The Enduring Relevance of Dr. Seuss’s Political Cartoons and Illustrations

“And the Wolf chewed up the children and spit out their bones…But those were Foreign Children and it really didn’t matter” An early Dr. Seuss cartoon has gone viral for the second time in recent years. First used as a condemnation against international inaction regarding the crimes against humanity in Syria in 2015, the cartoon has more recently been used to oppose the detention camps on the US-Mexico border, where children are being separated from parents seeking asylum in the … Continued


Beloved Bears in Children’s Literature

Goofy and Lovable Bears are an Important Cornerstone in Children’s Literature There’s just something about bears. For an animal so potentially dangerous, they have become a staple in children’s literature. A given a quick glance over their representation in children’s books and it’s easy to understand why — they’re large, fluffy, and endearingly dopey. And for the last nearly 100 years, they have maintained a permanent presence in libraries and children’s bookshelves. We highlight some of the most well-known literary … Continued


A Complete List of Anthony Bourdain’s Books

A Career In Writing Anthony Bourdain may be best known as the television persona traveling the world and eating exotic cuisines in his hit shows on the Food Network A Cook’s Tour, Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations, and The Layover, along with CNN’s Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown, but he is also the author of multiple best-selling books. Most of his books, both fiction and non-fiction, center around cooking and food, including his first breakout best-seller Kitchen Confidential, published in 2001. The … Continued


Books by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

King’s first book, Stride Toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story (1958), was about the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the beginning of the nonviolent Civil Rights movement. On December 1st, 1955, Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a bus, sparking a local boycott that was supported and sustained by the Montgomery Improvement Association. The Montgomery Improvement Association was created December 5th, 1955 by black ministers and community leaders and lead by the unanimously elected President, a young Martin Luther … Continued


Sir Richard Francis Burton – aka Ruffian Dick, Renegade Explorer and Sexual Scholar

Richard Francis Burton was born March 19th 1821, in Torquay, Devonshire, England to a Lieutenant Colonel and an heiress. Burton traveled extensively with his family through France, Italy and England before being sent to Trinity College in Oxford in 1840. He was an adventurous and rebellious youth who loved to learn but balked at formal education, immersing himself in such studies as falconry and fencing, and challenging a fellow student to a duel for making fun of his impressive mustache. … Continued


Thomas Wolfe’s Sugar-Mama

A tour through the iconic Thomas Wolfe Memorial house in downtown Asheville and the accompanying Visitor’s Center will give you an in-depth look at Wolfe’s ‘Altamont,’ the fictional name he gave to his thinly veiled description of his hometown in his paramount work Look Homeward, Angel. During your visit you will learn how tourism in Asheville in the first part of the 20th-century led Wolfe’s mother Julia to buy the ‘Old Kentucky Home,’ in order to capitalize on the boom, and how the house and his family shaped Wolfe’s prolific writing, which by the end of his career amounted to a million pages, although the majority were edited out of final works.

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Amy C. Manikowski is a writer, bookseller, trail-diverger, history buff, and pitbull lover. She graduated from Chatham University with an MFA a while ago, and after wandering aimlessly settled in Asheville NC.


Author E.R. Braithwaite (1912-2016)

Guyanese author E.R. Braithwaite has passed away at the venerable age of 104. Braithwaite is best known for his award-winning novel To Sir, With Love. This autobiographical tale tells of his time as a schoolteacher in the East End of London. The book was made into a film starring Sidney Poitier and the singer Lulu. His writings mostly dealt with the difficulties of being a black man with a classical education in a world full of discrimination.  Braithwaite joined the … Continued


The Works of Harper Lee

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Nelle Harper Lee was born in Monroeville, Alabama on April 28, 1926, and she passed away in her hometown earlier today, February 19, 2016.

Harper Lee was best known for the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, which was published in 1960. It was immediately successful, winning the Pulitzer Prize in 1961, and has become a classic of modern American literature.  She remained out of the public eye for decades afterwards, and did not publish anything else until 2015, a sequel to Mockingbird: Go Set a Watchman in 2015. (more…)


Women with Words: Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou (April 4, 1928 – May 28, 2014)

“I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” –Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou is widely regarded as one of the great voices of contemporary black literature. Her ability to capture the moment through the idiosyncracies of language makes her poetry and prose unique in its form. Her personal experiences and social commentary blend into a work of art that raises awareness in our society today. (more…)

Amber is the current marketing coordinator at Biblio. A lifelong love of the written word brought her to Biblio and she happily spends her days talking about books and delving into the wide world of antiquarian books.

You can also find her in the garden or writing about brewing and plant adventures at Pixie’s Pocket.


Maxine Kumin (1925 – 2014)

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Maxine Kumin

The Academy of American Poets posted the sad announcement of the passing of poet Maxine Kumin on February 6, 2014, at the age of 88.

Kumin was the recipient of the 1974 Pulitzer Prize-winning New England writer and past U.S. poet laureate. She also served as Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress and Poet Laureate of New Hampshire.  For her work in the literary realm, she was awarded the Aiken Taylor Award for Modern Poetry, an American Academy of Arts and Letters award, the Sarah Joseph Hale Award, the Levinson Prize, a National Endowment for the Arts grant, the Eunice Tietjens Memorial Prize from Poetry, and fellowships from the Academy of American Poets, and the National Council on the Arts. (more…)

Amber is the current marketing coordinator at Biblio. A lifelong love of the written word brought her to Biblio and she happily spends her days talking about books and delving into the wide world of antiquarian books.

You can also find her in the garden or writing about brewing and plant adventures at Pixie’s Pocket.