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Bottoms Up. Being a glossary of useful information for the thirsty.; Compiled by Two Knights and a Maid assisted by John Walker and the Haig Brothers

Bottoms Up. Being A Glossary Of Useful Information For The Thirsty.; Compiled By Two Knights And A Maid Assisted By John Walker And The Haig Brothers - Used Books

Bottoms Up. Being a glossary of useful information for the thirsty.; Compiled by Two Knights and a Maid assisted by John Walker and the Haig Brothers

  • Used
  • first
Minneapolis: Gordon Volland Publications / The Buzza Company, 1928. First edition. Original card covers, tied with a silk cord. 41 pages, printed rectos only. Die-cut in the shape of a cocktail shaker. Light wear to covers, pencil inscription inside cover. Damp mark affects the first eight pages. To quote Richard Powers's socialdance.stanford website: " This rare Prohibition Era cocktail recipe book, die-cut in the shape of a cocktail shaker, was published in the U.S. in 1928, at the height of the Prohibition Era, flaunting the ban on alcohol with cocktail recipes by famous silent film stars, vaudeville performers and musicians, including W. C. Fields, Fanny Brice, Florenz Ziegfield, Ted Lewis and George Gershwin. Bottoms Up is notable for two reasons. It was one of only a few cocktail books published in the U.S. during Prohibition, and it's the earliest known example of a book of cocktail recipes of famous celebrities. This is a natural pairing. While most Americans found it difficult or impossible to obtain alcohol during Prohibition, celebrities, especially in the entertainment business, thrived on the underground cocktail culture. . . . Today's tradition of American cocktails primarily developed during, and because of, Prohibition. Cocktail books before this era were usually trade publications intended for professional bartenders. Then the 1920s and early 30s saw the emergence of do-it-yourself cocktail books, mostly published in England, France, Canada and Cuba, featuring the new explosion of cocktails that developed during Prohibition. Very few cocktail books were published in the U.S. at this time, since the ingredients weren't available, and Bottoms Up is the rarest of them all....George Earl Buzza Jr. began his career as an artist, drawing cartoons for the Chicago Tribune. He was also a writer, printer, publisher, entrepreneur, and cocktail afficionado. He founded the Buzza Company in Minneapolis and built a factory with a distinctive tower, called Craftacres. Buzza also published a variety of books on topics such as entertaining, etiquette, bridge, and childrens' books. And the odd 1928 cocktail book Bottoms Up, at a time that most of the ingredients were illegal. In 1929, just before the stock market crash, Buzza sold his interest in the company and moved to Hollywood, intending to retire. Instead, the tireless entrepreneur formed a partnership with a fellow Minneapolis business associate. He became president of the Buzza-Cardozo Company, a greeting card firm in Hollywood, which also published books on the side, including Hollywood Cocktails, once again published during Prohibition. George designed the book himself. e Buzza Company specialized in designing and manufacturing greeting cards. By 1927 it was one of the nation's largest greeting card companies, shipping 40 million cards a year, with annual sales of $2.5 million.eorge Earl Buzza Jr. began his career as an artist, drawing cartoons for the Chicago Tribune. He was also a writer, printer, publisher, entrepreneur, and cocktail aficionado. He founded the Buzza Company in Minneapolis and built a factory with a distinctive tower, called Craftacres.George Earl Buzza Jr. began his career as an artist, drawing cartoons for the Chicago Tribune. He was also a writer, printer, publisher, entrepreneur, and cocktail aficionado.  He founded the Buzza Company in Minneapolis and built a factory with a distinctive tower, called Craftacres. The Buzza Company specialized in designing and manufacturing greeting cards. By 1927 it was one of the nation's largest greeting card companies, shipping 40 million cards a year, with annual sales of $2.5 million. Buzza also published a variety of books on topics such as entertaining, etiquette, bridge, and childrens' books.  And the odd 1928 cocktail book Bottoms Up, at a time that most of the ingredients were illegal. In 1929, just before the stock market crash, Buzza sold his interest in the company and moved to Hollywood, intending to retire.  Instead, the tireless entrepreneur formed a partnership with a fellow Minneapolis business associate.  He became president of the Buzza-Cardozo Company, a greeting card firm in Hollywood, which also published books on the side, including Hollywood Cocktails, once again published during Prohibition.  George designed the book himself. Considering his evident enthusiasm for cocktails, he probably designed Bottoms Up as well, and was likely one of the "Two Knights" who wrote it." No copy in OCLC.

  • Bookseller Thomas A Goldwasser Rare Books US (US)
  • Book condition Used
  • Quantity-available 1
  • Edition First edition
  • Publisher Gordon Volland Publications / The Buzza Company
  • Place of Publication Minneapolis
  • Date Published 1928
  • Keywords cocktails, Cocktails, Shaped book, ,