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A Cavalry Officer
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A Cavalry Officer

By REMINGTON, Frederic (1861-1909)

New York: R. H. Russell, 1901. Color printed lithograph by R. H. Russell after the original pastel drawing by Remington. This splendid image shows a white moustached cavalry officer cooly looking to his right while his horse, all hooves in the air, races along. It demonstrates Remington's complete command of form, proportion and subject matter. The officer holds the reins loosely with his left hand, while his right hand rest on this belt. He is perfectly balanced and confident, trusting his horse to fly at top speed, while he looks towards the horizon. R.H. Russell published the dramatic portfolio of prints from eight vivid pastels that were included in Remington's first one-man gallery exhibition in December of that same year. This portfolio, complete with text and an introduction by Owen Wister, featured four Indian subjects and four cowboy/military subjects and became collectively known as A Bunch of Buckskins . Today, this Buckskin set is arguably the most highly prized of Remington prints among collectors.

$1000.00

An Address delivered before the Philadelphia Society for Promoting Agriculture: at its anniversary meeting January 16, 1821

By BROOM, James M. (1776-1850)

Philadelphia: Printed for Littell & Henry, 1821. 8vo. 24pp. Later green morocco backed cloth covered boards Address given by the Delaware politician to celebrate the anniversary of the oldest agricultural society in the United States. Among Broom's comments is an enthusiastic recommendation on the benefits of new technology, including the cotton gin and a machine for preparing flax for manufacturing.

$250.00

A Statistical View of the Commerce of the United States

By PITKIN, Timothy (1766-1847)

Hartford: Charles Hosmer, 1816. 8vo. xii, 407, xix, [1]pp. Errata on verso of terminal leaf. Nineteenth century half calf and marbled paper covered boards, spine gilt with raised bands, black morocco lettering piece Provenance: Sir Edward William Watkin, 1st Baronet of Rose Hill (armorial stamp on spine) First edition: "A work of unusual importance ... still remains a valuable reference work on American economic history" (DAB). Many of the statistics compiled here were gleaned directly from the books of the Treasury department and never before published. In the Preface, Pitkin writes: "In making this collection ... our object is, to give, as far as the subject admits, a condensed and connected view of the wealth and resources of the American nation at different periods." This example with provenance to MP and British railroad magnate Sir Edward William Watkin. Howes P392; Sabin 63046; Kress B-6774.

$675.00

Army Packer
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Army Packer

By REMINGTON, Frederic (1861-1909)

New York: R. H. Russell, 1901. Chromolithographed plate, mounted onto original brown paper card. Marvellous Remington portrait of an army packer attentively watching the horizon Though "A Bunch of Buckskins" was a collection of illustrations of Western types: cowboy and Indian, it was Remington's extraordinary gift to be able to make illustrative types absolutely convincing individuals, whose character and capibility can be seen in their posture and demeanor. These tough outdoorsmen seem ready for anything and completely at one with their horses. In 1901 R.H. Russell published a dramatic portfolio of prints from eight vivid pastels that were included in Remington's first one-man gallery exhibition in December of that same year. This portfolio, complete with text and an introduction by Owen Wister, featured four Indian subjects and four cowboy/military subjects and became collectively known as "A Bunch of Buckskins". Today, this Buckskin set is arguably the most highly prized of Remington prints among collectors.

$1000.00

View of the City of Boston from Dorchester Heights

By HAVELL, Robert (1793-1878)

New York: Published by W A Coleman ... for Robt. Havell, Sing Sing N.York, 1841. Aquatint by and after Havell, printed in blue and black by W. Neale, 'Coloured by Havell & Spearing.' Slight vertical center crease. A "majestic view of Boston" (Deák) by Havell: landscape painter and engraver of Audubon's masterpiece. "Robert Havell gives us a majestic view of Boston composed of highly ordered elements: the open-spaced rusticity of the foreground, which serves as a staging area for viewing the city, is linked to the densely developed metropolis in the background by a curving watercourse ... The city itself is presented most appealingly in the configuration of a terraced pyramid where solid buildings and graceful church spires make their way steadily to the top. Although an air of ... tranquility prevails, the sky-canopied view is crowded to the very edges with signs of industrial and trading activities. Bostonians familiar with the nineteenth-century topography of their city are likely to be able to identify a host of buildings and locations. The most conspicuous architectural landmark is ... the State House, the large, domed building at the pinnacle of the view" (Deák). No doubt inspired by the example of John James Audubon, his long-time collaborator and friend, Robert Havell had emigrated to America in September 1839. He settled at Tarrytown, beside the Hudson River, and went on to establish himself as both an engraver and landscape painter of note. The painting on which the present print is based was first exhibited by Havell in 1841 at the National Academy of Design. Deák Picturing America 509.

$15000.00

A Tour Through North America; together with a Comprehensive View of the Canadas and United States. as adapted for Agricultural Emigration

By SHIRREFF, Patrick

Edinburgh: Oliver and Boyd [and others], 1835. 8vo. [2],iv,v,[3],473pp. Publisher's cloth backed paper covered boards, paper lettering label, worn First edition The author, a Scottish farmer from East Lothian, crossed Lake Michigan directly from Canada to Detroit on his way to Chicago, then a hamlet of 150 wooden houses. "Four chapters of the 'Tour' are devoted to an account of travels in northern and central Illinois and from St. Louis to Cincinnati by the rivers. The 'View' contains, besides general matter, three chapters descriptive of Illinois...his book is of considerable value" (Buck). Sabin 80554; Howes S425; Buck 263; Lande 789; TPL 1809.

$200.00

Arizona Cowboy
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Arizona Cowboy

By REMINGTON, Frederic (1861-1909)

New York: R. H. Russell, 1901. Chromolithographed plate, mounted onto original brown paper card. One of Remington's portraits of Wild West types, the Arizona Comboy is a tough and able, completely at ease in the saddle In 1901 R.H. Russell published a dramatic portfolio of prints from eight vivid pastels that were included in Remington's first one-man gallery exhibition in December of that same year. This portfolio, complete with text and an introduction by Owen Wister, featured four Indian subjects and four cowboy/military subjects and became collectively known as "A Bunch of Buckskins". Today, this Buckskin set is arguably the most highly prized of Remington prints among collectors.

$1000.00

A Collection of Precedents, Consisting of Proceedings and Decisions on Questions of Order and Appeals, in the House of Representatives; and Disagreeing Votes of the Two Houses on Bills, &c. from the Commencement of the First Session of the First Congress, to the end of the Third Session of the Eleventh Congress, Inclusive; Prepared in Pursuance of a Resolution of the House of Representatives of the Twenty-sixth of April, 1810

By LAMBERT, William

Washington: Printed by R.C. Weightman, 1811. 8vo. 317, [1], [10]pp. Contemporary sheep Along with Jefferson's Manual of Parlimentary Practice, the most influential work on early American parliamentary procedure. Lambert, a Congressional clerk, was authorized by the House of Representatives on 16 February 1811 to compile the present collection of precedents for the use of the House, with 500 copies ordered to be printed (see Annals of Congress, 3rd session, page 973). The first part of the work transcribes the Congressional Journal entries for every instance that an appeal was made on the basis of parliamentary order between 1789 and 1811. The second part of the work similarly reviews competing House and Senate bills in the same time period. The work was done principally for sitting members of the House and therefore not widely circulated. Lambert's Precedents would remain the authority on parliamentary order of the first twelve Congresses until the publication of Hind's Precedents in 1907. The Introduction of that work aptly describes the importance of such compilations: "In the House of Representatives, as in other legislative bodies, the memories of the older Members, as they might be corroborated by the journals, have been the favorite and most readily accessible repository of the precedents; but as the generations of statesmen come and go much is lost, and many useful precedents cease to be available except as from time to time the voluminous pages of the journals may be searched hastily under the stress of some pressing question. It is manifestly desirable, on a floor where high interests and great passions strive daily, that the rules of action should be known definitely, not only by the older members, but by all. Not only will the Speaker be enabled to make his decisions with more confidence and less fear that he may be swayed by the interests of the moment, but the Members, understanding the rules of his action, will sustain with commendation what they might have criticised with asperity. Thus, good order and dignity will be preserved to the body." Lambert served as the clerk of the House of Representatives and was the clerk who engrossed the Bill of Rights. An amateur astronomer, mathematician and cartographer, he corresponded regularly with Thomas Jefferson and James Madison largely on matters relating to the determination of latitude and longitude. Rare, with no other copy at auction in the last quarter century. Sabin 38739; Shaw & Shoemaker 24137.

$8500.00

View of the Ruins after the Great Fire in New York, Dec. 16th & 17th, 1835 as seen from Exchange Place
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View of the Ruins after the Great Fire in New York, Dec. 16th & 17th, 1835 as seen from Exchange Place

By BENNETT, William James (c.1784-1844)

New York: Lewis P. Clover, 1836. Aquatint in colors by W. J. Bennett after Nicolino Calyo (1779-1884), with extensive additional hand-coloring in watercolor and with the hand-scribed borderline in black ink, characteristic of early printings. Re-backed with re-margined left and right sides. Repaired tears in the sky and in the bottom margin. The ruin on the left is the Old Garden Street Church; this aquatint "is the only contemporary representation that we have of this church, as rebuilt in 1807" (Stokes, Iconography ..., page 618). Nicolino Calyo, an Italian portrait and miniature artist emigrated from Italy in 1834. An eyewitness to the Great Fire of 1835, he sketched the catastrophe as it unfolded throughout the day and night. He later painted a number of compositions based on these sketches, in gouache, and some of these were used by Bennett to create his aquatint engravings of the fire and its aftermath. William James Bennett was born and studied in England, exhibiting romantic landscape subjects there between 1808 and 1825. In 1826 he moved to New York City. As well as engraving the compositions of other artists, including important compositions for John W. Hill, Bennett produced original aquatints after his own designs. Bennett's series of views of American Cities set a standard, and established a compositional formula, for topographical art in America for succeeding generations of artists in all media; they remain the most memorable and beautiful examples of the genre. Lewis P. Clover, the publisher, demonstrated impressive imagination and ingenuity in the copy for his advertisement promoting these views of the Great Fire: "These beautiful ruins," he wrote, "are fast disappearing, and in a few months no vestige of them will be left: in a few years, they will linger as a dream in the memory of the present generation, and the recollection of the most disastrous fire that ever befell this city will, like all earthly things, pass into oblivion." Stokes, Iconography of Manhattan Island , page 617, illustrated plate 114b; NY Public Library, The Eno Collection of New York City Views , page 27; Collection of Percy R. Pyne II: a Catalogue of Engraved Views plans &c of New York City , number 165 (describes this state as from the " excessively scarce first issue "); Stauffer 141; Déak, William James Bennett , number 32.

$2000.00

The "America" Schooner Yacht. C Stevens, Esq Commodore of the New York Yacht Club
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The "America" Schooner Yacht. C Stevens, Esq Commodore of the New York Yacht Club

By DUTTON, Thomas Goldsworth (circa 1819 - 1891) after BRIERLY

London: Ackermann & Co, 1851. Tinted lithograph drawn on stone by Dutton, printed by Day & Son. Expert repairs, some facsimile in titles Sheet size: 16 1/2 x 21 1/4 inches. The great yacht whose humiliating defeat of all British rivals led to the establishment of the greatest of all yachting challenge cup races: the "America's Cup". Owned by Commodore John C. Stevens and five other members of the New York Yacht Club, the America was built in New York to the revolutionary design of George Steers. Launched in May 1851, in June of the same year she sailed to challenge the English yachting establishment. After having two challenges for races turned down, Commodore Stevens entered America in the Royal Yacht Squadron Regatta and under the brilliant captainship of Richard Brown (a highly skilled member of the Sandy Hook Pilots) she beat the best of the British yachts "with great ease" (India House Collection, p.62). The syndicate returned to New York with their prize: a trophy that was to become the America's Cup. The America herself was sold to John, Lord de Blaquiere on 1st September 1851, and six days later the present image was published. In July 1857, the original owners of the America donated their prize through a Deed of Gift to the New York Yacht Club: the deed stipulated that the cup was to be held in trust as a 'challenge' trophy to promote friendly competition. "Stung by this blow to contemporary perceptions of invincible British sea power, a succession of British syndicates attempted to win back the cup, but the New York Yacht Club remained unbeaten for 25 challenges over 113 years, the longest winning streak in the history of sport. Matches were held in the vicinity of New York City from 1870 to 1920, ... From 1930 to 1983, the races were sailed off Newport, Rhode Island for the rest of the NYYCs reign." (Wikipedia). A Descriptive Catalogue of the Marine Collection to be found at India House (New York: 1935) item number 252.

$900.00

The Book of Mormon ... translated by Joseph Smith, Jun. First European, from the Second American Edition
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The Book of Mormon ... translated by Joseph Smith, Jun. First European, from the Second American Edition

By SMITH, Joseph (1805-1844)

Liverpool: Printed by J. Tompkins...for Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, and Parley P. Pratt. By order of the Translator, 1841. 18mo. (5 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches). [4],634,[637]-643pp. Publisher's dark green morocco, flat spine lettered in gilt. Expert repairs to joints. Housed in a black morocco box. The fourth, and first European edition of the Book of Mormon. Published under the guidance of Brigham Young, who evidently was not aware of the 1840 edition at the time of publication, and so used the text of the Kirtland edition. "In this edition the testimonies of the witnesses, formerly at the end of the volume, were transferred to the front, as they now appear in all later editions, and an index was added at the end. This index is a revision of the one printed separately at Nauvoo in 1840, with a few corrections and added words. According to Elder Joseph Fielding Smith, the book was entered at Stationers' Hall in London, February 8, 1841. The contract was for 5000 copies, but only 4050 were delivered. An agreement was made in April, 1841, for the printing of another edition of 950 copies to supply the deficiency, at the expense of the printer, but the agreement was not carried out by the latter" (Sabin). Flake 598; Howes S623; Sabin 83041; Crawley 98.

$15000.00

Arator; Being a Series of Agricultural Essays, Practical and Political ... Third Edition, Revised and Enlarged
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Arator; Being a Series of Agricultural Essays, Practical and Political ... Third Edition, Revised and Enlarged

By TAYLOR, John

Baltimore: Printed by J. Robinson for John M. Carter, 1817. 12mo. 220pp. Contemporary tree sheep, flat spine ruled in gilt, red morocco lettering piece. Provenance: Edward R. Custis (early signature) Early American work on agriculture and slavery. Styled "third edition, revised and enlarged" on the titlepage (after the first edition of 1814), this strongly political and ideological work by the greatest of the agrarian states' rights theorists is devoted to the slavery issue, political and constitutional philosophy, and practical agricultural advice. This edition is the first to contain Taylor's essays on "Cotton," "Hay & Fodder," and "The Present and Political State of Agriculture." This edition also contains Taylor's final revisions to his important "Essays on Agrarian Philosophy." Rink 1182; Shaw & Shoemaker 42250; Sabin 94484.

$380.00

Memoires de Paul Jones, ou il expose ses principaux services, et rappelle ce qui lui est arrivé de plus remarquable pendant le cours de la révolution américaine, particulièrement en Europe, écrits par lui-même en anglais, et traduits sous ses yeux par le citoyen André

By (JONES, John Paul) - Benoit ANDRE

Paris: Chez Louis, 1798. 12mo. [4], xix, [1], 244 pp. Engraved portrait and vignette of naval battle as frontispiece. Uncut. Publisher's blue paper wrappers bound in. Abrasions to upper wrapper and half-title, minor dampstaining in rear. Later red crushed morocco by Blackwell, covers elaborately tooled in gilt, expert repairs to joints. First edition of the first biography of the Father of the American Navy: very rare complete with the frontispiece. Benoit André was, for a time, secretary to Jones and apparently this book is a narrative made up from the manuscript Journal for the King, which was translated by André and presented by Jones to Louis XVI in 1786. An appendix prints thirty letters to and from Jones, the writers including Washington, Franklin, and "Les Etats-Unis, Assembles en Congres." Don C. Seitz, in his Paul Jones, His Exploits in English Seas During 1778--1780, lists only newspaper and magazine accounts of Jones prior to this publication. Howes J 228; Sabin 36559.

$6250.00

View of Cohoes, N. Y. From Prospect Hill. Waterford, Lansingborough [Lansingburgh], Mt. Rafenesque [Rafinesque], and Troy, in the Distance
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View of Cohoes, N. Y. From Prospect Hill. Waterford, Lansingborough [Lansingburgh], Mt. Rafenesque [Rafinesque], and Troy, in the Distance

By LEWIS & GOODWIN (pub)

Albany: Lewis & Goodwin, 1862. Tinted lithograph. Sheet size: 21 1/2 x 38 1/2 inches. Very rare, large panoramic view of Cohoes, New York and points beyond George W. Lewis and Thomas Goodwin, Albany printers, appear to have teamed up for a year or two in the early 1860's. Several other town views, also in New York State, are dated 1862. This unusually large view was probably drawn by George W. Lewis. Reps cites a copy with only Lewis's name on it. Most town views of the period are about half the size of this one. Viewmakers usually solicited business owners and prominent citizens of a town prior to beginning the project, and it is very likely that the mill owners whose companies are all listed in the bottom margin contributed largely and required the larger format. At the time this view was published, Cohoes was one of the most prosperous towns in America. Known as "Spindle City", it was the center of textile manufacturing in the country. Cotton shipped up from Mobile (and other Southern ports) to New York and up the Hudson was turned into fabric at the many mills seen here lining the Erie Canal. In fact, Harmony Mills (represented in two buildings here) was just then under contract to produce uniforms for the Union Army. Cohoes is at the confluence of the Mohawk and Hudson Rivers. It enjoys immense water power from the Mohawk and access to the world via the Hudson. This is nicely demonstrated in this view which focuses on the rivers and canals that interlace the region, with the Erie Canal, lined with barges, in the foreground. This portion of the Canal, with several locks, was created to circumvent Cohoes Falls seen at the far left. The emphasis of the work and of the city was on production, and this is nicely demonstrated in the broad sweep of mills and boats that stretch across this panorama. Reps, Views and Viewmakers 2487.

$850.00

A Trip to the Yellowstone National Park in July, August and September 1875. From the Journal of General W. E. Strong

By STRONG, William Emerson

Washington: Privately Printed, 1876. Quarto. 143pp. plus two folding maps (one partially handcolored to show the route), seven plates, and seven mounted photographic portraits. Photographic portraits of Secretary of War William W. Belknap and Bvt. Brg. GenN.B. Sweitzer each signed below the image. Expertly bound to style in half dark purple morocco and cloth covered boards Provenance: Bvt. Brig. Genl. Nelson Bowman Sweitzer (commanding officer of Fort Ellis, Montana Territory; presentation inscription on the front endpaper) With mounted photographs chronicling the opening of Yellowstone National Park. An interesting journal of a fifty-three day hunting and fishing trip to Yellowstone via rail, stage, horseback, and the Missouri River, undertaken by Strong in the company of Secretary of War William Belknap, Gen. Randolph Marcy, and Gen. James Forsyth, in the summer of 1875. The narrative of the trip to Yellowstone includes descriptions of Salt Lake City and the Mormons, Virginia City, and Fort Ellis, and the balance of the narrative is devoted to Yellowstone, with rapt descriptions of the beauty of the area. While hunting and fishing they killed three buffalo, five deer, shot scores of birds, and caught some 3,000 trout in the Yellowstone River. The portraits depict Strong, Marcy, Belknap, Forsyth, Col. George Gillespie, Lieut. Gustavus Doane, and Gen. N.B. Sweitzer, and the plates include sketches of Fort Ellis, hot springs and Castle Geyser, and Yellowstone Lake. Strong was a Chicago businessman who was breveted a brigadier general during the Civil War, and who travelled extensively in the West. The Yellowstone National Park Archives has Strong's own copy of this book, in which he recorded the names of sixty-two friends to whom he presented copies, leading Dean Larsen to surmise that not more than a hundred copies were printed. The Streeter copy brought $250 in 1969, and then reappeared in 2001 at Sotheby's where it sold for $14,400. A scarce account, accorded a "b" rating by Howes, and not listed in Flake. This example inscribed by Sweitzer, the commanding officer of Fort Ellis, MT, who accompanied the group into Yellowstone, and additionally signed by Secretary of War Belknap, who was also on the expedition. Litchfield 50; Graff 4014; Phillips, American Sporting Books 364 (counts 6 plates and 7 photographs); Howes S1083 "b"; Streeter Sale 4101.

$17500.00

A view of Col. Johnson's engagement with the savages (commanded by Tecumseh) near Moravian Town, October 5th 1812 [i.e., 1813]
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A view of Col. Johnson's engagement with the savages (commanded by Tecumseh) near Moravian Town, October 5th 1812 [i.e., 1813]

By BOWEN, A[bel] (1790-1850)

[Boston: J. P. Peaslee, 1828. Hand-colored woodcut, sheet 9 x 16 inches.Published in: History of the discovery of America ... and their most remarkable engagements with the Indians by Henry Trumbull. Boston : Published by J.P. Peaslee, 1828, fold-out woodcut illustration. Early American version of the Battle of the Thames The print shows in a very stylized way the battle between American forces under the command of Colonel Richard M. Johnson and Natives allied with the British under the command of Tecumseh. At center is Johnson on horseback engaged with a Native wielding a tomahawk, a soldier shooting a Native in the face, and a Native scalping a fallen soldier, with Tecumseh standing on the far right. Prominent features are numbered and there is a corresponding key printed below. Interestingly, the fact that Tecumseh was killed at this battle is neither mentioned nor depicted. Tecumseh had allied with the British in his effort to establish a Native American confederacy east of the Mississippi under British protection. He traveled around trying to recruit other tribes to the cause. When the War of 1812 broke out, Chief Tecumseh and the Shawnees joined the British effort. When the Americans took Lake Erie, the British and Native Americans retreated, however General Harrison caught up with them near Chatham, Ontario, on the River Thames, 50 miles east of Detroit. with a much larger force, and in what later came to be called the Battle of the Thames, they were badly defeated. Colonel Richard Johnson (mentioned in the title) was in charge of a regiment of mounted Kentucky volunteers. It was said that Johnson personally killed Tecumseh, and he used this later to political advantage when running for Vice President.

$2800.00

A Tour in America, in 1798, 1799 and 1800. Exhibiting Sketches of Society and anners, and a Particular Account of the American System of Agriculture, with its recent improvements

By PARKINSON, Richard

London: Printed for J. Harding and J. Murray, 1805. 2 volumes, 8vo. [8], 319, [1]; [8], [319]-735, [1]pp., with errors in pagination as issued. Uncut. Modern cloth, retaining portions of the original blue paper boards First edition. "Parkinson was an English agriculturist, who came to America, recommended by Sir John Sinclair, to superintend the farms of General Washington, respecting whom the book abounds in curious details, that seem to have been generally overlooked by his biographers" (Sabin). Clark, Old South II:113; Howes P96; Sabin 58786.

$1200.00

A View of the United States of America, in a series of papers...interspersed with authentic documents: the whole tending to exhibit the progress and present state of civil and religious liberty, population, agriculture, exports, imports, fisheries, navigation, ship-building, manufactures, and general improvement

By COXE, Tench (1755-1824)

London: J. Johnson, 1795. 8vo. xiv, [2], 512pp, including 6 folding tables. Contemporary quarter sheep and marbled paper covered boards, with vellum tips, flat spine ruled in gilt, black morocco lettering piece, repairs to joints First English edition. This is certainly the most comprehensive and accurate collection of data on the American economy made in the 18th century, detailing Coxe's investigations into every branch of American trade and industry. First published in Philadelphia the year prior. Howes C833; Kress B2911; Sabin 17307.

$300.00

South West View Concord, N.H. 1860
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South West View Concord, N.H. 1860

By MOORE, H. P. (1833-1911)

New York: Endicott & Co, 1860. Tinted lithograph. Image: 12 7/8 x 18 1/2 inches; sheet:17 x 22 3/8 inches. Expert restoration to a few marginal tears. Handsome view of this beautiful New Hampshire town taken from a farm across the Upper Merrimack River Henry P. Moore began his artistic career as a viewmaker. Between 1854 and 1860 he produced 7 town views in Vermont, New Hampshire and New York. These were all notable for their accuracy and pleasant atmospheres and for the fine lithograph done by several of the best lithographic firms: J. H. Bufford and L. H. Bradford & Co. in Boston, and Endicott & Co. in New York. Moore moved to Concord when he was seven and no doubt had a special affinity for the prosperous farming and industrial town. This sketch from a slight eminence above a small farm looks across the Upper Merrimack at an interesting angle to show the factories on the river and the rest of the town, which includes the state capitol building. It is an exceptionally pleasant image with a family in the foreground working their farm, which overlooks the river and town. Following the flow upstream, we see the factories that lined the riverbank and made the town an early industrialized success. Reps, Views and Viewmakers... p. 192-93.

$750.00

[The complete suite of maps and plates from:] Puteshestvie Kapitana Billingsa Chrez Chukotskuiu zemliu ot Beringova proliva do Nizhnekolymskago ostroga, i Plavanie Kapitana Galla Na sudne Chernom Orle po Severovostochnomu Okeanu v 1791 godu. [The Voyage of Captain Billings through Chukchi Country from the Bering Strait and the Sea Voyage of Captain Hall on the Ship Black Eagle in 1791

By SARYCHEV, Gavril Andreevich (1763-1831); and Joseph BILLINGS (1758-1806)

St. Petersburg: Naval Printing Office, 1811. 3 engraved plates, 3 engraved maps. The folding maps sectioned and linen-backed. Uniformly matted. Housed in a red morocco backed box. Including a very rare Russian map of the Arctic. The maps and plates comprise (with titles being English translations of the Russian): 1) Mercator map of the Arctic Sea, Bering Strait and of a part of the North Pacific, showing the shores of the Chukchi Land in the west and of North America in the east 2) Map of the St. Lawrence Bay 3) Map of the Mechigmen Bay 4) Celebration in the tent of the elder of Reindeer Chukchi 5) Mode of travel of nomad Chukchi, in sleighs drawn by reindeer 6) Reindeer Chukchi "Satrychev's own description in Russian of Billing's [1785-1793] expedition in which he participated appeared in print in 1802. However, Sarychev was not in that part of Billing's party which traversed the Chukchi territory overland. Therefore, his above-mentioned work does not contain any description of it. A few years later the Russian Admiralty instructed Sarychev to go over Billing's papers and those of his companions and to compile a description of Billings' trip over the Chukchi territory. The present work is a result of this research and contains material on Alaska as well, including a valuable map..." (Lada Mocarski). In all, the quarto work comprised 191 pages and contained six maps and plates; all of the illustrations are present here. The large general map is of particular note, and is often lacking from extant examples of the book. It depicts the region from 60 degrees latitdue to 71 degrees north, from the American coast along the right side of the map, to the Kolyma River of eastern Siberia on the left side of the map. The map includes Billing's overland route through the Verkhoyansk Range and show's both sides of Bering's Strait in detail. Withal, a very rare early mapping of the region. Arctic Bibliography 37224; Howes S-116; Lada-Mocarski 67; Obol'ianinov 2405; Sabin 77124; Tourville 3970; Wickersham 6133.

$18000.00

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