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Africa & Middle East From Donald Heald Rare Books


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Carte de Maurice (ci-devant Ile-de-France) Contenant la Situation des Principales Sucreries, les Routes & les Limites des Divers Quartiers de l'He
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Carte de Maurice (ci-devant Ile-de-France) Contenant la Situation des Principales Sucreries, les Routes & les Limites des Divers Quartiers de l'He

By [MAURITIUS]

1859. Single sheet map, 25½ x 21 inches. Old folds, some minor loss at folds, including in center of sheet. Several small losses at edges. Contemporary ink doodles on verso, resulting in some small instances of loss due to ink burn. A remarkable, locally produced map of the island of Mauritius, off the coast of Africa, showing sugar plantations, roads, terrain, the city of Port Louis, and the several other small villages that dot the coast. The scale and quality of the map are a tribute to the remarkable local culture of books and printing which flourished on the island in the 19th century. James Pope-Hennessy, in his biography of his grandfather, at one time the Governor of the island, describes the many local bookstores and libraries. The French colonized the island, naming it "Ile de France," and the island remained under the control of the French East India Company until 1767. During the long war between France and England at the beginning of the 19th century, Mauritius proved to be an important strategic naval base, and as a result the British seized the island in 1810, and the Treaty of Paris confirmed official British possession in 1814. It remained an important sugar producing colony, and in the 20th century agricultural production was expanded to include tea, rice, and other produce. Toussaint notes a second edition in 1848 but does not list this particular edition of the map, styled the fifth in a caption. Toussaint, F67 (ref).

$2000.00

Ile de France [manuscript title]
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Ile de France [manuscript title]

By [MAURITIUS]

[N.p., but most likely Mauritius. Early to mid 18th century]. Manuscript map, 7¼ x 5½ inches. Bottom corners trimmed away, wear and some loss along left and top edge. Light to moderate soiling. An early manuscript map of the island of Mauritius, done in pen and ink on laid paper. On the map, the town of Grande Port is labeled as Port Bourbon, the port was renamed Port Bourbon when the French took over the island in 1710, though the name reverted back to Grande Port by the late 18th century. Plains, mountains, rivers, and other major geographical features are indicated on the map, as are the outlying smaller islands. The Dutch were the first Europeans to become interested in the island, taking possession in 1598. After exploiting the island's dense forests for a century and introducing the cultivation of sugar cane and cotton, in 1710 the Dutch abandoned the colony. The French soon claimed it as "Ile de France," and the island remained under the control of the French East India Company until 1767. During the long war between France and England at the beginning of the 19th century, Mauritius proved to be an important strategic naval base, and as a result the British took charge of the island in 1810, and the Treaty of Paris confirmed official British possession in 1814. It remained an important sugar producing colony, and in the 20th century agricultural production was expanded to include tea, rice, and other produce.

$1000.00

Plan du Port Louis. Dans L'Ile de France, situé par les 20 degrés 5 minutes de latitude sud et par 73 degrés de longitude de ténérif. Géometriquement levé sur les lieux. en 1721. Par le Chevalier Garnier de Fougerai [manuscript title]
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Plan du Port Louis. Dans L'Ile de France, situé par les 20 degrés 5 minutes de latitude sud et par 73 degrés de longitude de ténérif. Géometriquement levé sur les lieux. en 1721. Par le Chevalier Garnier de Fougerai [manuscript title]

By [MAURITIUS]

[N.p., but most likely Mauritius. Early to mid 19th century]. Manuscript map, 19¼ x 25 inches, on wove paper. Outline coloring. Old fold lines. Some light foxing and offsetting. Very minor loss at folds and from ink burn along the neatline. Manuscript plan of the harbor of Port Louis, with remarks on the best means for entering the harbor. Though dated 1721 in the cartouche, the plan is a later copy, probably made in the first half of the 19th century. The edges of land and sea have been watercolored for differentiation. The Pointe au Triton and the Ile aux Tonneliers are both labeled with several depths and anchorages noted. The Dutch were the first Europeans to become interested in the island, taking possession in 1598. After exploiting the island's dense forests for a century and introducing the cultivation of sugar cane and cotton, in 1710 the Dutch abandoned the colony. The French soon claimed it as "Ile de France," and the island remained under the control of the French East India Company until 1767. During the long war between France and England at the beginning of the 19th century, Mauritius proved to be an important strategic naval base, and as a result the British took charge of the island in 1810, and the Treaty of Paris confirmed official British possession in 1814. It remained an important sugar producing colony, and in the 20th century agricultural production was expanded to include tea, rice, and other produce.

$1750.00

Sketch of the Town & Environs of Port Louis Explanatory of the Operations of the British Army under the Command of Majr. Genl. the Honble. Jne. Abercrombie. Drawn by the Author. Decr. 1810 [manuscript title]
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Sketch of the Town & Environs of Port Louis Explanatory of the Operations of the British Army under the Command of Majr. Genl. the Honble. Jne. Abercrombie. Drawn by the Author. Decr. 1810 [manuscript title]

By [MAURITIUS]

[N.p., but possibly Port Louis. mid- 19th century]. Manuscript sheet map, 10¼ x 13½ inches. On drafting linen. Handcolored. Old fold. Minor toning. Manuscript map depicting troop deployments on the island of Mauritius in December of 1810, when the British finally overcame the French defenses and captured the island. The area from Grande Baie to Grande Riviere is shown, with the coast and terrain in between, documenting the route from the point of debarkation to the town of Port Louis. The legend gives different colored bars for troop positions on the subsequent days of the march, and includes figures for denoting passable and impassable routes. A similar manuscript map is described by Toussaint in his bibliography of Mauritius. The Dutch were the first Europeans to become interested in the island, taking possession in 1598. After exploiting the island's dense forests for a century and introducing the cultivation of sugar cane and cotton, the Dutch abandoned the colony in 1710. The French soon claimed it as "Ile de France," and the island remained under the control of the French East India Company until 1767. During the long war between France and England at the beginning of the 19th century, Mauritius proved to be an important strategic naval base, and as a result the British took charge of the island in 1810, and the Treaty of Paris confirmed official British possession in 1814. It remained an important sugar producing colony, and in the 20th century agricultural production was expanded to include tea, rice, and other produce. A handsome map illustrating a key event in the island's history. Toussaint, F599 (ref).

$1000.00

Aethiopia Superior vel Interior vulgo Abissinorum sive Presbiteri Ioannis Imperium
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Aethiopia Superior vel Interior vulgo Abissinorum sive Presbiteri Ioannis Imperium

By JANSSON, Jan (1588-1664); and [Dirck Jansz. VAN SANTEN (1637/8-1708), colourist]

Amsterdam, 1640. Copper engraved double page map, beautifully hand coloured by Dirck Jansz. Van Santen at the time of publication, sheet size: 21 x 24 1/2 inches. Without text on verso. A masterpiece of hand colouring by a Dutch old master. A beautiful map of central and Eastern Africa, including Mozambique north to present day Sudan. The map contains numerous coastal place names such as Mozambique Island, Quiloa, Mombaza, and Melinde indicating the importance of the area to both Arab, Portuguese, and traders and explorers from other countries. The map includes numerous rivers, villages and settlements throughout, and is highly embellished with elephants, ostriches and other animals within the map, as well as a decorative cartouche flanked by natives. The two Ptolemaic lakes of Zaire and Zaflan are in the lower portion of the map; Lake Niger, and the supposed course of the Niger River, is shown flowing westward. This map is based on Ortelius' 1573 map of the fictitious kingdom of Prester John. The myth of Prester John, the good Christian King of Africa waging his own crusade and defeating the enemies of Christianity, was based upon earlier legends of the Crusaders and is a fascinating piece of early mythological cartographic history. The present example is superbly hand coloured by famed illuminator Van Santen, with copious use of gold highlights identifying each town, boundaries, the gradients, the Equator and Tropic of Cancer, the sun burst above the cartouche and other highlights. "Atlases and books coloured by Van Santen figured among the showpieces of the most prominent collections ... and [books] decorated by Van Santen were considered gifts worthy of princes ... The colours, the gold, the patience and industriousness of Van Santen were obviously of great renown at the end of the 17th century ... His use of colour was much freer than that of other colourists. The tone of the colours was made to complement the gold he used so lavishly. In his best work two other costly pigments, ultramarine and carmine are found in large amounts, mostly set against gold" (Goedings). The present map includes the use of ultramarine, i.e. lapis lazuli, on the clothing of the native flanking the left side of the cartouche. Literally meaning "from over the sea," the pigment was made from the semi-precious stone Lapis Lazuli, found at the time only in Afghanistan. During the Rennaissance and Baroque periods, the striking blue pigment, which was more expensive than gold, was used only by artists of great renown, including Vermeer, Titian, Massaccio, and, as the present map confirms, Van Santen. Van der Krogt (Atlantes) 8720:1B; Truusje Goedings, "Dirk Jansz. Van Santen ... A Survey" (Amsterdam, 1992).

$4750.00

[Africa] Accuratissima Totius Africae Tabula in Lucem Producia Per Tacobum de Sandrart Norimbergae
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[Africa] Accuratissima Totius Africae Tabula in Lucem Producia Per Tacobum de Sandrart Norimbergae

By SANDRART, Jacob von (1630-1708) engraved by Johann Baptist HOMMAN (1663-1724)

Nuremburg: J. von Sandart, 1675. Copper engraving with early colour. Printed on laid paper. Title in manuscript ink on verso of sheet. Cleveland Historical Society collection stamp on verso of sheet. Numerous tears and creases in outside margins, which have been expertly repaired. Center fold has been strengthened. An early map of Africa by the great mapmaker Jacob von Sandrart, engraved by Homann. Sandrart's stunning map of Africa is a close copy of Fredrik de Wit's map, 'Nova Africa Descriptio' published in 1660. With the prime meridian running through Ferro Island, the map is typical of late seventeenth century maps of Africa. Like other maps of the period, Sandrart has included a highly decorative and informative cartouche in the lower left corner of the sheet. Homann's continental cartouches aspired to convey the natural history as well as the costume and manner of life of the human inhabitants. Here, while a woman peacefully nurses her baby in a hammock, a native chief stares out at the viewer from under the shade of a large umbrella. On the right side of the vignette, two riders on horseback, one with a cutlass and one with a decaptitated head, ride by a river where one man is attacking another with his sword. Among the humans are a lion, a snake, a reptile of some sort and another fox-like animal. Although the map repeats De Wit's decorations, it relies on Ptolemy for its description of the Nile basin. It is to some degree remarkable that seventeenth century maps of the interior of Africa were filled with geographical features and named locations, since there had been very little European exploration of the interior at this date. European trade took place at specific locations along the coast and almost nothing was known about the interior of the dark continent except through rumor. This is a fascinating map by Sandrart and one of only two maps engraved by Homann before 1690. Born at Frankfurt-on-Main, Jacob von Sandrart was one of the most esteemed mapmakers in Nuremberg at the close of the seventeenth century. He learned his trade from his uncle Joachim von Sandrart and from Cornelius Danckerts. As with this impressive map, all of Sandrart's charts are filled with a wealth of decorative details and highly ornate cartouches.

$1800.00

Africa XVIII, Nova Tabula
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Africa XVIII, Nova Tabula

By MÜNSTER, Sebastian (1488-1552)

[Basel: Heinrich Petri in the 'Geographia Universalis', 1542. Woodcut map, in excellent condition. The first state of the earliest reasonably obtainable map to focus on the depiction of the entire continent of Africa, and a veritable masterpiece of Renaissance cartography This highly important map represents the earliest reasonably obtainable map to depict the entire continent of Africa. Africa XVIII, Nova Tabula , is a fantastic visual synergy of archaic imagination and recent exploration. The overall shape of the continent is quite well defined, having been extensively explored by the Portuguese since the time of Prince Henry the Navigator in the mid-fifteenth-century, a point highlighted by the appearance of a caravel in the lower part of the map. Africa's various kingdoms are denoted by pictorial symbols of a crown and sceptre. Following Ptolemaic tradition, the Nile has its source in a series of lakes that lie at the foot of the mysterious Mountains of the Moon. The land around the Cape of Good Hope in South Africa is embellished by the appearance of an elephant, and exotic parrots occupy trees in Angola. Most amusingly, near the coast of east Africa, the "Monoculi," or one-eyed man imagined by Classical writers sits in wait for some hypothetical European visitor. Münster was a brilliant polymath and one of the most important intellectuals of the Renaissance era. Educated at Tübingen, his surviving college notebooks, Kollegienbuch , reveal a mind of insatiable curiosity, especially with regards to cosmography. Münster later became a professor of Hebrew at Heidelberg, and then from 1529 at the University of Basle. In the 1530s, he turned his attentions to translating Ptolemy's Geography , adding new material that related to the lands newly discovered in Africa, the Americas and Asia. The result was the publication of his highly regarded Geographia Universalis , first printed in 1540. The present map is from the second edition, but still represents the first-state of the map, as the same unaltered woodblock from the initial printing was employed in the production of the second edition. Münster was also a trend-setter in his ideas regarding design and layout of maps, and he was one of the first to create space on his woodblocks for the insertion of place names in metal type. Münster later published his Cosmographia (1544, revised 1550), a monumental encyclopedic book of contemporary knowledge and legend that became one of the most widely read books in Europe. Norwich, Maps of Africa , 2; Tooley, The Printed Maps of the Whole of the Continent of Africa, Part 1 (1500-1600), 6.

$4500.00

A Chart of the Coast of Guinea from Cape de Verde to Cape Bona Esperança
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A Chart of the Coast of Guinea from Cape de Verde to Cape Bona Esperança

By THORNTON, John (1641-1708) & Samuel (fl.1703-39)

London: William Mount & Thomas Page, 1734. Copper-engraved sea chart, in excellent condition. A very elegant sea chart of all of the west coast of Africa and one of the most important charts of the celebrated Third Book of 'The English Pilot' This very fine sea chart embraces the coast of Africa from Senegal all the way down to Cape Agulhas, past the Cape of Good Hope. The features of the coast are named in great detail, and the seas are elegantly traversed by loxodromes. The map is oriented with the east towards the top of the map, and a very beautiful cartouche surrounded by mermen and seashells adorns the upper left corner. In 1671, the London cartographer John Seller (fl.1664-97) commenced work on The English Pilot, a work that intended to challenge Dutch hegemony in the sea atlas market. Intended to be published in four books covering different regions of the globe, Seller published an uncompleted book on 'Oriental navigation' in 1675. Unable to continue this Herculean endeavour, Seller sold his rights to John Thornton, the official hydrographer to the English East India Company. Thornton took up the project with great fervour, publishing his first editions in 1689. Thornton did not publish his first edition of the Third Book, detailing navigation in the East Indies, until 1703. While Thornton largely based his charts on those of earlier Dutch cartographers, most notably those found in Pieter Goos' Zee-Spiegel and Lucas Janz Waghenaer's Mariner's Mirror , The English Pilot proved to be enormously popular. When John Thornton died in 1708, his brother Samuel took over the business and added to and modified existing charts. All four books were produced in editions until the 1760s, the Third Book ran into twelve editions up to 1761. The project succeeded in giving the English dominance in the sea chart market as the eighteenth-century progressed. Cf. Phillips, Atlases , 4278-10; Verner & Skelton (eds.), John Thornton - The English Pilot: The Third Book (Facsimile 1703 edition).

$650.00

A Large Draught of the Coast of Arabia from Maculla to Dofar
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A Large Draught of the Coast of Arabia from Maculla to Dofar

By THORNTON, John (1641-1708) & Samuel (fl.1703-39)

London: William Mount & Thomas Page, 1734. Copper-engraved sea chart by Sutton Nichols, in excellent condition apart from a small expert repair to the lower right and left corners. A very fine sea chart of the coast of Yemen and Oman from the celebrated Third Book of 'The English Pilot' This very attractive sea chart depicts the coast of the Arabian Peninsula from Al Makullah in Yemen to Dhofar in Oman. The coastal view is bisected into two images, separated by a border formed by the elegant tendrils of a vine. The upper view depicts the southern, while the lower portrays the northern aspect of the coast. Prominent features of the desert coastline are depicted, while compass roses, from which radiate rhumb lines, decorate the seas. In 1671, the London cartographer John Seller (fl.1664-97) commenced work on The English Pilot, a work that intended to challenge Dutch hegemony in the sea atlas market. Intended to be published in four books covering different regions of the globe, Seller published an uncompleted book on 'Oriental navigation' in 1675. Unable to continue this Herculean endeavour, Seller sold his rights to John Thornton, the official hydrographer to the English East India Company. Thornton took up the project with great fervour, publishing his first editions in 1689. Thornton did not publish his first edition of the Third Book, detailing navigation in the East Indies, until 1703. While Thornton largely based his charts on those of earlier Dutch cartographers, most notably those found in Pieter Goos' Zee-Spiegel and Lucas Janz Waghenaer's Mariner's Mirror , The English Pilot proved to be enormously popular. When John Thornton died in 1708, his brother Samuel took over the business and added to and modified existing charts. All four books were produced in editions until the 1760s, the Third Book ran into twelve editions up to 1761. The project succeeded in giving the English dominance in the sea chart market as the eighteenth-century progressed. Tibbetts, Arabia in Early Maps , 177; Cf. Phillips, Atlases , 4278-18; Verner & Skelton (eds.), John Thornton - The English Pilot: The Third Book (Facsimile 1703 edition).

$750.00

Africa, with All Its States, Kingdomes, Republics, Regions, Island &c. Improved and inlarged from D'Anville's map to which have been added a particular chart of the Gold Coast [on an inset larger scale map] wherein are distinguished all the european forts and factories by S. Boulton and also a summary description relative to the trade and natural produce, manners and customs of the African continent and islands
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Africa, with All Its States, Kingdomes, Republics, Regions, Island &c. Improved and inlarged from D'Anville's map to which have been added a particular chart of the Gold Coast [on an inset larger scale map] wherein are distinguished all the european forts and factories by S. Boulton and also a summary description relative to the trade and natural produce, manners and customs of the African continent and islands

By D'ANVILLE, Jean Baptiste Bourguignon (1697-1782)

London: Robert Laurie & James Whittle, 1794. Copper-engraved map, on four joined sheets, with original outline colour, some splits to old folds, small tears at margins, one with slight loss, overall in good condition. A fascinating late eighteenth-century wall map of Africa, after one of France's greatest cartographers Jean Baptiste Bourguignon d'Anville was the spiritual successor to Guillaume De L'Isle in the sense that he maintained the rigorous standard for accuracy that De L'Isle had established. D'Anville was the last French mapmaker to establish an international reputation superior to all his contemporaries, as witnessed by the respect shown by English cartographers and publishers during an era when the two countries were often at war and always hostile to one another. This excellent map of Africa, an English edition with revisions of D'Anville by Laurie & Whittle, was issued when the European appetite for exploration and colonization of the continent was just getting underway. By this time there were well over fifty fort/trading posts on the western and southeastern coasts representing various European nations, but there had been almost no penetration of the interior (these European `forts & factories' on the Gold Coast are shown in close up on Boulton's inset map). With the gradual outlawing of the slave trade by most civilized nations, interest in the vast interior regions greatly increased as whites sought other profitable resources, and Catholic and Protestant missionaries bravely evangelised. The peoples of Africa proved much more diverse and intriguing than ever imagined, and some of the discoveries in this regard are included in the extensive texts that are interspersed amongst the geographic features shown on the map.

$2500.00

L'Afrique Dressée Sur les Relationes les Plus Recentes et rectifiées sur les dernieres observations
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L'Afrique Dressée Sur les Relationes les Plus Recentes et rectifiées sur les dernieres observations

By [NOLIN, Jean-Baptiste (1657-1725)] and Jean-Baptiste NOLIN II (1686-1762)

Paris: Chez l'auteur rue s.Jacques au dessous de la rue Mathurins a l'Enseigne de la Place des Victoires, 1740. Copper-engraved wall map, with original outline colour, of four joined sheets, surrounded by text and vignettes printed on separate sheets, backed onto old linen, with contemporary wooden rollers, overall in very good condition. A rare and monumental wall map of Africa by a great French master of cartography. Jean-Baptiste Nolin was one of the most accomplished and certainly the most ambitious French cartographer of his era. He founded what ultimately became a family empire in Paris in the 1680s. Exceptionally, he managed to marry superlative decorative ornamentation with the serious objective of producing maps that reflected the most advanced rendering of geographical detail. The artistic élan of his compositions evinced a style that preserved the rhetorical ambitions of the Baroque ethic, while anticipating the playful elegance of the Rococo period. His masterpieces, many like the present wall map, were monumental in scale and represented Nolin's desire to overwhelm his competition in what was a very challenging market. Highly controversial, Nolin occasionally described himself as "the Engraver to the King", an appointment of which the royal court was curiously never apprised. In his endeavour to include the very latest geographical details on his maps, he seldom hesitated to acquire information from his eminent contemporaries, most notably Guillaume De L'Isle and Vincenzo Maria Coronelli, Jean-Dominique Cassini and the Sieur de Tillemon. At times these rivals were not appreciative of Nolin's adoption of their intellectual property, as De L'Isle successfully sued Nolin for plagiarism in 1705. However, the larger-than-life Nolin always seemed to transcend these challenges, leaving a thriving enterprise to be taken up by his son. The present map was created in 1740 by Jean-Baptiste Nolin II, largely based on earlier maps produced by his father. Geographically, the map is relatively progressive, however it showcases some rather curious speculations. The coastlines are well defined, having been explored for over two-hundred and fifty years, however, the heart of Africa remains an enigma. In the absence of direct observation, the European imagination was given free reign. In this light, Nolin adopts the seventeenth-century conceptions popularized by De L'Isle and Coronelli that the Nile was somehow connected to the Niger River, even though both rivers flow in different directions to terminate at points thousands of miles apart. Furthermore, the written descriptions of the continent's inhabitants are replete with archaic legends of bizarre and monstrous races. The presented map is an artistically virtuous composition on a monumental scale, the image being surrounded by thirty vignettes that depict events from African history. The focus of the vignettes is on the better known North African regions, however, there is also a great deal of attention paid to French commercial activities in Guinea. Each vignette is set within an elaborate baroque frame of a unique design, and is accompanied by textual narratives. The detailed description at the bottom is entitled "Description Geographique de L'Afrique." The large title cartouche is framed by period rocaille swirls, and is inhabited by an optimistic scene depicting the amicable commerce between Africans and Europeans, as well as a dedication to Louis XV. This wall map is one of the greatest subjects of the Nolins' legacy, not only being a masterful work of art and a fascinating image that tests the very limits of European geographical knowledge, but also a vivid record of a dramatic transitional period in the history of cartography, and of society in general. Tooley, Maps of Africa , p.86, plate 67.

$25000.00