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A Voyage of Discovery, made under the orders of the Admiralty, in his Majesty's ships Isabella and Alexander, for the purpose of exploring Baffin's Bay, and inquiring into the probability of a north-west passage
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A Voyage of Discovery, made under the orders of the Admiralty, in his Majesty's ships Isabella and Alexander, for the purpose of exploring Baffin's Bay, and inquiring into the probability of a north-west passage

By ROSS, Sir John (1777-1856)

London: John Murray, 1819. Quarto. (11 1/4 x 8 7/8 inches). [6], xxxix, [1], 252, cxliv pp. Small format errata leaf following the list of plates. 32 maps, coastal profiles, plates, tables or graphs (comprising: 1 engraved folding frontispiece general chart, 2 engraved folding maps by J. Walker after J. Bushnan and others, 25 aquatint or engraved plates and coastal profiles by D. Havell, R. Havell & Son, Thomas Lewin after A.M. Skene, Ross, H.P. Hoppner, Thomas Lewin and others [15 hand-coloured, 7 folding], 1 engraved table, 3 folding engraved meteorological graphs), wood-engraved illustrations (one full-page). Uncut. Repaired tears to the first three leaves, small tear to the frontispiece map with small area of loss affecting a few words of the Remark at the top right. Contemporary blue cloth, rebacked with the original spine, red morocco lettering piece First edition of the official account of Ross's first voyage. Ross "commanded the Isabella and the expedition, with Sir W. E. Parry in command of the Alexander. The vessels sailed from England Apr. 18, to Davis Strait and north along the west coast of Greenland to the entrance of Smith Sound; thence southward past Jones Sound to Lancaster Sound; after exploring it, the vessels continued southward, making a test of the breadth of Davis Strait, and returning to England by Nov. 14." (Arctic Bibliography). The expedition is credited with confirming the earlier discoveries of Bylot and Baffin, although they failed to probe deeper into Lancaster Sound, for which Ross was criticized on his return. Geographic discoveries included Melville Bay, Cape York, Prince Regent's Bay (Dedodes Fjord), Whale Sound, and Carey's Island. The scientific work produced some notable results and the present work also provides an account of an important encounter with "Arctic Highlanders" (i.e. Eskimos). In retrospect, Ross's voyage was the first of an important series of British north-west passage expeditions, which explored the Arctic regions in the period between 1818 and 1845. Abbey Travel II, 634; Arctic Bibliography 14873; Sabin 73376; Staton & Tremaine 1152; Hill 1488; Lande 1425.

$5000.00

Captivity of the Oatman Girls: Being an interesting narrative of life among the Apache and Mohave Indians: containing also an interesting account of the massacre of the Oatman family, by the Apache Indians in 1851 ..
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Captivity of the Oatman Girls: Being an interesting narrative of life among the Apache and Mohave Indians: containing also an interesting account of the massacre of the Oatman family, by the Apache Indians in 1851 ..

By STRATTON, R. B.

San Francisco: Whitton, Towne & Co.'s Excelsior Steam Power Press, 1857. 12mo. (7 1/4 x 4 1/4 inches). 231pp. Wood-engraved map, portrait of Olive Oatman, and numerous wood-engraved illustrations. Publisher's blue cloth, upper cover lettered in gilt. Housed in a later brown chemise and slipcase. The earliest obtainable edition of the most famous California Indian captivity: lovely example in publisher's cloth. The Oatman family belonged to a sect of Mormons called the Brewsterites, after their leader James C. Brewster. The group followed Brewster to California, which he believed was the proper location for Zion. Along the way the party split into two groups; the Oatman family took a southern route which led them through what is now present day Arizona. They were attacked by members of either the Tolkepayas or Western Yavapais about midway between Pima Village and Yuma. Most of the family was killed except for brother Lorenzo, who was left for dead, and sisters Mary Ann and Olive, who were taken captive. The sisters were soon traded to the Mohaves and brought to what is now Needles, California. Mary Ann died there of starvation and Olive was finally released after three years captivity. "[Olive's] adventures were vividly recounted by Royal Stratton and became a best-seller of the time" (Wagner-Camp). The very rare first edition was published in San Francisco in 1857, under the title Life Among the Indians. Only the Siebert copy of that great rarity has appeared on the market in the last quarter century. The present second edition quickly followed later in the same year and is the earliest obtainable edition. Later, more commonly found editions were published in Chicago and New York. Ayer, Supplement I:121; Graff 4006 (first edition); Howes S1068; Wagner-Camp 294:2; Sabin 92742.

$3000.00

Western America, including California and Oregon, with Maps of those Regions, and of the Sacramento Valley
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Western America, including California and Oregon, with Maps of those Regions, and of the Sacramento Valley

By WILKES, Charles (1798-1877)

Philadelphia: Lea & Blanchard, 1849. 8vo. [iii]-viii, [11]-130pp. 3 folding maps. Dampstaining in the top margin. Modern red morocco, covers stamped in blind and gilt Scarce first edition, complete with its three important maps: "In a sense it constitutes the first Pacific coast guide" (Howes). "Commander Wilkes compiled this work from data gathered while he was on the Pacific Coast commanding the United States Exploring Expedition from 1838 to 1842. He included a chapter on the gold region drawn from official reports and his knowledge of the area's geology and his own opinion of gold specimens sent east ...The map of the Sacramento Valley was an important source of information for gold seekers" (Kurutz). The three important maps comprise a large map of the Sacramento Valley, drawn by F. D. Stuart (Wheat, MTW III:646; Wheat, Gold 134), as well as maps of Upper California (Wheat, MTW 654; Wheat, Gold 135) and Oregon Territory (Wheat, MTW 654; Wheat, Gold 135). Graff 4656; Howes W416; Cowan I p 249; Cowan II p 683; Sabin 103995; Kurutz, The California Gold Rush 679a; Streeter Sale VII: 3326; Wagner-Camp 175a.

$6750.00

Articles of Association of the Bank of Potomac, Established at Alexandria
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Articles of Association of the Bank of Potomac, Established at Alexandria

By VIRGINIA - Bank of Potomac

Alexandria, VA: Printed by Samuel Snowden, 1805. 8vo. 16pp. Expertly bound to style in period half tree sheep and marbled paper covered boards The founding of a pioneering Virginia bank. The founding document of the Bank of Potomac, organized in December 1804 in Alexandria, Va. The work includes the articles of association for the bank laid out in twenty-two articles, followed by the roster of bank officers, and three designs for printed forms to be used in bank transactions. The first president of the Bank of Potomac was Thomas Vowell, Jr., a prominent Alexandria merchant who, with his brother John, owned a warehouse and wharf in the town. He is listed at the head of the bank officers, followed by the cashier, Charles Page, and the twelve directors, which includes prominent Virginia players such as Cuthbert Powell and William Fitzhugh. An exceptionally-rare work; the only copy in OCLC is located at the Library of Virginia. OCLC 6842675.

$3750.00

Directions for sailing to and from the River Mississippi, to accompany Blunt's Chart [caption title]
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Directions for sailing to and from the River Mississippi, to accompany Blunt's Chart [caption title]

By BLUNT, Edmund M. (1770-1862)

New York: Blunt, 1815. 8vo. 8pp. Original blue paper front wrapper, with letterpress mounted title label, bound in. Publishers' advertisement mounted to inside front wrapper. Later cloth-backed marbled paper boards Provenance: Marinens Bibliotek (inked stamps), deaccessioned by the Garnisions Biblioteket in 2017 Very rare early American sailing directions to and from the Mississippi River. First published in 1815, with a revised version issued in 1818, Blunt's chart of the Mississippi was the first detailed chart of the Gulf coast published in America. The present separately-issued sailing directions to accompany the chart are very rare, with only two examples recorded by OCLC (American Antiquarian Society and Tulane University). Shaw & Shoemaker 34156; Rink 3938; cf. Guthorn, United States Coastal Charts, p. 10.

$1500.00

Political Economy: Founded in Justice and Humanity. In a Letter to a Friend. By W.T.
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Political Economy: Founded in Justice and Humanity. In a Letter to a Friend. By W.T.

By [THORNTON, William (1759-1828)]

Washington, D.C.: Printed by Samuel Harrison Smith, 1804. 8vo. 24pp. Expertly bound to style in period tree sheep and marbled paper covered boards Rare anti-slavery tract by the first architect of the U.S. Capitol. A powerful anti-slavery tract by William Thornton, the great Federal-era polymath and designer of the United States Capitol. Thornton was born in 1759 in the British Virgin Islands, scion of a Tortola-based Quaker family and heir to a slave-worked sugar plantation. Sent to England at the age of five, Thornton did not return to Tortola until 1786, whereupon he began to sense the incommensurability of his Quaker values and the source of his income. Later that year, he emigrated to the U.S. and by 1788 was actively involved in the movement to free slaves through African colonization. In the present pamphlet, Thornton advocates abolition, asking how, "[a]fter the Americans, in the conscious pride of nature, declared to the whole world, in their great charter of independence, that every man is equally entitled to the protection of life, liberty and prosperity...the negroes are still in slavery" (p.[3]). Sabin 95645; Shaw & Shoemaker 7349.

$3500.00

Illustrations of Masonry, by one of the Fraternity ... [With:] A Narrative of the Facts and Circumstances relating to the Kidnapping and Presumed Murder of William Morgan: and of the attempt to carry off David C. Miller and to burn or destroy the Printing-Office of the latter, for the purpose of preventing the printing and publishing of a book entitiled "Illustrations of Masonry"
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Illustrations of Masonry, by one of the Fraternity ... [With:] A Narrative of the Facts and Circumstances relating to the Kidnapping and Presumed Murder of William Morgan: and of the attempt to carry off David C. Miller and to burn or destroy the Printing-Office of the latter, for the purpose of preventing the printing and publishing of a book entitiled "Illustrations of Masonry"

By MORGAN, William (1774-c.1826)

Rochester: Printed for the Author, William Morgan, 1828. 2 volumes, 8vo. 96pp; 72pp. [Illustrations:] Full dark blue crushed morocco, bound by Bradstreets; [Narrative:] Half dark blue curshed morocco and marbled paper covered boards, bound by Bensel. Provenance: H. F. DePuy (booklabels in both works); John Camp Williams (booklabel in Illustrations) Rare first Rochester edition of William Morgan's famous anti-Masonic pamphlet and a Rochester edition of the account of his abduction and presumed murder: both volumes from the famed library of H. F. DePuy. After being denied participation at a lodge in Batavia, William Morgan vowed to publish an exposé revealing the secrets of Masonry. Before publication, Morgan was arrested on a trumped up charge relating to a debt. Local printer David C. Miller, who was one of the financial backers of the proposed publication and whose shop was burned as a result, bailed Morgan out of jail and travelled with him to Fort Niagara. That was the last Morgan was seen alive and was presumed to have been kidnapped and murdered by a group of Masons from Batavia, several of whom would be convicted of kidnapping (but in the absence of the body, not murder). Miller would publish Morgan's work shortly after his disappearance. Titled Illustrations of Masonry , the work was first published in Batavia in 1826 with subsequent editions published in Rochester and New York (the New York 1826 [but 1827?] edition mistakenly cited as the first edition by some). The first edition, announced for publication in August 1826, was hastily and crudely printed at Miller's press. The present example of the Illustrations is the first Rochester Edition, and is the only edition in which Morgan's name is printed on the title-page. Though some records would seem to infer a frontispiece, this would apparently only appear in later issues and editions. This copy from the library of famed collector Henry F. DePuy, and sold in part two of his sale (Anderson Galleries, January 26-27, 1920, lot 1638). Several related works were also published on Morgan's disappearance and murder, like the present Narrative of the Facts . The present early Rochester edition of the Narrative is also from DePuy's library, and sold by Lathrop Harper in 1948 (catalogue 169, item 1327). All early editions of these work are rare and presumed suppressed, particularly those published in Batavia and Rochester. Morgan would become a symbol of the rights of free speech and free press, and anti-Masonic protests ensued following his disappearance, even leading to the formation of an anti-Masonic political party. Shaw and Shoemaker 34362 and 29804; Sabin 50676 and 50684.

$1500.00

The cabinet-maker's guide, or rules and instructions in the art of varnishing, dying, staining, japanning, polishing, lackering and beautifying wood, ivory, tortoise-shell, and metal
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The cabinet-maker's guide, or rules and instructions in the art of varnishing, dying, staining, japanning, polishing, lackering and beautifying wood, ivory, tortoise-shell, and metal

By [SIDDONS, G. A.]

Greenfield, MA: Ansel Phelps, 1825. 12mo. (6 x 3 1/2 inches). 108pp. Publisher's ad on rear board. Publisher's lettered boards, rebacked at an early date with blue checked calico cloth Provenance: A. Lovett (signature dated 1830) The first furniture finisher's manual published in America. Clear and concise instructions are given for dying and staining woods, making glue, making and applying varnish, polishing, japanning, cleaning woods and metals, and much more. For example, to make furniture oil: "Take linseed oil, put it in a glazed pipkin, with as much alkanet root as it will cover; let it boil gently, and you will find it become of a strong red color: let it cool, and it will be fit for use." Six tables in the appendix provide assistance for figuring lengths and weights, and an index follows. This first American edition reprinted from a London edition, and described on the title as "a new edition, with considerable additions. Including an appendix containing several valuable tables." Not in American Imprints, and only nine copies in OCLC. Rink 1793.

$6500.00

The History and Lives of the most Notorious Pirates, and their Crews ... the third edition
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The History and Lives of the most Notorious Pirates, and their Crews ... the third edition

By [JOHNSON, Captain Charles (fl. 1724-1736); sometimes attributed to Daniel DEFOE]

London: Sabine and Son, 1780. 12mo. (7 x 4 inches). 96pp. 15 woodcut full-page illustrations. Publisher's wrappers, upper wrapper with a large woodcut portrait of Capt. Martel (repeated from the illustration on p. 27), lower wrapper with publisher's ads Scarce 18th-century, illustrated chapbook edition of Johnson's "Lives of Pirates" This fascinating work, first published in 1724, was an instant success. The work remained in print in various languages throughout the 18th and 19th centuries - with over 30 editions being published before 1900. It now serves as one of the most important contemporary printed sources for information about the British pirates of the first decades of the 18th century. It includes chapters on all the great ones: Captain Avery, Edward Blackbeard Teach, Steed Bonnet, Bartholomew Roberts, Henry Morgan and others. Also includes chapters on two female pirates, Mary Read and Anne Bonny. "This work is considered a sequel to Exquemelin's Bucaniers of America, and most of the pirates it records operated in the West Indies and American waters ... Nothing is known of the author who called himself Captain Johnson, and the name may be an assumed one. Beginning in 1724, and continuing to the present day, books on pirates have appeared under his name. There is no evidence to support the idea that Johnson was an actual pirate, even though his accounts seem remarkably accurate. There also appears to be little substance to the coincidence that a contemporary dramatist of the same name wrote a play, The successful pyrate, about a popular hero Captain Avery. J. R. Moore identified Captain Johnson as Daniel Defoe ... , but this was contested by P. N. Furbank and W. R. Owens in 1988, as well as by David Cordingly in a 1998 edition of Johnson. If the author was Defoe, it is interesting to note that he also wrote an elaborate review of the work" (Hill). Others, including his bibliographer Moore, have attributed the work to Daniel Defoe based on the internal relationship to his works of proven authorship (cf. J.R. Moore, Defoe in the pillory. 1939. p. 126-188). The National Maritime Museum notes that there is "considerable evidence' to suggest that 'Johnson may well have been a nom de plume used by Daniel Defoe" (Piracy & Privateering p. 83). This edition not recorded by ESTC and with only one example in OCLC.

$2800.00

Journal of a Military Reconnaissance, from Santa Fe, New Mexico, to the Navajo Country..
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Journal of a Military Reconnaissance, from Santa Fe, New Mexico, to the Navajo Country..

By SIMPSON, James H. (1813-1883)

Philadelphia: Lippincott, Grambo and Co, 1852. 8vo. (8 7/8 x 5 1/2 inches). 140, [28] pp. Large folding map and seventy-five plates lithographed by Duval after R. H. Kern (including many printed in colour and hand-finished) [numbered 1-75, without plates numbered 2, 21 or 39 and with plates 66*, and 67* and 67**, complete thus, as issued]. Publisher's ads in the rear. Minor dampstain. Publisher's brown cloth, covers stamped in blind, spine gilt A cornerstone on the exploration of the southwest, with important color plates of Indians from the region. "One of the most accurate and complete of all narratives of exploration of the country of the Zuni and Pueblo Indians" (Field). Wheat praises the map as "An arresting production bringing out many new details of the region directly west of New Mexico." Simpson was the first explorer to visit and describe Chaco Canyon, Canyon de Chelly, Pueblo Bonita, Inscription Rock, and other sites in northern Arizona. As William Goetzmann notes, the work is "a major Southwestern archaeological endeavor" and "no serious student can afford to neglect Simpson's report even in the present day." The plates, handsomely illustrating Navajo costumes, artifacts and sites, make this an important American color plate book. Deak cites the well known view of Santa Fe by Richard Kern. Also included is a comparative vocabulary of the Pueblo language of the "wild tribes" of the borders of New Mexico. Bennett, p.98; Deak, Picturing America 590; Field 1413; Graff 3789; Howes S498, "aa."; Wagner-Camp 218; Palau 31488; Pilling, Proof-sheets 3608; Wheat Transmississippi 641; Reese, Stamped With A National Character 29.

$2000.00

California Illustrated: including a Description of the Panama and Nicaragua Routes. By a Returned Californian
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California Illustrated: including a Description of the Panama and Nicaragua Routes. By a Returned Californian

By [LETTS, John M.]

New York: William Holdredge, 1852. 8vo. (8 7/8 x 5 5/8 inches). 224pp. 48 tinted lithographic plates by G. W. Lewis after George V. Cooper. Scattered minor foxing. Publisher's pictorial cloth gilt A vivid narrative of California mining life, issued at the height of the Gold Rush fever: the rare first edition, first issue, with the Holdredge imprint. Letts sailed to Chagres in 1849, went overland to the Pacific, and sailed to San Francisco. This work is a vivid narrative of California mining life, issued at the height of the gold fever. It is particularly valuable for the attractive, accurate illustrations drawn by Cooper and lithographed by Cameron. Peters remarks: "Cooper has left us a pungent, graphic record of the long trip to and from the gold fields, of the young cities he found mushrooming there, of booming San Francisco and Sacramento, of the lovely vestiges of the mission-founding padres in early California, and of the actual life of the forty-niners, with its flavor of roughing it, humor, hope, and all the luring magic of the yellow streak." A lovely copy in its original publisher's gilt binding. Howes l300, "aa"; Cowan, p.390; Graff 2469; Flake 4880; Kurutz 395a; Hill, p.476; Peters, America on Stone, pp.130-31, 147; Peters, California on Stone, pp. 97,103-5; Sabin 40723; Wheat Gold Rush 125.

$1600.00

The Hon.ble John Hancock. of Boston in New-England; President of the American Congress. Done from an original picture painted by Littleford
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The Hon.ble John Hancock. of Boston in New-England; President of the American Congress. Done from an original picture painted by Littleford

By SHEPHERD, C. (publisher)

London: C. Shepherd, 1775. Mezzotint portrait. Wide margins. Minor creases. A British portrait of one of the leading American Revolutionary war leaders. Public curiosity for prints of Revolutionary heroes was not limited to America but spread to the English and European print shops, where an inquisitive audience clamored for a glimpse of the key figures of the war. London and Augsburg publishers, using the names C. Shepard, Thomas Hart, and John Morris, issued a series of mezzotints of the officers of the American Revolution. Public interest reached such a frenzy that European printmakers published fictitious portraits before they had accurate likenesses of the sitters, often using old plates and simply changing the name of the sitter. This porthole portrait of Hancock may have been based on a Copley painted portrait, though it claims to be after "Littleford". Littleford is thought to have been a fictitious portraitist and the resemblance to Hancock is somewhat remote. Nevertheless, the figure is commanding and a gentleman, such as might well be President of the Continental Congress. As Fowble noted: "As president of the Continental Congress in 1775, Hancock was newsworthy in both London and the colonies, and he was a tailor-made subject for print publishers. Some entrepreneurs, like Shelpherd in his anxiety to get the first prints on the street, were willing to supplement truth with a generous portion of fiction." Fowble Two Centuries of Prints in America 1680-1880 #63; Russell ENA III.6; Smith British Mezzotinto Portraits III.5.

$4500.00

Sleighing in Canada, on the River St Lawrence facing Montreal, 1841 / No. 1. Captn. Sandeman. / " [i.e. "No."] 2. Captn. Clitherow A.D.C. / " 3. Mr. Warre A.D.C. / No. 4. Mr. Baring A.D.C / " 5. Lt Col. Whyte / 7th Huzzars. / No. 6. Mrs. Murdock. / " 7. Mrs. Shirley. / " 8. Major Dicks[o]n A. Adjt. Genl. / No. 9 Mr. Paynter Rl. Artly. / " 10. Earl of Mulgrave A.D.C. / " 11. Col. The Honble C. Gore
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Sleighing in Canada, on the River St Lawrence facing Montreal, 1841 / No. 1. Captn. Sandeman. / " [i.e. "No."] 2. Captn. Clitherow A.D.C. / " 3. Mr. Warre A.D.C. / No. 4. Mr. Baring A.D.C / " 5. Lt Col. Whyte / 7th Huzzars. / No. 6. Mrs. Murdock. / " 7. Mrs. Shirley. / " 8. Major Dicks[o]n A. Adjt. Genl. / No. 9 Mr. Paynter Rl. Artly. / " 10. Earl of Mulgrave A.D.C. / " 11. Col. The Honble C. Gore

By WARRE, After Henry James and Mrs. SHIRLEY

[London]: C. Warren, 1841. Hand-colored lithograph by C. Warren. On card. Image: 11 3/8 x 27 1/2 inches; sheet: 13 5/8 x 28 7/8 inches. Expert restoration to upper left corner and left margin. Beautiful winter scene on the St. Lawrence by Henry James Warre Henry James Warre (1819 - 1898) graduated from Sandhurst and spent his entire working career in the British Army, advacing to Lieutenant General by the time of his retirement. He was also a very talented artist and his greatest contribution turned out to be the drawings he made in Her Majesty's Service in Canada, Crimea and New Zealand. This picture of people sleighing on the frozen St. Lawrence by Montreal on horse-drawn sleighs is one of Warre's earliest published works. It was made several years before the famous "Sketches of North America". Montreal and Mount Royal form the backdrop for this cheerful winter scene, in which Warre, his fellow officers and friends ride, bundled in furs, in their open sleighs on ice so thick it supports the mass of trotting horses and heavy sleds. Charles deVolpi, Montreal, A Pictorial Record I , plate 81; Reps, Views and Viewmakers... 3760.

$5750.00

Fifth Annual Exhibition of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. May, 1815
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Fifth Annual Exhibition of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. May, 1815

By PENNSYLVANIA ACADEMY OF FINE ARTS

Philadelphia, 1815. 12pp. Disbound Rare early American art exhibition catalogue, including works by Thomas Birch. The pamphlet lists the exhibits, including the Antique Saloon and Gallery, together accounting for over 160 individual drawings, engravings, prints, sculptures, and paintings. Among the paintings hanging in the gallery are several by Thomas Birch, including one titled, "View of Market Street Bridge." Birch, along with his father, was responsible for the first American color plate book, The City of Philadelphia, fifteen years earlier. Birch also curated this exhibition, according to the list of officers printed at the beginning of the text. There was also a statue of Washington carved in wood by William Rush, and portraits by Sully and Stuart. A rare work, with only digital copies listed in OCLC over six records, and a useful source for provenance research into early Pennsylvania artworks. Shaw & Shoemaker 23666.

$1500.00

The New Jamaica Almanack, and Register, for the Year of our Lord 1806
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The New Jamaica Almanack, and Register, for the Year of our Lord 1806

By JAMAICA

Kingston: Stevenson and Smith, 1806. 12mo. 184, [16]pp. The calendar interleaved with blank, plus additional blanks in rear. Contemporary green wallet-style morocco Early Jamaica almanac, including an early Jewish calendar. Some early Jamaica almanacs, like the present, include a page showing the Jewish calendar, which "would seem to be an indication of the importance of Jewish residents in the eyes of Christian Jamaicans" (B. W. Korn, "The Haham DeCordova of Jamaica," in: American Jewish Archives 18:2 (Nov. 1966)). These Jamaican calendars represent some of the earliest appearances of Hebrew font in the Western Hemisphere, in a publication intended specifically for Jews. Earlier works with Hebrew type, such as Judah Monis's Hebrew Grammar, were intended for a Gentile audience. Beyond the calendar, this almanac is filled with information about the colony, including pages devoted to each parish with details on population (including slaves), public office holders, court sessions, etc.

$3500.00

To The Members of the House of Representatives of the United States. Gentlemen, I consider it as a duty...to correct some unfounded statements made by Mr. Benjamin H. Latrobe ...[caption title]
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To The Members of the House of Representatives of the United States. Gentlemen, I consider it as a duty...to correct some unfounded statements made by Mr. Benjamin H. Latrobe ...[caption title]

By [THORNTON, William (1759-1828)]

Washington, 1805. 12pp. Disbound Scarce printed letter to the House of Representatives by the designer of the U. S. Capitol building, responding to criticisms of his plans by Superintendent of Construction Benjamin Latrobe. Thornton, a brilliant polymath and self-taught architect, was a late entry in a contest to design the federal legislature announced in 1792. Praised by both President Washington and Thomas Jefferson, Thornton's design won the competition and was gradually realized over the next three decades. The plans and the construction were fraught with problems, however, owing to structural and practical flaws in the amateur Thornton's design, faulty building in the first phases of construction, and struggles among the project's various actors. The first Superintendent of Construction, Eugene Hallet, a professional architect who had lost to Thornton in the contest, was accused of attempting to replace Thornton's designs with his own during the revision process and was replaced with George Hadfield, who resigned in 1798 out of frustration with the design and the quality of construction. In 1803, Benjamin Latrobe was finally hired as Superintendent, a position he would hold until the War of 1812, when construction in the capital was put to a halt. The debates between Thornton and the executors of the construction renewed when Latrobe submitted a report to Congress in 1804 criticizing the design. The present letter, signed by Thornton on Jan. 1, 1805, initiated a pamphlet controversy with Latrobe, who received Jefferson's somewhat qualified support and "emerged embittered but victorious" (DAB XVII, p.505). In 1815, following heavy destruction of the building by the British, Latrobe returned to the project as the new architect of the capitol, rebuilding with significantly greater freedom for the use of his own discretion in revising the designs. A rare document, with Sabin, Shaw and Shoemaker, and OCLC together locating five copies (Boston Athenaeum, University of Michigan, Yale, Harvard, and the Library of Congress). Sabin 95648; Shaw & Shoemaker 9477, 9636.

$1500.00

New Orleans Characters
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New Orleans Characters

By FRÉMAUX, Léon J. (1821-1898)

[New Orleans]: Peychaud & Garcia, 48 Camp Street, 1876. Folio. (13 11/16 x 9 3/4 inches). Lithographed and mounted on cloth guards throughout, title with oval hand-coloured vignette, 16 hand-coloured plates, each with title beneath. Publisher's half black morocco and pebbled cloth covered boards, lettered in glt on the upper cover. Front joint starting. Housed in a black morocco backed box. A classic American colour-plate book which offers a new and improved take on the twin European traditions of suites of plates of regional costume and street cries. "Costume books and illustrations of typical trades and occupations, so common in European color plate books, are comparatively rare in America. This book of New Orleans street characters may be the best example of the genre printed in the United States." (Reese). It clearly helped that Frémaux, a Louisiana native, empathsized with his subjects. He has managed to truly capture not only the individuals but also to embody the varied and colourful character of the city of New Orleans itself. His training as an engineer and cartographer will have served Frémaux well when it came to recording the details that make an image memorable: the pearl earring of Rose Nicaud, the first coffee vendor in New Orleans (see the final plate); the drummer's toeless shoe (plate 6 of the man who drummed up business for auctioneer, Placide J. Spear). Three of the plates are of characters from the "professional" classes and are probably all portraits of individuals that their contemporaries would have recognized: an early owner has noted in pencil that the first plate 'A Cotton Classer' is of 'Jules Lemairé', whilst the second plate ('Sugar broker & Weigher') is apparently a double portrait of 'Buck Miller' and 'O'Connell'. The remaining plates are all of street vendors or workers, and, whilst they are all drawn from life, they are more generic in nature - the two exceptions of identified individuals are the drummer and coffee seller already mentioned. The titles beneath each plate are in English (7) or English and Louisiana patois (5). Each plate is numbered, nine with a small number in the lower left corner of the image, but 7 have the number incorporated into the image itself; '1' is stamped onto the cotton bale; '2' is on the weighing machine; '10' is on the side of the hand-wagon, etc. Bennett p.44; Howes F362; Reese Stamped with a National Character 93.

$10000.00

Views in South America, from original drawings made in Brazil the River Plate, the Parana, &c
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Views in South America, from original drawings made in Brazil the River Plate, the Parana, &c

By OUSELEY, William Gore (1797-1866)

London: Thomas McLean, 1852. Folio. Lithographed title, dedication to Prince Albert with list of plates on verso, 26 tinted lithographed plates, lithographed plan. Expertly bound to style in dark blue morocco backed period cloth covered boards, large central morocco label on the upper cover, flat spine lettered in gilt, glazed yellow endpapers and pastedowns Among the rarest lithographed view books concerning South America. "In 1823 Ousley was transferred to Rio as secretary, and in 1838 was promoted to charge d'affaires. He was sent on a mission to Uruguay and Argentina in 1844 and returned to England in 1850 ... After he had returned to England, via the United States, he wished to publish a collection of drawings and watercolous of Brazil and the Rio de la Plata. The selection was made by Queen Victoria. This rare and valued album contains very pictureque lithographs" (Borba de Moraes). Published in 1852 and issued as tinted lithographs, like the present, for £4.4s, or hand coloured at £6.16s.6d, both issues are very rare. Unlike other lithographed plate books from this period, there was no deluxe issue on card. The list of plates cites the plan, 25 plates, plus one vignette (titled Serra de Estrella), though the vignette is in appearance no different than the other plates. Not in Abbey, attesting to the work's rarity. Borba de Moraes, p.643; Sabin 57947; Tooley 356; Palau 207325.

$37500.00

A Collection of Voyages and Travels, some now first printed from original manuscripts, others now first published in English. In Six Volumes ... The Third Edition ... [Uniformly bound with:]  A Collection of Voyages and Travels ... Compiled from the curious and valuable Library of the late Earl of Oxford
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A Collection of Voyages and Travels, some now first printed from original manuscripts, others now first published in English. In Six Volumes ... The Third Edition ... [Uniformly bound with:] A Collection of Voyages and Travels ... Compiled from the curious and valuable Library of the late Earl of Oxford

By CHURCHILL, Awnsham and John; and Thomas OSBORNE

London: by assignment by Messrs. Churchill for Henry Lintot and John Osborn (vols.I-VI); Thomas Osborne (vols.VII-VIII), 1747. 8 volumes, folio. (13 7/8 x 8 7/8 inches). Title to vol.I printed in red and black, text in two columns. 284 engraved maps and plates (19 folding, 125 double-page) by Kip, Moll and others, 1 folding letterpress table, 10 engraved illustrations, 62 wood-cut illustrations. Scattered minor foxing, minor worming at front of vol. 7. Contemporary calf, expertly rebacked retaining the original morocco lettering pieces, spines with raised bands in seven compartments, ruled in gilt on either side of each band Provenance: Henry Seymer, Hanford, Dorset (armorial bookplate) A fine set of the third and best edition of this "very valuable collection, both for its range of coverage and for the fact that it gives original accounts'' (Hill): complete with the Osborne continuation. Among the most important 18th century collections of voyages, including a number of accounts appearing here for the first time, or at least for the first time in English. The contents include seminal works on China, North and South America, Africa, Russia, Greenland, Japan, the northwest passage and more. Importantly, this set includes the first editions of the rare supplementary volumes, known as the "Harleian Voyages", compiled from Lord Oxford's library by Thomas Osborne and issued as volumes VII and VIII of the set. According to Sabin these are a "necessary accompaniment" although sets are generally found on the market in six volumes only. This combination of the third edition of Churchill's Voyages with Osborne's extension "is considered to be the best because of its greater inclusiveness and its copious index" (Hill). Sabin notes that in the first six volumes the "account of the books of voyages and travels" is brought up to date, and that "Many of the books in this collection have not appeared elsewhere in English". The better-known travellers whose works are printed here include: Baldaeus, Drake, Nieuhoff, John Smith, Columbus, Gemelli-Careri and Herrera. Cf. Borba de Moraes, pp. 1815; Hill (2004) 295; NMM 33; Sabin 13017 & 57765.

$26000.00

The Art of Making and Colouring Ivorytypes, Photographs, Talbotypes, and Miniature Painting on Ivory & c. together with valuable Receipts never before published
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The Art of Making and Colouring Ivorytypes, Photographs, Talbotypes, and Miniature Painting on Ivory & c. together with valuable Receipts never before published

By COOPER, Peregrine F.

Philadelphia: By the Author, 1863. 12mo. 52pp. WIth a hand-painted manuscript colour chart mounted on verso of the title and a signed and inscribed photograph of the author bound in following the title. With a letterpress ad for Cooper's Photographic Gallery mounted onto the rear pastedown. Publisher's cloth, covers stamped in blind and titled in gilt, rebacked and with endpapers renewed Rare American manual detailing an unusual hand coloured photographic process. This rare mid-19th-century American technique involved hand colouring salted paper or albumen prints, mounting them to white board and then specially glazing a piece of glass with a wax-based heated mixture and adhering the photograph face down to the glass on the waxed side. The effect is soft and beautiful and has the appearance of a hand-painted ivory miniature. The process was first used in America in the late 1850s by photographer Frederick Wenderoth, which he called the Toovytype. The author of this manual operated from a studio on Chestnut Street, according to his ad on the rear pastedown, and specialized in equestrian pictures, views of buildings, cased portrait images and the colouring of prints and photographs. In addition, the author offered lessons "in painting photographs of all sizes" and sold the present book to aid his students.

$4500.00

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