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Lettres de feu M. Jos. Marcoux, missionnaire du Sault, aux Chefs Iroquois du Lac des Deux Montagnes, 1848-49 ... Nene tesakoiatonnihne ne ratikosanenskse kanesatakehronon ne tharonhiakanere kenha kahnasakehronon ronsanikenha
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Lettres de feu M. Jos. Marcoux, missionnaire du Sault, aux Chefs Iroquois du Lac des Deux Montagnes, 1848-49 ... Nene tesakoiatonnihne ne ratikosanenskse kanesatakehronon ne tharonhiakanere kenha kahnasakehronon ronsanikenha

By MARCOUX, Joseph (1791-1855)

Tiohtiake [Montreal]: John Lovell, 1869. 16mo. Text entirely in Mohawk. 27, [1] pp. Publisher's lettered wrappers Father Marcoux's letters to the Chiefs of the Iroquois, printed entirely in Mohawk. Joseph Marcoux was a missionary among the Iroquois. He was born in Canada in 1791 and died there in 1855. He was ordained 12 January, 1813, and spent the remaining forty-two years of his life evangelizing the Iroquois, first at St. Regis and later at Caughnawaga, or Sault-St-Louis. In addition to his efforts towards the betterment of the spiritual and social condition of the Indians, he acquired such proficiency in the Iroquois tongue as to attain a high rank among philologists through his Iroquois grammar and his French-Iroquois dictionary. For his flock, whom he had provided with church and schools (1845), he translated into Iroquois Pere de Ligny's "Life of Christ", and published in their own language, a collection of prayers, hymns, and canticles (1852), a catechism (1854), a calendar of Catholic ritual, and a number of sermons. He died in 1855 of typhoid fever, at that time epidemic among the Iroquois. This collection of letters written by Father Maroux to the chiefs of the Iroquois is very rare, with no examples recorded at auction in the last half century and only a handful of institutional holdings. Pilling, Proof Sheets 2459; Pilling, Bibliography of the Iroquoian languages, p. 115.

$1750.00

In Congress, July 4, 1776. The Unanimous Declaration of the Thirteen United States of America

By DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. - Eleazer HUNTINGTON (engraver)

[Hartford, Connecticut]: Eleazer Huntington, 1824. Engraved broadside, printed on wove paper. Sheet size: approximately 25 x 20 inches. Expert restoration. Among the rarest broadside printings of the Declaration in the early 19th century. According to John Bidwell's list, this is the sixth broadside edition of the Declaration of Independence . Bidwell locates only three copies of the Huntington printing of the Declaration, at the Huntington Library, Massachusetts Historical Society, and American Antiquarian Society. The Declaration of Independence , the foundation document of the United States, has been printed numerous times since its original publication in 1776. At first as broadsides, then as an essential addition to any volume of laws, it was from the beginning a basic work in the American canon. The present document is one of the earliest broadside editions of the Declaration , done within a few years of the first broadside republications In the period following the war of 1812, Americans began to look back, for the first time with historical perspective, on the era of the founding of the country. The republic was now forty years old, and the generation which had taken part in the American Revolution, including the signers of the Declaration, was dropping away. With nostalgia and curiosity Americans began to examine the details of the nation's founding: documents such as the debates of the Constitutional Convention were published for the first time. Against this background it seemed extraordinary that the Declaration of Independence, as created, was unknown to Americans, when the text was so central to the national consciousness. Several entrepreneurs set out to bridge this gap by printing exact copies of the document, often featuring calligraphic text, portraits, or other decorative flourishes. The first to do so was a writing master named Benjamin Owen Tyler, who created a calligraphic version of the Declaration... and published it in 1818, recreating exactly the signatures of the signers as they appeared on the original. Three other broadside printings of the Declaration... were issued in 1818 and 1819, each containing ornamental borders or illustrations. These were followed in the early 1820s by the present printing by Hartford engraver and penmanship author Eleazer Huntington. Huntington followed Tyler's example by creating a calligraphic facsimile of the Declaration... , but stripped out the ornaments and illustrations that had been added by previous publishers, returning the document to the simple title and text of the original, and providing the signatures of the signers in exact facsimile. John Bidwell, "American History in Image and Text" in Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society , 1988, Vol. 98, pp.247-302 (also issued as a separate pamphlet by AAS), item 6.

$15000.00

History of the Indian Tribes of North America, with Biographical Sketches and Anecdotes of the Principal Chiefs. Embellished with one hundred and twenty portraits, from the Indian Gallery in the Department of War, at Washington
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History of the Indian Tribes of North America, with Biographical Sketches and Anecdotes of the Principal Chiefs. Embellished with one hundred and twenty portraits, from the Indian Gallery in the Department of War, at Washington

By MCKENNEY, Thomas L. (1785-1859) & James HALL (1793-1868)

Philadelphia: Frederick W. Greenough (vol.I) and Daniel Rice & James G. Clark (vols.II & III), 1844. 3 volumes, folio. (20 1/4 x 13 5/8 inches). 120 hand-coloured lithographic plates after Karl Bodmer, Charles Bird King, James Otto Lewis, P.Rhindesbacher and R.M.Sully, drawn on stone by A.Newsam, A. Hoffy, Ralph Trembley, Henry Dacre and others, printed and coloured by J.T. Bowen and others, vol.III with two lithographic maps and one table printed recto of one leaf, 17pp. of lithographic facsimile signatures of the original subscribers (subscriber leaves bound out of order). Contemporary half red morocco and period marbled paper covered boards, spines with raised bands in seven compartments, black morocco lettering pieces in the second and third, the others with a repeat Indian head decoration in gilt, marbled endpapers, gilt edges, expertly recased Lovely set of the first edition of "One of the most costly and important [works] ever published on the American Indians"(Field), "a landmark in American culture" (Horan) and an invaluable contemporary record of a vanished way of life, including some of the greatest American hand-coloured lithographs of the 19th century. After six years as superintendent of Indian Trade, Thomas McKenney had become concerned for the survival of the Western tribes. He had observed unscrupulous individuals taking advantage of the Native Americans for profit, and his vocal warnings about their future prompted his appointment by President Monroe to the Office of Indian Affairs. As first director, McKenney was to improve the administration of Indian programs in various government offices. His first trip was during the summer of 1826 to the Lake Superior area for a treaty with the Chippewa, opening mineral rights on their land. In 1827, he journeyed west again for a treaty with the Chippewa, Menominee, and Winebago in the present state of Michigan. His journeys provided an unparalleled opportunity to become acquainted with Native American tribes. When President Jackson dismissed him from his government post in 1830, McKenney was able to turn more of his attention to his publishing project. Within a few years, he was joined by James Hall, the Illinois journalist, lawyer, state treasurer and, from 1833, Cincinnati banker who had written extensively about the west. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin whom they tried to enlist in their publishing enterprise, saw their book as a way of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The text, which was written by Hall based on information supplied by McKenney, takes the form of a series of biographies of leading figures amongst the Indian nations, followed by a general history of the North American Indians. The work is now famous for its colour plate portraits of the chiefs, warriors and squaws of the various tribes, faithful copies of original oils by Charles Bird King painted from life in his studio in Washington (McKenney commissioned him to record the visiting Indian delegates) or worked up by King from the watercolours of the young frontier artist, James Otto Lewis. All but four of the original paintings were destroyed in the disastrous Smithsonian fire of 1865 so their appearance in this work preserves what is probably the best likeness of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the early 19th century. Numbered among King's sitters were Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. This was the most elaborate plate book produced in the United States to date, and its publishing history is extremely complex. The title pages give an indication of issue and are relatively simple: volume I, first issue was by Edward C. Biddle and is dated 1836 or more usually 1837, the second issue Frederick W. Greenough with the date 1838, and the third issue is by Daniel Rice & James G. Clark dated 1842. Volume II, first issue is by Frederick W. Greenough and dated 1838 and the second issue by Rice & Clark and dated 1842. Volume III is by Daniel Rice & James G. Clark and dated 1844. BAL 6934; Bennett p.79; Field 992; Howes M129; Lipperhiede Mc4; Reese Stamped With A National Character 24; Sabin 43410a; Servies 2150.

$160000.00

Biblia, das ist: die ganze go¨ttliche Heilige Schrift Alten und Neuen Testaments, / nach der deutschen Uebersetzung D. Martin Luthers
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Biblia, das ist: die ganze go¨ttliche Heilige Schrift Alten und Neuen Testaments, / nach der deutschen Uebersetzung D. Martin Luthers

By BIBLE IN GERMAN

Germantown, PA: Christoph Saur, 1776. Thick quarto. [4],992,277,[3]pp. Printed in two columns. Title page backed at an early date, foxing. Contemporary calf over wooden boards, brass bosses and cornerpieces. brass hinges and clasps The famous Gun-wad Bible of the Revolution: in a lovely contemporary Pennsylvania German binding. The third bible produced by Sauer (preceded by editions of 1743 and 1763) but perhaps the most famous. Of the 3000 copies printed, many are said to have been destroyed by the British during the Revolution. "At the invasion of Germantown Mr. Sauer fled from the place, and the British troops destroyed nearly all the copies of the Bible, by converting the leaves into litter for their horses, and by using the paper for their cartridges ... Substantially, the editions of 1763 and 1776 are one and the same" (Wright). It would appear that the source of the story of this bible derived from Isaiah Thomas, who writes in his History of America, recounting of the sale of Saur's estate in 1778, that during the Battle of Germantown the purchaser of the unbound sheets of the 1776 Bible "sold a part of [them] to be used as covers for cartridges." When first published in 1743, Saur's bible was the first bible in a European language to be published in America and just the second Bible printed in America after John Eliot's Indian Bibles of the 1660s. The present edition precedes the Aitken Bible by six years and is the first bible printed from type cast in America. Sauer's text of the Luther translation was largely based on the Halle Bible, but with the addition of the appendix to the Apocrypha with books 3 and 4 Esdras and 3 Maccabees supplied from the Berlenburg version. There are several variants of the edition: In this copy the main title-page is printed in black only and on the New Testament title-page the place of printing is given as "Germantown." Arndt, The First Century of German Language Printing in the United States of America 475; Darlow & Moule 4240; Evans 14663; Hildeburn 3336; O'Callaghan, p. 29; Sabin 5194; Wright, Early Bibles of America, pp. 28-50; Rumball-Petre 162; Thomas, History of Printing in America, pp. 41113.

$4000.00

The History of the Rise, Progress, and Establishment, of the Independence of the United States of America: including an Account of the Late War; and of the Thirteen Colonies, from their origin to that period
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The History of the Rise, Progress, and Establishment, of the Independence of the United States of America: including an Account of the Late War; and of the Thirteen Colonies, from their origin to that period

By GORDON, William (1728-1807)

London: Printed for the Author, 1788. 4 volumes, 8vo. 9 engraved folding maps and plates. Repaired tear to map of Yorktown. Contemporary tree calf, rebacked. The first edition of the "first full-scale history of this war by an American; to its preparation Jefferson contributed some aid" (Howes). Gordon was a dissenting minister in England, who like many of his class sympathized with the contention of the Thirteen Colonies. Going to America during the disturbances, and becoming pastor of the church at Jamaica Plain, now a district of Boston, he was throughout the Revolution a spectator close at hand of many important events, and the associate of many of the chief patriots. "Gordon is deservedly reckoned as the most impartial and reliable of the numerous historians of the American Revolution" (Sabin). The work is noted for its folding maps, engraved by T. Conder, which include a general map of the United States, as well as maps of New England, New Jersey, Virginia, the Carolinas, maps of the areas surrounding Boston and New York City, plus battle plans of Fort Moultrie and Yorktown. Howes G256; Sabin 28011; Larned 134; Gephart 996; Nebenzahl, Battle Plans of the American Revolution 23, 63, 86, 105, 201.

$9500.00

A Journal of the Voyages and Travels of a Corps of Discovery under the command of Capt. Lewis and Capt. Clarke of the army of the United States from the mouth of the river Missouri through the interior parts of North America to the Pacific ocean, during the years 1804, 1805 & 1806
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A Journal of the Voyages and Travels of a Corps of Discovery under the command of Capt. Lewis and Capt. Clarke of the army of the United States from the mouth of the river Missouri through the interior parts of North America to the Pacific ocean, during the years 1804, 1805 & 1806

By GASS, Patrick (1771-1870)

Pittsburgh: Printed by Zadok Cramer, for David M'Keehan, Publisher and Proprietor, 1807. 12mo. (6 1/2 x 4 inches). 262pp. Contemporary tree sheep, flat spine divided into compartments with blind rules, lettering in gilt in the second Provenance: John Statesir (inscription dated 1823) A rare unsophisticated copy in the original binding of the first edition of the earliest published firsthand account of the Lewis and Clark expedition: "one of the essential books for an Americana collection" (Streeter). The origins of Gass's journal is explained in a 7 April 1805 letter from Meriwether Lewis to President Thomas Jefferson: "We have encouraged our men to keep journals, and seven of them do so, to whom in this respect we give every assistance in our power." Because of the delay in the publication of the official account, Gass' journal became the first to appear in print, and as such was eagerly taken up by readers starved for information about the discoveries. "Patrick Gass was a rough reliable frontier soldier when he joined the Lewis and Clark expedition. He was made a sergeant when Sergeant Floyd died. He writes a terse soldier's narrative with rugged honesty... For seven years his story offered the only real information the nation had of the Oregon country and of the Louisiana Purchase. It is a work of primary importance" (Webster A. Jones). First editions of Gass's journal have become scarce, particularly in good condition. Besides being unsophisticated and in its original binding, this copy is also particularly tall, with most extant copies trimmed down considerably. Graff 1516; Hill (2004) 685; Howes G77 'b'; Literature of the Lewis & Clark Expedition 3.1; Sabin 26741; Shaw & Shoemaker 12646; Smith 3465; Streeter Sale 3120; Wagner-Camp 6:1.

$14000.00

Journey to the Gold Diggins by Jeremiah Saddlebags
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Journey to the Gold Diggins by Jeremiah Saddlebags

By CALIFORNIA GOLD RUSH - James A. & Donald F. READ, illustrators

New York: Stringer & Townsend, 1849. Oblong 8vo. (5 1/2 x 9 inches). 63, [1]pp. Pictorial title and 112 wood engraved comic illustrations. Original green lower wrapper (upper wrapper, which repeats the title is lacking). Housed in a modern cloth slipcase. Rare first edition of among the earliest caricatures of the Forty-Niners: a classic of California Gold Rush comic book literature. "Of the American comic books on the subject of the gold rush, the best known, although it is scarce, is this." This is the story of an "Argonaut who risked the hard journey to the gold fields, found that it was all a good deal more difficult than he had thought, avoided death by a hair's breadth time and again, and came home poorer than he went. It is the best of the American comic books on this theme" (Cowan). "Jeremiah Saddlebags underwent every possible mishap in this classic spoof of the adventurers of the Forty-Niner" (Streeter). Two issues of the first edition were published, without priority, in Cincinnati and New York (present). A scarce example of the best known work of Gold Rush comic book literature. Cowan, p. 523; Howes R92; Kurutz 524b; Murrell 170; Randall 404; Sabin 68157; Streeter sale 2591; Graff 3432.

$9500.00

Illustrations of the Manners, Customs, and Condition of the North American Indians with letters and notes written during eight years of travel and adventure among the wildest and most remarkable tribes now existing

By CATLIN, George (1796-1872)

London: J.E. Adlard for Henry G.Bohn, 1866. 2 volumes, octavo. (9 5/16 x 5 3/4 inches). 313 hand-coloured etchings on 180 plates, including 3 maps (1 folding). Contemporary red half morocco and marbled paper covered boards, spines in six compartments with raised bands, the second and fourth with coloured morocco lettering-pieces, the other compartments with alternate decoration of either a large tool of a shoulder-length portrait of an Indian, or a tool showing a crossed peace-pipe and tomahawk, marbled endpapers, gilt edges Provenance: Frederick S. Peck (bookplate) Deluxe issue: one of twelve copies with the plates printed in outline and entirely coloured by hand. This book was and is one of the most widely circulated works on American Indians written in the 19th century, and the illustrations so beautifully presented here remain the most important body of illustrative material of American Indian life in the American West. This is a later edition of Catlins' Letters and Notes , the London publisher, Henry Bohn, took over publication in 1845 and altered the title to that given above. What is important in this copy is the coloured plates. According to Sabin "Mr. Bohn had twelve or more copies colored after the fancy of the artist who did the work, but tolerably well." Sabin knew Bohn personally and was therefore certainly in a position to know. He goes on to state that "Such copies are worth $60 a set" (this was probably a bit optimistic, and, in fact, a set brought $24 at the Field sale in 1875. But, in comparison, a copy of the Indian Portfolio... sold for only $1.50). Howes disagrees with Sabin and states that various editions published by Bohn appear with the plates coloured, however, given the quality of the work involved and the lack of any contemporary evidence amongst Bohn's advertising material of a more generally available coloured issue, it would seem likely that Sabin is correct. The plates themselves are clean, fresh, and very handsomely coloured. It is impossible to identify the colourist, but it was quite possibly was one of the Catlin copyists working in England at that time, John Cullum or Rosa Bonheur. The plates illustrate scenes of Indian life in the West, and include a number of portraits of individual Indians. Copies of the work with such contemporary hand colouring are known in a variety of editions, suggesting that Bohn coloured sets on a bespoke basis, with whatever copies of the work he had on hand. The present set, with early uniform provenance, is stated on the titltes as the ninth edition of vol. 1 and tenth edition of vol. 2. Clark III:141; Field 260; Howes C241; McCracken 8K; cf. G.A.Miles & W.S.Reese America Pictured to the Life 55 (1848 edition); Pilling 685; Sabin 11537; Streeter Sale 4277; Wagner-Camp 84.

$27500.00

Catlin's North American Indian Portfolio. Hunting scenes and amusements of the Rocky Mountains and prairies of America. From drawings and notes of the author, made during eight years' travel amongst forty-eight of the wildest and most remote tribes of savages in North America
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Catlin's North American Indian Portfolio. Hunting scenes and amusements of the Rocky Mountains and prairies of America. From drawings and notes of the author, made during eight years' travel amongst forty-eight of the wildest and most remote tribes of savages in North America

By CATLIN, George (1796-1872)

New York: James Ackerman, 304 Broadway, cor.[ner] Duane St, 1845. Folio. (21 3/4 x 15 3/8 inches). Letterpress title (verso blank), 1p. "To the American Public" (verso blank), pp.[5-]16 explanatory text. 25 hand-coloured lithographic plates after Catlin. Expertly bound to style in half red morocco and publisher's cloth boards with morocco label. Housed in a red morocco backed box Provenance: Edward Eberstadt (catalogue 127:113, pencil note on front endpaper); Frank T. Siebert (his sale, Sotheby's New York, 28 October 1999, lot 845) The very rare first American edition of Catlin's masterpiece: among the most rare and desirable of all American color plate books or western Americanum. This is only the eleventh known copy of the coloured issue of the American edition of the North American Indian Portfolio, according to William Reese's census of over 160 sets, and corresponds to Reese issue 6. Bennett states: "This book is of the most excessive rarity and worth several times the value of the more common British printing." A highly important record of a "truly lofty and noble race...A numerous nation of human beings...three-fourths of whose country has fallen into the possession of civilized man...twelve million of whose bodies have fattened the soil in the mean time; who have fallen victims to whiskey, the small-pox, and the bayonet" (Catlin). Catlin first published his North American Indian Portfolio. .. in two issues in London in late November 1844. The first issue was hand-colored, the second had tinted plates. Both the London editions are now very rare, but they are known in roughly tenfold the number of this incredibly rare American edition, evidently published without Catlin's knowledge or consent in New York in 1845. It is a milestone in lithography in the United States. It was issued in a hand-colored edition on paper, in a hand-colored edition on card, and in a tinted edition on paper. Of the 160 copies of Catlin's work located in a census by William Reese, only sixteen were the American edition. Of the sixteen other located copies, half have the plates colored and printed on paper, as in the present copy. Only three American editions have appeared at auction since the late 1970s, while the London edition appears with some regularity. On a leaf after the titlepage, the publisher, Ackerman, proudly states that he is happy to prove that American work can be the equal of anything produced in Europe; his preface is given in full below. Catlin's North American Indian Portfolio contains the results of his years of painting, living with and travelling amongst the Great Plains Indians. Catlin summarized the American Indians as "an honest, hospitable, faithful, brave, warlike, cruel, revengeful, relentless, - yet honourable, contemplative and religious being." In a famous passage from the preface to the London edition of his North American Indian Portfolio. ., Catlin describes how the sight of several tribal chiefs in Philadelphia led to his resolution to record their way of life: "the history and customs of such a people, preserved by pictorial illustrations, are themes worthy of the lifetime of one man, and nothing short of the loss of my life shall prevent me from visiting their country and becoming their historian." He saw no future for either their way of life or their very existence, and with these thoughts always at the back of his mind he worked, against time, setting himself a truly punishing schedule, to record what he saw. From 1832 to 1837 he spent the summer months sketching the tribes and then finished his pictures in oils during the winter. The record he left is unique, both in its breadth and also in the sympathetic understanding that his images constantly demonstrate. A selection of the greatest of images from this record were published in Catlin's North American Indian Portfolio in an effort to reach as wide an audience as possible. In addition to publishing the present work, Catlin also spent from 1837 to 1852 touring the United States, England, France and Holland with his collection of paintings, examples of Indian crafts and accompanied by representative members of the Indian tribes. A financial reverse in 1852 meant that he lost the collection, but he spent his later years making several trips to South and Central America, sketching the natives there. Ackerman's introduction to this New York edition reads, in full: "To the American Public. A young American artist ventures to challenge for his works that encouragement which has hitherto been ministered too sparingly to American productions. As nation, we have so long been reproached with inability to produce pictorial embellishments equal to the European that, although a mistaken, it has become a received opinion. The enthusiastic author of the London Edition of this splendid and talented work has practically succumbed to the prevailing yet unjust prejudice, and has carried the results of his daring genius and enterprise to a foreign mart; sending from abroad, and from the hands of European artists, an American production in foreign habiliments to be patronized in the author's own land. The Artist and publisher of the republication on this side of the water, evincing through this, his enterprise, of American Art, an abiding confidence in the taste, judgement and liberality of his countrymen, has ventured (with a mere change of dress), to offer a cheaper, and he trusts, a better edition than the costly London copy. Fully equal, or greatly superior, the critical justice of the country may decide it to be. Of this favorable result, hope may tell the Artist a "flattering tale", yet he would plead enthusiasm, without which the life and spirit of all art dies. At all events, the greater cheapness of this edition is as unquestionable, a that it is purely "American fabric" recommends its patronage. In fact, the Artist would contest the received opinion, that nothing pictorial can be executed in this country equal to the European productions, and would leave his countrymen to carry out the experiment, whether it be not that patronage is alone wanting to produce originals- or republications equal if not superior to those of all Europe. This venture, receiving no impulse from the powerful arm of an overflowing government treasury, starts on an "Exploring Expedition" of its own, into the waters of criticism; and, if but prosperous gales attend its return, the grateful Artist pledges his unwearied efforts to produce nothing but the best specimens of American delineative art, wherewith to acknowledge the patronage and indulgence of his countrymen and to vindicate the capacity of our native artists." Bennett, p.22; Howes C243; McGrath, pp.52-53; Reese, Issue 6; Siebert Sale 845 (this copy); Reese, Stamped with a National Character 25; Wagner-Camp 105A:3.

$235000.00

Admiranda narratio fida tamen, de commodis et incolarum ritibus Virginiae, ... Anglico scripta sermone a Thoma Hariot
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Admiranda narratio fida tamen, de commodis et incolarum ritibus Virginiae, ... Anglico scripta sermone a Thoma Hariot

By HARIOT, Thomas; [and John WHITE]. - Theodor DE BRY and Johann Theodor DE BRY

Frankfurt: Theodor De Bry, 1590. Folio. Engraved title to text, letterpress title to plates, engraved arms on dedication leaf, colophon leaf F6, 1 double-page engraved map of Virginia [Burden 76, state 2], 1 engraved plate of Adam and Eve (first state with inscription "Iodocus a Winghe in / Theodore de Bry fe"), 27 engraved plates after John White. Expertly bound to style in early red morocco, spine with raised bands in six compartments, lettered in the second, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt, early marbled endpapers A fine copy of the De Bry first edition in Latin of Hariot's Virginia: the first eyewitness pictorial record of the American southeast and the first illustrated account wholly dedicated to any portion of what is now the United States. The publication of this work by De Bry launched what would later become known as his Grand Voyages. It is without question the most important of the series both in terms of contemporary influence and modern historical and ethnographic value. The text describes the first British colony to be established in the New World and is here united by De Bry with engravings based on watercolours by John White, a member of the expedition. This work offered the first accurate accounts and eyewitness depictions of native Americans. In 1584, Sir Walter Raleigh received a ten-year charter to establish the first permanent English settlement in Virginia and over the course of the next five years four expeditions landed at Roanoke for that purpose. The second of those expeditions included mathematician and navigator Thomas Hariot and artist and later colonial governor John White. Upon his return to London, Hariot would privately publish in 1588 A Brief and True Account of the New Found Land of Virginia (extant in only 6 known copies) which detailed the explorations and discoveries during the 1585 expedition. The following year Hakluyt would include the text in his seminal Principall Navigations . In 1589, master engraver and publisher Theodor De Bry traveled to London where he met Hakluyt, who told him of the British expeditions to Virginia and shared with him both Hariot's journal and White's watercolours from the expedition. Hakluyt suggested the publication of a series of illustrated voyages to America, beginning with Hariot/White. De Bry returned to Frankfurt and in 1590 published the work in Latin and German. John White's illustrations are among the most famous of early American images. White was the lieutenant-governor of the abortive colony, and a skilled artist. His carefully executed watercolours are remarkably accurate renderings of the Carolina Indians and their customs, costumes, rituals, hunting practices and dwellings. No other artist so carefully rendered American Indians until Karl Bodmer worked on the Missouri in the 1830s. The engravings after White are the best pictorial record of American Indians before the 19th century, while the important map within the work is the first detailed depiction of the Virginia coast and Carolina capes, showing the coast from the mouth of the Chesapeake to Wilmington, North Carolina. Arents 37; Church 140; Cumming & De Vorsey 12; European Americana 590/31; JCB I:396; Sabin 8784; Vail 7 (note).

$65000.00

Travels to the Source of the Missouri River and Across the American Continent to the Pacific Ocean. performed by order of the Government of the United States, in the years 1804, 1805, and 1806. By Captains Lewis and Clarke [sic]. Published from the official report
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Travels to the Source of the Missouri River and Across the American Continent to the Pacific Ocean. performed by order of the Government of the United States, in the years 1804, 1805, and 1806. By Captains Lewis and Clarke [sic]. Published from the official report

By LEWIS, Meriwether (1774-1809) and William CLARK (1770-1838)

London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme and Brown, 1814. Quarto. (11 1/4 x 8 3/4 inches). Half title. 1p. publisher's advertisement on verso of terminal leaf. Folding engraved map by Neele, five engraved plans on 3 plates. 8pp. publisher's ads preceding half-title. Uncut. Publisher's drab paper boards, paper spine label. Housed in a blue full morocco box. The first English edition of the great landmark of western exploration: a very rare example in original boards. First English and first quarto edition of the "definitive account of the most important exploration of the North American continent" (Wagner-Camp). The book describes the U.S. government-backed expedition to explore the newly-acquired Louisiana Purchase undertaken from 1804 to 1806 by ascending the Missouri to its source, crossing the Rocky Mountains, and reaching the Pacific Ocean. In total, the expedition covered some eight thousand miles in slightly more than twenty-eight months. They brought back the first reliable information about much of the area they traversed, made contact with the Indian inhabitants as a prelude to the expansion of the fur trade, and advanced by a quantum leap the geographical knowledge of the continent. The narrative was first published in Philadelphia in two octavo volumes in the same year as the present edition. The large folding map of the West (by Neele after the Philadelphia edition map) recalls an extraordinary feat of cartography, accurately revealing much of the trans-Mississippi for the first time. Wheat notes that the map is almost identical to the Philadelphia version "except for a few minor variations." The observations in the text make it an essential work of American natural history, ethnography, and science, and it forms a worthy record of the first great U.S. government expedition. In terms of typography and paper quality, the first English edition is far more pleasing than the first American. This fine example in the original publisher's boards, as issued. Included are 8 pages of publisher's ads preceding the title, which includes the present work, priced £2.12s.6d in boards. Field 929; Graff 2480; Hill 1018; Howes L317, "b."; Literature of Lewis & Clark 5A.2; Sabin 40829; Streeter Sale 3128; Wagner-Camp 13:2; Wheat, Transmississippi 317.

$30000.00

Route From Liverpool to Great Salt Lake Valley Illustrated with steel engravings and wood cuts from sketches made by Frederick Piercy...Together with a Geographical and Historical Description of Utah, and a Map of the Overland Routes to that Territory from the Missouri River. Also, an Authentic History of the Latter-Day Saints' Emigration from Europe
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Route From Liverpool to Great Salt Lake Valley Illustrated with steel engravings and wood cuts from sketches made by Frederick Piercy...Together with a Geographical and Historical Description of Utah, and a Map of the Overland Routes to that Territory from the Missouri River. Also, an Authentic History of the Latter-Day Saints' Emigration from Europe

By LINFORTH, James (editor); and Frederick PIERCY

Liverpool: Franklin D. Richards; London: Latter-Day Saints Book Depot, 1855. Quarto. (12 x 9 1/2 inches). viii,120pp. Folding map, thirty engraved plates, and woodcuts in text illustrations after Frederick H. Piercy. Contemporary half calf and tan cloth covered boards, rebacked. Housed in a red morocco backed box. Provenance: William Bernard and Maria Young Dougall (signature and inscription dated 1927 to); John A. and Leah Dunford Widstoe; University of Utah (small inked stamp on Contents leaf, deaccessioned in 1986) A landmark depiction of the West with superb plates, and one of the most important publications devoted to the Mormon emigration: with provenance to Brigham Young's daughter. "This elaborately prepared and illustrated book was published as a monument to the Mormon emigration to Utah, and as a means of attracting further emigrants. Piercy made a special trip to America [in 1853] to make sketches for the plates, which are some of the best western views of the period" (Streeter). The outstanding views show New Orleans, Natchez, Vicksburg, Nauvoo, Council Bluffs, Laramie, Fort Bridger, and Scott's Bluff. "...One of the most elaborately and beautifully illustrated of western books" (Howes). "...One of the basic sources of illustrated Western Americana of the period" (Taft). "One of the most illuminating maps of the West to appear during 1855...it shows Utah in all its glory. This is not only an important map in the history of Mormons, but is in every sense an important map in the history of the West, giving as it does a carefully drawn picture of that entire area" (Wheat). This copy inscribed by Brigham Young's daughter Maria Young Dougall (1849-1935) to her niece Leah Dunford Widstoe and her husband, John A. Widstoe (1872-1952), a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. It is additionally signed by prominent LDS Elder (and Maria Dougall's husband) William Bernard Dougall (1843-1909). Howes L359, "b;" Wagner-Camp 259; Graff 2501; Flake 6381; Sabin 41325; Streeter Sale 2296; Taft, Artists & Illustrators of the Old West, p.285; Wheat Transmississippi IV , pp.40-41; Crawley & Flake, A Mormon Fifty 46.

$30000.00

Paradise regain'd. A poem, in four books. To which is added Samson Agonistes; and poems upon several occasions, with a tractate of education ... The Eighth Edition, corrected
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Paradise regain'd. A poem, in four books. To which is added Samson Agonistes; and poems upon several occasions, with a tractate of education ... The Eighth Edition, corrected

By JEFFERSON, Thomas (1743-1826); Library of - John MILTON (1608-1674)

London: printed for J. and R. Tonson in the Strand, 1742. 8vo. (8 x 5 1/8 inches). [6],504pp., plus engraved frontispiece. Title page printed in red and black. Contemporary calf, spine gilt with raised bands, red morocco lettering piece (covers detached, spine abraded). Housed in a red morocco box. Provenance: Reuben Skelton (armorial bookplate); Thomas Jefferson (with his initials on pages 113 and 273); Martha Randolph (inscription); Virginia Jefferson Randolph (signature); Mary Jefferson Randolph (signature); Harold Jefferson Coolidge (bookplate) Thomas Jefferson's copy of Milton's Paradise Regained. By the end of the 18th century, Thomas Jefferson held the largest private library in America. In 1783, his library at Monticello included 2,640 volumes. Over the next thirty years, the collection swelled to over 6,000. In 1815, Jefferson's library was sold en bloc to the Library of Congress to replace their collection lost during the War of 1812 when the British burned the Capitol. The bulk of that collection was destroyed, again by fire, on Christmas eve 1851. Jefferson would build another library between 1815 and his death in 1826, which was dispersed at auction in 1829 by Nathaniel Poor. The provenance of the present volume pre-dates both of those sales, having originally been owned by Reuben Skelton of Virginia, the first husband of Martha Jefferson's stepmother, Elizabeth Lomax Skelton. Elizabeth Skelton was the third wife of Martha's father, John Wayles, and this volume was evidently inherited by her with her husband's estate. Elizabeth passed away shortly after her marriage to Martha's father, and this volume subsequently passed to Martha upon her father's death in 1773. Alternatively, given the interrelated marriages of the period, the volume could also have been inherited from Reuben Skelton by his brother, Bathurst Skelton, who would become Martha's first husband in 1766, until his death in 1768. Either way, the volume entered into Thomas Jefferson's library at Monticello in the 1770s. In his characteristic fashion, Thomas Jefferson has inscribed his initials on signature marks I1 and T1. The front pastedown furthermore bears the signature of his daughter Martha Randolph and her daughters Virginia and Mary. Further indications of provenance show the volume descending among various Randolph and Coolidge relatives into the 20th century. Why this volume was not sold to the Library of Congress in 1815 remains a mystery, but was perhaps in Jefferson's daughter's possession given her inscription. Among the surviving volumes from Jefferson's first library at the Library of Congress are other volumes with provenance to Reuben Skelton. Among the favorite and influential authors among the Founding Fathers, John Milton's republican political philosophy and radical thoughts on human liberty resonated with Thomas Jefferson. Indeed, even at a young age, Jefferson's commonplace book quotes Milton more than any other English poet. Jefferson's statute of Virginia for religious freedom, among his most important contributions, borrowed heavily from Milton's ideas on the separation of church and state. A quarto Baskerville edition of Paradise Regain'd, as well as octavo Baskerville editions of both Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained, were among the books sold to the Library of Congress in 1815, though both were destroyed in the subsequent fire (See Sowerby 4287 and 4288). The present volume not listed in Sowerby. ESTC T134211.

$48000.00

Travels to the Source of the Missouri River and Across the American Continent to the Pacific Ocean. performed by order of the Government of the United States, in the years 1804, 1805, and 1806. By Captains Lewis and Clarke [sic]. Published from the official report
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Travels to the Source of the Missouri River and Across the American Continent to the Pacific Ocean. performed by order of the Government of the United States, in the years 1804, 1805, and 1806. By Captains Lewis and Clarke [sic]. Published from the official report

By LEWIS, Meriwether (1774-1809) and William CLARK (1770-1838)

London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme and Brown, 1814. Quarto. (10 3/4 x 8 1/2 inches). Half-title, 1p. publisher's advertisement at end. 1 folding engraved map by Neele, five engraved plans on 3 plates. Contemporary speckled calf, expertly rebacked to style, spine gilt with raised bands, red morocco lettering piece, marbled endpapers Provenance: Beeston Long (armorial bookplate) The first English edition of the great landmark of western exploration. First English and first quarto edition of the "definitive account of the most important exploration of the North American continent" (Wagner-Camp). The book describes the U.S. government-backed expedition to explore the newly-acquired Louisiana Purchase undertaken from 1804 to 1806 by ascending the Missouri to its source, crossing the Rocky Mountains, and reaching the Pacific Ocean. In total, the expedition covered some eight thousand miles in slightly more than twenty-eight months. They brought back the first reliable information about much of the area they traversed, made contact with the Indian inhabitants as a prelude to the expansion of the fur trade, and advanced by a quantum leap the geographical knowledge of the continent. The narrative was first published in Philadelphia in two octavo volumes in the same year as the present edition. The large folding map of the West (by Neele after the Philadelphia edition map) recalls an extraordinary feat of cartography, accurately revealing much of the trans-Mississippi for the first time. Wheat notes that the map is almost identical to the Philadelphia version "except for a few minor variations." The observations in the text make it an essential work of American natural history, ethnography, and science, and it forms a worthy record of the first great U.S. government expedition. In terms of typography and paper quality, the first English edition is far more pleasing than the first American. Field 929; Graff 2480; Hill 1018; Howes L317, "b."; Literature of Lewis & Clark 5A.2; Sabin 40829; Streeter Sale 3128; Wagner-Camp 13:2; Wheat, Transmississippi 317.

$22000.00

Reasons for Establishing the Colony of Georgia, with regard to the trade of Great Britain, the increase of our people, and the employment and support it will afford to great numbers of our own poor, as well as foreign persecuted protestants. With some account of the country, and the design of the trustees ... the Second Edition
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Reasons for Establishing the Colony of Georgia, with regard to the trade of Great Britain, the increase of our people, and the employment and support it will afford to great numbers of our own poor, as well as foreign persecuted protestants. With some account of the country, and the design of the trustees ... the Second Edition

By MARTYN, Benjamin (1699-1763)

London: Printed for W. Meadows, 1733. 4to. [1-]48pp. Engraved frontispiece and tailpiece after J. Pine, engraved map. Expertly bound to style in half russia and period marbled paper covered boards, flat spine gilt An important and rare Georgia tract from the time of the colony's founding, complete with the rare map of the region. Martyn was a strong advocate and defender of the colony, and here gathers a number of interesting documents in addition to his own arguments, including a letter from Oglethorpe to the Trustees from Savannah, their reply to him, a list of the Trustees, etc. The map is the second state of that which first appeared in the 1732 edition of Some Account of the Designs of the Trustees for establishing the Colony of Georgia in America ., altered by removal of some of the notations and relocation of a few incidentals (see De Renne, I:p.18 for details). The interesting frontispiece is an imaginary view of the laying out of Savannah. This second edition of Martyn's tract is the first in which the author is named, and includes additions not found in the first edition, first issue. "A well-written tract; plausible in its arguments, glowing in its descriptions, valuable for its information, and pertinent in its appeals to the philanthropic and benevolent" (Sabin). De Renne I, p.45; Sabin 45002; Howes M356; LC, Georgia 104; Streeter Sale 1144; Cumming 211.

$12000.00

Notes on the State of Virginia ... first hot-pressed edition
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Notes on the State of Virginia ... first hot-pressed edition

By JEFFERSON, Thomas (1743-1826)

Philadelphia: R. T. Rawle, 1801. 8vo. [4],436,[1], 56pp. [with errors in pagination, as issued]. Stipple engraved portrait frontispiece, three maps (one folding), folding plate and folding table. Expertly bound to style in period tree sheep, flat spine divided into compartments with gilt roll tool, red morocco lettering piece Early American edition of Jefferson's famous work This is the only book-length work by Jefferson to be published in his lifetime, and has been called "one of America's first permanent literary and intellectual landmarks." It was largely written in 1781 and first published in Paris, in French, in 1785, then published in English in London in 1787. Written in the form of answers to questions about Virginia, the book supplies a description of the geography, with an abundance of supporting material and unusual information. As J.M. Edelstein notes: "Jefferson wrote about things which interested him deeply and about which he knew a great deal; the Notes , therefore, throws a fascinating light on his tastes, curiosities, and political and social opinions." The story of the creation of this book and its publishing history is an interesting one. It is told fully by Millicent Sowerby in her catalogue of Jefferson's library. The present 1801 Philadelphia edition printed by Rawle is one of the most handsome American editions of Jefferson, and the first issued after his election to the presidency. The portrait, pictured and described in Cunningham's The Image of Thomas Jefferson in the Public Eye., was engraved by William Harrison, Jr., after a print by Mathew Carey. It is one of the relatively few engraved images of Jefferson. This edition adds Jefferson's famous first inaugural address ("we are all Republicans, we are all Federalists"). Furthermore, an appendix adds his correspondence relating to the Logan massacre, a horrific frontier tale of the murder of a friendly Indian family in southwest Virginia during Lord Dunmore's War in 1774. Howes J78; Sabin 35898; Clark I:262; Sowerby, Jefferson's Library 4167; Adams, The Eye of Thomas Jefferson p. 51.

$6000.00

[Regarding the State of the English Nation, in the Year 1778]
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[Regarding the State of the English Nation, in the Year 1778]

By AMERICAN REVOLUTION

[Netherlands, 1780. Engraving. Plate mark: 8 1/4 x 11 inches. Wide margins. Framed. An American Revolution satirical print lamenting the war's effects on the English trade and economy. "A cow representing the commerce of Great Britain stands passively on the sea-shore while an American with a feathered cap saws off her horns; one horn lies on the ground. A Dutchman milks the cow, looking over his shoulder with a grin. France, a foppishly-dressed Frenchman, and Spain, a don in slashed doublet and cloak, hold bowls of milk. In the foreground lies the British lion asleep, unconscious of a pug-dog which stands on his back, befouling him. Behind the lion stands a plainly-dressed Englishman clasping his hands in despair. In the background across the sea is a town inscribed "Philadelphia"; in front of it, on the shore, two men on a minute scale (General and Admiral Howe) are seated at a table. Both are asleep, a punch-bowl is on the table, on the ground beside them are wine-bottles and a barrel. Beside them, laid up on dry land, is a man-of-war inscribed 'Eagle' (Howe's flag-ship)" (British Museum catalogue). First published in the Westminster magazine, separately-published Dutch and French pirated versions quickly followed. The present Dutch version was issued without text below the image. Cf. British Museum 5472; Fowble 103; Dolmetsch, Rebellion and Reconciliation: Satirical Prints on the Revolution at Williamsburg 41.

$2800.00

The Repeal, or the Funeral of Miss Ame=Stamp
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The Repeal, or the Funeral of Miss Ame=Stamp

By AMERICAN REVOLUTION - WILSON, Benjamin (1721-1788)

[London, 1766. Engraving, on laid paper. Sheet size: 11 11/16 x 18 1/2 inches. Early ink manuscript captions in the lower margin identifying the mourners in procession. Provenance: British Museum (inked accession stamp dated 1868 and duplicate deaccession stamp initialled JKR). Rare first edition of the most famous satirical print relating to the dreaded Stamp Act, printed on the day of its repeal. "One of the most famous and popular of the political satires commenting on the Stamp Act is this one ... An instant success, it became one of the most copied satires of the period" (Dolmetsch). This example a rare early impression issued prior to the numerous piracies which ensued (see below). Set on the bank of the Thames, with warehouses and goods awaiting shipment to America in the background, George Grenville carries a small coffin representing the Act toward a vault adorned with two skulls. Other mourners include caricatures of the leading proponents of the tax. At the lead is William Scott or Anti-Sejanus, who reads from a sermon while a dog pees on his leg. Scott is followed by Solicitor-General Wedderburn and Attorney General Fletcher Norton, carrying flags that display the vote against the repeal; then Grenville, Lord Bute, Lord Temple, Lord Halifax, and Lord Sandwich. The three ships in the background, to be loaded with the goods for America, are named Conway, Rockingham and Grafton after the leading members of Parliament responsible for the act's repeal. Wilson detailed the publication of this print in his autobiography (published by the Walpole Society, LXXIV 2012, p.200): "This print I published within ten minutes after the Act was repealed. I had but four days to sell it in; because on the fifth there appeared two pirated editions which sold for half the price. Nevertheless in those four days, I sold about 2,000 at a shilling apiece; I was informed by persons of credit that there were sold of the pirated copies above sixteen thousand..." The piracies are readily identified by the presence of text below the image, as well as being reduced in size. See the British Museum catalogue for detailed differences between the present example and the later issues. The present example preceded only by a proof state in the British Museum, before lettering of the second line of the title. According to the British Museum online catalogue, that is the only original (i.e. non-pirated) version which the British Museum holds, attesting to the rarity of Wilson's original. BM Satire 4140; Dolmetsch, Rebellion and Reconciliation: Satirical Prints on the Revolution at Williamsburg, pp.38-39; Cresswell 623.

$16500.00

The Drum's. The Tapestry Room. Weyers Cave. Central R. R. Augusta Va
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The Drum's. The Tapestry Room. Weyers Cave. Central R. R. Augusta Va

By BEYER, Edward

Richmond, Virginia: Edward Beyer, 1858. Tinted lithograph, 'Taken from Nature by Ed. Beyer', printed by W. Loeillot in Berlin. An exemplary print from one of the greatest American view books: `a major outstanding item' (Bennett) Edward Beyer was a German artist who visited the United States in the early 1850's. He chose to concentrate his work on Virginia and Kentucky, spending three years in Virginia working on the original drawings for this book. Although the title notes that the copyright was registered by Beyer in the District of Virginia, the book was actually produced in Germany, with the plates being prepared in Dresden or Berlin. The superb tinted lithograph views were generally printed in black with, generally, two further colours. The cavern system was discovered in 1804 by 18-year-old Bernard Weyer, a young trapper, looking for his missing trap. He named it Weyer's Cave, after himself, and, after exploring it for two years, opened it for the public, the first show cave of the United State. Weyer's Cave is now called the Grand Caverns. It is located in the central Shenandoah Valley in the town of Grottoes, Virginia. 'This cave is in Augusta County, seventeen miles North of Staunton, a short distance West of the Blue Ridge. It derives its name from Bernard Weyer, who discovered it in 1804, while hunting. With one exception, in extent, it is the largest Cave in the World... The Artist has selected the Tapestry and Drum Room for an Illustration, and which is perhaps the greatest of its Wonders. It gives forth, when struck on its walls, the deep sonourous sound of a bass drum... "the influence of 2,000 to 3,000 lights in these immense caverns is only such as to reveal the objects, without disturbing the solemn and sublime obscurity which sleeps in everything. Scarcely any scenes can awaken so many passions at once , and so deeply... I have had before, from other objects, one simple impression made with greater power; but I never had so many impressions made, and with so much power, before".' ( Description of the Album of Virginia... Illustrated Richmond, 1857). Deak writes of Beyer, "He was taken by the beauty of the Virginia landscape, particularly by the elegant settings of some of the region's watering places...Virginians responded warmly to Beyer's enterprise and often gave him advance access to architectural plans when these could be of help to him. There was probably no Virginia county that Beyer left unvisited in his zeal to present what is, in fact, an affectionate family album of an entire state." Deak praises Beyer's "delicate and precise style" and "characteristic refinement of proportion.". Cf. Bennett p.10; cf. Deak Picturing America 721; cf. Howes B413 ("b"); cf. Sabin 5125.

$750.00

Niagara Falls, From Goat Island
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Niagara Falls, From Goat Island

By CURRIER & IVES (pub.)

New York: Currier & Ives 152 Nassau Street, 1870. Hand-colored lithograph. Medium folio. Goat Island (previously called Iris Island) is a small island in the Niagara River, located in the middle of Niagara Falls between the Bridal Veil Falls and the Horseshoe Falls. This dramatic view of Horseshoe Falls includes the walkway to Terrapin Rocks and the tower that took sightseers as close to the natural wonder as any cared to go. The 40 foot tower was built in 1833 and survived for about 50 years. Gale 4842.

$475.00

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