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Kentucky United States

Number of reviews: 64
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My Movie Business

by John Irving


Reviewed on Feb 1 2009

John Irving, one of the great writer's of the modern era, with literary classics to his credit such as: 'Cider House Rules' and 'The World According to Garp', brings the full force of his prose to a memoir of his thirteen years in Hollywood, bringing his classic, 'Cider House Rules', to the silver screen (via four different directors.) Irving also details two of the other movies made into -- but not from -- his novels: 'The World According to Garp' and 'Hotel New Hampshire'. As well, he delves into his failed efforts to make his original debut work, 'Setting Free the Bears', into a motion picture. This is an intricately insightful memoir of the learning's in the differences between writing a timeless classic, and turning it into a movie. A generously illustrated autobiographical account of one of America's most rightfully renowned novelists. A must have, must read for the lover and collector of all things Irving.

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A Lawyer's Life

by David Fisher, Johnnie Cochran


Reviewed on Jul 1 2008

Perhaps America's most famous defense trail attorney, Johnnie Cochran, passed away 29 March 2005, leaving a rich legal legacy of groundbreaking cases, including the murder trail of OJ Simpson, in what may have been "the" trail of the 20th century, and his signature case. Along the way he was involved in a multitude of spectacular cases including, the racially charged Jersey Turnpike Four, Michael Jackson; Tupac Shakur, Snoop Dogg, Jim Brown, and Aretha Franklin, Sean "P Diddy" Combs amongst many. Lesser known was his works committed works in race relations, and within the African-American community. This autobiography is an intriguing and captivating look at his astounding career, and the astonishing man himself. A work that should be on the bookshelf of every lawyer, anyone in the legal art, and every collector of the genre. A real-life, absolutely spellbinding page-turner from beginning to end.

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Bad As I Wanna Be

by Tim Keown; Dennis Rodman


Reviewed on Feb 1 2008

This is the Dennis Rodman tell-all autobiography that set the standard of modern day sports bio's. It's adorned with the original cover photography by John W. McDonough that created a scandal, Rodman nude, setting on a Harley Davidson covered only by a basketball in his lap to the front of the jacket, and Rodman nude showing his backside while holding a basketball high in each hand to the rear of the jacket. It's been said the risqu� jacket photos may have help sell as many copies of the book than the book itself. Rodman, pro basketball superstar, accomplished motion picture actor, the most far out of far out personalities. Seemingly not just born to live on the edge, but light years beyond it. In this eye-popping bio, Rodman name's names, and gives blunt opinions, letting the bodies fall where they may. From one blazing hot story to the next, he diffidently tells it like it was, and is. Or as Rodman says, "Yor're going to have to find a way to stop me, bro, and nobody's found it yet." This was Dennis Rodman's debut work.

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Rivals

by Janet Dailey


Reviewed on Jan 28 2008

Bestselling author, Janet Dailey, of the Calder saga fame, has created the enthralling story of a passionately powerful woman who suddenly receives a mysterious inheritance, with the strings attached of a decades old and bitter family war, one which she must resolve, or win outright. The heroine, Flame Bennet, an advertising executive in San Francisco, becomes embroiled in an explosive love affair with land baron, Chance Stuart, who turns out to be a distant relative, and the only other heir to the inheritance she's been bequeathed. A feud, fired by old family rivalries, appears to ensnare all in its path, Flame and Chance; Malcom Powell, department store czar and Flame's longtime mentor; and Chance's lover before Flame entered the picture, Lucianna Colton, a world-famous, dark and beautiful diva. Will Flame be destroyed in this battle for love and life? Will they all? This is Janet Dailey at her very best in a mystery suspense thriller romance as big as the raw and raging Southwest, as sophisticated and urban� as Nob Hill, San Francisco. This was Ms. Dailey's 14th work.

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Ordinary People

by Judith Guest


Reviewed on Dec 29 2007

Ordinary People is a quintessential classic of the modern era, it is required reading in institutions of higher learning, and study guides are published specifically for it. it was the first unsolicited manuscript Viking Publishers had purchased in twenty-six years, and the under-anticipated initial sales from booksellers was to such a degree that they had to reauthorize two more printing runs before the trade edition was first shipped to stores. Ordinary People was the recipient of the Janet Heidiger Kafka Prize in 1976. It was made into a blockbuster movie in 1980, garnering three Academy Awards, directed by Robert Redford, and starring Donald Sutherland, Mary Tyler Moore, and Timothy Hutton. It is the story of a teenager returning home after several months in a mental facility, coming to terms with his none too ordinary self, in a middle class family that has always considered themselve, simply, as ordinary people. And it is the story of his family coming to terms with with the awakening that there are no ordinary people, and no ordinary families. Each must come to realize that all have their own trials and tribulations, joys and love. And come to accept that in opening up to each other they bring together that which creates a unique family, their family.

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Tuesdays With Morrie

by Mitch Albom


Reviewed on Dec 26 2007

Before Mitch Albom wrote the modern era classics, The Five People You Meet In Heaven, and, For One More Day; he had given us a grande classic in the endearing and enduring, Tuesdays With Morrie. Albom receives the grace most all of us long for in a return to the learning's of life foundationing the core of his values from the mentor of his youth. Professor Morrie Schwartz was that mentor for Albom, snd he revisits Morrie toward the end of his life when he is stricken with Lou Gehrig's disease. During that final time they meet Tuesdays in Morrie's study, as they did in times gone by, where Albom has the golden opportunity to ask the deeper questions he would not have known, nor known how to ask, in his youth. A faith reaffirming book that will leave you renewed and revitalized in your continuing trek through life daily. This was Mitch Albom's 7th work. A true life masterpiece.

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We're Right, They're Wrong

by James Carville


Reviewed on Dec 24 2007

In James Carville's second book, he unleashes the dogs of war, the dogs of political war that is. In his own ragin' Cajun style, he makes the case for Democrats getting off their backsides and charging head-on into the fray, firing back from the liberal left just as hard as they're fired upon from the conservative right. He tears into the Republican's 1990s Contract with America, pulling it apart piece by piece. He asks if you're tired of getting browbeaten at backyard barbecues and school board meetings as a martini sipping, Martha's Vineyard snob of a wimpy lil' Democrat? And shows you how to kick Repuby rear-ends all the way back to Kinnebunkport! It's time for a return of the good ol' Southern Yellow Dog Democrats, and James Carville is the lead dog! This was James Carville's 2nd work. A need to read no matter where your politics may lay.

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My Story

by Jeff Coplon; H. R. H. the Duchess of York; Jane Scovell


Reviewed on Dec 20 2007

Sarah, The Duchess of York's debut work is an in-depth, no-holds-barred, intriguing tell-all autobiography. It's written in the frank, unpretentious manner we've come to expect from the Duchess, former Sarah Ferguson. It's a startling tell-all story of life in Buckingham Palace with the most famous of royal families. This is not an attempt to lay all the grisly details of her marriage at the feet of others, Sarah takes full responsibility for her part in leaving a path of destruction behind her as well. This is a very open look behind the castle doors that most of us never get to see, and what really goes on there. If your a fan of the royals and royalty, this book should rank #1 on your; must have, must read list.

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Secrets of Serenity


Reviewed on Dec 16 2007

For those seeking infinite answers to eternal questions, seeking solace and serenity in ever confusing times, this miniature book should be in your pocket. One-hundred and four pages of daily meditational ponderments capsulized as simple one-liners, compiled from the great minds of wisdom throughout the ages, as yet another path to spark the soul in thought. For the miniature book collector, this should make for an absolutely wonderful addition to their library, as well as enlightenment for their mind. This miniature work is illustrated with twenty-eight full color photograph plates edited by Susan Oyama.

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Pieces of My Mind

by Andrew Rooney


Reviewed on Dec 9 2007

Andy Rooney, renowned writer, journalist, and co-host of television's, 60 Minutes, investigative news and commentary show; winner of 4 Emmy's, 6 Writers' Guild Awards, and a Peabody Award, along with a host of other tributes; gives us more pieces of his mind, opinions, and gripes in this wonderful book. Or as Andy puts it, "Revealing to people things they knew, but didn't know they knew." And for over four decades, Andy has been doing just that in his own intrepid style, with his one-of-a-kind, like-it-or-not, rambling approach to anything and everything. If you love Andy Rooney, you'll love this offering of, Pieces Of My Mind. If you're not familiar with Andy Rooney, but love "grumpy old men" with a twist of humor, this book will not only be an introduction to Andy (and his mind) ... but a real treat! This was Mr Rooney's 7th book.

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The Pinocchio Syndrome

by David Zeman


Reviewed on Dec 7 2007

David Zeman's debut novel, The Pinocchio Syndrome, has a Pandora's box plot of chillingly realistic overtures to our modern era. A cruise ship is blown to smithereens by a nuclear bomb from unknown sources, and following on the footsteps of the disaster comes a new and deadly virus, spreading across America, then the world. A shaky U.S. president appears to about be toppled by a maniacal billionaire, while elsewhere scientists race against the clock to find a cure for the Pinocchio Syndrome. Enter a beautiful and hard-driving investigative journalist, Karen Embry, who stumbles upon secrets that might well lead a terrified world into the horrors of an apocalyptic Armageddon. High-speed action adventure leads to a page-turning, breathtaking climax with this edge-of-your-seat story!

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Women Men Love-Women Men Leave

by Connell Cowan; Melvyn Kinder


Reviewed on Dec 1 2007

An inspiring and empowering book for women to learn the intricacies of men, why they revere some women while alienating themselves in crumbling relationships with others. This book intimately explores why love can seem so elusive for women, why women may unknowingly fear love, why innocent expectations can become dangerous, and the effects of women who give too freely. It also guides women toward insights on the true path to commitment, giving up the Prince Charming fantasy and finding "the" real man of her dreams for life, really trusting a man's love, Arousing her man, Deepening a man's love through enduring friendship, and the rules for staying in love forever. You'll find all the details here that a woman needs to have a deeply satisfying relationship for herself with her man. This guidebook in learning the reasons men fall into love, and fall out of love, is written by the authors of the blockbuster bestseller, Smart Women/Foolish Choices.

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After All These Years

by Susan Isaacs


Reviewed on Dec 1 2007

Susan Isaacs gives a fresh kind of new heroine in this mystery suspense thriller. Rosie Myers, An average-everyday high school teacher, a bit plump though pretty. Just a wife, mother, and homemaker from suburbia with a nice-enough loving husband, a teacher himself. Rosie's troubles begin when husband Richie transforms from math teach to Manhattan mogul, and uproots the family to an estate on Long Island. Still in all, what could be so bad about the good life, just an adjustment. Rosie finds out it's more than just an adjustment when Ritchie moves out the morning after their 25th wedding anniversary and leaves her cold for the classic trophy gal. Now Rose's living alone at the big empty estate, eating more chocolate chip cookies and more chocolate ice cream than it would take to sustain an eight-hundred pound gorilla in the mating season. Things go from bad to worse as Rose heads for the refrigerator one night, again, and trips over Ritchie --- dead. A huge carving knife sticking out of his chest, from Rosie's own set in the butcher block on the countertop. The police are sure it's her; opportunity, motive, and weapon ... open and shut. but what appears the end for poor Rosie, is only the beginning, as Rosie takes off on her own to finger the real murder, and the real reason why, in this irresistibly witty action adventure. In the end, Rosie finds out what she's been missing, after all these years. Ms Isaac's superbly packs together all the right stock in this novel; love, sex, romance, greed, lust, passion, power, and murder. Whether your being amazed at the heroine's courage and brilliance, gritting your teeth in horror, thrilled with her unpretentious charm or laughing uproariously at her wit --- this is a nonstop read behind closed doors.

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Airframe

by Michael Crichton


Reviewed on Nov 27 2007

From the author of such modern era classics and quintessential bestsellers as: The Andromeda Strain, The Terminal Man, Congo, Sphere, Rising Sun, Jurassic Park, and The Lost World; comes yet another blockbuster novel, Airframe. A commercial airliner suffers a horrendous mid air disaster, with three dead and fifty-six injured, and the flight cabin near totally destroyed. But, the captain hangs-on to regain control and land the plane. Now the race is on for investigators to find out the how and why of it. As horrifically fresh and relevant today as when it was first published in 1996, the stark terror will keep you holding onto the book with one hand and the arm of your chair with the other. This is indeed another Crichton classic.

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Cauldron

by Larry Bond


Reviewed on Nov 26 2007

Larry Bond is quiet nearly the most masterful writer of the military and war, alternative history as we have seen in the modern era. Enduringly plausible scenarios that do not take a back-seat as time passes, remaining as fresh as the day they were first published. In Cauldron, he creates the beginnings of a world gone mad, on the brink of World War III. Worldwide panic runs rampant as a global recession of monitories proportions sets in. Europe fractures, as markets collapse, into two unions. On one side, it appears Russia is going to return to its USSR roots, looking to align itself with one European faction, while the US and England join the other faction. Caught in the middle, populations of third-world countries, nearly en masse, are migrating toward Europe at an unsustainable rate --- plunging industrialized nations further into havoc. Limited geographical strikes and wars flare up, with the consequence of world destruction looming. The End Day appears horrifically soon! Can it be forestalled? Larry Bond's expertise in the military and the government before becoming a novelist makes for realistically in-depth research for the thesis of his novel, and his experiences lend for technically realistic action-adventure that holds you to your seat's, edge and then slams you back. This was Mr. Bond's 3rd work.

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The Mansions of Limbo

by Dominick Dunne


Reviewed on Nov 24 2007

One of the modern era's most incisive oracles, Dominick Dunne, gives us yet another great collection of his renowned essays from Vanity Fair magazine. From the man who gets the interviews of the rich and famous and the rich and infamous, that other writers only dream of, come fifteen electrifying essays in, The Mansions of Limbo. From Queen Noor of Jordan only one month after the Gulf War, to the always controversial artist and photographer Robert Mapplethorpe just prior to his death from AIDS, to the former wife, Jane Wyman, of the former President Ronald Reagan, and many more, Dunne gets "the" tell-all interviews of a lifetime --- and thrills us with his unparalleled mastery of the written word as a magnificent bonus. This was Dunne's sixth book, after such blockbuster bestsellers as: The Two Mrs. Grenvilles; Fatal Charms; People Like Us; An Inconvenient Woman; and, The Winners.

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The Fist of God

by Frederick Forsyth


Reviewed on Nov 20 2007

Frederick Forsyth has proven time and again that he is a master of his genre in historically based fiction of war, spying, and terrorism. He's given his readers blockbuster mystery suspense thrillers such as: The Day of the Jackal; The Dogs of War; The Fourth Protocol; The Odessa File; The Negotiator ... and more. With, The Fist of God, he has struck classic pay-dirt again. Here is perhaps the most thoroughly researched, historically based novel set in prewar operation Desert Storm yet written, with an absolutely captivating cast of characters. Forsyth takes us inside the Allies war-rooms, to secret meetings of Saddam Hussein's war cabinet, to daring flights by the American Air Force over the skies of Iraq, to the sands of Iraq itself, and into the deepest recesses of Hussien's depot dictatorship with a daring spy, Mike Martin, trying to reach an undercover agent he knows only as, Jerico, who holds high-level intel the Allies believe may make or break the war effort. This is an intense story of wartime subterfuge you won't want to miss. This was Frederick Forsyth's 11th work.

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Get Me Ellis Rubin

by Ellis Rubin; Dary Matera


Reviewed on Nov 18 2007

For fifty-five years Ellis Rubin (1925-2006) took on some of the most high-profile and bizarre cases in Miami, Florida, with some of the most creative and outlandish defenses ever conceived. He was, to say the least, a legal legend in Dade County, Florida courtrooms, which is says a lot considering Miami has the dubious distinction of being America's #1 "crime capitol." Rubin's unconventional defenses included a teenage boy with a distorted sense of reality who was on trial for murder, in which he argued in defense of the teenager that he suffered from "television intoxication." But as outlandish as Rubin might have seemed, he was not without his own set of morals. He once spent rime in jail for refusing to represent a potential client because he felt the man was lying to him. An amazing person, as one of America's most adroit lawyers and forceful speakers, he started life with a verbal stuttering condition so severe that he couldn't even pronounce his own name! His debut work in this autobiography explodes off the pages, giving us an inside tale of perhaps the most colorful attorneys in America's recent past.

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Night Sky

by Clare Francis


Reviewed on Nov 15 2007

Clare Francis offers us a spellbinder, in a novel that combines the impeccably researched historical drama of a Europe caught up in the midst of the horrors of World War Two, and its peoples caught up in survival, stark fear and white hot passions. Ms Francis' principle characters give us three distinctly defined and completely different personalities: Julie Lecaux, a single mother-to-be of a fatherless child from England, trying to conceal her shame in France; Paul Vasson, a one time petty thief, now a Nazi collaborator specializing in infiltrating the French Resistance; and David Freymann a German-Jewish scientist with a secret that could turn the tides of war to Germany should the Third Reich ever find out. This magnificently monumental story is as broad in scope as it is intimate in detail, the length and breath of 631 pages can still but hardly contain it. This was Clare Frances' premier, debut work.

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South of the Border

by John Byrne Cooke


Reviewed on Nov 11 2007

In a 21st century era where the grande western novels of yesteryear seem gone by the wayside, comes an authentic wild west storyteller in the vein of Zane Grey and Walter Noble Burns. John Byrne Cooke's, South of the Border: The Return of Butch Cassidy, is a rip-roaring -- and plausible -- bit of alternative history to Butch dying in Bolivia. Cooke's spellbinding tale picks up just after Word War I, in the young fledgling boomtown of Hollywood's silent pictures era, when westerns are the call-of-the-day, being cranked out by the hundreds. Enter Charlie Siringo, old Texan and ex- Pinkerton, famed for his decade long chase of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, until their untimely South American demise. Charlie now runs a Hollywood boardinghouse for cowboy actors and actresses, one of whom Charlie becomes involved in a May-December romance with, Victoria Hartford. But, were the reports charlie had gotten all those years ago about Butch's Bolivian death right? Now, Out of the Southwest rides a lone horseman with a colt strapped to his belt, that injects himself into Charlie's life at the boardinghouse, and into Victoria's heart. The fella' calls himself Leroy Roberts ... is he really? This story has a bang-up action adventure climax in the deserts of Old Mexico that will grab you in a heart-pounding ending. For wild west frontier lovers, this is a gotta' have, gotta' read! This was Mr. Cooke's 2nd work. His debut western novel, Snowblind Moon, was a Spur Award Winner.

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The Bloody Chamber

by Angela Carter


Reviewed on Nov 11 2007

Angela Carter (1940-1992), recipient of the W. Somerset Maughm Award, leaves us with a modern day classic vined around 19th century classics. She takes fairy and folk tales that were their own just-below-the-suface erotic, and recasts them as openly darkening adult erotica. At the hands of a masterful mistress such as Ms. Carter, the likes of, Little Red Riding Hood; Puss and Boots; Beauty and the Beast, and more, are shaped and sharpened to challenge the mind and stir the loins. This is a timeless wonderment for the fan and collector of adult erotica from a talent we may not see the likes of again. This was Angela Carter's 10th work.

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Spooker

by Dean Ing


Reviewed on Nov 4 2007

From the author of: The Ransom of Black Stealth One; Butcher Bird; The Nemesis Mission ... and more, comes a high-charged bestseller with a totally different twist on the spy game, Spooker. A spooker is a deep-cover agent's escape hatch stash, hidden with all the necessities to make it on the run if they believe their cover's been blown. A safety kit with forged documents, keys to an escape vehicle or airline tickets, and money --- lots and lots of money to buy their safe exit with. Now a whole new genre of hitmen have developed the seemingly perfect crime, Scare an agent to take it on the run, wait for them to pick up their spooker, kill 'em and grab the loot. Agents die everyday in their line of business, so who's the wiser? Nobody. Until the hitmen make a mistake, they kill a DEA agent in deep-cover that actually has a few good friends. And those friends take up his cause. String together the evidence, hunt down the hitmen, and stop the continuing massacre before they strike again. A first rate mystery suspense thriller. This was Dean Ing's 10th novel.

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Lessons in Becoming Myself

by Ellen Burstyn


Reviewed on Nov 3 2007

Academy Award winning actress, Ellen Burstyn, unabashedly reveals herself at every level, professionally, personally, and spiritually, in this all encompassing autobiography, her debut work. She covers the intricacies of a lifetime's search for, herself; with a frankness of honesty rare to be found in Hollywood. She begins with her leaving home at eighteen to become a model, and intimately details her early failed marriage, a long list of lost relationships, fruitless jobs, and countless moves crisscrossing the country, until she landed finally in New York and became the lead in a major Broadway play with her very first audition. Moving on to L.A., her interests turned to Hollywood and motion pictures, to become one of the era's renowned actresses. Unlike many of the Hollywood set, Ms. Burstyn's life has been an open-minded -- and more importantly -- open-hearted effort toward self-realization. It has taken her on a magnificent and extraordinary path, from the streets of New York, to Cambodia, to the Swiss Alps, to the Himalayas, and more. This is an ultimately captivating story ... that's not over yet!

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The Other

by Thomas Tryon


Reviewed on Oct 31 2007

Perhaps his best work, Thomas Tryon's debut novel, The Other, set a new standard in horror fiction for its day in time. He certainly raised the bar in a story of gradually gripping, eventually all consuming terror for its readers. A mesmerizing tale of twin boys born to a prominent family of a small town in rural Connecticut, who slowly but surely wreak hellatious havoc to the family, then upon the town, in the games they play while secreted away within the shrouds of an old dark barn and a dank cellar. A classic rendition of good versus evil, brother against brother, with a breath-catching twist.

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Ti-35 II Student Calculator Math Book


Reviewed on Oct 19 2007

An expanded version of Texas Instruments widely popular, 'Great International Math on Keys'. Not just for the school or college student as one might surmise from the title, this book should be a must read for everyone and anyone using a calculator, which it seems would include everybody in the civilized world. Put together by the experts at TI, in collaboration with the University of Denver's Mathematics Laboratory, it's an intricate, but easy-to-use and easy-to-learn from tutorial in opening new horizons to your calculator's keyboards. You'll come to understand how to make use of your calculator in new, valuable and fun ways that were un-mastered and left in disuse heretofore. Jam-packed with information on key areas, you'll find new, vital applications for your calculator in, Basic Keys; Keying Up Conversions; Keys To Home Management; Unlocking Algebra; Turning To Business And Finance; Latching Onto Trigonometry; Cracking Probability And Statistics; Securing Physics And Chemistry; and, Closing On Puzzles And Games. A fantastic book for improving and expanding your use of the calculator in all areas of your life!

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Schindler's List

by Thomas Keneally


Reviewed on Oct 14 2007

Originally titled, Schindler's Ark, this bestselling modern day classic, first published in 1982 by Thomas Keneally, was the basis for the blockbuster motion picture, Schindler's List, directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Liam Neeson. The book's title was changed to reflect the motion picture title for continuity. The novel, extrapolated on a true story, won the Booker Award upon its debut in 1982. It tells the story of Oskar Schindler, self-made industrialist and "by chance" hero during World War Two. By the winds of happenstance Schindler found himself in the harrowing position of deciding if Polish Jews -- under his authority while working in his factory -- might live or certainly die in the furnaces and gas chambers of Nazi concentration camps. And thereby, Schindler begins covert efforts to save the Jews under his watch. Keneally's intricate research into the Schindler affair is only exceeded by his talent as a brilliant novelist. He draws the reader into an increasing web of horror and terror, as real as the times it tells of, as atrocious as Adolph Hitler and his fascist cohorts. Keneally makes you feel you are actually there, constantly looking over your shoulder, around the next corner, waiting for the next SS boot to fall ... very well possibly ... upon you.

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Avoiding Mr. Wrong (And What to Do If You Didn'T)

by Stephen Arterburn; Meg J. Rinck; Margaret Josephson Rinck


Reviewed on Oct 8 2007

A must read before your next date! And a must read if you're already stuck with Mr. Wrong! Avoiding Mr. Wrong, by Stephen Arterburn, M.Ed., and Meg J. Rinck, Ed.D, instructs women in how to recognize early-on the ten male types who will lay ruin to their life --- before becoming entangled in a devastating relationship. It also offers instruction for those women who are presently involved in a trying relationship of that nature, what to do about it. This intriguing book is a real-life experience into women evaluating themselves firstly, to understand why they always seem drawn to all the Mr. Wrong's, and then explaining in graphic detail the ten most common Mr. Wrong's to recognize and avoid as if they have the plague, as for women pondering a relationship with them ... they do. But the book doesn't just offer the learning experience in being able to avoid Mr. Wrong, it also offers an invaluable section on: Ten Tips to Finding Mr. Right. This book gives women anywhere and everywhere a step up in hope, toward truly rewarding relationships in their lives. Stephen Arterburn is the founder of, New Life Clinics, the largest provider of Christian Counseling and treatment throughout the United States and Canada. He is host of the daily radio program, New Life Live, heard on over 100 radio stations. He is also the founder of the, Women of Faith Conferences, which have been attended by over one-million women. Meg J. Renck is a clinical psychologist and ordained clergy. This was Stephen Arterburn's 32nd work and Dr. Meg J. Renck's 4th work.

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The Summons

by John Grisham


Reviewed on Oct 2 2007

John Grisham, one of America's most prolific of bestselling authors, bring us yet another taught, and tightly wound mystery suspense thiller of the first magnitude. The summons, comes from Ray Arlee's father, Judge Arlee, to return home to the family estate in a small southern town. The occasion is his impending death, and he wants to discuss family matters with Ray, a law professor, and Ray's brother, Forrest, the all-time winner for family black sheep of family black sheep. But, Judge Arlee dies before the meeting takes place, not only leaving their unfinished meeting behind, but a shocking secret only he and Ray knew ... and perhaps one other. This Grisham novel will draw you in and capture your imagination from page 1 to page 341.

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Phantom Leader

by Mark Berent


Reviewed on Sep 28 2007

Mark Berent, a distinguished flyer in the USAF for more than twenty years, and a veteran of the Vietnam War, author's an explosive novel in, 'Phantom Leader'. He gives us a rich collage of heroes, each embroiled in the seething battle of the Tet Offensive in 1968 Vietnam, a field of honor that Berent himself is all to familiar with in very real terms: Pilot Toby Parker, is making his way through the jungle, only to stumble into the middle of a tank attack at Lang Tri. Major "Flak" Apples, parachutes from his downed fighter jet, right into the waiting arms of the enemy at the "Hanoi Hilton". Special Forces Colonel Wolf Lochert, is set to confront an old advisari he has never been able to beat in combat. General "Whitey" Whisenand, gives his all to cover his troops on the front-lines while fighting two wars --- one in Vietnam and one in Washington, DC. Major Court Bannister, is conflicted with choices that could make him Vietnam's first "air ace", or destroy his career. This is a heart-pounding novel so vivid in detail and riveting in its action adventure that you'll forget it's only fiction.

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Flower Drying With a Microwave

by Titia Joosten


Reviewed on Sep 26 2007

Titia Joosten's book swept Europe, then America as the first to show decorators and crafters how to dry flowers, fauna, and leaves without the necessity of time, space, and light used in traditional methods before the advent of the microwave --- and get fabulous results bursting with color. This slender, 72 page work is concise and jam-packed with easy-to-follow directions and instructions. As well as drying techniques, Ms. Joosten includes marvelous see-and-do illustrations to demonstrate flower wiring and clustering. Wreath-making as well as garlands are covered here. And mirror, window, or over-the-door embellishments. This is an absolute gem for the professional or the amateur. Professional credits to Studio 4 Colour of Amsterdam and Seudio Veldkamp, photography; Bronja Cramer, drawings; De Walburg Nursery; and Sandy Mush Herb Nursery.

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Marie Curie

by Susan Quinn


Reviewed on Sep 22 2007

In this monumental work, Susan Quinn, takes us intriguingly deeper into the life of Marie Curie than has ever been brought forth to the reader before. Meticulously referenced via heretofore unavailable personal journals of Marie Curie's, friend's testimonials, and other documents, Quinn presents a richly intimate biography of the woman we only thought we knew. She opens us to a complete insight of the woman and the scientist. Her life, loves, and work. Her passions, triumphs, and tragedies. Quinn strips away the superficial image we've grown accustom to, and gives us a very real person in terms of Marie Curie herself, the times she lived in, and the environment she worked in. A historical must read.

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The Red Fox

by Anthony Hyde


Reviewed on Sep 20 2007

Anthony Hyde's debut novel is as tight and taught a mystery suspense thriller as your likely to become caught-up in. A gripping drama of old loves, missing persons, personal danger, international intrigue, government conspiracies, and long-hidden fortunes --- all bound together in a breathtaking mix. The story unfolds with journalist, Robert Thorne, receiving a call for help from an old flame, as her father has went missing. Thorne's search for his ex-lover's father -- a wealthy fur dealer on the world market -- takes him on a chilling international hunt, piecing together a trail that leads from America, to Russia, to Europe. Thorne not only learns of his ex's dark family secrets in the process; but of his own from an ill forgotten childhood. This is an intense work that will haunt you from beginning to end.

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Don't Cry Now

by Joy Fielding


Reviewed on Sep 17 2007

In, 'Don't Cry Now', Joy Fielding may excel her bestsellers, 'See Jane Run' and 'Tell Me No Secrets'. In her 11th work she gives us a suspense thriller supreme. The events of average-everyday life are injected with startling twists which spiral out of control into terror-driven horror. Fielding's heroine, Bonnie Wheeler, seemingly has the perfect life, a home in one of Boston's most sought after neighborhoods, a lovely daughter, and a handsome and successful husband. But, Bonnie's perfect world is shattered when she finds her husband's ex-wife murdered ... and it becomes increasingly clear to her that the same "someone" is after her and her daughter. A classic collectible for mystery suspense lovers.

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Year Zero

by Jeff Long


Reviewed on Sep 14 2007

In Jeff Long's seventh work, the bestselling author creates a spine-tingling thriller that seems destined to become a classic with, 'Year Zero', in the mode of 'The Andromeda Strain' --- with a startling spiritual twist. Long's hero in this novel is, Nathan Swift, a young archaeologist doing field research in the holy land on a hunt for the historical Jesus Christ. Nathan is a principled man, who in a lapse of greed sells a major find he has unearthed on the black-market, a vial of blood from the 1st century. The vial unleashes a pandemic plague on the world that threatens to wipeout all of mankind. On his journey home to America, through an adventurous series of events, Nathan ends-up at Los Alamos in New Mexico, where he finds the greatest minds in science have met in search of a cure. In a last-ditch effort, racing against time, they use human lab-rats cloned from year zero. Nathan comes face to face with men made from the relics he had once looted, one of whom actually claims to be Jesus Christ! Could this be Patient Zero ... with the answer they seek?

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A Matter of Honor

by Jeffrey Archer


Reviewed on Sep 12 2007

This is a masterfully written mystery suspense thriller that will draw you in from page one, until you close the book for the final time, and long afterward. Jeffrey Archer's seventh novel stretches from World War Two to modern day, and around the globe. Archer's intriguing story centers on a captain, Adam Scott, and his recently deceased father, a retired colonel. And, his father's decades old secret, that had driven him from a WW2 hero, to a broken and disgraced man. That secret becomes Adam's final bequeathment from his father, and leads him to a Swiss vault, where he finds a priceless Russian Fourteenth century work of art. The unfolding events thereafter become so ominous that they could change the whole balance of power between America and the Soviet Union forevermore. This is Jeffery Archer at his very best, of Hitchcockian proportions.

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Fault Lines

by Anne Rivers Siddons


Reviewed on Sep 9 2007

'Fault Lines' may be Anne Rivers Siddon's most powerful work since 'Colony', an utterly intriguing story of relationships, and of self. Ms. Siddon draws the reader into the intimate center of turmoil of three women; mother, daughter, and their sister/aunt. The story is woven around the confused heroine, Merritt, sister to Laura and mother to teenage Glynn. After an explosive family quarrel Glynn runs off from Atlanta, to her aunt Laura's home in Hollywood, where Laura pursues a declining career in the movies. After a Life's collision with the glitter of Hollywood as a backdrop, all three women find themselves on the road with a borrowed lodge in the Santa Cruz Mountains as their destination. As they confront each other and themselves, and their fault lines within reach an explosive breaking point, so do the fault lines buried deep beneath the ground under their lodge in this earthquake prone country. This novel is a nail-biter supreme that will keep you turning page after page until its unexpected climax.

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Dustin Hoffman

by Jeff Lenburg


Reviewed on Sep 9 2007

Jeff Lenburg's, 'Dustin Hoffman: Hollywood's Antihero', was the first early-on, in-depth biography of the superstar. Comprehensive in its reviews of the day and intriguing with its up close and personal interviews with friends and co-worker, this well put together bio looks at Hoffman's bravura acting style, as well as his complex and contradictory inner self. The book also includes 16 photographs from private collections and public archives that fans of Hoffman are sure to enjoy.

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Day of Confession

by Allan Folsom


Reviewed on Sep 9 2007

With the entry of his second novel, Allan Folsom gives us a riveting suspense mystery matching the chilling power of his bestselling 'Day After Tomorrow'. In this story we find Holsom's hero in the unlikely character of a successful Hollywood lawyer, Harry Addison. Harry's world gets turned upside down when he receives a message on his telephone answering machine from his estranged brother, Daniel, a priest in Vatican City, telling him the Cardinal Vicar of Rome has been assassinated. Just a scant few hours later, Daniel is killed when a bus he is on explodes. Harry flies to Rome to recover his brother's body, only yo be catapulted into a conspiracy of deception and terror, while learning Daniel was the prime suspect in the assassination. Looking into what exactly happened to Daniel, he's amazed to find Daniel may still be alive. As he searches for Daniel, he too becomes a man on the run, accused of killing a policeman. Complications abound as Harry finds he is also being stalked by an infamous Terrorist who is also seeking Daniel. At the center of this thriller are men of God undertaking the devil's handiwork as they attempt to establish a new Holy Roman Empire in Communist Red China. This is a super chillier that will grab your imagination and yank it right into the middle of this spellbinder.

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Snapshot

by Linda Barnes


Reviewed on Sep 6 2007

Like the male P.I.'s of the Dashiell Hammett and Mickey Spillane era before her, Linda Barnes stays true to the hard-boiled detective personification, but takes the "male" out of a male dominated genre, replacing them with a female in grand, classic style. And like her counterparts of yesteryear, Barnes heroine, Carlotta Carlyle, is rough and savvy, but with a heart-of-gold and an underlying compassion. In this mystery thriller she's digging for answers of a child's death, helping her little sister from the Big Sister Organization find a father she's never known, shaking up one of Boston's most prestigious hospitals, and healing some old wounds of her own; while she combats a deadly conspiracy of the forces of hypocrisy and corruption in the big city. Barnes creates a character in Carlyle of wit and gravity, tough and beautiful, flippant but dead serious. For detective novel lovers this is a grip-your-seat, page-turner of a must read.

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Bridesmaids

by Judith Balaban Quine


Reviewed on Sep 5 2007

A rivetingly open and honest biography of Princess Grace Kelly and six of her best friends, as related by one of those friends and confidant, Judith Balaban Quine. This is the tell-all story of Grace Kelly, and the story of those six friends who would be her bridesmaids on her weding day in 1956 to Prince Rainier of Monaco. It is also the story of the glittering glamour years of Hollywood, the legendary sophisticated era of Broadway in New York, and the fantasy of exotic Monaco. And it's an intriguing portrayal of the women who lived, loved and worked in that time. Ms. Quine's book is illustrated with 87 marvelous photographs from private collections and public archives, and peppered with startling memoirs of movie stars, the rich, and famous, to numerous too mention here. This is "the" definitive work on Grace Kelly, her life and her era.

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The Fountain of Age

by Betty Friedan


Reviewed on Aug 26 2007

From the founder of, NOW, the National Organization for Women and the National Women's Political Caucus, famed author Betty Friedan produces what may well be her most important book since the publishing of her 'The Feminine Mystique' in 1963, with this breakthrough work, 'The Fountain of Age'. In 'The Feminine Mystique' Ms. Friedan forever changed the way women viewed themselves and the way society at large viewed them. Now, in 'The Fountain of Age', she does the same for "senior citizens". Opening new vistas for those over sixty and beyond, philosophically, psychologically, sexually, medically, career-wise, retirement-wise, and in every other conceivable way. After an intriguing read of this provocative book you'll never think of old age the same way again, and you'll never think of it again in the depressing, restrictive terms society has been lead to believe. This book shatters the shackles of the youth myth and makes blazingly golden the golden years.

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Personal History

by Katharine Graham


Reviewed on Aug 21 2007

An incredible autobiography of an amazing woman. The very personal story of a woman born to wealth and privilege, surprisingly naive, who comes to adulthood in a storybook romance and marriage only to see her beloved husband succumb to manic-depression and suicide. It is also a corporate business story within the personal story of her learn-as-you-go career life as she's thrust into the position of the head of her father's Washington Post newspaper, steering it through some of its most tumultuous times; the Vietnam War, Civil Rights, the Pentagon Papers, and Watergate. And it is a Washington insider's power and political story, with an in-depth look at her relationships with the likes of Warren Buffett, George Schulz, Robert McNamara, fifty years of Presidents and their First Ladies ... and more. A leave-nothing-out intricate book so intriguingly written, with such forthright honesty, that it will keep you turning page after page from 1 through 642.

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Sweetsir

by Helen Yglesias


Reviewed on Aug 12 2007

In Helen Yglesias' fourth work, Sweetsir, she catapults her readers into the center of a disastrously violent and abusive marriage in her edge-of-your-seat, heart-stopping portrayal of Sally and Morgan Sweetsir. She lays bare the darkest side of human relationships between a man and a woman. One that ultimately leads to Morgan's death and Sally's murder trail. Will the jury be persuaded that spouse abuse warrants murder? Will the reader? This tightly written, and taughtly felt, drama is Ms. Yglesias at her best. The story will haunt the reader long after the book is closed and slipped back upon the shelf.

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Friction

by E. R. Frank


Reviewed on Jul 28 2007

A fast paced page-turner dramatizing the trails and tribulations of being a teenager in the new millennium. The story centers around Alex, a teenager with a first boyfriend, Tim, and a first mega-crush on her teacher, Simon. Things go from complicated to terrible when a new student enters the picture, Stacey, ultra-cool with her secret past, gleaming hair, tongue ring, and wise beyond her years in all the wrong ways persona. She's hot for the teach too, and more than willing to start the rumors flying about a student/teacher relationship between Alex and Simon that's rated X. As the muck and mire fly even Alex begins to wonder what's real, and what's not, what's true, and what's not, what's right, and what's wrong? And what of the horrific truth of Stacy, and what's really happening behind closed doors at home? Ms. Frank is an Award winning writer and an active social worker who knows the high school beat, and how to spin a gripping novel. This was her third work, coming after 'Life Is Funny' and 'America'.

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Screen Deco

by Howard Mandelbaum; Eric Myers


Reviewed on Jul 6 2007

A definitive Hollywood bio looking back at the Roaring 20's through the 1930's during the golden age of the silver screen. A lavish and sumptuous era that coined the ever-enduring term, art deco, to describe the grandiosity Hollywood splashed across theater screens nationwide, capturing America for two decades in its glamorous stylings. 'Screen Deco' includes 250+ b&w plates, a wondrous marvel of photographs from both public archives and private collections. This work is a treasure trove for the movie buff, a rare treat for the retro art deco fan, and a feast for fans of both. Researched and written by two of the movie industries foremost historians.

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Memorial Day

by Vince Flynn


Reviewed on Jun 17 2007

'New York Times' bestselling author Vince Flynn remains the unquestionable master of high political intrigue. Packed with all the heart-stopping action and political intrigue that Vince Flynn's fans have come to expect from him, this is a stylish thriller of the first magnitude. In this riveting installment Flynn's hero, Counterterrorism Operative, Mitch Rapp, is off to fight the world's most deadly terrorists -- including al Queda -- in this chilling political suspense-thriller. He's on a four day countdown from Memorial Day to stop another attack on the US more horrific than 9/11. This is a roller-coaster ride of a page turner! This was Vince Flynn's 6th work.

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Monitoring Your Health


Reviewed on Jun 16 2007

In the chapters of this definitive book, the American Medical Association in conjunction with Reader's Digest offer suggestions to help you become an active, lifetime participant in your own health care. Accompanied by a multitude of full color photos, graphs, and charts to assist. And contributed to by more than 35 doctors. A comprehensive reference and guide for every individual, every family, every home.

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Suzanne's Diary For Nicholas

by James Patterson


Reviewed on Jun 16 2007

A romantic melodrama of the first order supreme. James Patterson balances a fine mix of love, passion, joy, mystery and suspense. An enticing and intriguing tale of a woman who finds the man of her dreams, only to have him dissappear with but one trace, a diary left behind written by a new mother to her baby son. Lots of new twists to the age-old "lost love" plot here that will keep you on the edge of your seat with this page-turner!

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National Parks

by Reader's Digest


Reviewed on Jun 15 2007

With this volume Reader's Digest produces a definitive list and thoroughly descriptive read to all of America's wondrous national parks system in their unequaled style. It is a two part publication for ease of reference, Part One presents ten of America's finest national parks handpicked by the writers and photographer for their beauty and attractions. Part Two, a thirty page gazette, provides photographs, maps, and capsulated descriptions of thirty-five other national parks. A legend explaining the facilities, map features, and symbols used is also included. For the parks lover, outdoors person, naturalist, vacationer, sightseer, or traveler; whether on an extended trip or a weekend jaunt, this copy is a definite must have. Or for the person who simply revels in viewing magnificent photography of the great outdoors this is a very needed addition.

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After All

by Mary Tyler Moore


Reviewed on Jun 11 2007

A very candid autobiography, and an exhilarating and moving tell-all of an extraordinarily complex and creative star. Poignantly recounting her passions, pain, and tragedies in remarkable openness and sincere reflection --- all told with Mary's characteristic wit, resolve, snd levelheadedness. From childhood star to America's girl-next-door in her role as Laura Petrie on 'The Dick Van Dyke Show', to her signature series in 'The Mary Tyler Moore Show' garnering a record-breaking 29 Emmys, to memorable starring roles in motion pictures and on the Broadway stage in such momentous productions as, 'Ordinary People' and 'Whose Life Is It Anyway?'. All Interwoven throughout with not-until-now-known stories from behind-the-scenes ... and "endearing" relationships. She tells of her divorce from Grant Tinker, and their creation of the hugely successful MTM Enterprises. She heartbreakingly recalls the loss of her son, Richard, and her struggles and triumphs over alcoholism and diabetes, and where she is now. Peppered with sharp anecdotes, this is a sensitive and remarkable look at an enduring woman, and one of Hollywood's shinning stars. This was Ms. Moore's debut work.

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Dreams of Glory

by Thomas Fleming


Reviewed on Jun 6 2007

From distinguished historian and renown writer, Thomas Fleming, another blockbuster novel set around the very real events of the American Revolutionary War. In Jersey Washington and his troops are starving and freezing, while across the river the British troops party in New York as their leaders hatch a brazen plot to kidnap General George Washington and bring the war to a crashing halt. A riveting read whose fictional premise is intriguingly woven with its threads of details in history.

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Like Father, Like Son

by Hunter S. Fulghum


Reviewed on May 25 2007

From the son of renowned bestselling author Robert Fulghum, his son Hunter S Fulghum's first work in an insightful look at family, generations, growing up, and mid-life for men in a compilation of real-life stories from across America. Witty, humorous, lunatic, drama, tragedy, crisis; all the stuff of life that make up the moments of our lives. A wonderful revelation and look back at how boys become guys, and guys become men --- adults. This one's not just a "must" read, but a "must" read totally enjoyable and captivating in the reading.

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Cauldron

by Larry Bond


Reviewed on May 13 2007

Edge-of-your-seat thriller dramatizing the horrific events of Europe's financial markets collapsing, and catapulting America and the rest of the world into a WW3 scenario. Vivid human characterizations fill out this epic saga from, Larry Bond, the author of New York Times bestsellers, 'Red Phoenix' and 'Vortex', and the collaborator of Tom Clancy on his blockbuster hit, 'Red Storm Rising. If you love explosive intrigue combined with super action adventure this novel is a first-rate page-turner. Mr. Bond has all the right credentials in creating this realistic work of fiction as a former naval officer and warfare analyst, now a proven master of the art suspense writer. Don't miss this one!

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A Single Step

by Pamela Cockerill; Heather Mills McCartney


Reviewed on May 12 2007

The blockbuster autobiography of, Heather Mills McCartney, ex-wife to Beatles' fab Paul McCatney, and recently one of the public's and critic's most favored celebs from the hit show 'Dancing With The Stars'. This is the riveting and awe-inspiring, rags-to-riches story of an absolutely remarkable woman who went from the runaway of a broken home as a child and working in a carnival, to becoming a renowned model, successful business woman, and front-lines activist before meeting and marrying Paul Mcartney. The moving and uplifting story of a courageous woman who never let losing a leg to amputation stop her at anything that life had to offer. Sixteen pages of photography from personal archives, totaling thirty-five B&W plates are included in this work. [*originally titled 'Out On A Limb' in its British debut]

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Playing for Keeps

by David Halberstam


Reviewed on May 5 2007

Author David Halberstam brings to the reader the perspective of a great historian, the inside knowledge of a dogged sportswriter, and the love of a fan to bear on one of the most mythic of players in basketball -- or any other game -- in this penetrating bio of Michael Jordan.

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Laurel & Hardy

by Scott MacGillivray


Reviewed on Apr 22 2007

The first in-depth book detailing what might be considered the lost years, or the neglected years, of the famed Laurel & Hardy comedy team. This work covers Laurel & Hardy's blockbuster smash-hits of the 1940's through America and the world's war years and beyond. Highly readable and intricately referenced, this book is a "must read/must have" for the Laurel & Hardy fan, Golden Age film aficionados, or anyone who just loves classic comedy. Includes marvelous photographs and B&W plates of marquee posters.

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Gai-Jin

by James Clavell


Reviewed on Apr 19 2007

This monumental work was the third in James Clavell's six part saga of Asia and Japan. Grand in scope and scale, filled with the richness and passion of two great histories coming together, Mr. Clavell weaves an extraordinary tale of Japan, newly opened to Gai-Jin -- foreigners -- and teeming with contradictions as the ancient and the modern day world of the latter 19th century meet in a clash of cultures, of nations, of generations.

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From Fields of Gold

by Alexandra Ripley


Reviewed on Apr 16 2007

Awesome! Sweeping in the length and breath of its portrayals from the antebellum South, to the Yankee North, to the royal empire of Britain; from plantation, to mansions, to castles. Riveting in its historical impeccability. A lustfully romantic action adventure drama the equal to Margaret Mitchell. A very, must read.

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Gay Talese

by Unto The Sons


Reviewed on Jul 16 2006

Bestselling author, Gay Talese, of such renown modern day classics as 'Honor Thy Father' and 'Thy Neighbor's Wife' has wrought his most compelling work yet -- 11 years in the writing -- in this epic of the millions who emigrated from Italy to America beginning at the turn of the 20th century, told on a grande full-scale here for the first time. The immigrant saga is brought close to us through the lives of the author's own forebears in this biographical drama, particularly his Italian-born father, Joseph, a tailor and assimilated American who during World War 2 existed as an "emotional double-agent" -- swayed by his brothers fighting in the Fascists army while at the same time aiding the Allied cause as a volunteer Shore Patrolman within his adopted home of Ocean City, New Jersey. Joseph's tempered loyalty, felt by so many immigrant's during Italy's confrontation with the Allies, brought him into his own confrontation with his American-born son (Gay), who saw himself as an "alien" under his father's roof, and an "outsider" on the flag-waving Protestant Island of Ocean City -- "olive-skinned in a freckle-faced town". The son would in time become the chronicler of not only his father's fate but also the fate of an impoverished patriarchal world of Southern Italy after World War 2; that had dispatched so many millions of immigrants to the New World. A breathtaking epic, a saga supreme, a "must read"!

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