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Moravian Church.; Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons. Committee to Whom the Petition of the Deputies of the United Moravian Churches, in Behalf of Themselves and Their United Brethren, was Referred.; Great Britain
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Moravian Church.; Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons. Committee to Whom the Petition of the Deputies of the United Moravian Churches, in Behalf of Themselves and Their United Brethren, was Referred.; Great Britain

By Atkins, Edward

Moravian Church.; Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons. Committee to Whom the Petition of the Deputies of the United Moravian Churches, in Behalf of Themselves and Their United Brethren, was Referred.; Great Britain. A composite volume. Some exemplars arranged differently. First item ([2], 635-638 p.) includes, with separate t.p.: Anno regni Georgii II Regis Magnae Britanniae, Franciae & Hiberniae, vicesimo secundo : at the Parliament begun and holden at Westminster the tenth day of November Anno Dom. 1747 ... London : Printed by Thomas Baskett ... and by the assigns of Robert Baskett, 1749, London: Printed by the Assigns of R. and Edw. Atkins Esquires. For Thomas Basset at the Sign of the George near Cliffords Inn in Fleetstreet. Small 2vo, 12x 7.75 in. First Edition. [Blank]; 2, [Tittle page, iii]; 7F-5; B-F2; A-I2; K-O2; X-Z2; Aa-Ii2; Kk-Qq2; [Blank]. This copy is bound in full contemporary sheepskin, the pages are crisp but the boards are loose and last section of Epilogue is disbound from major work. Rest is holding. Loss to spine with chips and edges bumped on boards. Signed on front board by Charles Russell Lowell, Sr. and opposite page by Charles Russell Lowell, Jr. Report from the Committee to Whom the Petition of the Deputies of the United Moravian Churches, in behalf of themselves and their United Brethren, Was Referred, together with some extracts of the most material vouchers and papers contained in the Appendix to the said report -- Appendix of the most material vouchers and papers referred to in the Report (58 p., 2d count) -- "Unitatis Fratrum fidei, liturgiae et praxeos expositio, tum etiam circa credenda paritèr atque agenda dispensandi ratio -- Enchiridion theologiae patristicae -- Epilogus. (MORAVIAN). Report from the Committee to Whom the Petition of the Deputies of the United Moravian Churches, in Behalf of Themselves and Their United Brethren, Was Referred: Together with Some Extracts of the Most Material Vouchers and Papers Contained in the Appendix to the Said Report. London: 1749. 1st ed. (4), iv, (2) 635-638, 27, 58, (4), [59]-120, ([121]-156 pp. With separate title page printed by Thomas Baskett. Historical documents of the Moravians in several languages. among other subjects it dealt with the Moravians work in the Dutch West Indies and Algiers with slaves; Count Zinzendorff, and Isaac Watts. An interesting look at the British government's early encouragement of the settlement of Moravians in the American colonies. OCLC locates only 17 copies. Charles Russell Lowell, Sr. (15 August 1782 in Boston – 20 January 1861 in Cambridge, Massachusetts) was a Unitarian minister and the son of judge John Lowell. Biography: He was born in Boston, Massachusetts, and attended The Roxbury Latin School and later Harvard College in 1800 where he studied law and then theology. After two years in Edinburgh, Scotland and one year on the Continent, Lowell was, from 1806 until his death, pastor of the West Congregational (Unitarian) Church of Boston. From that year until 1840, he traveled extensively in Europe and the east. During the latter part of his life Lowell officiated only occasionally in his church. Lowell was elected a member of the American Antiquarian Society in 1814, and served on its board of councilors from 1820 to 1853.[4] He married Harriet, daughter of Robert T. Spence, of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, an officer in the U. S. Navy. Harvard gave him the degree of D.D. in 1823. He was a fellow of its corporation from 1818 until 1833. Almost alone, he spoke out from the pulpit against slavery to Boston's elite. Charles Russell Lowell, Jr (1807-1870), son of Charles Lowell, Sr. and Harriet Traill (Spence) Lowell, solidified the already strong ties between the Lowell and Jackson families by marrying Anna Cabot Jackson, daughter of Patrick Tracy Jackson, in 1832. Jackson, a merchant whose business failed in the Panic of 1837. Charles Russell Lowell devoted the remainder of his career to cataloguing the books of the Boston Athenaeum, while his wife opened and conducted a successful school for young girls in Boston.

$2000.00

The Memoirs of the Lives and Actions of James and William Dukes of Hamilton and Castleherald, & c. In which an Account is given of the Rise and Progress of the Civil Wars of Scotland with other Great Transactions both in England and Germany, from the Year
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The Memoirs of the Lives and Actions of James and William Dukes of Hamilton and Castleherald, & c. In which an Account is given of the Rise and Progress of the Civil Wars of Scotland with other Great Transactions both in England and Germany, from the Year

By Burnet, Gilbert

Burnet, Gilbert. (1643-1715) The Memoirs of the Lives and Actions of James and William Dukes of Hamilton and Castleherald, & c. In which an Account is given of the Rise and Progress of the Civil Wars of Scotland with other Great Transactions both in England and Germany, from the Year 1625, to the Year 1652. Together with many Letters, Instructions, and other Papers, Written by King Charles the I. Never before published, all drawn out of, or Copied from the Originals. London, Printed by J. Grover, for R. Royston, Bookseller to the Kings Most Excellent Majesty, 1677. Folio, 12 x 7.5 in. First edition. []3, a6, B-Zz, Aa-Zz4, Aaa-Lll4. Contains both portraits where other volumes are lacking. "[Burnet's] vacations were spent chiefly in Hamilton, where the duchess engaged him in putting in order all the papers relating to her father's and uncle's political careers. Lauderdale, who had his own reasons for anxiety as to the light which might be cast upon transactions in which he had himself been engaged, no sooner heard of this than he sent for Burnet to come to court that he might give him all the informa¬tion in his power. The 'Memoirs of the Dukes of Hamilton', Burnet's first historical work, was published in 1676, [actually 1677]. His investigations led in a curious way to a reconciliation between Hamilton and the court. Among the papers which he ex¬amined were found undoubted claims of the family upon the crown, for satisfaction of which Hamilton consented to concur in the court measures. This was 1671". (DNB) In Burnet's Preface to "Memoirs", he states one of the reasons for undertak¬ing this work, saying, "And particularly, I wondered to find James Duke of Hamilton represented to the World, with such foul and base Characters, as if he had been a Monster both for Ingratitude and Treachery, though he had laid down his Life for the King, and involved his Estate in vast Debts for His Service. It seemed to me the great¬est Injustice in the world, that one who served his Prince and his Country so long, and so faithfully, and sealed all with his blood, should not only be deprived of the Honour due to his Memory, but that a company of ignorant and impudent Slanders should do what they could to attaint his Blood and Family, by the black Imputations they have cast on him, and that this should pass current without any Vindications." Wing B-5832

$649.00

The eloquence of the British Senate, being a selection of the best speeches of the most distinguished English, Irish, and Scotch parliamentary speakers from the beginning of the reign of Charles I to the present time, with notes, biographical, critical, First American Edition by T. Kirk, 1809-1811
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The eloquence of the British Senate, being a selection of the best speeches of the most distinguished English, Irish, and Scotch parliamentary speakers from the beginning of the reign of Charles I to the present time, with notes, biographical, critical, First American Edition by T. Kirk, 1809-1811

By Hazlitt, William

45 Libraries have copies of this 2 volume set. Covers British Senate speeches from 1625 to 1802. The first American Edition was printed after the First British Edition in 1807. A rare set. Naturally many of the speeches in the second volume are concerned with the American colonies and the what is termed 'obstreperous behavior' of their inhabitants...Hazlitt introduces the various speakers with wonderfully opinionated comments that range from a few lines in length to numerous pages (Edmund Burke & Charles James Fox to name a few). Geoffry Keynes suggests that the odd dating of the two volumes is the result of predating Volume I as it was produced in late 1809 but neglecting to do so in Volume II. There were two additional editions of 1810, issued in Brooklyn and New York. [Keynes, p. 141. Sabin 3124. Shaw & Shoemaker 17730]. In period leather swirled and decorated boards with some fox and staining as is usual from books and paper of this period. A fine set with the usual abrasions and other tears to the leather, otherwise a great set for American history and Revolutionary War collectors to see the arguments for and against the colonies on a variety of issues, including the Stamp Act and many other debates in Britain. A rare set, no copies found. Title: The eloquence of the British Senate, being a selection of the best speeches of the most distinguished English, Irish, and Scotch parliamentary speakers from the beginning of the reign of Charles I to the present time, with notes, biographical, critical, and explanatory / Author(s): Hazlitt, William,; 1778-1830.Publication: Brooklyn : Printed by T. Kirk, Year: 1810-1809 Description: v. ; 23 cm. Language: English Standard No: LCCN: 78-322630 SUBJECT(S) Geographic: Great Britain -- Politics and government -- 1603-1714. Great Britain -- Politics and government -- 1714-1820. Grande-Bretagne -- Politique et gouvernement -- 1603-1714. Grande-Bretagne -- Politique et gouvernement -- 1714-1820. Class Descriptors: LC: DA397; Dewey: 941/.06/08 Responsibility: [compiled] by William Hazlitt. Entry: 19790124 Update: 20100821 Accession No: OCLC: 4808743

$275.00

Le Morte Darthur. (The Noble and Joyous Booke entyled Le Morte Darthur) 1933
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Le Morte Darthur. (The Noble and Joyous Booke entyled Le Morte Darthur) 1933

By Mallory, Sir Thomas

Le Morte D'arthur. (The Noble and Joyous Booke entyled Le Morte D'arthur). William Caxton. Westminster, 31 July, 1485 is followed by the 1498 Edition 'The Boke of Noble Kyng. Kyng Arthure Somtyme Kynge of Englande and His Noble Actes and Feates of armes of Chyvalrye, and His Noble Knyghtes and Table Rounde and is Deuyeded in to. XXI Bookes. Wynkyn de Worde, Westminster. 1498. This edition is an exact copy of that rare and unusual work that includes the wood cut engravings found throughout the text. This facsimile copy was done by the Elizabethan scholar A. H. Bullen who established the Shakespeare Head Press in Stratford-up-Avon in 1904. His original aim was to produce a good edition of Shakespeare's works, and his ten volume Stratford Town Shakespeare was completed by 1907. After Bullen died in 1927, the press was acquired by a partnership including Basil Blackwell, the Oxford bookseller. Bernard Newdigate was appointed as typographer and under his direction the press worked within the Morris tradition: Ovid's Metamorphoses was the first book he produced as a limited edition. This Wynck de Worde edition is taken from a 'perfect', we say that with a bit of tongue in cheek, edition of the Morte d'Arthur, was done on paper stock that nearly as possible matches the original as well as the type and the engravings. It is a delightful copy and it will sharpen your skills at reading Olde Englysshe literature. One can hear the lilt of the voice as in this time period, most everyone read aloud. Entering a library in this time period would have meant that there was a constant and sustained sound of people reading works out loud...ssshh was not invented until long after. King Henry VIII and his daughter Elizabeth both read silently, a tradition started many centuries before by Saint Augustine (he was thought mad, gifted and touched by the Lord God because he could read silently and tell the audience everything that he had just read!). It is said also, that Southern speech and up until the 1940's and 50's certain communities off the coast of North Carolina had retained what linguists believed the truest living speech of old English that Henry the 8th and Elizabeth and indeed even Shakespeare would have sounded like. Caxton's printing was and is very phonetic to the ear and very pleasing to learn to read and indeed, read out loud....A wonderful book set for any collection or you can buy the original for a couple of million dollars! Libraries worldwide that own item: 1 (of this 1933 Edition) Title: The noble and joyous boke entytled le Morte Darthur ... Whyche boke was reduced in to Englysshe by the well dysposyd knyghte Syr Thomas Malory. Author(s): Malory, Thomas, Sir, 15th cent. Publication: Oxford : Printed at the Shakespeare Head Press and published by Basil Blackwell, Year: 1933 Description: 2 v ; 4to. Language: English Document Type: Book Entry: 19970201 Update: 20080517 Accession No: OCLC: 181668176 Database: WorldCat

$1500.00

Jus Regium: or, The Just and Solid Foundations of Monarchy in General: and more especially of the Monarchy of Scotland: Manitain’d against Buchannan, Daphtali, Dolman, Milton, & c. By Sir George Mackenzie, His Majesty’s Advocate in Scotland.
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Jus Regium: or, The Just and Solid Foundations of Monarchy in General: and more especially of the Monarchy of Scotland: Manitain’d against Buchannan, Daphtali, Dolman, Milton, & c. By Sir George Mackenzie, His Majesty’s Advocate in Scotland.

By Mackenzie, Sir George

Mackenzie, Sir George: Jus Regium: or, The Just and Solid Foundations of Monarchy in General: and more especially of the Monarchy of Scotland: Manitain'd against Buchannan, Daphtali, Dolman, Milton, & c. By Sir George Mackenzie, His Majesty's Advocate in Scotland. London: Printed for Richard Chiswell, at the Rose and Crown in St. Paul's Church-yard. 1684. A rare English history book. MACKENZIE, Sir George Lacks engraved portrait frontispiece of Charles II, otherwise a very crisp copy in contemporary quarter calf with paper boards, rubbed on hinges and corners of boards. Three separate editions were published in this year. A good copy. Has early pages replaced with blank blue paper and this may be one of the later editions, which lacked the portrait, since by 1684 everyone knew what Charles II looked like. Wing M163. Charles II, second son of Charles I and Henrietta Marie of France, was born in 1630. He spent his teenage years fighting Parliament's Roundhead forces until his father's execution in 1649, when he escaped to France. He drifted to Holland, but returned to Scotland in 1650 amid the Scottish proclamation of his kingship; in 1651, he led a Scottish force of 10,000 into a dismal defeat by Cromwell's forces at Worcester. He escaped, but remained a fugitive for six weeks until he engineered passage to France. Charles roamed Europe for eight years before being invited back to England as the Commonwealth dissolved. He married Catherine of Braganza, but sired no legitimate children. His oldest child, James Scott, Duke of Monmouth, made a failed bid to capture the crown at the time of his father's death and was executed by James II, brother of Charles II and Uncle to Monmouth. Charles II died in February 1685 from complications following a stroke. Charles arrived in London to claim the throne on his 30th birthday, May 29, 1660. He was extremely tolerant of those who had condemned his father to death: only nine of the conspirators were executed. He was also tolerant in religious matters, but more from political wisdom than overwhelming morality. England was overjoyed at having a monarch again. However, royal powers and privileges had been severely limited by Parliament. He was forced to fund his administration from customs taxes and a healthy pension paid to him by France's Louis XIV. Royal prerogative, the soul of the Tudor monarchs, James I and Charles I, had all but vanished. This moment was a turning point in English political history, as Parliament maintained a superior position to that of the king, and the modern concept of political parties formed from the ashes of the Cavaliers and Roundheads. The Cavaliers evolved into the Tory Party, royalists intent on preserving the king's authority over Parliament, while the Roundheads transformed into the Whig Party, men of property dedicated to expanding trade abroad and maintaining Parliament's supremacy in the political field. The first decade of Charles' reign was beset by many problems. Defeat at the hands of the Dutch in a mishandled war over foreign commerce cost him domestic support. The Great Plague of 1665 and the Fire of London in the following year left much of the city in ruins. In 1667, the Dutch sailed up the Medway, sunk five battleships and towed the Royal Charles back to Holland. King and Council were ridiculed for not having enough interest in the affairs of government. The 1670's saw Charles' forging a new alliance with France against the Dutch. French support was based on the promise that Charles would reintroduce Catholicism in England at a convenient time - apparently, that convenient time never came, as Charles did nothing to bring England under the Catholic umbrella, although he made a deathbed conversion to the Roman faith. The Whigs used Catholicism to undermine Charles; England was in the throes of yet another wave of anti-Catholicism, with the Whigs employing this paranoia in an attempt to unseat the heir apparent, Charles' Catholic brother James, from succeeding to the throne. Titus Oates, a defrocked Anglican priest, stoked the fires of anti-Catholicism by accusing the queen and her favorites of attempting to murder Charles; ten men fell prey to false witness and Oates' manipulation of the anti-Catholic movement, and were executed. Many accused Anthony Cooper, Earl of Shaftsbury and founder of the Whig Party, of inciting the anti-Catholic violence of 1679-80; this has remained one of the greatest mysteries in British history. The Whig-dominated Parliament tried to push through an Exclusion Bill barring Catholics from holding public office (and keeping James Stuart from the throne), but Charles was struck down by a fever and opinion swayed to his side. His last years were occupied with securing his brother's claim to the throne and garnering Tory support. Charles' era is remembered as the time of "Merry Olde England". The monarchy, although limited in scope, was successfully restored - the eleven years of Commonwealth were officially ignored as nothing more than an interregnum between the reign of Charles I and Charles II. Charles' tolerance was astounding considering the situation of England at the time of his ascension, but was necessary for his reign to stand a chance at success. He was intelligent and a patron of scientific research, but somewhat lazy as a ruler, choosing to wait until the last moment to make a decision. The British attitude towards Charles II is humorously revealed in this quote from 1066 and All That: "Charles II was always very merry and was therefore not so much a king as a Monarch. During the civil war, he had rendered valuable assistance to his father's side by hiding in all the oak-trees he could find. He was thus very romantic and popular and was able after the death of Cromwell to descend to the throne."

$195.00

Hudibra, First, Second, Third and Subsequent Parts. First Edition, First Issue 1663
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Hudibra, First, Second, Third and Subsequent Parts. First Edition, First Issue 1663

By Butler, Samuel

Butler, Samuel. "Hudibras. The First Part. Written in the time of the late Wars". [4], 268 pages. First Authorized Edition, first issue, with "Saint" in imprint spelled out in full; errata is present, lacking the imprimatur leaf (dated Nov. 11, 1662), and all textual errors uncorrected. London: Printed by J.G. for Richard Marriot, 1663. [bound with] "Hudibras. The Second Part. By the Author of the First". [4], 216 pages. Also, third part dated 1678. Bound in exceptionally fine binding and in very good condition with the bookplates of Daniel Henry Holmes, an avid book collector. This edition certainly is one of the rarest being that it is a first issue. A pirate copy came out the year before in 1662 and all proceeds from the sale of the book by the thief were recovered by Butler. Collation is as follows: [2 blank], TP, A3-8, B8-I8, K-R8, 2nd TP, B-I8, K-O8, P4, 3rd TP, A-I8, K-R8, S7, [2 Blank].Hudibras by Samuel Butler is a critique of the English Civil War and pokes at the Puritans and their military zeal to spread the word of God with Bible and Pike. This attractive printing and wonderfully bound copy of Butler's mock epic in octosyllabic couplets, its three parts first published in 1663, 1664 and 1678. Modeled after Don Quixote, the work satirizes the hypocrisy and self-seeking of the Presbyterians and independents represented by the title character, Hudibras and his servant Ralpho, demonstrating the pairs, greed, stupidity, cowardice and duplicity. Butler, a Colonel in the Cromwellian army is involved in any number of various comic misadventures and Butler is squarely pointing at Oliver Cromwell and his lot as Butler was and remained a confirmed Royalist and Anglican (King Henry VIII's Anglican Church). This mock epic became the rage of its time and was followed by nearly 27 editions that included, later engraved illustrations to highlight the comedic adventures of the two. In the end of this volume are also found the Letter from the Knight to his Lady and a corresponding letter from the Lady to the Knight.

$3550.00