Sign In | Register
Master of the Senate: The Years of Lyndon Johnson by  Robert A Caro - Signed First Edition - 2002 - from Bookmarc's and Biblio.com

Master of the Senate: The Years of Lyndon Johnson

by Caro, Robert A

Condition: Very Good/Very Good


New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2002. I2 - A first edition (stated) hardcover book SIGNED by author on the title page in very good condition in very good dust jacket that is mylar protected. Dust jacket has less than half inch tear on the back top left side, some wrinkling, chipping and crease on the edges, some scattered scratches and rubbing, light discoloration and shelf wear. Book has some bumped corners and wrinkling on the spine edges, some light stains on the page edges, light discoloration and shelf wear. Book Three of Robert A. Carol's monumental work, The Years of Lyndon Johnson - the most admired and riveting political biography of our era - which began with the best-selling and prizewinning The Path to Power and Means of Ascent. Master of the Senate carries Lyndon Johnson's story through one of its most remarkable periods: his twelve years, from 1949 to 1960, in the United States Senate. At the heart of the book is its unprecedented revelation of how legislative power works in America, how the Senate works, and how Johnson, in his ascent to the presidency, mastered the Senate as no political leader before him had ever done. It was during these years that all Johnson's experience - from his Texas Hill Country boyhood to his passionate representation in Congress of his hardscrabble constituents to his tireless construction of a political machine - came to fruition. Caro introduces the story with a dramatic account of the Senate itself: how Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, and John C. Calhoun had made it the center of governmental energy, the forum in which the great issues of the country were thrashed out. And how, by the time Johnson arrived, it had dwindled into a body that merely responded to executive initiatives, all but impervious to the forces of change. Caro anatomizes the genius for political strategy and tactics by which, in an institution that had made the seniority system all-powerful for a century and more, Johnson became Majority Leader after only a single term - the youngest and greatest Senate Leader in our history; how he manipulated the Senate's hallowed rules and customs and the weaknesses and strengths of his colleagues to change the "unchangeable" Senate from a loose confederation of sovereign senators to a whirring legislative machine under his own iron-fisted control. Caro demonstrates how Johnson's political genius enabled him to reconcile the unreconcilable: to retain the support of the southerners who controlled the Senate while earning the trust - or at least the cooperation - of the liberals, led by Paul Douglas and Hubert Humphrey, without whom he could not achieve his goal of winning the presidency. He shows the dark side of Johnson's ambition: how he proved his loyalty to the great oil barons who had financed his rise to power by ruthlessly destroying the career of the New Dealer who was in charge of regulating them, Federal Power Commission Chairman Leland Olds. And we watch him achieve the impossible: convincing southerners that although he was firmly in their camp as the anointed successor to their leader, Richard Russell, it was essential that they allow him to make some progress toward civil rights. In a breathtaking tour de force, Caro details Johnson's amazing triumph in maneuvering to passage the first civil rights legislation since 1875. Master of the Senate, told with an abundance of rich detail that could only have come from Caro's peerless research, is both a galvanizing portrait of the man himself - the titan of Capital Hill, volcanic, mesmerizing - and a definitive and revelatory study of the workings and personal and legislative power. It is a work that displays all the acuteness of understanding and narrative brilliance that led the New York Times to call Caro's The Path to Power "a monumental political saga... powerful and stirring." 9.5"x6.5", 1167 pages. Satisfaction Guaranteed. Robert Allan Caro is an American journalist and author known for his biographies of United States political figures Robert Moses and Lyndon B. Johnson. After working for many years as a reporter, Caro wrote The Power Broker (1974), a biography of New York urban planner Robert Moses, which was chosen by the Modern Library as one of the hundred greatest nonfiction books of the twentieth century. He has since written four of a planned five volumes of The Years of Lyndon Johnson (1982, 1990, 2002, 2012), a biography of the former president. For his biographies, he has won two Pulitzer Prizes in Biography, two National Book Awards (including one for Lifetime Achievement), the Francis Parkman Prize (awarded by the Society of American Historians to the book that "best exemplifies the union of the historian and the artist"), three National Book Critics Circle Awards, the H.L. Mencken Award, the Carr P. Collins Award from the Texas Institute of Letters, the D.B. Hardeman Prize, and a Gold Medal in Biography from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. In 2010 President Barack Obama awarded Caro the National Humanities Medal. Due to Caro's reputation for exhaustive research and detail, he is sometimes invoked by reviewers of other writers who are called "Caro-esque" for their own extensive research. . Signed by Author. First Edition. Hard Cover. Very Good/Very Good. 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall.
Multi-volume Set

Volume three of the biography of Lyndon Johnson reveals how legislative power works, how the US Senate works, how Lyndon Johnson on his way to the presidency mastered both and how he passed the first Civil Rights legislation since 1868.




Reviews

Review this book (Want a chance to win $50? Log-in or create an account first!) (You'll be automatically entered for a chance to win $50!)



Help & frequently asked questions


Glossary

Some terminology that may be used in this description includes:
title page
A page at the front of a book which may contain the title of the book, any subtitles, the authors, contributors, editors, the...[more]
rubbing
Abrasion or wear to the surface. Usually used in reference to a book's boards or dust-jacket.
shelf wear
Shelf wear (shelfwear) describes damage caused over time to a book by placing and removing a book from a shelf. This damage is...[more]
edges
The collective of the top, fore and bottom edges of the text block of the book, being that part of the edges of the pages of a...[more]
spine
The outer portion of a book which covers the actual binding. The spine usually faces outward when a book is placed on a shelf....[more]
chipping
A defect in which small pieces are missing from the edges; fraying or small pieces of paper missing the edge of a paperback, or...[more]
First Edition
In book collecting, the first edition is the earliest published form of a book. A book may have more than one first edition in...[more]
jacket
Sometimes used as another term for dust jacket, a protective and often decorative wrapper, usually made of paper which wraps...[more]

$125.00

$4.50 shipping to USA

More shipping options >





Harlem Renaissance

Collecting the Harlem Renaissance

One of the most influential - and certainly most iconic - cultural revolutions in American history, the Harlem Renaissance offers a compelling repertoire for both seasoned and novice book collectors. We've put together a beautiful gallery of high points to help start your collection here.

Collecting Dr. Seuss Books and Ephemera

Collecting Dr. Seuss

Whether you are into the pricey first editions or interesting Seussiana ephemera, this is a good starting point for building a book collection based on Dr. Seuss


Trustpilot