Nina Simone

Born Eunice Kathleen Waymon on February 21st, 1933 in Tryon NC, Nina Simone was the sixth of eight children. She started playing piano by ear at the age of 3, and church organ by 7. She dreamed of becoming the first black concert pianist in the United States and gathered supporters in her small North Carolina town. During her first recital at 12 years old, Simone took a stand against the racial injustices of the Jim Crow South and refused … Continued


Travelling the World with Ernest Hemingway

Miscellaneous materials relating to Hemingway's East African air safaris, from the collection of his pilot, Captain Roy Marsh
Miscellaneous materials relating to Hemingway’s East African air safaris, from the collection of his pilot, Captain Roy Marsh

by Ashleigh Redmond

 

From Idaho to Slovenia, my travels over the past six years have been, at least in part, inspired by Ernest Hemingway. My partner has had a healthy obsession with Hemingway since he was young, and we have been lucky enough to visit some of the most significant places in Hemingway’s life.

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Thomas Wolfe’s Sugar-Mama

A tour through the iconic Thomas Wolfe Memorial house in downtown Asheville and the accompanying Visitor’s Center will give you an in-depth look at Wolfe’s ‘Altamont,’ the fictional name he gave to his thinly veiled description of his hometown in his paramount work Look Homeward, Angel. During your visit you will learn how tourism in Asheville in the first part of the 20th-century led Wolfe’s mother Julia to buy the ‘Old Kentucky Home,’ in order to capitalize on the boom, and how the house and his family shaped Wolfe’s prolific writing, which by the end of his career amounted to a million pages, although the majority were edited out of final works.

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Amy C. Manikowski is a writer, bookseller, trail-diverger, history buff, and pitbull lover. She graduated from Chatham University with a MFA a while ago, and after wandering aimlessly settled in Asheville NC.

Cool Things Found Inside of Books

One of the best parts of older books, in my opinion, has always been the possibility of finding things wedged in between the pages: sometimes used as an impromptu bookmark, some stuffed there to hide, some shuffled in by accident. There’s just something a little bit magical about it. I was recently rearranging my bookshelves (alphabetically by author of course, which had fallen to disarray since our big move), when I happened across a call to arms from my best … Continued


#BiblioShelf 2016 Giveaway Winners!

We are pleased to announce the winners for the #BiblioShelf Giveaway!

One winner from the blog post widget: Rick H.

One winner from the Instagram #BiblioShelf Contest: Amanda S.

Each one has been contacted by email and will get $100 credit in BiblioBucks for FREE BOOKS!

Thanks for playing, everyone!

Here’s the rest of the #BiblioShelf Instagram entries, just for fun! (If the widget below doesn’t load, just click here!)

[wdi_feed id=”1″]

Amber is the current marketing coordinator at Biblio. A lifelong love of the written word brought her to Biblio and she happily spends her days talking about books and delving into the wide world of antiquarian books. You can also find her in the garden or writing about brewing and plant adventures at Pixie's Pocket.

#BiblioShelf Free Book Giveaway!

#BiblioShelf Free Book GiveawayThe season of the best reading weather is here! To celebrate tumbling leaves, warm beverages, and the pleasure of a good book, Biblio is giving away $100 in BiblioBucks to a lucky follower!

Enter to win by using the giveaway widget below the rules. If you are on Instagram, you can enter to win there by visiting this link and following the instructions!

The rules:

BiblioBucks are good for use on Biblio.com, Biblio.co.uk, Biblio.com.au, and Biblio.co.nz. Winner must create a free account on one of those sites, to which the $100 credit will be applied. If the winner does not respond within 5 business days, another winner will be chosen. By entering this giveaway, you agree to receive promotional emails from Biblio. Learn more about BiblioBucks here.


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Amber is the current marketing coordinator at Biblio. A lifelong love of the written word brought her to Biblio and she happily spends her days talking about books and delving into the wide world of antiquarian books. You can also find her in the garden or writing about brewing and plant adventures at Pixie's Pocket.

All Hallow’s Read 2016

Bernie Wrightson, Frankenstein
Bernie Wrightson, Frankenstein

It’s time for All Hallow’s Read again, that magical time of year when we give the gift of fright!

If you haven’t yet heard about it, All Hallow’s Read is a month-long celebration of the horror genre (for the adults) and spooky stories (for the kids). The idea is, whether it’s a beautifully-wrapped Stephen King novel to your spouse, a dog-eared copy of Frankenstein you abandon on a park bench with the inscription “Take Me!” on a Post-It Note, or anything in-between, that we all take the time to give each other scary books. (more…)

Pru is a North Carolina native, transplanted to the bustling base of South Carolina’s tiny share of the Blue Ridge Mountains, where she tag-teams with her husband to herd two brilliant boys and two cats. When she’s not busy blogging with Biblio or toiling over original works, you can most likely find her speeding around in the mountains, blasting egregiously loud music and singing off-key. Despite being fresh in the bookselling scene, she’s been a insatiable reader since forever, and will point you to her love for Oscar Wilde and Jane Austen, while tucking Neil Gaiman and Douglas Adams behind her back and shushing them. Honestly, she’ll read anything you put in front of her. Help support her writing career via Patreon

The Politics of Middle Earth

the politics of middle earth - a blog for #hobbitday at biblio.com

 

I, unlike many self-proclaimed nerdy kids my age, didn’t properly get to meet and make friends with Bilbo, Frodo, and the gang until I was in college. Sure, sure, I’d gone to midnight premiers for the Lord of the Rings movies with gaggles of friends, but I didn’t dress up like Gandalf and I sure as heck didn’t know a single phrase in the Elven tongue. I thought Silmarillion was the type of metal from which Bilbo’s chain-mail shirt was made.

That changed in college, though. I went to a small women’s liberal arts school, where the month-long winter term was usually a way to get some of our required credits out of the way in the most ridiculous manner possible. Loads of my friends were off traveling to Mexico, Tunisia, or London. I would have been bummed about not going abroad, but the week we were to sign up for our January Term courses, a friend told me about two classes that totally out-shadowed all those exotic adventures: a music history course centered on The Beatles and a political science course lovingly named The Politics of Middle-Earth. (more…)

Pru is a North Carolina native, transplanted to the bustling base of South Carolina’s tiny share of the Blue Ridge Mountains, where she tag-teams with her husband to herd two brilliant boys and two cats. When she’s not busy blogging with Biblio or toiling over original works, you can most likely find her speeding around in the mountains, blasting egregiously loud music and singing off-key. Despite being fresh in the bookselling scene, she’s been a insatiable reader since forever, and will point you to her love for Oscar Wilde and Jane Austen, while tucking Neil Gaiman and Douglas Adams behind her back and shushing them. Honestly, she’ll read anything you put in front of her. Help support her writing career via Patreon

Explaining it all: Encyclopaedia Britannica

encyclopaedia britannica, eleventh edition
Listed by Digital Editions on Biblio
Encyclopaedia Britannica, Eleventh Edition on Biblio.com
Listed by Digital Editions on Biblio

In a recent article for the Chicago Tribune,  Donald Liebenson takes a look at the new book Everything Explained That Is Explainable by Denis Boyles.

The book is about the Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica. This acclaimed edition of the encyclopaedia was published in 1910-1911, and was made up of over 44 million words bound in 29 volumes. It is considered the bar by which scholarly reference books are measured.

Liebenson was kind enough to mention in his article that Biblio has copies of this edition for sale. It is true! The specific listing they mentioned is from the bookseller Digital Editions in New Jersey. The complete 29 volume set comes with it’s own lovely, vertical case. As the bookseller describes in their listing, this edition is “The ultimate encyclopedic reference for the historian (or any other scholar who wishes to discover the “state of knowledge” in his or her specialty before 1910.”

The case is included in the listing, as well as a buckram-bound “Reader’s Guide” – all for the price of $10,850.00 USD.

Resources:

Check out the listing and it’s full description here.

Here’s ALL of the eleventh edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica on Biblio at this time.

Read the full article about the book on the Chicago Tribune here.

Amber is the current marketing coordinator at Biblio. A lifelong love of the written word brought her to Biblio and she happily spends her days talking about books and delving into the wide world of antiquarian books. You can also find her in the garden or writing about brewing and plant adventures at Pixie's Pocket.