petitioned the ruler to allow one … Continued


Happy Pi Day!

“Pi Day is celebrated on March 14th (3/14) around the world. Pi (Greek letter “π”) is the symbol used in mathematics to represent a constant — the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter — which is approximately 3.14159.

Pi has been calculated to over one trillion digits beyond its decimal point. As an irrational and transcendental number, it will continue infinitely without repetition or pattern. While only a handful of digits are needed for typical calculations, Pi’s infinite nature makes it a fun challenge to memorize, and to computationally calculate more and more digits.”  – From PiDay.org

Check out these awesome selections of books about Pi and other awesome mathematics books available on Biblio.com!

A History of Pi by Petr. Beckman
A History of Pi by Petr. Beckman
The Joy of Pi by David Blatner
The Joy of Pi by David Blatner
Pi - Unleashedby Jörg Arndt; Christoph Haenel
Pi – Unleashed by Jörg Arndt; Christoph Haenel
Sir Cumference and the Dragon of Pi: A Math Adventure by Cindy Neuschwander
Sir Cumference and the Dragon of Pi: A Math Adventure by Cindy Neuschwander
3.1416 All That by P. Davis and W. Chinn
3.1416 All That by P. Davis and W. Chinn

 

 


Elizabeth Bishop Paints

“Pansies” Gouache and graphite on paper, 15 ” x 12 ¼” , 1960. Bishop’s largest and most finished recorded painting.
Photo of Elizabeth Bishop for review of Edgar Allan Poe and the Juke-Box. Photo by Joseph Breitenbach

 

When the prominent poet Elizabeth Bishop died in 1979 her long time partner and executor Alice Methfessel unearthed a collection of 11 paintings and 2 assemblages that were done by Bishop between 1934-1978.

The work spans much of Bishop’s adult life,  Bishop “worked as a painter as well as a poet, and her verse, like visual art, is known for its ability to capture significant scenes.” Methfessel, who Bishop also dedicated her last book Geography III to, died in 2009 and the collection is now being offered by James Jaffe Rare Books.

“Red Flowers on Black” 6” x 9”



“Sleeping Figure”. 5 5/8” x 8 5/8”, circa 1935-1940. portrait of Bishop’s friend and lover Louise Crane


“41 Charles Street”. 6 7/8″ wide x 8 1/4″ high]


“Tea Service”.10” x 8”




“County Courthouse”. 6 ¾” x 5 ¾”, circa 1938




“Olivia”. 6 ” x 5” A little wooden church on Olivia Street in Key West not far from Bishop’s home



An introduction and slideshow to the collection can be seen here.

The paintings range from $25,000 – $50,000 each and are available through Biblio