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Moby Dick, or, The Whale

By MELVILLE, Herman (1819-1891)

New York: Harper & Brothers, 1851. 12mo. (7 3/8 x 4 7/8 inches). xxiii, [1], 635, [1], [6]pp. Publisher's ads in the rear. Foxing. Publisher's red cloth, cover bordered in blind and with central Harper & Brother's circular stamp in blind, spine lettered in gilt, rebacked retaining the original spine, original brown/orange coated endpapers. Housed in a cloth box. Rare first American edition of arguably the greatest work in American literature. The first American edition followed the three-volume English edition by a month and contained some thirty-five passages which had been edited out of the English edition. "[Melville's] great book, Moby Dick, was a complete practical failure, misunderstood by the critics and ignored by the public; and in 1853 the Harpers' fire destroyed the plates of all of his books and most of the copies remaining in stock [only about sixty copies survived the fire] ... Melville's permanent fame must always rest on the great prose epic of Moby Dick, a book that has no equal in American literature for variety and splendor of style and for depth of feeling" (Dictionary of American Biography). "Moby Dick is the great conundrum-book. Is it a profound allegory with the white whale the embodiment of moral evil, or merely the finest story of the sea ever written?" (Grolier, American). This example complete with the six pages of advertisements in the rear and in the publisher's red "A" cloth. BAL 13664; Grolier American 60; Johnson High Spots 57; Wright II:1701.

$24000.00

Memorial of the Citizens of New York, in Favor of Canal Navigation between the Great Western Lakes and the Tide-Waters of the Hudson

By ERIE CANAL - [De Witt CLINTON]

New York: Samuel Wood & Sons, 1816. 8vo. 18pp. Uncut and unopened. Toning. Stitched self-wrappers. Among the earliest and most influential works leading to the building of the Erie Canal. "In the autumn of 1815, Judge Jonas Platt was holding court in New York, and Thomas Eddy, having invited him to breakfast one morning, proposed to him the plan of endeavoring to get up a public meeting, in order to urge the propriety of offering a memorial to the Legislature, importuning them to construct the canal from Lake Erie to the Hudson. Judge Platt readily agreed and consented to present the subject to the meeting. Eddy called on De Witt Clinton, then Mayor of New York, who heartily joined in the undertaking. It was agreed that cards of invitation should be sent to about a hundred prominent men of the city. The large and respectable assemblage which gathered at the City Hotel, on December 3, was presided over by William Bayard and addressed by Judge Platt, De Witt Clinton, John Swartwout and others. In his introductory speech Judge Platt urged the expediency of a formal and public abandonment of the plan of an inclined-plane canal which had been proposed in the first report of the commissioners. Clinton, Swartwout, Eddy and Cadwallader D. Colden were appointed a committee to prepare a memorial to the Legislature. This able document, known in canal history as the 'New York Memorial,' was written by Clinton, and from its presentation may be dated the earnest and active progress of the enterprise. This memorial, says one writer, 'was the foundation of the present system of internal navigation; ... it effectually exploded the Ontario route, and silenced forever its advocates; and ... it produced an electrical effect throughout the whole country.' It was signed by a great portion of the respectable citizens of New York City, and copies sent throughout the state aroused an enthusiasm which resulted in public meetings in almost every city and village between Albany and Buffalo, and in the adoption of similar memorials. This agitation brought before the next Legislature an appeal from more than one hundred thousand petitioners to proceed at once with the work of making a canal. The project immediately became popular. This memorial with its clear and concise style of expression, its forceful arguments, and its large amount of information concerning the whole subject appealed to the multitudes who read it, and turned many of the skeptical to its favor" (Whitford, History of the Canal System of the State of New York). The work is surprisingly scarce; we can find no example on the market in over fifty years. Sabin 22747.

$1500.00

Letters from His Excellency General Washington, to Arthur Young ... containing an account of his husbandry, with a map of his farm; his opinions on various questions in agriculture; and many particulars of the rural economy of the United States

By WASHINGTON, George (1732-1799)

London: Printed by B. McMillan, 1801. 8vo. vi, 172pp. Engraved folding map of Mt. Vernon. Nineteenth century flexible black morocco, expertly rebacked to style, marbled endpapers and edges First edition of Washington and Young's correspondence on agricultural matters. These letters offer perhaps the best picture from his own pen of Washington as an agriculturist and plantation owner, seeking to improve both his own lands and those of his country through correspondence with the leading British agricultural theorist. Arthur Young (1741-1820) was a noted British agriculturist with whom Washington established a lively correspondence during his retirement. With the responsibilities of administering his estate at Mount Vernon, Washington sought to gain a deeper understanding of the most successful modes of farming available. Correspondence published here also includes letters from Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson. The folding engraved map of Mount Vernon by Neele is after Washington's own drawing. Sabin 101719; Howes W138.

$2500.00

Debates, Resolutions and other Proceedings of the Convention of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts ... for the Purpose of Assenting to and Ratifying the Constitution Recommended by the Grand Federal Convention

By CONSTITUTION, United States

Boston: Adams and Nourse, 1788. 8vo. 219, [1]pp. Contemporary calf, spine with raised bands. Housed in a cloth box. Provenance: J. Parker (early signature) The debates of the Massachusetts Ratifying Convention. "The Constitution might well be considered the central document of all American political discourse ... An evolving rather than static document, its text has never left a central place in American political discourse" (Reese). The struggle to ratify the Constitution can be viewed as the first national, grassroots political campaign in the United States. The differences between the Federalists, who advocated for passage of the new frame of government, and the Anti-Federalists, was significant and ratification was by no means assured. When the Confederation Congress resolved to send the Constitution to the states for ratification on recommendation by the Convention and George Washington himself, they intended it to be voted upon on its face. In Massachusetts, however, anti-federalist opposition was significant. In order to mollify their concerns, delegate to the convention Theophilus Parsons added nine amendments, which were presented by John Hancock (dramatically arising from his sick bed to deliver them). Thus, the Constitution was ratified by Massachusetts with the amendments added as a recommendation to "remove the fears, and quiet the apprehensions of many of the good people of this Commonwealth, and more effectually guard against an undue administration of the federal government." Three of these recommendations would become the Fifth, Seventh and Tenth Amendments of Constitution. The sixth state to ratify the Constitution, Massachusetts was the first to suggest amendments, which in turn led directly to the passage of the Bill of Rights. The present work includes a printing of the proposed Constitution on pages 3-19, the text of George Washington's letter on the ratification process, the debates of the 9 January to 7 February 1788 convention (including the aforementioned speech by Hancock), the proposed amendments and the details of the narrow 187-168 vote. Evans 21242; Sabin 45702; Ford 97; Sowerby 3008; Reese, Federal Hundred 21.

$4500.00

Constitution and By-Laws of the American Jewish Publication Society. (Founded on the 9th of Heshvan, 5606). Adopted at Philadelphia, on Sunday, November 30, 1845, Kislev 1, 5606

By JUDAICA, American

Philadelphia: C. Sherman, 5606. 12mo. 11, [1]pp. Publisher's plain wrappers Provenance: Leeser Library Hebrew Education Society (inked stamp on title) The founding of the American Jewish Publication Society: the first Jewish organization in the United States dedicated to the advancement of Jewish Culture and Religion. Isaac Leeser established the American Jewish Publication Society in 1845 in an effort to further Jewish education and defend against Christian missionaries. "The corresponding secretary and real workhorse of the Jewish Publication Society was Isaac Leeser" (Sarna, JPS and the Americanization of American Culture, pp. 1-4). The Society published fourteen works in a series entitled Jewish Miscellany before falling subscriptions, a stretched budget, Leeser's busy schedule, and finally, a destructive fire brought its activities to an end in 1851. The Preamble of the Society's Constitution reads: "The subscribers, deeply impressed with the necessity of fostering Jewish Literature and of diffusing the utmost possible knowledge, among all classes of Israelites, of the tenets of their religion and the history of their people; and feeling that the attainment of this project is beyond the means of any individual, and that association is a powerful lever to foster any great and good cause, do combine, as a society, for the purpose of carrying the above objects into effect, and pledge themselves to each other to contribute all in their power to promote the interest of their association." Singerman 881. Not in Rosenbach.

$2500.00

The Geographical Society of Baltimore. The Bahama Islands

By SHATTUCK, George Burbank

New York: Macmillan Company, 1905. Small 4to. 93 plates. Publisher's blue cloth First edition of the findings of a 1903 expedition to the islands by the Geographical Society of Baltimore and researchers from Johns Hopkins University. Includes chapters on geology, climate, flora and fauna, history (including much on slavery), and more.

$750.00

Memorial on the Upward Forces of Fluids

By GENET, Edmond Charles (1763-1834)

Albany: Packard & Van Benthuysen, 1825. 8vo. (9 x 5 3/4 inches). 112pp. 5 engraved plates, folding table. Foxing. Publisher's lettered boards, rebacked Among the earliest American works on aviation. An ambassador of the French Republic to the United States, Genet settled in New York and married Cornelia Clinton, the daughter of New York Governor George Clinton. Despite its title, which suggests hydraulics, the work largely deals with aviation and is regarded as the first printed suggestion of the theory of a heavier than air machine taking flight. The appendix includes chapters on "navigating the atmosphere," "applying steam power to aeronautics," and the "velocity of different winds." "This pamphlet by the former Ambassador from France contains a proposal for a large airship and other suggestions for the use of the aerostatic principle" (Aeronautic Americana) The "first book printed in the United States on practical aeronautics and on the first patent for an aeronautical invention" (Streeter). Scarce. Aeronautical Americana 9; Honeyman Sale 1475; Howes G100; Rink 610; Streeter Sale 3974.

$4500.00

The Gallery of Illustrious Americans, containing the portraits and biographical sketches of twenty-four of the most eminent citizens of the American Republic, since the death of Washington. From daguerreotypes by Brady - engraved by d'Avignon

By BRADY, Mathew B. (c.1823-1896, photographer). - Charles Edwards LESTER (1815-1889, editor)

New York: M.B.Brady, F.d'Avignon, C.Edwards Lester, 1850. 1st series only (all published), folio. (21 x 15 inches). Letterpress title and salutation leaf. 12 lithographic portraits on india paper, mounted as issued, by d'Avignon after daguerreotypes by Brady (11) and a painting by S. Gambardella (1). Each plate with the publisher's blindstamp in the lower margin, as issued. Expertly bound to style in half black morocco and period cloth covered boards, yellow endpapers A famous but very rare work, including portraits of John James Audubon and President Zachary Taylor from daguerreotypes by Mathew Brady, the most famous American photographer of the mid-19th century. The series is made up of twelve portraits, all but one from Brady's daguerreotypes, accompanied by biographical descriptions. It was intended as a celebration of the United States during the first half of the nineteenth century through the "noble deeds" of its most famous citizens. "In this Gallery, therefore, will be grouped together those American citizens, who have rendered the most signal [sic.] services to the Nation, since the death of the Father of the Republic. As there is nothing sectional in the scope of this work, it will be comprehensive in its spirit; and it is hoped that it may ... bind the Union still more firmly together" (Preface). The work had its roots in 1845 when "Brady, the commercial photographer, became Brady the historian, who used a camera as Bancroft did his pen. It was in this year that Brady began work on the tremendous project of preserving for posterity the pictures of all distinguished Americans, which he planned to publish in a massive volume with the title of The Gallery of Illustrious Americans ... The year 1850 was ... a milestone in Brady's life; his dream of having his Gallery ... published became a reality" (J.D.Horan Mathew Brady Historian with a camera. 1955 pp.10-14). With Brady as the senior partner, the work was a joint publishing venture between the journalist and author Charles Edwards Lester (who undertook to write the biographical sketches), the lithographer F. d'Avignon and Brady. The "book was issued by D'Avignon's Press ... It received fine notices from the Herald and other New York newspapers, but the public was apathetic and sales were disappointing. Brady had paid D'Avignon a hundred dollars apiece for each of the lithographic stones and Brady soon recognized the book as a critical success but a financial failure" (op.cit. p.14). From the title it is clear that Brady originally planned to issue a second series of 12 portraits, but, according to Horan, Brady "reluctantly abandoned the project." Horan goes on to note that Sabin claims that the work was completed in 1856 but there are no extant copies of this second part, and it appears that Sabin was mistaken in this case. The subjects of the work are as follows: 1. General Zachary Taylor, twelfth President of the United States 2. John Caldwell Calhoun 3. Daniel Webster 4. Silas Wright 5. Henry Clay 6. John Charles Fremont 7. John James Audubon 8. William Hickling Prescott 9. General Winfield Scott 10. President Fillmore 11. William Ellery Channing 12. Lewis Cass J.D. Horan Mathew Brady historian with a camera pp.10-14; Dorothy Meserve Kunhardt, et. al. Mathew Brady and his world pp.47-48; Harold Francis Pfister Facing the light: Historic American portrait daguerreotypes p.22; Sabin 40221 (calls for a second series in error); Robert Taft Photography and the American scene pp.59-60.

$22500.00

Carolina Sports by Land and Water. Including Incidents of Devil-Fishing, &c

By ELLIOTT, William

Charleston, SC: Burges & James, 1846. 12mo. 172pp. Publisher's cloth, upper cover titled in gilt. Red cloth chemise and slipcase. Provenance: Windsor Holden White (bookplate); F. P. Williamson (bookplate) First edition. William Elliott (1788-3 Feb. 1863) was a third-generation South Carolina planter, writer, and sportsman. He served in the state senate for nearly two decades, and was respected as one of the most gifted planters of the old South producing large crops of rice and sea island cotton. He wrote frequently on agricultural and outdoor topics in newspapers and in the American Turf Register and Sporting Magazine. The sporting sketches were collected and published as Carolina Sports by Land and Water, Including Incidents of Devil Fishing, Etc. (1846). "The charm of these tales lies in the animation and gusto with which Elliott communicates his experiences ... Theodore Roosevelt, who became fascinated with harpooning the devilfish in later years, paid tribute to Elliott's book: "Killing devil-fish with the harpoon and lance had always appealed to me as a fascinating sport, since as a boy I had read Elliott's account of it in his 'Field Sports of South Carolina'"(ANB). A landmark of American sporting literature and an uncommon antebellum Charleston imprint, here in the publisher's cloth. Phillips p. 111; Howes E112; Gee, Sportsman's Library p. 136; Henderson p. 108; Five Centuries of Sport (Maclay Sale) lot 208; Litchfield p. 41.

$3000.00

Constitution of the State of Missouri; Made in Convention, at the City of Jefferson, A.D. 1845 [cover title]
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Constitution of the State of Missouri; Made in Convention, at the City of Jefferson, A.D. 1845 [cover title]

By [MISSOURI]

Jefferson: James Lusk, 1846. 26pp. Bound to style in half calf and marbled boards, leather label. Old library stamp on first leaf, contemporary ink manuscript notation on first page. Heavily trimmed, with some loss to page numbers and annotation. The Attempted Missouri Constitution of 1845 The rare Missouri Constitution drafted in the convention of 1845. The first Missouri Constitution was passed in 1820, just prior to statehood in 1821. This is the second proposed constitution, drafted due to the growing population of the state. It was not, however, ratified by the voters, and thus was not adopted. Indeed, the manuscript note in this copy relates that, "This proposed Constitution was submitted to the people of Mo Aug 1846 & rejected by a majority of 8,460-" The constitution was not amended again until 1865, when Missouri passed a constitution with draconian loyalty oaths, designed to exclude all but the most fervent Unionists from public life. American Imprints Inventory ( Missouri ) 481.

$2000.00

A View of Boston, Taken on the Road to Dorchester
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A View of Boston, Taken on the Road to Dorchester

By DES BARRES, J. F. W. (1721-1824); after William PIERIE

London: J. F. W. Des Barres, 1776. Engraved view, printed on laid paper, engraved by James Newton after Pierie. Sheet size: 22 1/2 x 31 1/2 inches. First state. Repaired tears in lower margin. Rare view of Boston from Dorchester Heights, published shortly after George Washington's first victory of the American Revolution. Following the Battles of Lexington and Concord, American troops laid siege to Boston. Strategically, Dorchester Heights offered commanding views of both Boston town and harbour. On March 4, 1776, under the cover of darkness and with batteries firing from Roxbury and Cambridge to provide a diversion, George Washington moved canon captured at Ticonderoga onto the Heights and fortified the position. Faced with little choice given the overwhelming strategic advantage, General Howe retreated from Boston on March 17, giving George Washington and the Americans a decisive early victory in the war. The present view, accomplished by British artillery officer William Pierie in 1773, depicts Boston, Boston Harbor and Roxbury, as it would have been seen by Washington and the American army. The Shirley-Eustis house, the home of Governor William Shirley and later Governor William Eustis, in Roxbury is visible in the middle ground, and in the far distance the beacon is visible atop Beacon Hill. A rare view, published in 1776 in the New England section of Des Barres monumental Atlantic Neptune. Joseph Frederick Wallet Des Barres was born in Switzerland, where his Huguenot ancestors had fled following the repeal of the Edict of Nantes. He studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before immigrating to Britain where he trained at the Royal Military College, Woolwich. Upon the outbreak of hostilities with France in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to join his personal detail. Des Barres returned to London in 1774, where the Royal Navy charged him with the Herculean task of producing an atlas of sea charts of the American coast. The result was The Atlantic Neptune, which became the most celebrated sea atlas of its era, containing the first systematic survey of the east coast of North America. Des Barres's synergy of great empirical accuracy with the peerless artistic virtue of his aquatint views, created a work that "has been described as the most splendid collection of charts, plates and views ever published" (National Maritime Museum Catalogue). The Neptune eventually consisted of four volumes and Des Barres's dedication to the project was so strong that often at his own expense he continually updated and added new charts and views to various editions up until 1784, producing over 250 charts and views, many appearing in several variations. Following the completion of The Neptune, Des Barres returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, living to the advanced age of 103. Henry Stevens Collection, HNS97; Deak 132.

$17500.00

A Revisal of all the Public Acts of the State of North-Carolina and of the State of Tennessee, now in force in the State of Tennessee. [issued with]: The Laws of North Carolina and Tennessee, respecting vacant Lands and Deeds, which are no longer in force, but Necessary to the Investigation of Land Titles in Tennessee...
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A Revisal of all the Public Acts of the State of North-Carolina and of the State of Tennessee, now in force in the State of Tennessee. [issued with]: The Laws of North Carolina and Tennessee, respecting vacant Lands and Deeds, which are no longer in force, but Necessary to the Investigation of Land Titles in Tennessee...

By HAYWOOD, John, [ed]

Nashville: Thomas G. Bradford, 1810. [2],474,lxxiii,[3]; 136,xxv pp. Bound to style in half calf and marbled boards, leather label. Several early ownership inscriptions on front endleaves and titlepage. A few scattered manuscript notations throughout. Some tanning and minor foxing. The First Tennessee Laws The second edition of the third recorded Nashville imprint, which is popularly referred to as the first work of "book" length to issue from a Nashville press. Though the preface and index have been updated, the body of the text remains generally unchanged from the first edition, published just the year before, and it is possible that it is the same sheets of the first edition with new preface and index. Haywood writes in the preface: "The following pages are offered to the public with an assurance that could not be felt in presenting the first edition...The general complaint heretofore was to the index. It is now remedied and the laws passed since the first publication are referred to in it, and the reader apprised of the laws since repealed and obsolete." The first edition of this work is extremely scarce, as is this second edition. It is bound with another early Tennessee imprint intended to supplement this revised edition but printed separately, which details relevant but expired Tennessee and North Carolina land statutes. American Imprints Inventory ( Tennessee ) 44, 45; Allen 163, 164; OCLC 10290865, 19850730; Sabin 94782, 94744; Shaw & Shoemaker 21471, 21472.

$2000.00

International Sport with Flying-Machines [caption title]
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International Sport with Flying-Machines [caption title]

By AVIATION - James MEANS; Alexander Graham BELL; Octave CHANUTE and A. Lawrence ROTCH

Boston, 1908. 3pp., tall folded bifolium. Early aviation ephemera. Inspired by a similar aviation prize having been issued in France and by the technical improvements resulting by international yachting competitions, on April 18, 1908, the American Aviation Prize Fund was established by aviation pioneers James Means, Octave Chanute, A. Lawrence Rotch and telephone inventor Alexander Graham Bell. The present ephemeral handbill was circulated to "those interested in aviation" soliciting $100 from 250 individuals in order to fund a prize for an international sporting contest of flying machines. Published just prior to the Wright Brothers May 1908 demonstrations in Europe, the prize was evidently an early attempt to establish similar air shows in the United States.

$500.00

The Problem of Manflight

By MEANS, James (1853-1920)

Boston: W.B. Clarke & Co, 1894. 8vo. 20pp. Publisher's wrappers An early work on manned flight by a pioneer who influenced the Wright Brothers. A shoe manufacturing industrialist from Dorchester, Massachusetts, Means would become the founder of the Boston Aeronautical Society and the publisher of the 1895-1897 American Aeronautical Manuals, a journal which would have a profound influence on the Wright Brothers. The present work, published seven years before the Wright Brothers flight at Kitty Hawk, reviews the principles of flight, including lift, tacking, angle of descent, etc. and includes an image of Otto Lilienthal's 1893 glider flight on the upper wrapper. Importantly, the work gives the results of Means's own experiments launching unmanned "soaring machines" from the tower of Boston Light. The work concludes with the statement: "Aerial transit will be accomplished because the air is a solid if you hit it hard enough." Means' extensive collection of works on aviation, as well as his correspondence and photographs, are housed at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. Also at the Museum is the Wright Brothers copy of this pamphlet. Randers-Pehrson & Renstrom 97; Library of Congress, Dream of Flight 111.

$1600.00

Residence of Washington, Mount Vernon

By (WASHINGTON, George)

Np, 1840. Pen and ink and watercolor. Approximately 13 1/2 x 18 inches, mounted on contemporary sheet, with manuscript title, overall 15 x 19 1/2 inches. One short closed tear visible in the left margin. Nicely framed. Lovely early watercolour view of the east facade of Mount Vernon A fine and skilfully executed early watercolor view of the east facade of Mount Vernon. The piece is titled in the bottom margin, "Residence of Washington. Mount Vernon." The artist has included a female figure sitting on the portico, while a male figure in a blue coat rides away on the dirt road to the right of the structure. The work likely emanates from the 1840s, when John Augustine Washington III, George Washington's great-grand nephew owned the estate. A lovely 19th-century view of the Palladian-style residence of the Father of Our Country and America's first First Family.

$4250.00

[The Stamp Act]
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[The Stamp Act]

By [AMERICAN REVOLUTION] - Great Britain, Act of Parliament

London: Mark Baskett, 1765. Folio. (12 x 7 7/8 inches). [2], 279-310pp. 5 George III, cap. XII. Disbound. Housed in a blue full morocco box. Very rare first official printing of the Stamp Act: an exceptionally important document in American history. The passage of the Stamp Act was one of the signal events in the history of the United States. After its successful effort in the French and Indian War, the British government was saddled with a massive debt. Added to this was the cost of administering its new lands in Canada, and the necessity of protecting colonists on the American frontier from Indian attacks. In order to raise funds for border defenses, the British Parliament decided to levy a tax directly on the colonists, rather than relying on colonial legislatures to raise the funds themselves. Over the protests of colonial agents in London, including Benjamin Franklin from Pennsylvania and Jared Ingersoll of Connecticut, a tax was levied on all legal and commercial papers, pamphlets, newspapers, almanacs, cards, and dice. Nine pages in the present act are taken up with descriptions of what type of printed materials would be subject to the tax. A Stamp Office was created in Britain, and Stamp Inspectors were to be assigned to each colonial district. Colonists wishing to purchase or use any of the materials covered in the Act would be required to buy a stamp. The outrage in the colonies at this form of taxation was immediate and overwhelming, and the Stamp Act was repealed in 1766. The bitterness engendered by the Act lingered on, and, coupled with subsequent British laws including the Intolerable Acts and the Townshend Acts, became some of the many grievances enunciated in the Declaration of Independence. "This is the original folio edition of the famous (or infamous) Stamp Act, by which the American colonies were taxed in and on their business papers" (Church). "The importance of this act to our history needs no comment" (Streeter). Sabin and Howes note an octavo edition of sixty-six pages, also printed by Baskett in London in 1765. This momentous law was reprinted several times in the American colonies in 1765, in editions in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Annapolis, New London, and Woodbridge, New Jersey. Sweet & Maxwell II:176; Church 1054; Stevens 6; Howes A285; Sabin 1606.

$27500.00

Bound volume of 44 pieces of lithographed Confederate sheet music, mostly with illustrated covers
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Bound volume of 44 pieces of lithographed Confederate sheet music, mostly with illustrated covers

By CIVIL WAR, Confederate

Richmond, Columbia, Augusta, and elsewhere, 1863. Quarto. Collation as below. Expertly bound to style in half dark purple morocco and purple cloth covered boards, flat spine ruled and lettered in gilt, yellow endpapers An impressive collection of Confederate lithographed sheet music. This bound volume includes the majority of the imprints by Richmond publishers and lithographers George Dunn and Company, active in Richmond from 1862-64. The collection includes: 1) The Dying Soldier, or the Moon rose o'er the battle plain. 4pp. Richmond: J. W. Davies & Sons, lithographed by E. Crehen, 1864. P&W 6983. 2) Dear Mother I've come home to die. Words by E. Bowers, Music by Henry Tucker. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co.; Columbia, SC, Julian Selby, [nd]. P&W 6953. 3) God Save the South. Words by Earnest Halphin, music by Chas. W. A. Ellerbrock. 6pp. Lithographed by B. Duncan & Co., Columbia, SC. Baltimore: Miller & Beacham; Augusta: Blackmar & Co., nd. P&W 7064. 4) The March of the Southern Men. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co.; Columbia: Julian A. Selby, 1863. P&W 7228. 5) On Guard. Words by Wallace Rowe. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co.; Columbia: Julian A. Selby, 1864. P&W 7327. 6) The Southern Soldier Boy. Song sung by Miss Sallie Partington in the Virginia Cavalier at the New Richmond Theatre. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co.; Columbia: Julian A. Selby, 1863. P&W 7494. 7) The South. Poetry by Charlie Wildwood. Music by John H. Hewitt. 4pp. Columbia, SC: Julian A. Selby, B. Duncan & Co., lith., 1863. P&W 7474. 8) Palmetto Schottisch. Composed and Arranged by A. F. Turner. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co., 1864. P&W 7348. 9) I Remember the hour when sadly we parted. 4pp. Mobile: H.C. Clarke [and others], 1864. P&W 7116. 10) Annie of the Vale. Words by G.P. Morris. Music by J.R. Thomas. 6pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co.; Columbia: Julian A. Selby, nd. P&W 6806. 11) Good Bye Sweetheart, Good Bye. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co.; Columbia: Julian A. Selby, 1863. P&W 7084. 12) Spring Time Polka. Composed by A.J. Turner. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co., 1864. P&W 7505. 13) My Wife and Child Song. Poetry by the Late Lamented Hero General Stonewall Jackson. Music by F. W. Rosier. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co.; Columbia: Julian A. Selby, 1863. P&W 7288. 14) Mother, Oh! Sing me to rest. Composed by M. Keller. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co.; Columbia: Julian A. Selby, nd. P&W 7279. 15) The Musical Olio: or Favorite Gems of the Popular Southern Composer, John H. Hewitt. 4pp. Macon & Savannah: John C. Schreiner & Son, nd. P&W 6966. 16) Up With the Flag. Composed nd Respectfully Dedicated to the Fourth N.C. Troops by Dr. Wm. B. Harrell. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co.; Columbia: Julian A. Selby, 1863. P&W 7572. 17) Pray, Maiden, Pray! Poetry by A. W. Kercheval. Music by A.J. Turner. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co., 1864. P&W 7380. 18) The Standard Bearer. Words by Major T.N. P. C.S.A. Music by N.S. Cleman. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co., 1864. P&W 7506. 19) No Surrender Song. Music by C.C. Mera. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co.; Columbia: Julian A. Selby, 1864. P&W 7301. 20) Keep me awake Mother. Words by Mrs. M.W. Stratton. Music by Jos. Hart Denck. 4pp. Columbia: Julian A. Selby, nd. P&W 7175. 21) Gen'l Morgan's Grand March. Composed by C.L. Peticolas. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co.; Columbia: Julian A. Selby, 1864. P&W 7049. 22) Nautical Song...The Alabama. By E. King. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co.1864. P&W 6793. 23) All quiet along the Potomac To-Night. Words by Lamar Fontaine. Music by J. H. Hewitt. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co., 1864. P&W 6796. 24) The Exotics. Flowers of Song Transplanted to Southern Soil. 4pp. Augusta: Blackmar & Broth.; Columbia: B. Duncan & Co., lith, nd. P&W 7361. 25) Mary of Argyle. Music by S. Nelson. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co.,1864. P&W 7234. 26) Her Bright Smile Haunts Me Still. Words by J.E. Carpenter. Music by W.T. Wrighton. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co., 1864. P&W 7097. 27) Harp of the South. Awake! A Southern War Song. Words by J.M. Kilgour. Music by C.L. Peticolas. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co.; Columbia: Julian A. Selby, 1863. P&W 7090. 28) Mother is the Battle Over. Arranged by Jos. Hart Denck. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co.; Columbia: Julian A. Selby, nd. P&W 7277 29) The Southern Cross. Words by St. George Tucker. Music by C. L. Peticolas. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co.; Columbia: Julian A. Selby, 1863. P&W 7482. 30) The Star Spangled Cross and the Field of Pure White. Written and Composed by Subaltern. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co.; Columbia: Julian A. Selby, 1864. P&W 7510. 31) Virginian Marseillasise. By F. W. Rosier. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co.; Columbia: Julian A. Selby, nd. P&W 7584. 32) Wait till the War, Love, Is Over. Words by A.J. Andrews. Music by C.W. Burton. 4pp. Richmond: West & Johnston, litho. by Geo. Dunn. & Co., 1864. P&W 7599. 33) When this Cruel War is Over. Words by Charles C Sawyer. Music by Henry Tucker. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co.; Columbia: Julian A. Selby, nd. P&W 7630. 34) You Can Never Win Us Back ... Written by a Lady of Kentucky. Arranged by J.E. Smith. 4pp. Richmond: J.W. Davies & Sons., litho. by E. Crehen, 1864. P&W 7653. 35) Gems of Southern Song. 4pp. Macon: John W. Burke; Columbia: B. Duncan & Co., lith., nd. P&W 7576. 36) Call me not back from Echoless Shore. Words by Chas. C. Sawyer. Music by Henry Tucker. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co.; Columbia: Julian A. Selby, nd. P&W 6878. 37) The Dearest Spot of Earth to Me Is Home. By W.T. Wrighton. 6pp. Augusta: Blackmar & Bro., nd. P&W 6954. 38) There's Life in the Old Land Yet. Poetry by Jas. R. Randall. Music by Edward Eaton. Augusta: Blackmar & Bro., lith. B. Duncan, Columbia., nd. P&W 7548. 39) Who Will Care for Mother Now. Poetry by C.C. Sawyer. Music by C.F. Thompson. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co. 1864. P&W 7638. 40) Christmas and New Year Musical Souvenir. Music by F.W.R. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co.; Columbia: Julian A. Selby, 1863. P&W 6903. 41) Our First President's Quickstep. By P. Rivinac. 4pp. Augusta: Blackmar & Bro., B. Duncan, lith. Columbia. P&W 7337. 42) Something to Love Me.Words by J.E. Carpenter. Music by E.L. Hime. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co.; Columbia: Julian A. Selby, nd. P&W 7467. 43) Silver Bells Mazurka. Composed by Charles O. Pape. 6pp. Columbia: P.L. Valdry, nd. P&W 7446. 44) We Have Parted. Poetry and Music by Miss Ella Wren. 4pp. Richmond: Geo. Dunn & Co.; Columbia: Julian A. Selby, 1863. P&W 7613.

$12000.00

Specimens of Fancy Turning  Executed on the Hand or Foot Lathe with Geometric, Oval, and Eccentric Chucks and Elliptical Cutting Frame
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Specimens of Fancy Turning Executed on the Hand or Foot Lathe with Geometric, Oval, and Eccentric Chucks and Elliptical Cutting Frame

By [WOOLSEY, E. J.]

Philadelphia: H. C. Baird, 1869. Square 8vo. (8 5/8 x 7 1/4 inches). Title, plus 2pp. Explanation. 30 mounted albumen photographs. Publisher's green cloth, covers bordered in blind, upper cover titled in gilt, yellow endpapers Extraordinary proto-Modernist work of delicate abstract beauty and a very rare early American photographically illustrated book. "The accompanying specimens of turning on the lathe are photographic copies of the originals, executed on a scale one-third larger than the copies ... These figures were cut on the lathe by a delicate pointed tool kept in position by guides, and pressed at the back by a fine spiral spring, which tool can be drawn back at any moment by the turner ... The object I originally intended was to illustrate the curves that the lathe was capable of producing, by cutting out figures on a glass plate covered with collodion, and one of the following figures with a white ground is printed from a plate so operated upon. The same figure is photographed on a black ground. The collodion, however, tears under the action of the tool, and this defect is corrected by using the blackened card process and then by photographing the card" (Explanation). The Explanation is signed with the initials E.J.W. of Lenox, Massachusetts and has been ascribed to Woolsely, a noted landowner in the town. This early photographically illustrated book is a wonderful example of proto-modernism, with the resulting exquisite images unintentionally becoming works of art. Furthermore, this is an incredibly early example of the concept of scratching directly onto photographic paper to create a work of art, much in the style of today's popular contemporary artist Marco Breuer. For this reason, copies of this work reside in the famed collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art (54.636.1) and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (98.537).

$17500.00

[Autograph letter signed, from George Washington to Burwell Bassett, offering condolences on the death of his daughter, and discussing news of the engagement of John Custis to Eleanor Calvert]
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[Autograph letter signed, from George Washington to Burwell Bassett, offering condolences on the death of his daughter, and discussing news of the engagement of John Custis to Eleanor Calvert]

By WASHINGTON, GEORGE (1732-1799)

Mount Vernon, 1773. [3]pp. on two sheets, each approximately 9 x 7¼ inches. Small quarto. Repaired splits along old folds. A long and personal letter from Washington at Mt. Vernon. An emotional letter written by George Washington at Mount Vernon to Col. Burwell Bassett in 1773, the year before he attended the First Continental Congress as a delegate for Virginia. Bassett was a close friend of Washington and was also married to one of Martha Washington's sisters, Anna Maria Dandridge, thus making their families very close as well. Washington writes primarily in this instance to console the Bassetts on the loss of their daughter, Elizabeth: "Dear sir, The interruption of the Post for several Weeks, prevented our receiving the melancholy account of your loss till within these few days. That we sympathize in your misfortune, and lament the decree which has deprivd you of so dutiful a Child, & the World of so promising a young Lady, stands in no need, I hope, of argument to prove; but the ways of Providence being inscrutible, and the justice of it not to be scand by the shallow eye of humanity, nor to be counteracted by the utmost efforts of human Power, or Wisdom; resignation, &, as far as the strength of our reason & religion can carry us, a cheerful acquessence to the d[iv]ine will is what we are to aim at: and I am perswaded that your own good sense will arm you with the fortitude to withstand the stroke, great as it is and enable you to console Mrs Bassett whose loss, & feelings upon this occasion, are much to be pitied." Washington also discusses business with Bassett, informing him that his journey to New York to enroll his stepson John Parke Custis in King's College precludes him from attending to relevant matters in Williamsburg, Va.: "By Letters from Doctr Cooper, Presidt of the College in New York, my departure for that place is now fixd to about the 8th of May, which puts it out of my power to attend the Meeting in Williamsburg this Court; I have therefore, by Mr Henderson, Inclosd several Letters to, & drafts upon, different People for money, to Colo. Fielding Lewis, who wrote me that he should be in Wmsburg; but if sickness, or any other unforeseen accident should prevent his attendance, I should take it very kind of you to ask for, & open my Letter to him and comply with the Contents in respect to the receivg & paying of money." Lastly, Washington takes the opportunity to inform Bassett of the engagement of Custis to Eleanor Calvert, of whose timing he does not entirely approve: "Mrs Washington in her Letter to Mrs Bassett informs her of Jack Custis's engagemt with Nelly Calvert, Second daughter of Benedict Calvert Esqr. of Maryland; I shall say nothing further therefore on the Subject than that I could have wish'd he had postpond entering into the engagement till his Studies were finishd, not that I have any objection to the Match, as she is a girl of exceeding good Character but because I fear, as he has discoverd much fickleness already, that he may either change, and therefore injure the young Lady; or, that it may precipitate him into a Marriage before, I am certain, he has ever bestowd a serious thought of the consequences; by which means his education is Interrupted, & he perhaps, wishing to be at liberty again before he is fairly imbarked on those important duties. My Sincere good wishes attend Mrs Bassett & the Family and I am Dr Sir Yr Most Affecte Hble Servt Go: Washington." In the event, Washington's fears were well founded, as Custis dropped out of King's College by the end of 1773, and married Calvert in Febrary 1774. When Custis died at the age of 26 in 1781, after falling ill at the battle of Yorktown, he did so at Bassett's estate. The spring of 1773 was generally a terrible season for both the Bassetts and the Washingtons, as just three months after the death of Elizabeth Bassett, Martha Washington's youngest daughter, Mary Parke Custis, also died suddenly. An excellent letter that demonstrates the close relationship between George Washington, Burwell Bassett, and their families, and one that sheds light on the trying period that both families were experiencing at the time. "From George Washington to Burwell Bassett, 20 April 1773," Founders Online , http://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/02-09-02-0164.

$37500.00

A Year's Residence in the United States ... By William Cobbett ... Part I ... [Bound with:] Notes on a Journey in America from the Coast of Virginia to the Territory of Illinois. By Morris Birkbeck ... The Fourth Edition ... [Bound with:] Letters from Illinois. By Morris Birkbeck ... Third Edition ... [And with:] Sketches of America. A Narrative of a Journey of FIve Thousand  Miles through the Eastern and Western States of America ... By Henry Bradshaw Fearon
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A Year's Residence in the United States ... By William Cobbett ... Part I ... [Bound with:] Notes on a Journey in America from the Coast of Virginia to the Territory of Illinois. By Morris Birkbeck ... The Fourth Edition ... [Bound with:] Letters from Illinois. By Morris Birkbeck ... Third Edition ... [And with:] Sketches of America. A Narrative of a Journey of FIve Thousand Miles through the Eastern and Western States of America ... By Henry Bradshaw Fearon

By COBBETT, William; Morris BIRKBECK; and Henry FEARON

London, 1818. Four volumes in one, 8vo. [4], 186; 156pp, plus engraved folding map (hand coloured in outline); xv, [1], 114; vii, [1], 462pp. Contemporary half calf and marbled paper covered boards, rebacked A lovely sammelband of English editions of classic accounts of agrarian travels in America. Howes C525, B468, B467, and F65.

$1400.00

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