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The Road to Yorktown; Jefferson, Lafayette and the British Invasion of Virginia

by Maass, John R

Condition: Very good


Charleston, SC: History Press, 2015. Presumed First Edition/First Printing. Trade paperback. Very good. 203, [5] pages. Illustrations. Maps. Notes. bibliography. Index. About the Author. Signed by author on title-page. Cover has slight wear and soiling. Pencil erasure residue on rear end page. John R. Maass is a historian at the U.S. Army Center of Military History, Fort McNair, Washington, D.C. and an adjunct professor of history at Norwich University. He is the author of North Carolina and the French and Indian War: the Spreading Flames of War (The History Press); Defending a New Nation, 1783-1811 (U.S. Army Center of Military History); and The Road to Yorktown (The History Press). He was an editor of the Journal of Backcountry Studies. In 1781, Virginia was invaded by formidable British forces that sought to subdue the Old Dominion. Lieutenant General Charles, Lord Cornwallis, led thousands of enemy troops from Norfolk to Charlottesville, burning and pillaging. Many of Virginias famed Patriots including George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry and Nathanael Greene struggled to defend the commonwealth. Only by concentrating a small band of troops under energetic French general the Marquis de Lafayette were American forces able to resist British operations. With strained support from Governor Jefferson's administration, Lafayette fought a campaign against the veteran soldiers of Lord Cornwallis that eventually led to the famed showdown at Yorktown. Historian John R. Maass traces this often overlooked Revolutionary struggle for Virginia and details each step on the road to Yorktown. The Siege of Yorktown, also known as the Battle of Yorktown, the Surrender at Yorktown, German Battle or the Siege of Little York, ending on October 19, 1781, at Yorktown, Virginia, was a decisive victory by a combined force of American Continental Army troops led by General George Washington and French Army troops led by the Comte de Rochambeau over a British Army commanded by British lord and Lieutenant General Charles Cornwallis. The culmination of the Yorktown campaign, the siege proved to be the last major land battle of the American Revolutionary War in the North American theater, as the surrender by Cornwallis, and the capture of both him and his army, prompted the British government to negotiate an end to the conflict. The French and American armies united north of New York City during the summer of 1781. The combined armies began moving south toward Virginia, engaging in tactics of deception to lead the British to believe a siege of New York was planned. De Grasse sailed from the West Indies and arrived at the Chesapeake Bay at the end of August, bringing additional troops and providing a naval blockade of Yorktown. He was transporting 500,000 silver pesos collected from the citizens of Havana, Cuba, to fund supplies for the siege and payroll for the Continental Army. In the beginning of September, he defeated a British fleet led by Sir Thomas Graves that came to relieve Cornwallis at the Battle of the Chesapeake. As a result of this victory, de Grasse blocked any escape by sea for Cornwallis. By late September Washington and Rochambeau arrived, and the army and naval forces completely surrounded Cornwallis. After initial preparations, the Americans and French built their first parallel and began the bombardment. With the British defense weakened, on October 14, 1781 Washington sent two columns to attack the last major remaining British outer defenses. A French column took redoubt #9 and an American column took redoubt #10. With these defenses taken, the allies were able to finish their second parallel. With the American artillery closer and more intense than ever, the British situation began to deteriorate rapidly and Cornwallis asked for capitulation terms on the 17th. After two days of negotiation, the surrender ceremony took place on the 19th; Lord Cornwallis, claiming to be ill, was absent from the ceremony. With the capture of more than 7,000 British soldiers, negotiations between the United States and Great Britain began, resulting in the Treaty of Paris in 1783.
  • Bookseller: Ground Zero Books, Ltd. US (US)
  • Bookseller Inventory #: 72598
  • Title: The Road to Yorktown; Jefferson, Lafayette and the British Invasion of Virginia
  • Author: Maass, John R
  • Format/binding: Trade paperback
  • Book condition: Used - Very good
  • Quantity available: 1
  • Edition: Presumed First Edition/First Printing
  • Binding: Paperback
  • Publisher: History Press
  • Place: Charleston, SC
  • Date published: 2015
  • Keywords: American Revolution, Siege of Yorktown, Marquis de Lafayette, Nathanael Greene, Cornwallis, William Phillips, Banastre Tarleton, John Simcoe, Yorktown, Virginia, Anthony Wayne


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