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Galveston Cotton Exchange Sketches

By TEXAS

Galveston: M. Strickland, 1876. Small 4to. Twelve full-page lithographic cartoons (numbered I-XII including the inside front and rear wrappers). Publisher's wrappers, vertical centerfold, crudely stitched at an early date. Lampooning bull versus bear in the largest Texas cotton exchange. Miles Strickland (d. 1882) was among the earliest lithographers in Texas. The present work is a humorous look at the mid-1870s Texas cotton market, featuring bulls and bears in comic misadventures. The cartoons, by an unnamed artist but perhaps Strickland, poke fun at the growing cotton market, repeatedly showing the bulls getting the best of the bears. In the first cartoon, for examples, a bull is holding bales of cotton (labelled receipts, dry goods and trade) by a chain over a cliff just a few inches from a ledge marked bottom, while a bear bites the bull's hind leg; the chain snaps and the bull lands on the bear's head, turns and chases away the bear prodding it with its horns. In another, a group of bears are trying to give a sick bull medicine and an enema, but end of getting kicked and horned. In the penultimate cartoon, a butchered bull is shown hanging by a curing hook, with the head, and entrails below; the following page a group of bears all clamoring to reach the bull's "oysters" which are suspended from the ceiling. The final cartoon shows both bulls and bears being herded into a shack labelled New York Futures on the edge of the cliff, propped up from below on stilts, with a bull and a bear with axes in hand waiting for it to fill. After the Civil War, production of cotton in Texas increased drastically, due to the expansion of railroad distribution, improved compression baling, and a great influx in sharecroppers. The Galveston Cotton Exchange was formed to address pricing disputes between buyers and sellers; to establish fair trade principles; and to collect and disseminate information concerning the crop and market conditions. Concurrently, cotton futures began trading in New York and Liverpool. Although stated on the upper wrapper as the second edition, we find no record of any other example of any edition of this work.

$2500.00

The Will of General George Washington: to which is annexed, a schedule of his property, directed to be sold

By WASHINGTON, George (1732-1799)

Alexandria, [Virginia]: Printed from the record of the County Court of Fairfax, 1800. 12mo. (6 1/4 x 4 inches). 32pp. Contemporary paper wrappers Scarce first edition of George Washington's will: the document which emancipated his slaves. In July 1799, just six months before his death, George Washington prepared his will alone without, as he said any "professional character'' being "consulted.'' Within the month following his death, his executors presented this will for probate to the Fairfax County Court, in whose custody it remains. A few days thereafter the will was printed in Alexandria and circulated throughout the country in pamphlet form. The lucid and powerful prose of the text of the will displays at its best the distinctive style of writing that Washington had developed through the years. Most notable of the wills provisions are the instructions that he gave for freeing his slaves and for the support thereafter of the helpless children and the old and infirm among them. It was not until 1810 that the appraisers filed their report in the office of the clerk of the Fairfax County Court. The executors held public sales of some of the livestock at Mount Vernon before Martha Washington's death in 1802 and continued selling the remainder of the listed property. Final settlement of the estate was not achieved until June 21, 1847. Washington's will was widely republished in many of the states, but the first edition published in Alexandria Virginia is scarce. Howes W145; Sabin 101752; Evans 39000.

$25000.00

The Federalist, on the New Constitution. by Publius. Written in 1788. To which is added, Pacificus, on the Proclamation of Neutrality. Written in 1793. likewise, the Federal Constitution, with all the Amendments
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The Federalist, on the New Constitution. by Publius. Written in 1788. To which is added, Pacificus, on the Proclamation of Neutrality. Written in 1793. likewise, the Federal Constitution, with all the Amendments

By HAMILTON, Alexander (1755-1804), James MADISON (1751-1836) and John JAY (1745-1829)

New York: Printed and sold by George F. Hopkins, 1802. 2 volumes, 8vo. (8 1/8 x 5 inches). viii,317,[1]pp., complete with two pages numbered 167 and two pages numbered 168 (as noted on the errata on verso of the vol I terminal text leaf), and with page numbering 263-270 repeated, as issued; v,[3],351, [1] pp., including an ad leaf bound following the table of contents. Expertly bound to style in period tree sheep, spines gilt Rare second edition of the most important work of American political thought ever written and according to Thomas Jefferson "the best commentary on the principles of government" - the first edition to identify Hamilton, Jay and Madison as the authors. The Federalist comprises the collected printing of the eighty-five seminal essays written in defense of the newly-drafted Constitution. The essays were first issued individually by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay in New York newspapers under the pseudonym Publius to garner support for the ratification of the Constitution. This first collected edition was published in early 1788: volume I published in March, contains the first 36 numbers, volume II published in May, includes the remaining 49, together with the text of the Constitution. Upon its publication, George Washington noted to Alexander Hamilton that the work "will merit the Notice of Posterity; because in it are candidly and ably discussed the principles of freedom and the topics of government, which will always be interesting to mankind" (George Washington, letter to Hamilton, 28 August 1788). The genesis of this "classic exposition of the principles of republican government" (R.B. Bernstein, Are We to be a Nation? The Making of the Constitution, 1987, p.242) is to be found in the "great national discussion" which took place about the ratification of the Constitution, and the necessity of answering the salvos in print from the Anti-Federalists and other opponents of a strong Federal government. The original plan was for James Madison and John Jay to help Hamilton write a series of essays explaining the merits of their system, whilst also rebutting the arguments of its detractors. "Hamilton wrote the first piece in October 1787 on a sloop returning from Albany...he finished many pieces while the printer waited in a hall for the completed copy" (R. Brookhiser, Alexander Hamilton: American, 1999, pp.68-69). In the end, well over half of the 85 essays were written by Hamilton. Despite the intense time pressures under which the series was written "what began as a propaganda tract, aimed only at winning the election for delegates to New York's state ratifying convention, evolved into the classic commentary upon the American Federal system" (F. McDonald, Alexander Hamilton: A Biography, p.107). Styled the "revised and corrected" edition on the title, with additions to the first edition of 1788, Ford attributes editorship of this second edition to John Wells, though Sabin attributes it to William Coleman, noting it as "the last issued during Hamilton's life." The second edition is notable for the addition of the federal constitution and the first eleven amendments, and a series of articles written by Hamilton under the pseudonym "Pacificus," defending Washington's "Neutrality Proclamation" of 1793 regarding the Anglo-French war. It is arguably the most complete edition, and the only other English language edition issued in Hamilton's lifetime. Significantly, it identifies Hamilton, Jay, and Madison as the authors, but does not specify who wrote which essays; "it was at first intended to mark the numbers distinctly which were written by each; but considerations have since occurred which would perhaps render this measure improper." Clearly issued by Hamilton partisans, the preface implies that virtually all of it was Hamilton's work, and the republication of the Pacificus essays (written in opposition to Madison) confirms the Hamiltonian slant. Ron Chernow, Alexander Hamilton (New York, 2004),p.44, 48, 188, 603-6; Cohen 2818; DAB XI, pp.312-13; Ford 21; Howes H114, "aa"; Sabin 23981.

$14000.00

Scenes In The Rocky Mountains, and in Oregon, California, New Mexico, Texas, and The Grand Prairies or notes by the way, during an excursion of three years ... By a New Englander

By SAGE, Rufus B. (1817-1893)

Philadelphia: Carey & Hart, 1846. 8vo. (7 1/8 x 4 3/4 inches). 303pp. Large folding map. Map silked with repaired tears. Twentieth century polished calf bound by Sangorski & Sutcliffe, spine with raised bands in six compartments, red morocco lettering piece, repeat decoration in gilt First edition, first issue of one of the most important overland narratives: this copy complete with its important map. Sage set out from Westport in the summer of 1841 with a fur caravan, later visiting New Mexico, witnessing the disaster of the Snively expedition, and joining the end of the 1843 Fremont expedition. He returned to Ohio in time to take a vigorous if futile role in the election of 1844, supporting Henry Clay. He wrote this book in 1845. The story of the publication of this work and its subsequent sale is told by LeRoy Hafen in the introduction to the most scholarly edition of Sage, issued in two volumes by the Arthur H. Clark Co. in 1956. According to Hafen, the publishers of the original edition felt the addition of a map would cost too much, and it was only at the author's insistence that a map was printed and sold with the book, at a higher rate. The map, based mainly on the 1845 Fremont map, is usually not found with the book. It is "one of the earliest to depict the finally-determined Oregon boundary...one of the earliest attempts to show on a map the evermore-heavily traveled emigrant road to California" (Wheat). It adds interesting notes on the country and locations of fur trading establishments. Howes notes that it is "the best contemporary account of Snively's abortive land-pirate expedition" (Howes). Sage was certainly one of the most literate and acute observers of the West in the period immediately before the events of 1846. First edition, first issue (with page numbers 77-88, 270-271, and 302 placed in the inner margin). Cowan pp. 548-9; Field 1345; "Fifty Texas Rarities" 30; Graff 3633; Howes S16 ("b"); Mintz 402; Rader 2870; Sabin 74892; Streeter sale V:3049; Wagner-Camp 123:1; Wheat "Mapping the Transmississippi West" 527; Wheat "Maps of the California Gold Rush" 30; Raines, p. 181.

$6500.00

An Account of the Present State of Nova Scotia
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An Account of the Present State of Nova Scotia

By [HOLLINGSWORTH, Samuel]

Edinburgh: Printed for William Creech and T. Longman, 1786. 8vo. viii, 157, [1]pp. Contemporary marbled paper boards, rebacked with tan calf, spine lettered in gilt, endpapers renewed. Scarce promotional tract to encourage emigration to Nova Scotia. Written in the years following the end of the American Revolution, and dedicated to John Lord Sheffield, the author gives a full account of the natural resources of Nova Scotia to encourage British settlement in order to strengthen British control of the North American fisheries. The work includes chapters devoted to the flora and fauna, climate, cities and settlements, Native Americans, fur trade and the fisheries. Hollingsworth concludes that the British province would see enormous growth in the coming decades, foretelling the failure of the United States, or "new fangled states, where a rude and imperfect fabric is suddenly raised upon the sandy foundations of a turbulent democracy..." Staton & Tremaine (who list only the 1787 second edition) say: "Written mainly while the author was in America, the work treats of relations with the United States, Indians, the fur trade, fisheries, settlements, government, etc." Sabin 32543; Staton & Tremaine 592 (second edition); ESTC T102232.

$2400.00

Illustrations of the Croton Aqueduct
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Illustrations of the Croton Aqueduct

By TOWER, Fayette Bartholomew

New York and London: Wiley and Putnam, 1843. Small folio. 152pp (including the engraved title), plus 22 plates (12 engraved and 10 aquatint views; the aquatint views by Bennett (7), Hill (2) and Gimbrede (1)). Copyright slip mounted on verso of the title. Minor foxing to the text. [WITH:] Two silk ribbons issued to commemorate the completion of the aqueduct and a 15 January 1851 letterpress handbill issued by the Board of the Croton Aqueduct Department detailing rules on the use of Aqueduct water, all laid in. Publisher's brown cloth, covers blocked in blind, upper cover lettered in gilt, rebacked to style with dark brown morocco Provenance: Morden College Blackheath (inked stamp on title); Charles Kelsall (lengthy inscription on front pastedown) Scarce work on the construction of the Croton Aqueduct, with landscape aquatint views by Bennett and Hill. In 1832, the Common Council addressed the growing city's need for a more adequate water supply, and five years later construction commenced on an aqueduct system to bring water from the Croton River in Westchester County to a reservoir at 42nd and Fifth Avenue. At the time, the 41-mile project to bring in fresh water by gravity alone was the largest such project attempted in the United States. Upon its completion in 1842, a great celebration was held in the city. "A thorough account of the progressive measures taken by the city to supply its residents with water is given in F. B. Tower, Illustrations of the Croton Aqueduct (1843). Tower was an engineer associated with the Croton project during the entire span of the planning and building operations. For his account, he drew mainly from printed documents of the Common Council, prefacing his oeuvre with a brief history of the celebrated aqueducts of Europe and South America. Seven of the plates in the folio volume are aqueducts executed by William James Bennett based on Tower's drawings" (Deak). Deak 526. Not in Abbey.

$2000.00

American Yachts, a Series of Water-Color Sketches ... [With:] American yachts: Their clubs and races ..

By COZZENS, Frederic S. (1846-1928); and J. D. Jerrold KELLEY (1847-1922)

New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1885. 2 volumes, oblong folio (plates) and 8vo (text). [Plates:] Printed on card throughout. Title printed in red and black. 27 mounted chromolithographic plates, paper letterpress title labels mounted on verso as issued (numbered 1-26, plus the "Extra Plate" issued for the 1885 America's Cup). Minor wear at edges and corners of the cards. [Text] Title printed in red and black, half-title. xxi, [1], 451pp., plus 25 plates. Expertly bound to style in half dark blue morocco and marbled paper covered boards, spines with raised bands, lettered in gilt, marbled endpapers Magnificent pictorial record of the golden age of yachting in America and one of the rarest works of American chomolithography. This work covers a period of thirty years from the first "America" race at Cowes, England in 1851, to the 1885 America's Cup. A total of nearly eighty yachts (mostly the cutters and schooners favoured in the 1870s) are depicted in actual races, including the successful defenders Magic (1870), Sappho (1871), Madelaine (1876), and Mischief (1881). Frederic Cozzens was one of America's finest marine artists. Like most great marine artists, he was thoroughly acquainted with ship building and the art of sailing. He is best known for his paintings of great American yachts of the latter half of the 19th century, which were commissioned by many of New York's leading yachtsmen. In 1884, he expanded his audience by making a series of lithographs of his paintings. It was from some of these that Armstrong & Company, among the best chromolithographers of the day, produced the superb chromolithographs of American yachts which comprise this work. The work was published by Scribner's and Sons, limited to 1250 sets and sold strictly by subscription. Contemporary advertisements for the work describe it as "the most attractive work on yachting ever issued." The accompanying text by U.S. Navy Lieutenant James Douglas Jerrold Kelley, which is often lacking from sets, describes each plate. In the Introduction, Kelley writes of the plates: "In these pictures of our pleasure fleet, the portrait of no boat has been printed until all possible means tending to accuracy have been exhausted. Whenever the originals could be found, within the year devoted to this art work, they were carefully painted, both under sail and at anchor; failing this, studies were made of verified photographs and plans, and, in many cases, the finished pictures were submitted to the owners of the boats represented; and when the criticisms were just -- for yachtsmen are not always the keenest critics of their own vessels -- these were accepted and the work revised until it received the imprimatur of those most nearly interested; finally, a number of the plates were exposed in yacht club-rooms, to the frank and solicited judgment of experienced yachtsmen, and the opinions expressed were carefully considered." The work is very rare, with only one other complete set in the auction records for the last thirty years. Not in Reese, Stamped with a National Character. Bennett, p.29; Last, The Color Explosion, pp. 34-35.

$37500.00

New England's Memorial: Or, a brief Relation of the most Memorable and Remarkable Passages of the Providence, of God, manifested to the Planters of New-England in America: with special Reference to the first Colony thereof, Called New-Plimouth

By MORTON, Nathaniel (1616-1685)

Boston: for Daniel Henchman, 1721. 8vo. [10], 248, [2]pp. Publisher's advertisement recto of terminal leaf. Minor foxing. Nineteenth century black morocco by P. Low, spine with raised bands in five compartments, lettered in gilt, marbled endpapers A New England cornerstone: the first comprehensive history of Plymouth colony. First issued in a very rare 1669 Boston edition, this second American edition includes a supplement by Josiah Cotton concerning events in New England between 1669 and 1691. "Nathaniel Morton, a nephew of Governor Bradford, was secretary to the General Court of Massachusetts from 1645, thus having favorable opportunities of gathering information. The work is arranged in chronological order, and is filled with particulars of the greatest interest. The voyage of the Mayflower is given in detail, as is also the story of the landing and first settlement of the Pilgrims. The text is interspersed with several elegiac poems, epitaphs, and acrostics" (Church). Evans 2266; Howes M851; Sabin 51013; Church 605 (first edition).

$9500.00

Route From Liverpool to Great Salt Lake Valley Illustrated with steel engravings and wood cuts from sketches made by Frederick Piercy...Together with a Geographical and Historical Description of Utah, and a Map of the Overland Routes to that Territory from the Missouri River. Also, an Authentic History of the Latter-Day Saints' Emigration from Europe

By LINFORTH, James (editor); and Frederick PIERCY

Liverpool: Franklin D. Richards; London: Latter-Day Saints Book Depot, 1855. Quarto. (12 x 9 1/2 inches). viii,120pp. Folding map, thirty engraved plates, and woodcuts in text illustrations after Frederick H. Piercy. Contemporary blue-green cloth covered boards, rebacked and retipped to style with calf, marbled endpapers A landmark depiction of the West with superb plates, and one of the most important publications devoted to the Mormon emigration. "This elaborately prepared and illustrated book was published as a monument to the Mormon emigration to Utah, and as a means of attracting further emigrants. Piercy made a special trip to America [in 1853] to make sketches for the plates, which are some of the best western views of the period" (Streeter). The outstanding views show New Orleans, Natchez, Vicksburg, Nauvoo, Council Bluffs, Laramie, Fort Bridger, and Scott's Bluff. "...One of the most elaborately and beautifully illustrated of western books" (Howes). "...One of the basic sources of illustrated Western Americana of the period" (Taft). "One of the most illuminating maps of the West to appear during 1855...it shows Utah in all its glory. This is not only an important map in the history of Mormons, but is in every sense an important map in the history of the West, giving as it does a carefully drawn picture of that entire area" (Wheat). Howes L359, "b;" Wagner-Camp 259; Graff 2501; Flake 6381; Sabin 41325; Streeter Sale 2296; Taft, Artists & Illustrators of the Old West, p.285; Wheat Transmississippi IV , pp.40-41; Crawley & Flake, A Mormon Fifty 46.

$22500.00

A Defence of the Constitutions of Government of the United States of America, against the Attack of M. Turgot in his Letter to Dr. Price, Dated the Twenty-Second day of March, 1778

By ADAMS, John (1735-1826)

London: John Stockdale, 1794. 3 volumes, 8vo. [8], xxxii, [3]-392; [2], 451, [1]; [2], 528, [36]pp. Engraved portrait frontispiece in vol. 1 after Copley. Contemporary tree calf, expertly rebacked to style, flat spines ruled in gilt, red morocco lettered pieces Provenance: Charles Bathurst (armorial bookplate) The definitive, final and complete edition of Adams' influential work on American constitutional thought. The first volume was first published in London in 1787, with the second and third separately-issued volumes appearing the following year. The present 1794 edition is the first collected one. The complete American edition would not be published until 1797. This work is one of the most important and widely read of the many writings of the important Revolutionary figure and second president of the United States. At the time Adams wrote this work he was serving as the first United States ambassador in England, an uncomfortable position for a recent rebel, but he was ever ready to argue the American point of view. Here he forcibly states the principles on which he perceived the United States to be founded. The book was popular and went through numerous editions. Its issuance as the Federal Constitutional Convention was assembling added to its popularity and resulted in several American reprintings, and according to the DAB, "its timeliness gave it vogue." Later, Adams' detractors sought to find in it a hidden desire for a monarchy. This example with provenance to Charles Bathurst (1754-1831) of Lydney Park, a long-serving member of parliament and later as Treasurer of the Navy, Secretary at War and Master of the Mint. Howes A60; Sabin 235; Reese, Federal Hundred, 11.

$6000.00

Peace River: A Canoe Voyage from Hudson's Bay to the Pacific, by the late Sir George Simpson ... in 1828. Journal of the late Chief Factor, Archibald McDonald ... who accompanied him. Edited, with Notes, by Malcolm McLeod

By MACDONALD, Archibald

Ottawa: J. Durie & Son, 1872. 8vo. xix, 119 pp. Large folding map at end. Errata slip. Original sage green wrappers printed in black. Housed in a chemise and green-morocco backed slipcase Provenance: Henry F. De Puy (booklabel) Among the rarest works related to Simpson's famed journey from Hudson's Bay to the Pacific. An important overland journal with long daily entries describing Simpson's 1828 journey of more than 3,000 miles from York Factory on Hudson's Bay, to Fort Langley (near present day Vancouver, British Columbia) during which most of the great fur trading posts were visited. McLeod was the son of a Hudson Bay Company Chief Factor and his notes include personal recollections of many of the important fur-traders. "This pamphlet, which offers a wealth of detailed information on the area, advocates strongly the use of the Pass as part of the route of the proposed Pacific Railroad" (Streeter) Peel 90; Smith 6284; TPL 1496; Lande 13030; Lowther 400; Graff 3878; Soliday II:951; Streeter 3989.

$3500.00

An Essay on Slavery, proving from scripture its Inconsistency with Humanity and Religion ... To which is added, An Elegy on the miserable State of an African Slave

By SHARP, Granville (1735-1813); and William SHENSTONE (1714-1763)

Burlington: Isaac Collins, 1773. 8vo. 28pp. Stab-stitched in contemporary paper wrappers. Housed in a red morocco box. Provenance: James Moon Rare first edition of Sharp's Essay on Slavery. In 1772 a proslavery writer, Thomas Thompson, attempted to prove that the slave trade was consistent with Biblical principles and natural law. Largely basing his argument on a passage from Levitucus XXV, his publication, titled The African trade for Negro slaves, shewn to be consistent with principles of humanity, and with the laws of revealed religion (Canterbury: 1772), greatly disturbed Sharp and the present essay was written as a response. Sharp sent a copy of his unpublished manuscript to an unnamed friend in America, but presumably his frequent correspondent and leading Quaker abolitionist Anthony Benezet, who likely arranged for the publication. The work includes a lengthy anonymous preface which has been attributed to Samuel Allinson (Cadbury, Henry J. "Quaker bibliographical notes." Bulletin of Friends Historical Association 26 [1937]: 49-51), which quotes at length a contemporary review of Thompson's work. Sharp's rebuke follows on pp. 17-26 ,in which he reviews Mosaic law in great detail to disprove Thompson's conclusions. A fourteen stanza poem by William Shenstone follows, beginning "See the poor native quit the Lybian shores/ Ah! not in love's delightful fetters bound! / No radiant smile his dying peace restores / Nor love, nor fame, nor friendship heals his wounds." This Burlington, NJ edition, printed by Isaac Collins, is the first edition of the work; it would not be printed in Great Britain until 1776, within Sharp's The Just Limitation of Slavery (London:1776). No other examples of this work are cited in the auction records for the last half century. This example with provenance to James Moon (1713-1796) a noted Quaker abolitionist. Evans 13005; ESTC W31989; Humphrey 131.

$5750.00

The American Pilot: Containing the Navigation of the Sea-Coast of North-America

By NORMAN, John and William

Boston: printed and sold by John Norman, 1810. Folio. (21 1/4 x 16 1/2 inches). Letterpress title, 4pp. letterpress sailing Directions, 11 engraved maps (2 single page, 4 double-page, 5 folding). Repairs to lower margins and upper corners of text leaves, some repairs to maps at folds. Contemporary blue paper covered boards, rebacked. Housed in a blue morocco backed box An American cartographic rarity: a complete copy of Norman's famed American Pilot, among the earliest of American atlases. The American Revolution brought to an end Britain's leading role in the mapping of America. The task now fell to the American publishing industry, still in its infancy, but with first-hand access to the new surveys that were documenting the rapid growth of the nation. In particular, there was a need for nautical charts for use by the expanding New England commercial fleets. The first American marine atlas, Mathew Clark's A Complete Set of Charts of the Coast of America , was published in Boston in 1790. Two of Clark's charts had been engraved by John Norman, who was inspired to launch his own enterprise. In January 1790, Norman published a notice in the Boston Gazette stating he was currently engraving charts of all the coast of America on a large scale. These were assembled and published as The American Pilot (Boston:1791). Norman's Pilot, the second American marine atlas, indeed the second American atlas of any kind, marked an advance over the earlier work of Mathew Clark. New editions of the Pilot appeared in 1792 and 1794, and after John Norman's death, his son, William, brought out editions in 1794, 1798, 1801, 1803, 1810 and 1816. Despite the seemingly large number of editions, The American Pilot is one of the rarest of all American atlases. Wheat and Brun (pps. 198-199) locate just ten complete copies for the first five editions: 1791 (Huntington, Harvard); 1792 (LC, Clements); 1794(1) (LC, JCB, Boston Public); 1794(2) (Yale); 1798 (LC, Boston Public). We find no other complete example of this 1810 issue. The maps comprise: 1) A Chart of Nantucket Shoals Surveyed by Capt. Paul Pinkham. 2 sheets joined, 21x32 3/4 inches. Wheat & Brun 221, state 3. 2) A New General Chart of the West Indies from the Latest Marine Journals and Surveys. 4 sheets joined, 28x40 1/2 inches. Wheat & Brun 683. 3) A Chart of South Carolina and Georgia. Single sheet, 20 3/4x16 1/2 inches. Wheat & Brun 607, state 3. 4) Chart of the Coast of America from Cape Hateras to Cape Roman from the Actual Surveys of Dl. Dunbibin Esqr. 2 sheets joined, 20 3/4x32 1/2 inches. Wheat & Brun 589, state 5. 5) A New and Accurate Chart of the Bay of Chesapeak Including Delaware Bay. 4 sheets joined, 42x34 1/2 inches. Wheat & Brun 310, state 2. 6) [Chart from New York to Timber Island Including Nantucket Shoals from the Latest Surveys.] 5 sheets joined, 54 1/2x39 1/2 inches overall. Wheat & Brun 157, state 3 (without title). 7) A Chart of the Coast of New England from the South Shoal to Cape Sable Including George's Bank from Holland's Actual Surveys. 4 sheets joined, 35x41 1/2 inches. Wheat & Brun 159, state 2. 8) A Chart of the Coast of America from Wood's Island to Good Harbor. 2 sheets joined, 21x32 1/2 inches. Wheat & Brun 166, state 2. 9) [Chart of the Coast of Nova Scotia from Cape Sable to Forked Harbor.] 2 sheets joined, 21x33 1/4 inches. 10) A Chart of the Streights of Bell Isle. Single sheet, 16 1/2x21 inches. Wheat & Brun 107, state 2. 11) A Chart of the Banks of and Part of the Coast of Newfoundland Including the Islands of Sable and Cape Breton from the Actual Surveys of Jos. F.W. Des Barres Esqr. 2 sheets joined, 21x33 inches. Phillips Atlases 4477 (1803 edition); Wroth, Some Contributions to Navigation , pp. 32-33.

$180000.00

A Memoir of the Construction, Cost and Capacity of the Croton Aqueduct, compiled from Official Document: Together with an Account of the Civic Celebration of the Fourteenth October, 1842, on occasion of the completion of the great work
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A Memoir of the Construction, Cost and Capacity of the Croton Aqueduct, compiled from Official Document: Together with an Account of the Civic Celebration of the Fourteenth October, 1842, on occasion of the completion of the great work

By KING, Charles

New York: Charles King, 1843. Quarto. vii, [1], 308pp. Engraved view, after Robert Havell, engraved by Jordan and Halpin. Foxing. Publisher's brown pebble-grained morocco, covers elaborately tooled in gilt and blind, spine with wide semi-raised bands in five compartments, lettered in gilt in the second and fourth, the others with a repeat overall decoration in gilt, glazed yellow endpapers, gilt edge Provenance: Jacob Miller (name in gilt on the upper cover) In an elaborate presentation binding. In 1832, the Common Council addressed the growing city's need for a more adequate water supply, and five years later construction commenced on an aqueduct system to bring water from the Croton River in Westchester County to a reservoir at 42nd and Fifth Avenue. At the time, the 41-mile project to bring in fresh water by gravity alone was the largest such project attempted in the United States. Upon its completion in 1842, a great celebration was held in the city and several publications were issued, including the present work which was underwritten by the Common Council. This example is in an elaborate publisher's presentation binding, evidently accomplished for members of the Common Council, Board of Aldermen, and other New York notables involved in the project.

$1000.00

In Congress, July 4, 1776. The Unanimous Declaration of the Thirteen United States of America

By DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. - Eleazer HUNTINGTON (engraver)

[Hartford, Connecticut]: Eleazer Huntington, 1824. Engraved broadside, printed on wove paper. Sheet size: approximately 25 x 20 inches. Among the rarest broadside printings of the Declaration in the early 19th century. According to John Bidwell's list, this is the sixth broadside edition of the Declaration of Independence . Bidwell locates only three copies of the Huntington printing of the Declaration, at the Huntington Library, Massachusetts Historical Society, and American Antiquarian Society. The Declaration of Independence , the foundation document of the United States, has been printed numerous times since its original publication in 1776. At first as broadsides, then as an essential addition to any volume of laws, it was from the beginning a basic work in the American canon. The present document is one of the earliest broadside editions of the Declaration , done within a few years of the first broadside republications In the period following the war of 1812, Americans began to look back, for the first time with historical perspective, on the era of the founding of the country. The republic was now forty years old, and the generation which had taken part in the American Revolution, including the signers of the Declaration, was dropping away. With nostalgia and curiosity Americans began to examine the details of the nation's founding: documents such as the debates of the Constitutional Convention were published for the first time. Against this background it seemed extraordinary that the Declaration of Independence, as created, was unknown to Americans, when the text was so central to the national consciousness. Several entrepreneurs set out to bridge this gap by printing exact copies of the document, often featuring calligraphic text, portraits, or other decorative flourishes. The first to do so was a writing master named Benjamin Owen Tyler, who created a calligraphic version of the Declaration... and published it in 1818, recreating exactly the signatures of the signers as they appeared on the original. Three other broadside printings of the Declaration... were issued in 1818 and 1819, each containing ornamental borders or illustrations. These were followed in the early 1820s by the present printing by Hartford engraver and penmanship author Eleazer Huntington. Huntington followed Tyler's example by creating a calligraphic facsimile of the Declaration... , but stripped out the ornaments and illustrations that had been added by previous publishers, returning the document to the simple title and text of the original, and providing the signatures of the signers in exact facsimile. John Bidwell, "American History in Image and Text" in Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society , 1988, Vol. 98, pp.247-302 (also issued as a separate pamphlet by AAS), item 6.

$16000.00

Thirteen Years of Travel and Exploration in Alaska ... Edited by Prof. and Mrs. J. H. Carruth
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Thirteen Years of Travel and Exploration in Alaska ... Edited by Prof. and Mrs. J. H. Carruth

By PIERCE, W. H.

Lawrence, Kansas: Journal Publishing Company, 1890. 8vo. 224pp. Three full-page woodcut illustration facing pages 9, 83 and 143. Publisher's tan wrappers, upper wrapper lettered in black. Housed in a cloth chemise. First edition of a very rare early account of the interior of Alaska. "It is the intention of the writer of this book to put before the reader the knowledge he has gained of the Territory of Alaska, both of the coast and interior, its gold and silver mines, its fisheries; in fact, to give a truthful and reliable account of all its valuable resources and geological and botanical curiosities. A true and reliable knowledge of these things has been obtained in thirteen years of travel and exploration in this little known Territory ... [Previous accounts] have not been of a character to truthfully enlighten the reader, as they generally treat of the coast and its scenery. Little or nothing has been said by those writers regarding the more interesting and great unknown interior -- its great rivers, forests, and boundless uninhabited wastes and solitudes ... My first journey was to northern British Columbia, my second was along the coast of Alaska, my third and fourth were in the interior of Alaska" (Introduction). A prospector, Pierce arrived at Fort Wrangel in 1877, commencing thirteen years of harrowing journeys within Alaska seeking fortune. This included descending the Yukon, ascending the Forty Mile River and more. "One of the earliest accounts of gold discovery on the Yukon, by a pioneer of 1886" (Howes). The only other example on the market that we can identify was in the Thomas W. Streeter sale in 1969. Howes P357; Streeter Sale 3539.

$6500.00

Through the Brazilian Wilderness
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Through the Brazilian Wilderness

By ROOSEVELT, Theodore (1858-1919)

New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1914. Large 8vo. Photogravure frontispiece and 48 half-tone plates, one folding and 2 full-page maps. Publisher's cloth, upper cover and spine stamped in gilt, top edge gilt, others uncut. Housed in a red morocco box. Provenance: Lola Edith Lowther (presentation inscription by Roosevelt, dated 13 May 1915) Rare presentation copy of the first edition. After losing his bid for a third term in the White House, Roosevelt accepted an invitation from the Brazilian government to accompany explorer Candido Rondon on an expedition to descend the River of Doubt (now named Rio Roosevelt) through an unexplored region of the Amazon. This work recounts his harrowing 1913-1914 journey, in which Roosevelt nearly died. The expedition would prove to be Roosevelt's last great adventure and Through the Brazilian Wilderness among the final works published in his lifetime. Interestingly, this volume was inscribed in the midst of Roosevelt's 1915 libel trial, having been sued for calling New York Republican leader William Barnes "a political boss of the most obnoxious type." The trial, held in Syracuse (it being deemed a more neutral jurisdiction than Albany), lasted from 19 April to 22 May, 1915, when the jury found in Roosevelt's favor. Roosevelt would later write that the toll which the trial took on him ensured the end of his active participation in politics. During the course of the trial, Roosevelt stayed at the home of his friend Horace Wilkinson, the founder of Crucible Steel. The present volume is inscribed to Horace Wilkinson's wife's niece, Lola Edith Lowther.

$8000.00

Hunting with the Eskimos: the unique record of a sportsman's year among the northernmost tribe -- the big game hunt, the native life, and the battle for existence through the long Arctic night
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Hunting with the Eskimos: the unique record of a sportsman's year among the northernmost tribe -- the big game hunt, the native life, and the battle for existence through the long Arctic night

By WHITNEY, Harry (1873-1936)

New York: De Vinne Press for the Century Co, 1910. Large 8vo. 68 photographic plates. Signed by the author on the title. Later half green crushed morocco and period orange cloth covered boards, spine with raised bands in six compartments, endpapers renewed. One of 150 numbered large paper copies signed by Whitney: an important account of life in northern Greenland from an eyewitness to Peary's race to the pole. Harry Whitney (1873-1936) was a wealthy American sportsman, a descendant of the Eli Whitney family of New Haven, Connecticut (not to be confused with his contemporary, sportsman and donor of Yale's gymnasium Harry Payne Whitney). Whitney first travelled to the far northern Arctic for sport in 1908-09, on the ship carrying Robert Peary's expedition to the North Pole in the spring of 1908. While Peary and his rival Frederick Cook assaulted the Pole, Whitney hunted musk ox, polar bears, walrus, and other arctic game, and wintered over with the Inuit. In the spring of 1909 he encountered Frederick Cook, who claimed to have reached the Pole, and left some luggage in Whitney's care as he raced south to report his triumph. When Peary arrived later in the summer, he offered Whitney a ride home, but refused to bring Cook's luggage. Whitney thus became embroiled in the controversy over who achieved the Pole first, since Cook claimed his proofs were in the baggage. This deluxe edition, limited to 150 numbered copies on special paper, this being copy number 5, is rare.

$1500.00

Sketches of Camp Boone. The First Encampment of the Kentucky State Guard; held near Louisville, from August 23rd to August 30th, 1860. Also, photographic views of the camp, and Portraits of the General's Staff
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Sketches of Camp Boone. The First Encampment of the Kentucky State Guard; held near Louisville, from August 23rd to August 30th, 1860. Also, photographic views of the camp, and Portraits of the General's Staff

By KENTUCKY - Garrett & Nickerson, photographers

Louisville: Published by G. T. Shaw for Garrett & Nickerson, Photographists, 1860. 4to. (10 x 7 3/4 inches). 27, [1]pp. plus 9 oval salt paper print photograph portraits mounted on one sheet with printed captions, 11 salt paper print photograph views of the camp, with rounded corners mounted on 11 sheets. Contemporary red morocco, upper cover titled in gilt, rebacked, with original spine laid down Very rare early photographically-illustrated work, depicting military camp life on the eve of the Civil War in Louisville Kentucky. On March 5th, 1860, fore-seeing the coming of an armed conflict, the Kentucky State Legislature organized the Kentucky State Guard. By early spring the officers had received their commissions, with Simon Bolivar Buckner named Inspector-General with the rank of Major General. On August 23, 1860 the Kentucky State Guard assembled for the first time on the grounds of the South-Western Agricultural Association in Louisville, naming their camp for famed Kentuckian Daniel Boone. Seeing a commercial opportunity, Louisville photographers Garrett & Nickerson captured the week-long event. The preliminary text in this work gives a detailed record of all the orders given during the first encampment, as well as a complete roster of the officers. The illustrations within the work are all salt paper prints from collodion glass negatives by Louisville photographers C. Alfred Garrett and George H. Nickerson. The nine officers depicted on the first page of photographs are: Major General S. B. Buckner, Colonel Frank Tryon, Colonel Benjamin Hardin Helm, Colonial Isaac W. Scott, Colonel Charles D. Pennebaker, Colonel Samuel Gill, Major James A. Beattie, Captain Philip Vacaro and Rev. James Craik. The views comprise (titles as per captions listed on the final page of text): 1) First View of Camp Boone, looking North 2) Second View of Camp Boone, looking North-East 3) Dress Parade 4) Guard Mounting 5) Visit of the Governor to Major Hunt 6) Street Scene after Parade [#1] 7) Visit of Commissioned Officers to Capt. Hayes 8) Street Scene after Parade [#2] 9) Visit of the Governor to Col. Frank Tryon 10) Meeting of Officers after Parade 11) Street Scene after Parade [#3] At the start of the Civil War, border-state Kentucky vowed to stay neutral. It was not long, however, before the state legislature moved to side with the Union. Nevertheless, many of its citizens, and many of the soldiers in the Kentucky State Guard, sided with the Confederacy. Indeed, the Confederates formed their own Camp Boone in Tennessee to attract the well-trained Kentucky militiamen. This included Buckner, as well as Captain John Hunt Morgan, the infamous leader of the Morgan Raiders. Interestingly, the final image within the work would seem to depict Morgan's men, as one of the crates in the foreground is labelled "Lex. Rifles", after the name of Morgan's company (the Lexington Rifles). Thus the present work, depicting the Kentucky State Guard in August of 1860, inadvertently captures the images of many soon-to-be soldiers in the Confederate Army. Photographically-illustrated works from this early period were seldom printed in large quantities. That fact, coupled with the destruction caused by the Civil War in the years immediately following the publication has made this work very rare. OCLC cites but two known examples (University of Chicago and University of Kentucky); an additional example is held in the Gilder-Lehrman Collection at the New York Historical Society and we know of another in private hands. A significant photographic incunable. Not in Truthful Lens.

$32500.00

Congress of the United States: at the second session begun and held at the City of New-York ... An Act to prescribe the Mode in which public Acts, Records and judicial proceedings in each state, shall be authenticated so as to take effect in every other state
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Congress of the United States: at the second session begun and held at the City of New-York ... An Act to prescribe the Mode in which public Acts, Records and judicial proceedings in each state, shall be authenticated so as to take effect in every other state

By JEFFERSON, Thomas (1743-1826)

[New York: Childs and Swaine, 1790. Folio. (15 1/8 x 9 inches). 1p. Signed by Thomas Jefferson, as Secretary of State. Expert repair to separation at horizontal centerfold. Housed in a full red morocco box. An act of the First Congress, signed by Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson here transmits the first legislation to enforce the "Full Faith and Credit Clause" of the Constitution. The law was passed in May 1790 by the second session of the First Congress in order to fulfil Article IV, Section 1 of the Constitution, which stipulated "Full Faith and Credit shall be given in each State to the public Acts, Records, and judicial Proceedings of every other State. And the Congress may by general Laws prescribe the Manner in which such Acts, Records and Proceedings shall be proved, and the Effect thereof." Specifically, the legislation ordered that official state documents be authenticated by means of an official seal, and that "said records and judicial proceedings authenticated as aforesaid, shall have such faith and credit given to them in every court within the United States, as they have by law or usage in the courts of the State from whence the said records are, or shall be taken." Evans 22968.

$28500.00

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