Sign In | Register
No image available

In the Track of Speed

by Moss, Stirling

Condition: See description


(London: Frederick Muller, 1957). 8vo; original blue boards, lettered in gilt on spine; pictorial dustwrapper; pp. 212, incl. index; plates. Dustwrapper slightly rubbed and edgeworn; bump to top fore-corners; earlier owner's name signed on front free endpaper; moderate foxing. Good condition. "This is the story of post-war motor racing and in particular of Stirling Moss's own meteoric rise to fame in one of the most hazardous sports in the world. Its author, British motor racing champion of 1950/51/52/54/55/56, became a racing driver as a boy in his teens and is now recognized as one of the greatest drivers of all time. He describes here the highlights of the post-war period of motor racing, and you will learn not only about his own successes and failures but a great deal about the technique, the temperament, the inner feelings and the secret hopes and fears of the drivers, men whose lives are devoted to the adventure and danger of high-speed racing." .


Reviews

Review this book (Want a chance to win $50? Log-in or create an account first!) (You'll be automatically entered for a chance to win $50!)



Help & frequently asked questions


Glossary

Some terminology that may be used in this description includes:
dustwrapper
Also known as book jacket, dust cover, or dust wrapper, a dust jacket is a protective and decorative cover for a book that is...[more]
gilt
The decorative application of gold or gold coloring to a portion of a book on the spine, edges of the text block, or an inlay in...[more]

£ 5.00
($6.74)

£11.85 shipping to USA

More shipping options >




Vintage Valentine's Day Cards

Collecting Vintage Valentine's Day Cards

Exchanging Valentines can be an awkward process, especially when you consider "Vinegar Valentines" and other snarky sentiments - whatever your tastes, enjoy the sweet and sour cards alike in this gallery!

Biblio Hoaxes: An Inhabitant of Formosa

The Great Formosa Hoax

George Psalmanazar played a grand prank in 1703, pretending to be a resident of the island of Formosa. His book took London by storm.  Learn more...


Trustpilot