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Delphinium

By DIETZSCH, Barbara Regina (1706-1783)

Ca. 2nd and 3rd quarters, 18th century. Watercolor with gouache and gold leaf on vellum 7 x 5 ¾ ", Framed: 18 x 15 ½ " The present composition captures with striking vividness a flower from the Delphinium genus of perennial flowering plants found throughout the Northern Hemisphere and on the high mountains of tropical Africa. Various delphiniums are cultivated as ornamental plants, for traditional and native plant gardens. The numerous hybrids and cultivars are primarily used as garden plants, providing height at the back of the summer border, in association with roses, lilies, and geraniums. The lush texture, deep blueness, and overall sheen of Dietzsch’s portrait of this flower gives the impression that the plant is suspended in time; its ephemeral, delicate life immortalized for eternity. The Dietzsches were an important family of painters, engravers, and musicians that flourished in Nuremberg during the eighteenth century. The patronage of Dr. Christoph Trew, the great botanist and bibliographer, made Nuremberg one of the foremost centers of botanical art in the world, and the Dietzsch family was one of the most noted of the era. Barbara Regina Dietzsch is particularly well known for her marvelous renderings of flowers and fruit in watercolor and gouache. Employed at the court of Nuremberg, she painted primarily in watercolor and gouache and produced extensively for engravers there. Her work was of such outstanding quality that it was used by Trew and the great flower painter Georg Ehret for a number of plates in the Hortus Nitidissimis(1750-86). Indeed, even at the time of its production, Dietzsch’s art was much sought after by collectors in both the Netherlands and England, and it is recorded that some of the best known painters of the time even accepted her works as a form of payment, signaling the type of celebrated reputation she was able to attain within her lifetime—a celebration that has only continued to grow ever since. Like most of her family's work, Barbara Regina Dietzsch's watercolors are often characterized by the use of a black or dark brown ground, and it is partly upon the basis of this that the current attribution has been based. Ehret also occasionally placed his bouquets on a dark background, but these are not nearly as successful as Dietzsch's in making the subject come to life. Various examples of her work can be found in the Broughton Collection at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, England and in each the dark ground is present. What separates the work of Barbara Regina from that of her other family members is the remarkable clarity of depiction and skill in rendering. With unbelievable mastery and stylistic power, Dietzsch overcame contemporary estimations of women's inferiority in the field of art, creating watercolors of distinctive splendor. Catalogued by Xueli Wang, Columbia University, BA; Courtauld Institute of Art, MA. You are warmly invited to visit our gallery at 1016 Madison Avenue in New York City to view this work whenever it might be convenient. It is our intention to have highly competitive prices. Your thoughts are welcome..

$30000.00

Matthiola Incana

By DIETZSCH, Barbara Regina ( 1706-1783)

Watercolor with gouache and gold leaf on vellum 7 x 5 ¾ ", Framed: 18 x 15 ½ " The present composition captures with striking vividness a flower from the Matthiola incana species. The genus Matthiola is named in honor of the Italian physician and botanist Pierandrea Mattioli (1500-1577). Matthiola incana, also known as stocks, is noted for its colorful, clove-scented flowers. A highly fragrant form of this flower was identified in the 1700s at the Brompton Park Nursery in London, giving rise to the common name of brompton stock which is still used today. From late spring into fall, these strongly fragrant flowers bloom in dense clusters in an array of colors including shades of pink, lavender, purple, white, yellow and red. Bloom time is shortened considerably in hot summer climates. The lush texture, vibrant colors, and overall sheen of Dietzsch’s portrait of this flower gives the impression that the plant is suspended in time; its ephemeral, delicate life immortalized for eternity. The Dietzsches were an important family of painters, engravers, and musicians that flourished in Nuremberg during the eighteenth century. The patronage of Dr. Christoph Trew, the great botanist and bibliographer, made Nuremberg one of the foremost centers of botanical art in the world, and the Dietzsch family was one of the most noted of the era. Barbara Regina Dietzsch is particularly well known for her marvelous renderings of flowers and fruit in watercolor and gouache. Employed at the court of Nuremberg, she painted primarily in watercolor and gouache and produced extensively for engravers there. Her work was of such outstanding quality that it was used by Trew and the great flower painter Georg Ehret for a number of plates in the Hortus Nitidissimis(1750-86). Indeed, even at the time of its production, Dietzsch’s art was much sought after by collectors in both the Netherlands and England, and it is recorded that some of the best known painters of the time even accepted her works as a form of payment, signaling the type of celebrated reputation she was able to attain within her lifetime—a celebration that has only continued to grow ever since. Like most of her family's work, Barbara Regina Dietzsch's watercolors are often characterized by the use of a black or dark brown ground, and it is partly upon the basis of this that the current attribution has been based. Ehret also occasionally placed his bouquets on a dark background, but these are not nearly as successful as Dietzsch's in making the subject come to life. Various examples of her work can be found in the Broughton Collection at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, England and in each the dark ground is present. What separates the work of Barbara Regina from that of her other family members is the remarkable clarity of depiction and skill in rendering. With unbelievable mastery and stylistic power, Dietzsch overcame contemporary estimations of women's inferiority in the field of art, creating watercolors of distinctive splendor. Catalogued by Xueli Wang, Columbia University, BA; Courtauld Institute of Art, MA. You are warmly invited to visit our gallery at 1016 Madison Avenue in New York City to view this work whenever it might be convenient. It is our intention to have highly competitive prices. Your thoughts are welcome..

$20000.00

Narcissus Poëticus

By PEIGNE, Madame (French, active 1770, died 1815)

Gouache on toned paper 31 ½" x 26 ½" Signed on lower left; title inscribed on bottom margin Madam Peigné was one of the only women artists working in France in the late 18th- and early 19th-century, a time when female artists were not allowed to draw or paint from nudes, create frescoes, or receive formal academic training, though they were allowed to engage with still life painting and natural history subject matter. Despite these restrictions, Madam Peigné was able to create artworks of exceptional grace, beauty, and liveliness. The present composition features a captivating portrait of Narcissus Poeticus, a flower often identified as the narcissus of ancient times, and associated with the Greek legend of Narcissus. Otherwise known as “pheasant's-eye daffodil” or “poet's narcissus,” this flower was also one of the first daffodils to be cultivated. Strongly fragrant, with a ring of petals in snow white and a short corona of faint yellow with distinct reddish edge, the narcissus grows from 8 to 16 inches tall, and is widely found in North America. Peigné’s portrayal brings out the simplicity and delicacy of the narcissus, as well as its luminosity and buoyancy. The four different flower heads show the bloom from every angle allowing the viewer to fully appreciate their delicacy. The nuanced tones of the variously green leaves are complemented by the toned color of the paper, while the texture of the petals is skillfully evoked. The sinuous leaves of the flower convey a sense of movement, and contribute to the overall sense of animation and ebullience. Catalogued by Xueli Wang, Columbia University, BA; Courtauld Institute of Art, MA. You are warmly invited to visit our gallery at 1016 Madison Avenue in New York City to view this work whenever it might be convenient. It is our intention to have highly competitive prices. Your thoughts are welcome..

$28000.00

Bouquet (Pink Flowers)

By DIETZSCH, Barbara Regina (1706-1783)

Ca. 2nd and 3rd quarters, 18th Watercolor with gouache and gold leaf on vellum 7 x 5 ¾ ", Framed: 18 x 15 ½ " The present composition captures with striking vividness a cluster of pink flowers. The lush texture, vibrant color, and overall sheen of Dietzsch’s portrait of this plant gives the impression that the flowers are suspended in time; their ephemeral, delicate life immortalized for eternity. The Dietzsches were an important family of painters, engravers, and musicians that flourished in Nuremberg during the eighteenth century. The patronage of Dr. Christoph Trew, the great botanist and bibliographer, made Nuremberg one of the foremost centers of botanical art in the world, and the Dietzsch family was one of the most noted of the era. Barbara Regina Dietzsch is particularly well known for her marvelous renderings of flowers and fruit in watercolor and gouache. Employed at the court of Nuremberg, she painted primarily in watercolor and gouache and produced extensively for engravers there. Her work was of such outstanding quality that it was used by Trew and the great flower painter Georg Ehret for a number of plates in the Hortus Nitidissimis(1750-86). Indeed, even at the time of its production, Dietzsch’s art was much sought after by collectors in both the Netherlands and England, and it is recorded that some of the best known painters of the time even accepted her works as a form of payment, signaling the type of celebrated reputation she was able to attain within her lifetime—a celebration that has only continued to grow ever since. Like most of her family's work, Barbara Regina Dietzsch's watercolors are often characterized by the use of a black or dark brown ground, and it is partly upon the basis of this that the current attribution has been based. Ehret also occasionally placed his bouquets on a dark background, but these are not nearly as successful as Dietzsch's in making the subject come to life. Various examples of her work can be found in the Broughton Collection at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, England and in each the dark ground is present. What separates the work of Barbara Regina from that of her other family members is the remarkable clarity of depiction and skill in rendering. With unbelievable mastery and stylistic power, Dietzsch overcame contemporary estimations of women's inferiority in the field of art, creating watercolors of distinctive splendor. Catalogued by Xueli Wang, Columbia University, BA; Courtauld Institute of Art, MA. You are warmly invited to visit our gallery at 1016 Madison Avenue in New York City to view this work whenever it might be convenient. It is our intention to have highly competitive prices. Your thoughts are welcome..

$25000.00

April Fool / Haemanthus Coccineus, Plate 39

By REDOUTE, Pierre-Joseph (1759-1840)

Paris: Chez L'auteur De L'imprimerie de Didot Jeune, 1802-1816 A fine stipple engraving with original hand color and full margins from the folio edition of “Les Liliacées” by Pierre-Joseph Redouté (1759 - 1840) 21 x 14 inches sheet. Fine stipple-engraved plate in colors. L’imprimerie de Didot Jeune. Paris, 1802 - 1816. Annotation with names in French and Latin on lower half; legend below identifying P.J. Redouté as painter and Langlois as engraver (minor unevenness along right and bottom edges, toning consistent with age). The present stipple engraving comes with full margins showing the page number in the upper right corner, a rare sight in existing Redouté works today. This engraving provides a true-to-life portraiture of the April Fool flower, also known as the Blood Flower, Blood Lily, or Paintbrush Lily. Its latin name Haemanthus Coccineus comes from the Greek terms haima (blood) and anthos (flower), and the latin word coccineus (red or scarlet). Its nickname “Paintbrush Lily” comes from the resemblance of its fine and numerous stamens to a shaving brush. This dazzling plant originates from Southern Africa, and can be commonly found in the winter rainfall regions of Southern Namibia, the Cape Peninsula, and the Keiskamma River. It is a resilient flower that is able to flourish in a variety of soils and altitudes, as well as survive heavy annual rainfall of up to 43 inches. This flower usually grows in the winter and spring, and goes dormant in the summer. The present composition shows a single blood flower floating gracefully in space, accompanied by a separate portrait of the towering leaves of this same plant. The lack of background or setting here allows the viewer to focus without distraction on the delicate complexity of the plant itself. The spectacular beauty of the flower is rendered with painstaking detail. We see resplendent golden anthers emerge from a circle of overlapping scarlet-red petals. The intricate leopard-spot markings along the flower’s stem are visible down to each individual spot. Redouté also breathes life into the large, fleshy leaves of this plant (some of which can grow to as tall as 20 inches and as wide as 6 inches), endowing their monumental, tongue-shaped bodies with freshness and vigor. The main life-size illustrations are accompanied by Redouté’s small drawings placed below, which show the plant’s individual anatomical parts and enable it to be identified with precision and cultivated to perfection. The unequalled botanical artist Pierre-Joseph Redouté occupies a central position in the development of European flower painting. Dubbed the “Raphael of flowers,” he produced over 2,100 published plates depicting more than 1,800 flower species over the course of his career, many of which had never been represented before. Redouté had, as pupils or patrons, five queens and empresses of France, from Marie-Antoinette to Empress Josephine and her successor, Marie Louise. Despite many changes of regime in a turbulent epoch, he managed to work without interruption, a testament to his enduring appeal as an artist. His work represents a uniquely harmonious blend of scientific precision and supremely delicate rendering that has never been surpassed. The eight-volumed “Les Liliacées” is perhaps Redouté’s most celebrated work, which he issued while under the patronage of the Empress Josephine, wife of Napoleon. This collection of 486 plates records the plants of the Lily family, and related flowers, that Josephine collected and cultivated in her magnificent gardens at Malmaison. Likely no more than 220 copies were produced (Brian Mathew, 8). The luminosity of stipple engraving, a technique perfected by Redouté, is particularly suited to the reproduction of botanical detail. The medium involved engraving a copper plate with a dense grid of dots that could be modulated to convey delicate gradations of color. The edges of the leaves and petals were dotted as well so as to achieve softness of form. Because the ink rested on the paper in miniscule dots, it did not obscure the “light” of the paper beneath the color. After this complex printing process was complete, the prints were finished by hand in watercolor, so as to conform to the exquisite models Redouté provided. Reference: Brian Mathew, “P.J. Redouté: Lilies and Related Flowers,” (London: 1981). Catalogued by Xueli Wang, Columbia University, BA; Courtauld Institute of Art, MA. You are warmly invited to visit our gallery at 1016 Madison Avenue in New York City to view this work whenever it might be convenient. .

$1800.00

North’s Neomarica/Moraea Vaginata, Plate 56

By REDOUTE, Pierre Joseph (1759-1840)

Paris: Chez L'auteur De L'imprimerie de Didot Jeune, 1802-1816 from the folio edition of “Les Liliacées” by Pierre-Joseph Redouté (1759 - 1840) 21 x 14 inches sheet. Fine stipple-engraved plate in colors. L’imprimerie de Didot Jeune. Paris, 1802 - 1816. Annotation with names in Latin and French on lower half; legend below identifying Redouté as painter and de Gouy as engraver (tiny tears along left edge, toning consistent with age). The unequalled botanical artist Pierre-Joseph Redouté occupies a central position in the development of European flower painting. Dubbed the “Raphael of flowers,” he produced over 2,100 published plates depicting more than 1,800 flower species over the course of his career, many of which had never been represented before. Redouté had, as pupils or patrons, five queens and empresses of France, from Marie-Antoinette to Empress Josephine and her successor, Marie Louise. Despite many changes of regime in a turbulent epoch, he managed to work without interruption, a testament to his enduring appeal as an artist. His work represents a uniquely harmonious blend of scientific precision and supremely delicate rendering that has never been surpassed. The eight-volumed “Les Liliacées” is perhaps Redouté’s most celebrated work, which he issued while under the patronage of the Empress Josephine, wife of Napoleon. This collection of 486 plates records the plants of the Lily family, and related flowers, that Josephine collected and cultivated in her magnificent gardens at Malmaison. Likely no more than 220 copies were produced (Brian Mathew, 8). The luminosity of stipple engraving, a technique perfected by Redouté, is particularly suited to the reproduction of botanical detail. The medium involved engraving a copper plate with a dense grid of dots that could be modulated to convey delicate gradations of color. The edges of the leaves and petals were dotted as well so as to achieve softness of form. Because the ink rested on the paper in miniscule dots, it did not obscure the “light” of the paper beneath the color. After this complex printing process was complete, the prints were finished by hand in watercolor, so as to conform to the exquisite models Redouté provided. The present stipple engraving comes with full margins, a rare sight in existing Redoute works today. This engraving provides a true-to-life portraiture of the gorgeous North’s Neomarica, otherwise known as Walking Iris, North’s false flag, or Apostle Plant. This breathtaking flower is an unusual member of the Iris family. Its name, Neomarica, comes from the Greek words for new (neo) and the Roman word for nymph (Marica). It is a clumping perennial that originates from Brazil, and can be identified by its striking multi-colored petals and its long, pointed leaves. Its flowers bloom off and on in spring, summer, and fall, and thrive in dappled or bright shade. When growing, the weight of these flowers causes the plant’s stem to bend to the soil, where the flowers take root and causes a new plant to grow. This fascinating method of self-propagation gives the illusion that the plant “walks around” the garden as it spreads, thereby earning it its other name, Walking Iris. The Walking Iris in the present composition floats elegantly in space, without background or setting. The regal simplicity of the composition allows the viewer to focus without distraction on the delicate complexity of the plant itself. The exotic beauty of the plant is marvelously rendered, with its finely detailed white, yellow, and blue petals that call to mind a cross between an orchid and an iris, and its tall and sword-shaped leaves. The main life-size illustration is accompanied by Redouté’s small anatomical drawing of the flower’s pistil placed below, which enables the flower to be identified with precision and cultivated to perfection. Reference: Brian Mathew, “P.J. Redouté: Lilies and Related Flowers,” (London: 1981). Catalogued by Xueli Wang, Columbia University, BA; Courtauld Institute of Art, MA. You are warmly invited to visit our gallery at 1016 Madison Avenue in New York City to view this work whenever it might be convenient. .

$2500.00

Tiger Lily/Lilium Tigrinum, Plate 475

By REDOUTE, Pierre-Joseph (1759-1840)

Paris: Chez L'auteur De L'imprimerie de Didot Jeune, 1802-1816 A fine stipple engraving with original hand color and full margins from the folio edition of “Les Liliacées” by Pierre-Joseph Redouté (1759 - 1840) 21 x 14 inches sheet. Fine stipple-engraved plate in colors. L’imprimerie de Didot Jeune. Paris, 1802 - 1816. Annotation with names in French and Latin on lower half; legend below identifying P.J. Redouté as painter and Lemaire as engraver (tiny cuts on right edge, minor spotting near bottom). The present stipple engraving comes with full margins showing the page number in the upper right corner, a rare sight in existing Redouté works today. This engraving provides a true-to-life portraiture of the exquisite Tiger Lily, whose name actually refers to the jaguar, and indicates the flower’s resemblance to the animal’s golden orange color and black spots. This beloved lily species originates from East Asia, where it was grown for at least a thousand years, partly as a food, before being introduced to Europe in 1804, when bulbs were transported to Kew from Canton (Mathew, 44). The Tiger Lily also has rich literary resonance, having been personified in J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan and Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland. In their whimsical fantasy tales, both writers endow the Tiger Lily with the impressive human characteristics of haughtiness, passion, and glamour. The Tiger Lily plant in the present composition floats elegantly in space, without background or setting, thereby allowing the viewer to focus without distraction on the delicate complexity of the plant itself. The exotic beauty of the Tiger Lily is marvelously rendered. We see its resplendent petals curling outward like ribbons, and dotted with an intricate jaguar pattern visible down to each individual black spot. There are also the stout, dark purplish stem; the crisp, curving leaves; and the glinting black-purple axillary bulbils that cover the stem. The main life-size illustration is accompanied by Redouté’s small anatomical drawing of the stamen, placed below. This enables the flower to be identified with precision and cultivated to perfection. The unequalled botanical artist Pierre-Joseph Redouté occupies a central position in the development of European flower painting. Dubbed the “Raphael of flowers,” he produced over 2,100 published plates depicting more than 1,800 flower species over the course of his career, many of which had never been represented before. Redouté had, as pupils or patrons, five queens and empresses of France, from Marie-Antoinette to Empress Josephine and her successor, Marie Louise. Despite many changes of regime in a turbulent epoch, he managed to work without interruption, a testament to his enduring appeal as an artist. His work represents a uniquely harmonious blend of scientific precision and supremely delicate rendering that has never been surpassed. The eight-volumed “Les Liliacées” is perhaps Redouté’s most celebrated work, which he issued while under the patronage of the Empress Josephine, wife of Napoleon. This collection of 486 plates records the plants of the Lily family, and related flowers, that Josephine collected and cultivated in her magnificent gardens at Malmaison. Likely no more than 220 copies were produced (Brian Mathew, 8). The luminosity of stipple engraving, a technique perfected by Redouté, is particularly suited to the reproduction of botanical detail. The medium involved engraving a copper plate with a dense grid of dots that could be modulated to convey delicate gradations of color. The edges of the leaves and petals were dotted as well so as to achieve softness of form. Because the ink rested on the paper in miniscule dots, it did not obscure the “light” of the paper beneath the color. After this complex printing process was complete, the prints were finished by hand in watercolor, so as to conform to the exquisite models Redouté provided. Reference: Brian Mathew, “P.J. Redouté: Lilies and Related Flowers,” (London: 1981). Catalogued by Xueli Wang, Columbia University, BA; Courtauld Institute of Art, MA. You are warmly invited to visit our gallery at 1016 Madison Avenue in New York City to view this work whenever it might be convenient. .

$3500.00

Dwarf Iris/Iris Lutescens, Plate 263

By REDOUTE, Pierre-Joseph (1759-1840)

Paris: Chez L'auteur De L'imprimerie de Didot Jeune, 1802-1816 A fine stipple engraving with original hand color and full margins showing full printed surface From the folio edition of “Les Liliacées” by Pierre-Joseph Redouté (1759 - 1840) 21 x 14 inches sheet. Fine stipple-engraved plate in colors. L’imprimerie de Didot Jeune. Paris, 1802 - 1816. Annotation with names in Latin and French on lower half; legend below identifying Redouté as painter and de Gouy as engraver (tiny tears along right edge, toning consistent with age). The unequalled botanical artist Pierre-Joseph Redouté occupies a central position in the development of European flower painting. Dubbed the “Raphael of flowers,” he produced over 2,100 published plates depicting more than 1,800 flower species over the course of his career, many of which had never been represented before. Redouté had, as pupils or patrons, five queens and empresses of France, from Marie-Antoinette to Empress Josephine and her successor, Marie Louise. Despite many changes of regime in a turbulent epoch, he managed to work without interruption, a testament to his enduring appeal as an artist. His work represents a uniquely harmonious blend of scientific precision and supremely delicate rendering that has never been surpassed. The eight-volumed “Les Liliacées” is perhaps Redouté’s most celebrated work, which he issued while under the patronage of the Empress Josephine, wife of Napoleon. This collection of 486 plates records the plants of the Lily family, and related flowers, that Josephine collected and cultivated in her magnificent gardens at Malmaison. Likely no more than 220 copies were produced (Brian Mathew, 8). The luminosity of stipple engraving, a technique perfected by Redouté, is particularly suited to the reproduction of botanical detail. The medium involved engraving a copper plate with a dense grid of dots that could be modulated to convey delicate gradations of color. The edges of the leaves and petals were dotted as well so as to achieve softness of form. Because the ink rested on the paper in miniscule dots, it did not obscure the “light” of the paper beneath the color. After this complex printing process was complete, the prints were finished by hand in watercolor, so as to conform to the exquisite models Redouté provided. The present stipple engraving comes with full margins showing the page number in the upper right corner, a rare sight that is often cut out of existing Redoute works today. This engraving provides a true-to-life portraiture of the Dwarf Iris or Dwarf Bearded Iris, and so named because it resembles a miniature iris. This plant can be easily identified by its graceful alternation between large spreading or pendent fall petals and smaller, standard petals. It flourishes in temperate climates, blooming yellow or violet flowers in the spring and becoming dormant in the summer. It is frequently cultivated by gardeners as an ornamental flower. The Dwarf Iris in the present composition floats elegantly in space, without background or setting. The regal simplicity of the composition allows the viewer to focus without distraction on the beauty and delicate complexity of the plant itself. The dynamic structure of the flower is meticulously rendered, with its finely detailed yellow flowers, “bearded” pendent petals, fresh roots, and erect and lustrous leaves. The main life-size illustration is accompanied by Redouté’s small drawing of the flower’s pistil placed below, which records the flower’s individual anatomical feature and allows for it to be identified with precision and cultivated to perfection. Reference: Brian Mathew, “P.J. Redouté: Lilies and Related Flowers,” (London: 1981). Catalogued by Xueli Wang, Columbia University, BA; Courtauld Institute of Art, MA. You are warmly invited to visit our gallery at 1016 Madison Avenue in New York City to view this work whenever it might be convenient. .

$1500.00

Tuberose/Polianthahes Tuberosa, Plate 147

By REDOUTE, Pierre-Joseph (1759-1840)

Paris: Chez L'auteur De L'imprimerie de Didot Jeune, 1802-1816 A fine stipple engraving with original hand color and full margins “Tuberose/Polianthahes Tuberosa, Plate 147,” from the folio edition of “Les Liliacées” by Pierre-Joseph Redouté (1759 - 1840) 21 x 14 inches sheet. Fine stipple-engraved plate in colors. L’imprimerie de Didot Jeune. Paris, 1802 - 1816. Annotation with names in French on lower half; legend below identifying P.J. Redouté as painter and Langlois as engraver (tiny tears along right and lower left edge, toning consistent with age). The present stipple engraving comes with full margins, a rare sight in existing Redoute works today. This engraving provides a true-to-life portraiture of the Tuberose, a plant beloved for the intensely rich and sultry fragrance of its flowers. The origin of this night-blooming plant can be traced to a few corners of the world. Most believe it is from Mexico, and arose from its wild form, Polianthes gracilis. Scholar Brian Mathew proposes that this flower may have been introduced by the Spanish into Mexico during their early explorations of the region. Other accounts indicate that the Tuberose may have been imported into Europe from the East, where it had been grown for centuries for its alluring scent (Mathew, 114). The present composition shows a single-form tuberose floating elegantly in space, without background or setting. The regal simplicity of the composition allows the viewer to focus without distraction on the delicate complexity of the plant itself. The gorgeous details of this plant are meticulously rendered. The main life-size illustration is accompanied by Redouté’s small anatomical drawing placed below, which shows the flower’s pistil as well as the flower opened out to show stamens. These small drawings enable the flower to be identified with precision and cultivated to perfection. The unequalled botanical artist Pierre-Joseph Redouté occupies a central position in the development of European flower painting. Dubbed the “Raphael of flowers,” he produced over 2,100 published plates depicting more than 1,800 flower species over the course of his career, many of which had never been represented before. Redouté had, as pupils or patrons, five queens and empresses of France, from Marie-Antoinette to Empress Josephine and her successor, Marie Louise. Despite many changes of regime in a turbulent epoch, he managed to work without interruption, a testament to his enduring appeal as an artist. His work represents a uniquely harmonious blend of scientific precision and supremely delicate rendering that has never been surpassed. The eight-volumed “Les Liliacées” is perhaps Redouté’s most celebrated work, which he issued while under the patronage of the Empress Josephine, wife of Napoleon. This collection of 486 plates records the plants of the Lily family, and related flowers, that Josephine collected and cultivated in her magnificent gardens at Malmaison. Likely no more than 220 copies were produced (Brian Mathew, 8). The luminosity of stipple engraving, a technique perfected by Redouté, is particularly suited to the reproduction of botanical detail. The medium involved engraving a copper plate with a dense grid of dots that could be modulated to convey delicate gradations of color. The edges of the leaves and petals were dotted as well so as to achieve softness of form. Because the ink rested on the paper in miniscule dots, it did not obscure the “light” of the paper beneath the color. After this complex printing process was complete, the prints were finished by hand in watercolor, so as to conform to the exquisite models Redouté provided. Reference: Brian Mathew, “P.J. Redouté: Lilies and Related Flowers,” (London: 1981). Catalogued by Xueli Wang, Columbia University, BA; Courtauld Institute of Art, MA. You are warmly invited to visit our gallery at 1016 Madison Avenue in New York City to view this work whenever it might be convenient. .

$800.00

Flabby Leaved Canna/Canna Flaccida, Plate 107

By REDOUTE, Pierre-Joseph (1759-1840)

Paris: Chez L'auteur, De l'imprimerie de Didot Jeune, 1802 - 1816 “Flabby Leaved Canna/ Canna Flaccida, Plate 107” from the folio edition of “Les Liliacées” by Pierre-Joseph Redouté (1759 - 1840) 21 x 14 inches sheet, 31 x 24 inches framed. Fine stipple-engraved plate in colors. L’imprimerie de Didot Jeune. Paris, 1802 - 1816. Annotation with names in French on lower half; legend below identifying P.J. Redouté as painter and Phillippeaux as engraver (tiny tears along bottom edge, toning consistent with age). The unequalled botanical artist Pierre-Joseph Redouté occupies a central position in the development of European flower painting. Dubbed the “Raphael of flowers,” he produced over 2,100 published plates depicting more than 1,800 flower species over the course of his career, many of which had never been represented before. Redouté had, as pupils or patrons, five queens and empresses of France, from Marie-Antoinette to Empress Josephine and her successor, Marie Louise. Despite many changes of regime in a turbulent epoch, he managed to work without interruption, a testament to his enduring appeal as an artist. His work represents a uniquely harmonious blend of scientific precision and supremely delicate rendering that has never been surpassed. “Les Liliacées” is perhaps Redouté’s most celebrated volume, which he issued while under the patronage of the Empress Josephine, wife of Napoleon. This volume records the plants of the Lily family, and related flowers, that Josephine collected and cultivated in her magnificent gardens at Malmaison. The luminosity of stipple engraving, a technique perfected by Redouté, is particularly suited to the reproduction of botanical detail. The medium involved engraving a copper plate with a dense grid of dots that could be modulated to convey delicate gradations of color. The edges of the leaves and petals were dotted as well so as to achieve softness of form. Because the ink rested on the paper in miniscule dots, it did not obscure the “light” of the paper beneath the color. After this complex printing process was complete, the prints were finished by hand in watercolor, so as to conform to the exquisite models Redouté provided. The present stipple engraving provides a true-to-life portraiture of a Flabby Leaved Canna flower or Balisier Flasque. Its other names include Golden Canna and Bandana of the Everglades. This blooming, showy, native aquatic plant originates from the South-eastern and South-central wetlands of America, from Texas to South Carolina. It flourishes at the edges of marshes, ponds, and lakes, and is easily identifiable by its clusters of elegant, silky yellow flowers. This plant was first described by the early American explorer William Bertram, who found these flowers growing along the coast of Georgia. The seeds were carried along the currents of the rivers and became easily rooted along shorelines. They were then introduced to England in 1788 and today can be found in diverse parts of the world, from India and the Philippines to Mexico, Panama, and Brazil. In this composition, the Golden Canna floats gracefully in space, without background or setting. The regal simplicity of the composition allows the viewer to focus without distraction on the beauty and delicate complexity of the plant itself. The various parts of the flower are on full display, including the soft and supple petals, tender stem, and succulent, oblong leaves. The main life-size illustration is accompanied by Redouté’s small drawing placed below, which record the flower’s individual anatomical features. These small drawings enables the flower to be identified with precision and cultivated to perfection. Catalogued by Xueli Wang, Columbia University, BA; Courtauld Institute of Art, MA. You are warmly invited to visit our gallery at 1016 Madison Avenue in New York City to view this work whenever it might be convenient. .

$4000.00

Bird-of-Paradise/Strelizia Reginae, Plate 78

By REDOUTE, Pierre Joseph (1759-1840)

Paris: Chez L'auteur De L'imprimerie de Didot Jeune, 1802-1816 A fine stipple engraving with original hand color “Bird-of-Paradise/Strelizia Reginae, Plate 78,” from the folio edition of “Les Liliacées” by Pierre-Joseph Redouté (1759 - 1840) 21 x 14 inches sheet, 31 x 24 inches framed. Fine stipple-engraved plate in colors. L’imprimerie de Didot Jeune. Paris, 1802 - 1816. Annotation with names in French on lower half; legend below identifying P.J. Redouté as painter and Phillippeaux as engraver (tiny tears on left margin, toning consistent with age). The unequalled botanical artist Pierre-Joseph Redouté occupies a central position in the development of European flower painting. Dubbed the “Raphael of flowers,” he produced over 2,100 published plates depicting more than 1,800 flower species over the course of his career, many of which had never been represented before. Redouté had, as pupils or patrons, five queens and empresses of France, from Marie-Antoinette to Empress Josephine and her successor, Marie Louise. Despite many changes of regime in a turbulent epoch, he managed to work without interruption, a testament to his enduring appeal as an artist. His work represents a uniquely harmonious blend of scientific precision and supremely delicate rendering that has never been surpassed. “Les Liliacées” is perhaps Redouté’s most celebrated volume, which he issued while under the patronage of the Empress Josephine, wife of Napoleon. This volume records the plants of the Lily family, and related flowers, that Josephine collected and cultivated in her magnificent gardens at Malmaison. The luminosity of stipple engraving, a technique perfected by Redouté, is particularly suited to the reproduction of botanical detail. The medium involved engraving a copper plate with a dense grid of dots that could be modulated to convey delicate gradations of color. The edges of the leaves and petals were dotted as well so as to achieve softness of form. Because the ink rested on the paper in miniscule dots, it did not obscure the “light” of the paper beneath the color. After this complex printing process was complete, the prints were finished by hand in watercolor, so as to conform to the exquisite models Redouté provided. The present stipple engraving provides a true-to-life portraiture of a Bird of Paradise flower, so named because the exquisite shape and intense colors of its petals resemble the magnificent feathers of birds-of-paradise. This stunning and scarce plant was first introduced to Britain from its native South Africa in the late 18th century, when its flowers caused a great sensation at Kew Gardens. It acquired its Latin name, Strelitzia, from Sir Joseph Banks, who named it in honor of Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, who in 1761 became Queen to George III (Mathew, 236). In this composition, the Strelitzia floats gracefully in space, without background or setting. The regal simplicity of the composition allows the viewer to focus without distraction on the beauty and delicate complexity of the plant itself. The exceptional structure of the flower is on full display, with its outer three fiery orange segments equally parted, and the inner three indigo blue segments peaking through. The whole inflorescence is enclosed within a large tubular beak-like bract--a feature that gave Strelitzia its third, vernacular name--Crane Flower (Mathew, 236). The main life-size illustration is accompanied by Redouté’s small drawing placed below, which record the flower’s individual anatomical features, including the pistil and stamens, the bract, and the flower with bracts removed (Mathew, 236). These small drawings enable each flower to be identified with precision and cultivated to perfection. Reference: Brian Mathew, “P.J. Redouté: Lilies and Related Flowers,” (London: 1981). Catalogued by Xueli Wang, Columbia University, BA; Courtauld Institute of Art, MA. You are warmly invited to visit our gallery at 1016 Madison Avenue in New York City to view this work whenever it might be convenient. .

$12000.00

Recueil des Vegetaux Utiles en Medecine.

By LINNAEUS, Carolus (1707-1778).

Late 18th-early 19th-century. LINNAEUS, Carolus (1707-1778). Recueil des Vegetaux Utiles en Medecine. Late 18th-early 19th-century. Folio (14 2/8 x 9 2/8 inches). 170 pages of manuscript text, including tables and index listing 475 different specimens. 223 numbered pages of original botanical watercolours, many illustrating more than one specimen on paper watermarked with a heart containing the initials "RG" (7 pages blank, and many misbound). Late 19th-century half French morocco, title lettered in gilt on the spine (end-papers renewed, extremities scuffed). A FINE AND APPARENTLY ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT, following the order of, describing and illustrating the majority of the plants of Carolus Linnaeus' Materia Medica, Liber I. de Plantis, first published in Stockholm in 1749. Quite possibly by a member of the famous French Lestiboudois family of botanists (Jean-Baptiste, 1715-1804; François Joseph, 1759 – 1815; and Gaspard Thémistocle 1797–1876). Linnaeus' Materia medica of 1749 contains the Linnaean names of 535 medicinal plants, several of which were for the first time reduced to their proper genera and species. The current work represents an original attempt to classify herbs with known medicinal properties according to the Linnaean classification system. The plants listed are for the most part common in Western Europe, though some are found in Africa. Each plant has a note with a brief history of each plant, with references to its use in antiquity, and its Latin, French and occasionally German name..

$125000.00

A Magnificent Album of Original Watercolours of Brazilian Flowers

By BRAZILIAN FLORA.

1800-1825. BRAZILIAN FLORA. A Magnificent Album of Original Watercolours of Brazilian Flowers. 1800-1825. Folio (22 4/8 x 18 inches). 65 superb original watercolours, including two unfinished, of flowers native to Brazil, com­prising 40 drawn on the leaves of the album (22 4/8 x 17 inches) watermarked Whatman 1814, the re­maining 25 on separate sheets loosely inserted, including 10 drawings ca 19 x 14 inches and 15 drawings ca 10 x 8 inches, on paper watermarked 1794 - 1809, most with contemporary Latin or French identification in ink or pencil (some spotting and browning). Contemporary diced russia (remains of gilt spine with part of label reading "Flore Bresilienne," very worn, upper cover detached). Provenance: with the engraved armorial bookplate of Joaquim de Sousa-Leao, first Baron and Viscount of Campo Alegre (fl 1867 - 1900), owner of substantial sugar mills in Pernambuco, on the front paste-down; with Sotheby's, November 21st, 1985, lot 48 A very attractive set of drawings, most certainly predating the monumental work on the fora of Brazil by Martius and Endlicher: "Flora brasiliensis sive enumeratio plantarum in Brasilia hactenus detectarum...", published between 1840 and 1906, comprising 130 fascicles with 3811 plates. The only clue as to the identity of the artist is a pencilled signature "Schonfeld" on drawing number 35. A note loosely inserted by a descendant of Sousa-Leao records a Dutch provenance for the volume and suggests that the drawings were made by a Dutch artist under the auspices of Baron van Mollerus and J. Crommelin, Dutch diplomats at the Brazilian court from 1816 to 1821. The species illustrated in­clude heliconia, tea, coffee, mimosa, passiflora, caladina, bignonia, bromelia, begonia, heliotrope, ru-ellia, impomea, commelina, hemerocallis, hamellia, cassia, amaryllus, hibiscus, globba, canna, pontederia, mollia, wittelsbachia, alstromeria, epidendrum, iris, sobelia, cactus, bougainvillier, etc. Catalogued by Kate Hunter .

$250000.00

Icones Plantarum sponte nascentium in regnis Daniae et Norvegiae, in ducatibus Slesvici et Holsatiae, et in comitatibus Oldenburgi et Delmenhorstiae: Ad illustrandum opus de iisdem Plantis, Regio jussu exarandum, Florae Danicae...

By OEDER, Georg Christian (1728-1791).

Hafniae [Copenhagen]: Claudius Philbertus and Mart. Halligeri, 1766, 1770, and 1777. 4 volumes. Folio, (14 7/8 x 9 5/8 inches). Letterpress title pages printed in red and black, sectional titles (occasional browning throughout). 699 (of 720) hand-colored botanical plates, some folding (14 plates in volume IV loose with ragged trimming to left margins, small tear to lower margin of Plate 250, small hole to Plate 597 not affecting image, and deep crease to Plate 654 not affecting image). Contemporary full brown calf, boards decoratively ruled in gilt with gilt cornerpieces, spines elaborately tooled in gilt in compartments with six raised bands, red and green gilt morocco lettering labels, gilt board edges, marbled endpapers (somewhat worn and soiled, with most joints starting, volume IV joints cracked). Provenance: With the early 20th-century bookplates of the Estate of Nanhoron in North Wales, with its Welsh motto "Duw A Diwedd Da" ("God and a Good End"). Heritage Auctions sale 6148, November 2015, lot 45202. ONE OF THE "FINEST NATIONAL FLORAS EVER COMPILED" (Blunt and Stearn) First edition of the first 12 fascicles (of an eventual 51 fascicles with 3,240 plates). With 699 VIBRANTLY hand-colored botanical plates. This copy without plates 551, 555, 574, 584, 585, 602, 603, 605, 610, 611, 617, 618, 633, 634, 643, 661, 665, 668, 672, 683, and 695. Oeder was a German-Danish botanist, medical doctor, economist and social reformer, and the first director of the Danish Botanical Garden. As part of his job at the Botanical Garden he initiated this ambitious European botanical work, which was published over a 125-year period. It covers, in great detail, the plants of Norway, Greenland, Iceland, the Faroe Islands, portions of Northern Germany, and some Swedish flora. "The value of the work was in the accuracy and beauty of the plates made under his [Oeder's] supervision by Martin and Michael Rösssler and later, under the supervision of the Danish editors, by Christian F. Mueller (1748-1814) and Johann Theodor Bayer (1782-1873). The Rösslers together contributed some 600 plates, J.T. Bayer some 1,500 plates. Their figures unite great artistic excellence with utmost scientific exactness, so that they belong to the best of their kind" (Stearn, The Flora Danica: Its History and Illustrations). Great Flower Books, pp. 69-70. Dunthorne 218. Nissen BBI, 2249. Stafleu & Cowan 7001 & 7008..

$18000.00

The Trees of Great Britain and Ireland.

By ELWES, John Henry (1846-1922) and Augustine HENRY.

Edinburgh: Privately Printed, 1906–1913 ELWES, John Henry (1846-1922) and Augustine HENRY. The Trees of Great Britain and Ireland. Edinburgh: Privately Printed, 1906–1913 15 original parts in 7 volumes, 4to (320 x 260mm.), 5 coloured lithographed frontispieces, photogravure frontispiece portrait in volume 7, 413 plates and diagrams (minor foxing to some titles). Original printed wrappers and cloth-backed printed portfolios with ties (one upper cover with small abrasion). First edition, RARE in the original parts. "The most important work of Elwes’s life was begun in 1903 when, with his friend Augustine Henry, he undertook the production of Trees of Great Britain and Ireland. Henry wrote the strictly botanical parts and Elwes contributed sections on the distribution, history, and cultivation of species, drawing on his knowledge of an immense number of species in their native habitat" (DNB). Elwes, a traveller, collector, and particularly as a plantsman. "He knew what to collect, was determined in his travels to find it, was highly observant in describing the geographical distribution of what he found, and was particularly skilled in propagating specimens he brought back" (Balfour and Baigent). "He devoted his life to natural history and travel. His original interest was in ornithology and it was in the Proceedings of the Zoological Society (1873) that his paper on 'The geographical distribution of Asiatic birds' was published. This was the result of a visit in 1871 to Sikkim and, illegally, to Tibet, and was important in establishing that the Himalayan region was part of the same biogeographical region as China. Elwes attributed his election in 1897 to the Royal Society to this paper" (DNB)..

$7500.00

Collection des Orchidées les plus remarquables de l'archipel Indien et du Japon.

By BLUME, Karl Ludwig (1796-1862).

Amsterdam: C.G. Sulpke, 1858-[1859]. BLUME, Karl Ludwig (1796-1862). Collection des Orchidées les plus remarquables de l'archipel Indien et du Japon. Amsterdam: C.G. Sulpke, 1858-[1859]. Folio (17 2/8 x 11 inches). Half-title and letterpress title-page. Additional hand-colored lithographed title-page and 70 lithographed plates, including 56 hand-colored and one double-page as issued, by G. Severeyns after T.Bik, Blume, Gordon, Latour, van Raalten and A.J. Wendel (some minor spotting and offsetting). Later half green morocco, gilt, with the binder's ticket of W.S. Hiltz of New York on the front paste-down. Provenance: Presented to the Pana Public Library by the W.E. Hayward Estate, label on the front paste-down. First edition, separate issue. A very attractive work on the orchids of the Malay Archipelago. This work was also issued simultaneously, with a Latin title, as a supplement to the author's Flora Javae. spent his professional life working in the Dutch East Indies and in the Netherlands, where he was Director of the Rijksherbarium (state herbarium) at Leiden. He carried out extensive studies of the flora of southern Asia, particularly in Java, then a colony of the Netherlands. From 1823 to 1826 Blume was Deputy Director of Agriculture at the botanic garden in Bogor (Buitenzorg) in Java. Great Flower Books p. 50; Nissen BBI 175; Stafleu & Cowan TL2 569..

$6500.00

Selectarum Stirpium Americanarum Historia...

By JACQUIN, Nikolaus Joseph, Baron von (1727-1817).

Vienna: Joseph Kurtböck for Kraus, 1763. Folio, (14 ? x 9 ? inches). Half-title, fine engraved allegorical frontispiece title page, vignette title page, Dedication, head and tail pieces (first blanks creased, some spotting). Fine folding engraved plate, 183 full-page engravings (lower corner of plate 44 torn away not affecting image, plates 82-83 and 111-118 browned). Near contemporary half tan calf, drab boards, the smooth spine in 6 gilt-ruled compartments, red morocco gilt lettering piece in one (a bit spotted, joints and extremities rubbed, some loss at corners). Provenance: Armorial bookplate to front pastedown ("Corn: Henr: Â Roy. Medicinae Doctor. Heritage Auctions, 2015, sale 6148, lot 45194. All but the first 12 plates with Latin names supplied in neat contemporary manuscript captions. FIRST EDITION OF JACQUIN'S FIRST MAJOR PUBLICATION AND HIS FIRST ILLUSTRATED WORK First edition. The 184 engraved plates after Jacquin "are excellent for the period" (Zimmer). "Jacquin's first major publication and his first illustrated work is based on his travels to the West Indies, 1755 and 1759" (De Belder). The additional engraved frontispiece-title shows two Native Americans holding up a banner containing a map of the West Indies, surrounded by Caribbean flowering plants and animals, and the title within a ribbon. The engraved title vignette depicts colonists arriving on a Caribbean island in a stormy sea. "In 1754, at the age of 27, a botanist born in Leiden, Nikolaus Joseph von Jacquin, made his first expedition to Central America. He was collecting seeds and plants for the Imperial gardens at Schonbrunn in Vienna. He took with him his Dutch head gardener and two Italian zoologists, and initially they concentrated on Grenada, Martinique, and Domingo, then under the control of the French. Von Jacquin sent the others home, in succession, laden with plants, but was himself captured by the British and kept prisoner for over a year. On his release, he remained in America, visiting Cuba and Jamaica to collect more plants before returning to Vienna in 1759. His books are among the finest of the period: 'Selectarum stirpium Americanarum historia' was first published in 1763" [as here] (Martyn Rix, "The Golden Age of Botanical Art," p. 114).Stafleu and Cowan call this book "an important complement to the 1760 'Enumeratio' and should always be consulted with it." "Ants damaged Jacquin's herbarium material, and he therefore supplemented his descriptions and notes on the new species with watercolor drawings" (Blunt and Stearn, p. 175), on which these engravings are based. Dunthorne 148. Hunt 579. Nissen BBI 979. Pritzel 4362. Sabin 35521. Stafleu & Cowan TL2 3243. .

$8500.00

Histoire des Chênes de l'Amérique...

By MICHAUX, André (1746-1802) - Pierre-Joseph REDOUTÉ (1759-1840).

Paris: l'Imprimerie de Crapelet, 1801. Folio (17 x 11 ¾ inches). Half-title. 36 fine engraved plates (marginal staining throughout, not affecting images). Contemporary full mottled calf, gilt fillets, the smooth spine in 6 gilt-ruled compartments (darkened by smoke, front hinge cracked). First edition. With 32 plates after Pierre-Joseph Redouté, the remainder by his brother Henri-Joseph Redouté (1766-1852). Michaux was a French botanist and explorer best known for his study of North American flora. The present volume, a study of North American oaks, represents "the results of Michaux's ten year sojourn in North America under the commission from the French government. His interest in North American trees was also to assess their importance as timber for the construction of naval vessels" (A Catalogue of Rédoutéana, 8). Michaux's "contribution to our knowledge of American plant life made for him a place of imperishable distinction as an American botanist" (Humphry, Makers of North American Botany, p. 177). Upon the death of his wife in 1770, Michaux was plunged into a deep depression. "The naturalist Louis-Guillaume Le Monnier (1717-1799) recommended a sustained study how foreign plants could be grown in France as a way to occupy the heartbroken Michaux. Michaux followed the advice. He conducted experiments on his farm and later became a student of the French naturalist Bernard de Jussieu (1699-1777) at Trianon. "Michaux subsequently studied at the Jardin du Roi, now known as Jardin des Plantes in Paris. During this period, he made the acquaintance of many eminent scientists of the day, including the Garden's long-time director Georges-Louis Leclerc, Comte du Buffon (1707-1788, APS 1768), whose assertion of American degeneracy provoked an extensive rebuttal by Thomas Jefferson in his Notes. Michaux also met the Garden's superintendent André Thouin (1746-1824), a friend and correspondent of Jefferson. "During his tenure at the Jardin du Roi, Michaux conducted extensive botanizing expedition throughout England, France and Spain. In 1782 he embarked on what would be a three-year journey through the Middle East to collect seeds and plants. His subsequent plan to explore the regions of Kashmir and Tibet was thwarted when the French government instead chose him to lead a scientific mission to the United States. The primary goal of the expedition was to search for plants that could be used in France, including new species of trees with which to replenish French forests. Prior to the journey Michaux was appointed King's Botanist. "In 1785 Michaux departed for North America with a gardener and his fifteen-year old son François André. Michaux founded a nursery at Hackensack, New Jersey, and the next year established a base in Charleston, South Carolina, from which he launched expeditions through various parts of Canada and the United States, from Nova Scotia to Spanish Florida, into the Ohio River Valley, Kentucky, and the prairies of Illinois. While his main objective was the collection of plants, he also introduced several plants into North America, including the mimosa or silk tree, the crape myrtle, the tea plant, and the camellia. Michaux kept journals in which he recorded in great detail the conditions of travel, the day's progress, and the plants he observed. "Michaux made contact with many leading Americans, including several prominent members of the American Philosophical Society. He met, for example, Benjamin Franklin, George Washington (1731-1799, APS 1780), John Bartram (1699-1777, APS 1768), and Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826, APS 1780). In 1792, Jefferson enlisted the Society to sponsor Michaux to "find the shortest & most convenient route of communication between the U.S. & the Pacific Ocean." However, political complications prematurely ended the mission when Jefferson learned that Michaux apparently intended to aid the French Foreign Minister Edmond-Charles Genet (1763-1834) in his efforts to arouse support for France. The nature of the secret political mission that Michaux supposedly agreed to undertake is still largely unclear; in any event, the controversy left Michaux without support to complete the expedition. Despite these difficulties and France's diminishing ability to finance his work, Michaux continued with his botanical studies and travels in the United States for three more years. He was not only an astute observer of plants but he also was particularly skilled in questioning local people about their produce and agricultural practices. Indeed, a contemporary noted that Michaux "was not a Frenchman, an Englishman, or a Canadian, but everywhere one found him closer to the natives than any other foreigner would have been." In 1796 Michaux embarked from North America for France. Four weeks after his departure, his ship was wrecked off the coast of Holland. His herbarium was damaged, and he lost some of his manuscripts, but he arrived safely in Paris in December 1796. To his disappointment, he learned that most of the thousands of trees he had sent from North America had not survived the turmoil of the revolution. Furthermore, he was unable to secure funding that would have allowed him to return to the United States, as he had hoped. Instead, for the next four years, Michaux focused on the cultivation of his collected plants and on preparing for publication his studies Oaks of North America (1801) and Flora of North America (1803). Finally, in 1800 Michaux set out for another expedition, this time to Australia. In 1801 he left ship at the island of Mauritius to study plant life there. In 1802 he went on to Madagascar where he died of a fever" (American Philosophical Society online). Great Flower Books p. 67. Nissen BBI 1358. Hunt, Redoutéana 8. Stafleu & Cowan 5957. Sabin 48692. Pritzel 6194..

$12500.00

Elementary Botanical Plates Illustrative of the Science of Botany.

By THORNTON, Robert John (1768-1837).

London: T. Bensley for the Publishers... and the Author, 1810. THORNTON, Robert John (1768-1837). Elementary Botanical Plates Illustrative of the Science of Botany. London: T. Bensley for the Publishers... and the Author, 1810. 2 volumes. Folio (18 4/8 x 13 inches). Volume I: Letterpress title-page. Engraved allegorical frontispiece by Ridley after Russell and Opie, engraved portrait and dedication, 26 further portraits of botanists, view of Litchfield Cathedral, and 74 engraved, mezzotint, and aquatint plates of botanical, scientific, and other subjects, 3 double-page or folding (few plates with light scattered foxing mostly confined to margins, one folding plate with stub-tear, one caption shaved). Volume II: "A New Illustration of the Sexual System of Linnaeus" (engraved title-page for volume I, misbound). London: for the Author by T. Bensley, 1799 [some watermarks 1805]. Engraved frontispiece by Bartolozzi and Landseer after Reinagle, engraved and letterpress titles, 89 engraved, mezzotint, and aquatint botanical plates, one folded, 2 double-page, followed by 2 further engraved title-pages by Vincent after Tomkins (general title ending "Including," second title beginning "The Genera"), letterpress dedication of "Part the Second", plate of classes by number of stamen, 3 plates of Analyses and 2 of "Explanations of Class" 1 (occasional light foxing, a few of the larger plates with captions or image shaved). Contemporary diced russia, each cover with an elaborate border in blind and gilt with multiple fillets, and repeated palmette, alpinia and fern tools, inner gilt dentelles with repeated mantlepiece-like devices, spines gilt in compartments lettered with "Thornton's Philosophy of Botany," volume numbers 3 and 4, and date "1810," and with symmetrical arrangements of floral and foliate tools in the others, all edges gilt (extremities a bit rubbed, spine edges more so, joints weak). Volumes III and IV of "The Philosophy of Botany", composed of parts of Thornton's "New Illustration of the Sexual System of Carolus von Linnaeus". Although the majority of the plates are botanic, two depict volcanic eruptions, and two show the harvesting and drinking of tea. Volumes one and two, Botanical Extracts or Philosophy of Botany, not present here, are mostly text with only two engraved plates of portraits and one or two botanical plates. The work is described as a "bibliographer's nightmare" by Stafleu & Cowan, with plate counts and states varying, but the present copies seem to be the later issue. Nissen BBI 1956; Stafleu & Cowan TL2 14284..

$18000.00

Groups of Flowers, Drawn and Accurately Coloured after Nature, with Full Directions for the Young Artist... WITH Six Birds, Accurately Drawn and Coloured after Nature… WITH Groups of Fruit, Accurately Drawn and Coloured after Nature...

By BROOKSHAW, George (1751-1823).

London: Thomas McLean, 1819. 3 volumes in one. Folio, (14 ½ x 10 ½ inches). 18 lithographed plates, each in two states: one colored, and one uncolored (some spotting). Contemporary full green morocco gilt (some wear at extremities). Second edition, first published in 1817. Initially a cabinet-maker specializing in painted furniture decorated with borders of flowers, Brookshaw appears to have abandoned this career at about the same time as he parted company with his wife and began living with Elizabeth Stanton, and under the assumed name of G. Brown (c.1794-1804). During this time he earned a living as a teacher of flower-painting and on the proceeds of his painting manuals like this one. "However, Brookshaw's most important published work, which indeed is of some botanical significance, was his finely illustrated treatise on fruit growing, the Pomona Britannica, issued in parts from 1804-when he first resumed his own name-and as a single folio volume in 1812" (Lucy Wood for DNB). .

$2300.00

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