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Biblio: Used, Rare and Collectible Books for Sale

Book reviews from fict

North Carolina United States

Number of reviews: 22
Average review: star star star star

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Cutting For Stone


Reviewed on Jan 8 2011

Initially, I wasn't certain if I'd like this book, as I'm a bit put off by "medically" things. In the end, this book was a brilliant work by an extraordinary writer.

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Place Called Freedom, A


Reviewed on Jul 19 2010

I suppose it was a bit unfair to hope that Follett's "other" historical work would be of the magnificent caliber of Pillars of the Earth or World Without End. Not that this work was necessarily bad, but it was forgettable. Follett starts the novel off with enough gusto and seems to be building towards an epic, but then appears to lose interest in his subject about 2/3 through the book and cobbles together a quick, trite ending as if to wash his hands of it as quickly as possible.

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A Most Wanted Man

by John Le Carre


Reviewed on Feb 19 2009

Rather entertaining story - interesting insight into state concerns as to how to handle terrorism. Not Le Carre's best, though.

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star star

Bangkok Haunts

by John Burdett


Reviewed on Feb 19 2009

Mildly entertaining story, although the turbid view of the inside world of the Thai sex-trade might have been a little more graphic than I would have liked.

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The Baron in the Trees

by Italo Calvino


Reviewed on Mar 12 2008

In my opinion, this, Calvino's first novel, is his finest. A remarkable story.

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Traveling Mercies

by Anne Lamott


Reviewed on Mar 5 2008

A wonderful, soulful, and candid book. Lamott's writing is a delightful blend of thoughtful emotions: wistful, joyful, biting and incisive - all at the same time.

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Searching For God Knows What

by Donald Miller


Reviewed on Jul 20 2007

Another sharp and insightful book by Miller, challenging basic assumptions and inspiring us to cut through the formulas of religion to focus on faith.

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All the Pretty Horses

by Cormac McCarthy


Reviewed on Jul 7 2007

A great book, but not McCarthy's best, by a long shot.

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Blue Like Jazz

by Donald Miller


Reviewed on May 15 2007

A breath of fresh air for those disenchanted and frustrated with the institutionalization of Christianity in America today.

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The River Why

by David James Duncan


Reviewed on May 15 2007

One of the greatest modern books I've read. Enduring, timeless, and enchanting.

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How to Build Shaker Furniture

by Thos Moser


Reviewed on May 15 2007

Rather spartan on technical drawings, and photography is older and black and white, making it difficult to evaulate the pieces pictured.

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star

Who Moved My Cheese?

by Spencer Johnson


Reviewed on Feb 19 2007

In a previous job, we were required to watch an insipid cartoon based on this book as part of an orientation. Its difficult to express how entirely demoralizing the implication is that you are merely a mouse trapped in a maze, for whom the sole goal in life is "cheese." Gives new meaning to the phrase "rat race." One person nearly lost their job on the spot for standing up in the Q&A session afterwards, and asking, "What if I don't like cheese? What if I like salad instead?"

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The Famished Road

by Ben Okri


Reviewed on Jan 24 2007

Good, but perhaps a little too prone to wander into surrealism for some.

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Black Beauty Grows Up

by I. M. Richardson; Anna Black Beauty Sewell


Reviewed on Jan 17 2007

I must disagree -- maybe for an adult its on the average side, but, for a child, say 7-10 years old - one of the pre-requisites to great literature.

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The Historian

by Elizabeth Kostova


Reviewed on Jan 17 2007

Riding a bit on the coat tails of the Da Vinci Code and awfully similar in theme, but at least much better written with something approaching real-life dialogue.

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100 Years of Solitude

by Gabriel Garcia Marquez


Reviewed on Jan 8 2007

Unforgettable and larger-than-life, this is magical realism at its zenith.

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Blood Meridian, Or, the Evening Redness in the West

by Cormac McCarthy


Reviewed on Jan 4 2007

Both majestic and terrible, definitely one of the hallmark pieces of literature from the 20th century. You won't be disappointed!

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