Sign In | Register

Book reviews from AbbeyRheinhartt

Number of reviews: 9
Average review: star star

no image

This Family of Mine: What It Was Like Growing Up Gotti

by Victoria Gotti


Reviewed on Mar 14 2011

Victoria Gotti paints the picture of her parent's marriage and her growing-up life. Gotti is a beautiful, intelligent, fiercely strong woman who provides her own, unique, perspective and voice to describe an unusual life and business. Central to her view is her love and respect for her family, and her father. Wish there could be more women like her --- loved it! ABBEY RHEINHARTT.

Respond to this review or add your own



Little House On the Prairie


Reviewed on Mar 10 2011

This is a must read for all little girls. The book chronicles the life, emotions, and imagination of little Laura, as the family moves westward. The book is autobiographical, historically accurate, and beautifully illustrated. Abbey Rheinhart.

Respond to this review or add your own



star

I Hope They Serve Beer In Hell


Reviewed on Mar 10 2011

This is an awful, terrible book about an awful terrible person who abuses himself, women, and alcohol, and is proud of it. The author, Tucker Max, makes Charlie Sheen look lovely. This book is one long frat party.If that's what you like, then this is your book.Abbie Rheinhart.

Respond to this review or add your own



star star star star star

The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks


Reviewed on Mar 10 2011

This is a historically significant book that captures three important points: (1) the lack of ethics in medical research, particularly informed consent; (2) how this lack of medical consent affected a simple African-American family of relatively no sophistication; and (3)that the family of Henrietta Lacks cannot afford health insurance, notwithstanding the enormity of her contribution to science.During 1951, Henrietta Lacks went to Johns Hopkins with a "knot" in her cervix. The biopsy revealed cancer. Tissue was removed and cultured. The cancer was unique in that it continued to grow in a laboratory setting, and were named HeLa cells for their source, Henrietta Lacks. These particular cells were unique in that they do not observe the Hayflick limit, which is the usual lifetime of cancerous cells.These cells were used in the testing by Jonas Salk for his polio vaccine, and are used so regularly in the scientific community that it is estimated 300 scientific papers a month are written on the basis of research performed with HeLa cells. Neither Lacks nor her family gave the physician permission to harvest the cells. When the family, who was relatively unsophisticated, learned that "she was being kept alive," they were extremely concerned, and engaged counsel. They did not understand that it was her tumor only.

Respond to this review or add your own



star star star star star

Paula Deen


Reviewed on Mar 9 2011

I loved this book!!!! It was about the trials and tribulations of a single mom...and it had every bit of the buttery, salty, crunchy, crackly flavor we have all come to love.This is a great book for a gift.Abbie Rheinhart.

Respond to this review or add your own



no image

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

by Rebecca Skloot, Cassandra Campbell, Bahni Turpin


Reviewed on Mar 9 2011

This is a significant book in medical history and African-American history. In 1951 Ms. Lacks was 31, and entered Johns Hopkins Hospital with a painful "knot" in her cervix. After biopsy, it was determined that she had cervical cancer; the tumor was unlike anything ever seen before. The cancerous cells recovered were named the HeLa line, and continue to grow today, some sixty years later (which is unusual), and are commonly used in biomedical research.Scientists have grown some 20 tons of her tumor cells.The Lacks family was kept in the dark, and when they learned, they were horrified. Some members were extremely simple, and believed that she had been wrongly kept alive, not understanding that the cells were from her tumor.The book raises questions of ethics, lack of informed consent, poverty and race. Also, notwithstanding the great value of this line of cells in biomedical (including polio vaccine) from Ms. Lacks, her family, ironically, is unable to afford health insurance.

Respond to this review or add your own



The Da Vinci Code

by Brown, Dan


Reviewed on Mar 9 2011

This is a fast-paced, brilliant book...and extremely enjoyable. This book is a perfect gift for anyone...whether a beach read for a lady, or a long flight read for a man. You cannot go wrong with this book. Abbey Rheinhartt.

Respond to this review or add your own



Gone With the Wind

by Mitchell, Margaret


Reviewed on Mar 9 2011

I approached this book with trepidation. Would this be a book that glorified slavery and antebellum life? No, quite the contrary, although it provides rich description of the wealthy class before the Civil War.This book has an excellent story, well told, in which the characters are the symbols of their country. Scarlett is the United States, at first content and lazy with slavery, then hardened by war, and she shifts to be ruthlessly concerned with commerce and moving forward. Ashley is beautiful and pale, and represents the old south, which cannot adapt.You won't find better character development anywhere. This book is extremely well-written. Do yourself a favor and but a nice dusty one, so you can have that authentic feeling.This book is hugely feminist. It also tells a huge story, but is fast-paced, and will keep you locked in to the life of Scarlett.This is a significant book in American literature, but it is not dry. This book is a must-read.Abbey Rheinhartt.

Respond to this review or add your own



star star star star star

Little House On the Prairie


Reviewed on Mar 8 2011

This is a wonderful book, beautifully illustrated. Young readers will enjoy the true story of Laura and her sister Mary. This book is a significant piece of Americana, as well, and should be read by all children to understand what 19th century America was about.Abbie Rheinhart

Respond to this review or add your own