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The Arctic Whaling Journals of William Scoresby the Younger. Three Volume Set. (Works issued by the Hakluyt Society, Third Series, vols. 12, 20, and 21.)
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The Arctic Whaling Journals of William Scoresby the Younger. Three Volume Set. (Works issued by the Hakluyt Society, Third Series, vols. 12, 20, and 21.)

By William Scoresby; C. Ian Jackson (Editor)

London: Hakluyt Society. Complete three volume set. Works issued by the Hakluyt Society, Third Series, vols. 12, 20, and 21. First Edition. Hardcover. Blue cloth over boards with gilt titles to spine and vignette of sailing ship Victoria on front board. As New books in Fine jackets. Jacket spines slightly sunned. Heavy item (6 lbs/2.7 kg); extra charge for Expedited, Express or International shipping. Volume I: The Voyages of 1811, 1812 and 1813. 2003. pp. lxi + 242. 9 monochrome illustrations, 5 maps. ISBN 0 904180 82 4 Volume II: The Voyages of 1814, 1815 and 1816. Appendix by George Huxtable. 2008. pp. xxxvii + 308. 8 monochrome illustrations, 3 maps. ISBN 978-0-904180-92-3. Volume III: The Voyages of 1817, 1818 and 1820. Appendix by Fred M. Walker. 2009. pp. xlii + 245, 2 plates, 3 maps, 6 line drawings. ISBN 978-0-904180-95-4. William Scoresby (1789-1857) made his first voyage with his father in the whaler Resolution at the age of eleven. Three years later he was formally apprenticed to his father and another three years saw him promoted to chief officer. On his twenty-first birthday, his father moved to another ship, relinquishing command of the Resolution to his son. Another ten years would see the publication in 1820 of Scoresby's two-volume An Account of the Arctic Regions, with a History and Description of the Northern Whale-Fishery, described as "the foundation stone of Arctic science for their scientific records and social and religious comment as well as detailed descriptions of navigation and whaling. The second volume of this set contains the unpublished accounts of Scoresby's three voyages in the Esk in 1814-16. These journals show the dangers inherent in annual sailings to the Greenland Sea in latitudes 78° to 80° N. The dangers were not merely those of besetment and damage by the ice where the bowhead whales had to be sought, nor of the persistent fog and frequent gales characteristic of these icy seas; human error and stupidity could be equally disastrous. For high drama, the 1816 journal is outstanding. When part of the Esk's hull was torn off by ice, various methods of repair were tried without success, including a drastic attempt to invert the empty ship in the sea at the ice-edge. Scoresby's ability to return the Esk safely to England seems as incredible now as it was to the crews of the other whaling ships who had eagerly anticipated plundering an abandoned ship in the Arctic. In addition to the journals and the editor's introduction, the second volume also contains a unique "second view" of the 1814 voyage: the journal kept by a young supernumerary, Charles Steward, and an appendix by George Huxtable, FRIN, on Scoresby's navigation methods. The third and final volume in this contains Scoresby's unpublished accounts of his three voyages of 1817, 1818 and 1820. During these years Scoresby's life changed profoundly. An unsuccessful hunt in 1817 led to several changes in partners. At the end of 1818 Scoresby moved to Liverpool, where he completed the writing of An Account of the Arctic Regions and watched the construction of his new ship, the Baffin. After his first summer ashore for many years in 1819, in 1820 he brought back to Liverpool a "full ship" of seventeen whales, despite being faced by mutineers in the crew who earlier had been involved in piracy in the Caribbean and, apparently, hoped to seize the Baffin "and convey her and her valuable cargo to a foreign country." In each of the journals, Scoresby wrote detailed descriptions of his landings: on Jan Mayen in 1817, western Spitsbergen in 1818, and the Langanes peninsula in northeast Iceland in 1820. The 1817 voyage, when Scoresby and others found the Greenland Sea relatively free of ice, involved him in the renewed British interest in arctic maritime exploration after the Napoleonic Wars. The Introduction to this volume contains a major reappraisal of Scoresby's role, especially in regard to his alleged mistreatment by John Barrow, Second Secretary of the Admiralty. The volume also contains an appendix by Fred M. Walker on the building of wooden whaleships such as the Baffin that were capable of routine ice navigation under sail as far north as 80° N.

$114.00

Tides of War: Endurance
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Tides of War: Endurance

By C. Alexander London

First Edition. Hard to Find! New York: Scholastic. Trade Paperback. 2015. First Edition. New. Reading level: 4th-7th graders. Ryan Keene and his sea lion, Hansel, are members of the US Navy's Marine Mammal Program, which sounds exciting but rarely involves any real danger. Mostly they are responsible for recovering lost objects from the ocean floor. That all changes they travel to the perilous Arctic, where polar bears stalk the ice and killer whales prowl the water. But even at the ends of the Earth, the most dangerous predator is man.

$6.95

National Geographic Magazine, August 1931 (Vol. 60, No. 2)
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National Geographic Magazine, August 1931 (Vol. 60, No. 2)

By Amos Burg; W. Robert Moore; Mabel Cook Cole; Harriet Chalmers Adams

Washington, DC: National Geographic Society. August 1931. Periodical. Near Fine. Tightly bound. Interior is free of marks, tears, folds, or creases. Unobtrusive pen and pencil marks on yellow portion of cover and spine (see photo). Minor creasing to spine. Contents: Amos Burg, "On Mackenzie's Trail to the Polar Sea"; W. Robert Moore, "Along the Old Mandarin Road of Indo-China"; "Under the French Tricolor in Indo-China"; Mabel Cook Cole, "The Island of Nias, at the Edge of the World"; Harriet Chalmers Adams, "Madrid Out-of-Doors."

$16.95

National Geographic Magazine, October 1935 (Vol. 68, No. 4)
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National Geographic Magazine, October 1935 (Vol. 68, No. 4)

By Gilbert Grosvenor, Richard Evelyn Byrd; Joseph F. Rock; Maynard Owen Williams

Washington, DC: National Geographic Society. October 1935. Periodical. Near Fine. Tightly bound. Interior is free of marks or tears, one page dog-eared. Cover shows light shelfwear. Light creasing to spine. Contents: Richard Evelyn Byrd, "Exploring the Ice Age in Antarctica" (76 pages, 72 illustrations, 2 maps); Joseph F. Rock, "Sungmas, Living Oracles of the Tibetan Church"; "Demon-Possessed Tibetans and their Incredible Feats" (12 color photos); Maynard Owen Williams, "By Motor Trail across French Indo-China" (48 pages, 32 illustrations); "The Tricolor Rules the Rainbow in French Indo-China" (27 color photos); "The Second Stratosphere Expedition."

$34.20

Four Travel Journals: The Americas, Antarctica and Africa, 1775-1874 (Works issued by the Hakluyt Society, Third Series, Volume 18)
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Four Travel Journals: The Americas, Antarctica and Africa, 1775-1874 (Works issued by the Hakluyt Society, Third Series, Volume 18)

By Juan Francisco de la Bodega y Quadra; Pringle Stokes; Joseph Henry Kay; Jacob Wainwright; Herbert K. Beals (Editor); R. J. Campbell (Editor); Ann Savours (Editor); Anita McConnell (Editor); Roy Bridges (Editor)

London: Ashgate for the Hakluyt Society. 2007. First Edition. Hardcover. Blue cloth over boards with gilt titles to spine and vignette of sailing ship Victoria on front board. As New book in Near Fine jacket. Jacket spine slightly faded. pp. x + 404, 50 plates, 8 maps. The annotated texts of four previously unpublished travel journals from the period 1775-1874, treated separately with biographical and historical introductions, bibliographies and indexes: 1. The 1775 Journal of Juan Francisco de la Bodega y Quadra compiled during a Spanish survey sent from Mexico to explore the north-west coast of America. Edited by Herbert K. Beals. Bodega's journal records the voyage's travails, hardships, discoveries, and eventual return. His small schooner, Sonora, was not designed for open-ocean voyaging; a landing party was attacked and killed; midway into the voyage the Sonora became separated from her flagship; and later she was nearly capsized by a massive wave. 2. The 1827 Journal of HMS Beagle Commander Pringle Stokes in the Strait of Magellan. Edited by R. J. Campbell. This is an account of a detached operation, in very difficult weather conditions, in the western part of the strait. The introdution includes remarks on the hydrographic history of the strait from its discovery to the inception of the survey. 3. Journal kept by Midshipman Joseph Henry Kay during the voyage of HMS Chanticleer, 1828-31. Edited by Ann Savours and Anita McConnell. The voyage was to make observations in the South Atlantic to determine the shape of the Earth and to ascertain the longitudes of a number of ports. Kay's lively diary describes the Chanticleer's encounters with warships of the Brazilian navy, largely manned by Englishmen, and his struggles to take observations during gales, snowstorms, fierce squalls and constant chilling rain, nevertheless remaining cheerful in the company of his fellow midshipmen. 4. Jacob Wainwright's Diary of the Transportation of Dr Livingstone's Body to the Coast, May 1873 to February 1874. Edited by Roy Bridges. Wainwright was the young African freed slave who carved the inscription on the tree beneath which David Livingstone's heart was buried. This diary covers his journey back to the coast with the body. The remarkable record throws important light on conditions in East Africa in the 1870s as well as on the tragic life of Wainwright himself. Now published for the first time in English, it also throws some odd lights on Victorian missionary and publishing activities.

$30.00

The Navigation of the Frobisher Voyages (The Annual Hakluyt Society Lecture 1997)
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The Navigation of the Frobisher Voyages (The Annual Hakluyt Society Lecture 1997)

By James McDermott

London: Hakluyt Society. 1998. Staple-bound pamphlet. 1st Edition. Fine. 24 pages.

$9.80

The Discovery of the South Shetland Islands: The Voyage of the Brig Williams, 1819-1820 and The Journal of Midshipman C.W. Poynter (Works issued by the Hakluyt Society, Third Series, Volume 4)
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The Discovery of the South Shetland Islands: The Voyage of the Brig Williams, 1819-1820 and The Journal of Midshipman C.W. Poynter (Works issued by the Hakluyt Society, Third Series, Volume 4)

By C. W. Poynter; R. J. Campbell (Editor)

London: Hakluyt Society. 2000. First Edition. Hardcover. Blue cloth over boards with gilt titles to spine and vignette of sailing ship Victoria on front board. Fine book in a Fine jacket. Spine slightly faded. pp. xv + 248. 16 color plates, 6 monochrome plates, 9 maps. In 1819, William Smith, carrying a general cargo from Montevideo to Valparaiso, sailed further south round Cape Horn than his predecessors in the hope of finding favorable winds. He sighted land in 62°S. His report to the Senior Naval Officer in Valparaiso was ridiculed, but on a subsequent voyage he confirmed his discovery, taking surroundings and sailing along the coast. As a result, the Senior Naval Officer chartered his vessel, the brig Williams, and having put Edward Bransfield in charge, sent her to survey the new discovery. Charles Poynter was one of the midshipmen who sailed with Bransfield. His account of this expedition, which forms the principal part of this volume, recently came to light in New Zealand, and is the only first-hand account of the voyage, during which the Antarctic mainland was sighted for the first time, that appears to have survived. The introduction contains some remarks on the South Shetland Islands, followed by chapters giving a brief look at the history of the Spanish in South America and the British presence in the area, together with the speculation leading to the search for Antarctica and chapters on early nineteenth-century navigation and hydrographic surveying. There were several second-hand accounts of William Smith's earlier voyages, and Bransfield's expedition which appeared in reports, journals and books at the time. These are included with brief accounts of other voyages to the South Shetland Islands which took place while Bransfield was in the area, to complete the picture. Poynter's journal explains the reasons behind most of the names given to land features, some of which were not included in the published accounts at the time. There are also three charts and a number of views which are reproduced together with modern photographs of the area. It also contains a large number of geographical positions which enable a track chart of the voyage to be produced and an assessment of the accuracy of this short but remarkable voyage to be made. Finally the chart published as a result of Bransfield's survey is included.

$13.95

The Third Voyage of Martin Frobisher to Baffin Island, 1578 (Works issued by the Hakluyt Society, Third Series, Volume 6)
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The Third Voyage of Martin Frobisher to Baffin Island, 1578 (Works issued by the Hakluyt Society, Third Series, Volume 6)

By James McDermott (Editor)

London: Hakluyt Society. July 28, 2001. First Edition. Hardcover. Blue cloth over boards with gilt titles to spine and vignette of sailing ship Victoria on front board. Fine book in a Fine jacket. Spine slightly faded. pp. x + 268. 5 half tone plates, 1 map. Martin Frobisher's third (1578) voyage to Baffin island was the consequence of flawed logic and excessive optimism on the part of the adventurers of the ephemeral 'Company of Cathay'. Their original intention--to find a north-western route to the Far East--had been largely forgotten following the imagined discovery of gold and silver-bearing ore in the forbidding and icy landscape of Baffin Island which Frobisher had first sighted two years earlier. This was to be England's first experience of a "gold-rush," and if many refused to be swayed by the promise of an empire to rival that of Spain, others, including the Queen and many of her Privy Councillors, allowed their cupidity to override all caution. As the likelihood of future profits was downgraded in successive assays of the mineral samples, the adventurers accepted that a much larger expedition would be required to extract sufficient ore to provide an adequate return upon monies already spent. The result--a fleet of fifteen ships, crewed by almost five hundred men--remains the largest fleet ever to have visited Baffin Island. Their travails in arctic seas, near-comic failures of navigation and the backbreaking task of mining the largest possible amount of mineral ore in the time allowed by the brief arctic summer, were recorded in several eyewitness reports, all of which, for the first time, have been assembled in a single volume.

$13.40