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Partes confines Trium Magnorum Imperiorum Austriaci Russici et Osmanici
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Partes confines Trium Magnorum Imperiorum Austriaci Russici et Osmanici

By RHODE, Johann Christoph (1713-1786)

[Berlin: Royal Prussian Academy of Sciences], 1785. Engraved case map, full period hand colouring, dissected and linen-backed as issued. Housed in period green morocco backed case, with armorial bookplate of the Borghese family. Highly-detailed 18th century large-scale map of the Black Sea region: fine example from the celebrated library of the Borghese family. Centered on the Black Sea, this map depicts the region from the Ionian Sea in the west, to as far eastward as the western edge of the Caspian Sea, as far south as Cyprus and as far north as just above Tsaritsyn (i.e. Volgograd), taking in much of southeastern Europe (Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary, Greece, etc.), all of Turkey, Georgia and parts of Ukraine and Russia. Rhode served as geographer of the Royal Russian Academy of Sciences from 1752 until his death. The present map was accomplished in the midst of the Austro-Turkish and Russo-Turkish wars, between the Austrian and Ottoman Empires. On the slip case is the engraved bookplate of the library of the Borghese Princes, with their coat of arms: "Ex libris M. A. Principis Burhesii." Camillo Filippo Ludovico (1775-1832), Prince Borghese and son of Marco-Antonio III (1730-1800), married Napoleon's sister, Pauline, in 1803.

$4500.00

[Sri Lanka] Insula Ceilon olim Taprobana. Carte de L'Isle de Ceylan
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[Sri Lanka] Insula Ceilon olim Taprobana. Carte de L'Isle de Ceylan

By DE L'ISLE, Guillaume and COVENS & MORTIER

Amsterdam: Covens & Mortier, 1742. Engraving with period outline colour. Some mild soiling and off-set. Guillaume de l'Isle (1675-1726) was the son of a cartographer and pupil of Jean Dominique Cassini, who, among other important contributions, aligned the study of astronomy to the study of geography. Under Cassini's direction, observations were made from locations all over the world that enabled longitudinal calculations to be made with much greater accuracy. De l'Isle carried on this exacting work with remarkable dedication and integrity, constantly revising and improving his maps. While precision was his primary goal, his maps are invariably elegant and attractive. Jean (Johannes) Covens and Corneille (Cornelius) Mortier were brothers-in-law, who carried on the book publishing business established by Pierre Mortier in Amsterdam in 1685. Pierre Mortier's company owed much of its success to his access to French publishers, whose publications he re-issued in handsome editions.The elder Mortier died in 1711; his wife continued the firm until she died in 1719. In 1721, Covens and Mortier formed a partnership, Covens having married Agatha Mortier in the same year. They continued the business by publishing enlarged editions of Sanson, Jaillot, and De L'Isle, as well as some of the later Dutch cartographical masters such as De Wit and Allard, and of course Pierre Mortier. This map is from an edition of De L'Isle entitled, Atlas Nouveau, Contenant Toutes Les Parties Du Monde, Ou sont exactement Remarquées les Empires, Monarchies, Royaumes, Etats, Republiques &c. Par Guillaume de l'Isle. Premier Géographe de sa Majesté. It delineates the island in great detail. At the time the map was made, the coastal areas were ruled by the Dutch East Indian Company, who were undoubtedly responsible for the soundings indicated around the island and for mapping the roads depicted. Koeman, C&M 7, #91.

$350.00

Accurater Geographischer Entwurf der Königlichen Dänischen auf der Küste Choromandel in Ost-Indien belegenen Stadt und Vestung Trankenbar oder Tarangenbadi u Dansburg
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Accurater Geographischer Entwurf der Königlichen Dänischen auf der Küste Choromandel in Ost-Indien belegenen Stadt und Vestung Trankenbar oder Tarangenbadi u Dansburg

By SEUTTER, Matthäus (1678-1757)

Augsburg, 1740. Copper engraved map, full period hand colouring. Beautiful 18th century map of the region surrounding Tharangambadi, the chief factory of the Dutch East India Company in southwestern India. The Dutch East India Company founded Tharangambadi (aka Trankebar or Tranquebar) in the early 17th century. With the town's strategic presence on the southwest coast and protection by an impressive fort, Tharanambadi quickly became the chief factory of the Company. In the early 18th century, Protestant missionaries from Germany came to the region and established a mission, with Moravian Brethren soon to follow. These facts combined no doubt encouraged German mapmaker Matthaeus Seutter to produce this splendid map of the region. Along both sides of the map, a tremendous amount of textual information explains the various sites and settlements, by means of five symbolic and thirteen numbered references. Aesthetically, the map is extremely pleasing, and is here in full period colour. Matthaeus Seutter was one of the most important German mapmakers of the eighteenth century. Born in Augsburg in 1678, he became an apprentice to the renowned cartographer Johann Baptiste Homann in Nuremberg. In 1707 he established himself as a map publisher in Augsburg, and quickly became Homann's main rival. His business flourished and by 1731 he was appointed Geographer to the Imperial Court. He produced some of the age's most beautiful maps, atlases, and globes, all of which are famed for their cartographic detail, brilliant colour, and ornate cartouches. Not in Gole.

$2400.00

[Asia] To the Right Honourable William Lord Cowper, Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, this Map of Asia
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[Asia] To the Right Honourable William Lord Cowper, Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, this Map of Asia

By MOLL, Herman (1654-1732)

London: H. Moll, D. Midwinter, Thos. Bowles, Philip Overton, 1720. Copper-engraved map, with original outline colour, slightly toned, marginal foxing, centerfold reinforced. A fine example of Moll's intriguing map of Asia, depicting the continent just before the greatest era of European imperial expansion This sensational map embraces the entire Asiatic landmass, as conceived by Europeans in the first quarter of the eighteenth-century. During this period, rival powers, including Britain, France, the Netherlands and Portugal vied for trade dominance in this region rich in spices and precious gems. Most of India was ruled by the Mughal Empire; China was then under the Qing Dynasty; and the mighty Shogun ruled Japan. The British were the dominant traders in India and the Dutch held the lead in the Spice Islands. The map features cartographic insets detailing some of the most commercially important Asiatic locales including; the Hellespont, connecting the Black Sea to the Mediterranean, running past the Ottoman capital of Istanbul; the harbour of Bombay; the Hoogly River, running past modern day Kolkata in Bengal; the Chinese trading islands of Amoy and Chusan; as well as an inset of the Arctic coast of Asia, which some still hoped would one day reveal a 'Northeastern Passage' from Europe to the Far East. The general map shows that parts of the continent lying to the northeast of Honshu, Japan were scarcely known. "Iessu," or Hokkaido has a nebulous shape, connected to an equally mysterious Siberia. This map includes an important feature for mariners, the directions and annual times of the Monsoons in the Indian Ocean and the South China Sea, winds and currents that either greatly aid or hinder the direction of sailing vessels. The sensational title cartouche depicts figures in exotic Asian costume, surrounded by various riches, including jewelry and Ming porcelain. The present map was part of Herman Moll's magnificent folio work, a New and Compleat Atlas . Moll was the most important cartographer working in London during his era, a career that spanned over fifty years. His origins have been a source of great scholarly debate; however, the prevailing opinion suggests that he hailed from the Hanseatic port city of Bremen, Germany. Joining a number of his countrymen, he fled the turmoil of the Scanian Wars for London, and in 1678 is first recorded as working there as an engraver for Moses Pitt on the production of the English Atlas . It was not long before Moll found himself as a charter member of London's most interesting social circle, which congregated at Jonathan's Coffee House at Number 20 Exchange Alley, Cornhill. It was at this establishment that speculators met to trade equities (most notoriously South Sea Company shares). Moll's coffeehouse circle included the scientist Robert Hooke, the archaeologist William Stuckley, the authors Jonathan Swift and Daniel Defoe, and the intellectually-gifted pirates William Dampier, Woodes Rogers and William Hacke. From these friends, Moll gained a great deal of privileged information that was later conveyed in his cartographic works, some appearing in the works of these same figures. Moll was highly astute, both politically and commercially, and he was consistently able to craft maps and atlases that appealed to the particular fancy of wealthy individual patrons, as well as the popular trends of the day. In many cases, his works are amongst the very finest maps of their subjects ever created with toponymy in the English language. Shirley, Maps in the Atlases of the British Library I, T.Moll-4b, 4; Cf. Reinhartz, The Cartographer and the Literati: Herman Moll and his Intellectual Circle.

$2250.00

Carte Réduite de L'Ocean Septentrional compris entre l'Asie et l'Amerique suivant les Decouvertes qui ont été faites par les Russes..
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Carte Réduite de L'Ocean Septentrional compris entre l'Asie et l'Amerique suivant les Decouvertes qui ont été faites par les Russes..

By BELLIN, Jacques Nicolas (1703-72)

Paris: J. N. Bellin, 1766. Copper-engraved map, in very good condition apart from expert repairs to center fold. A fascinating map of the North Pacific shown just before the voyages of Cook, by Bellin, the esteemed French Royal hydrographer, present here in the first state This extremely interesting and finely engraved large map depicts the northern Pacific Ocean, and adjacent coasts during an early stage in its exploration, after the first wave of great Russian explorers but just before the momentous voyages of Captain James Cook. The map embraces a vast expanse from north of the 35th parallel, from Japan to California. The map shows the tracks of the Russian voyages of Bering and his deputy Aleksei Chirikov conducted from 1728-43 that first defined eastern Siberia and touched upon the American northwest. Save the imaginary bulge on the north coast of the Chuckchi Peninsula, the coasts of Siberia are extremely well-defined, attesting to Bering's enormous talent as a cartographer. Japan, whose rulers were known to be especially unwelcoming to foreign explorers, is not well understood, such that its large northernmost island, Hokkaido, does not appear at all on the map. It is perhaps Bellin's depiction of North America that is most intriguing. It shows how Bering and Chirikov touched on various points of the Aleutians and sighted Mount St. Elias, the 18,000 ft. peak located near the top of the Alaska panhandle. The Pacific northwest immediately south of that point is entirely conjectural noting apocryphal discoveries such as the 'River of the King's' encountered by the Spanish Admiral de Fuente in 1640, and the Strait of Juan De Fuca, discovered in 1592. Although the latter body of water does exist, it was probably first encountered by Europeans in the 1770s. Bellin does, however, note Sir Francis Drake's actual discovery of 'Nouvelle Albion' (northern California) in 1578. The map optimistically shows a land route across the continent to the Pacific, decades before any such endeavor was embarked upon. The mapping of the heart of North America is also most curious, as it shows the Red River system, which in reality flows towards Hudson's Bay, as being connected to the Mississippi Basin. The map is elegantly traversed by rhumb lines and the composition is completed by an exquisite rococo title cartouche. This map was part of the l'Hydrographie Française, a great sea atlas, published by Bellin in two volumes from 1755 to 1766. This was one of the finest works of the prolific Bellin, the "Hydrographer to the King", who was so highly regarded that the British (who were almost always at war with France) made him a member of their Royal Society. Kershaw, Early Printed Maps of Canada IV:1125, plate 879; Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast of America , 610.

$2400.00

A Large Draught of the South Part of Borneo
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A Large Draught of the South Part of Borneo

By THORNTON, John (1641-1708) & Samuel (fl.1703-39)

London: William Mount & Thomas Page, 1734. Copper-engraved sea chart, in excellent condition apart from a skilfully repaired marginal split at the base of the centerfold and marginal soiling. A very attractive sea chart of southern Borneo, from the celebrated Third Book of the 'English Pilot' This very attractive sea chart depicts Kalimantan, now the Indonesian section of Borneo and the adjacent part of the Java Sea. While the delineation of the coast is geographically well assured, the interior of the island is shown to be virtually unknown. Inhabited by fierce indigenous tribes and exotic animals, agents of the Dutch East Indian Company, who then nominally controlled the coasts, were afraid to venture into the interior. Indeed, parts of Borneo have not even been fully explored to this day. The Java Sea is elegantly adorned with rhumb lines that radiate from a compass rose and from centerpoints placed on an invisible circle. A handsome title cartouche embellishes the lower left corner of the composition. In 1671, the London cartographer John Seller (fl.1664-97) commenced work on The English Pilot, a work that intended to challenge Dutch hegemony in the sea atlas market. Intended to be published in four books covering different regions of the globe, Seller published an uncompleted book on 'Oriental navigation' in 1675. Unable to continue this Herculean endeavour, Seller sold his rights to John Thornton, the official hydrographer to the English East India Company. Thornton took up the project with great fervour, publishing his first editions in 1689. Thornton did not publish his first edition of the Third Book, detailing navigation in the East Indies, until 1703. While Thornton largely based his charts on those of earlier Dutch cartographers, most notably those found in Pieter Goos' Zee-Spiegel and Lucas Janz Waghenaer's Mariner's Mirror, The English Pilot proved to be enormously popular. When John Thornton died in 1708, his brother Samuel took over the business and added to and modified existing charts. All four books were produced in editions until the 1760s, the Third Book ran into twelve editions up to 1761. The project succeeded in giving the English dominance in the sea chart market as the eighteenth-century progressed. National Maritime Museum (Greenwich), chart G258:2/17; Cf. Phillips, Atlases , 4278-38; Verner & Skelton (eds.), John Thornton - The English Pilot: The Third Book (Facsimile 1703 edition).

$450.00

A Large Draught of the Coast of Arabia from Maculla to Dofar
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A Large Draught of the Coast of Arabia from Maculla to Dofar

By THORNTON, John (1641-1708) & Samuel (fl.1703-39)

London: William Mount & Thomas Page, 1734. Copper-engraved sea chart by Sutton Nichols, in excellent condition apart from a small expert repair to the lower right and left corners. A very fine sea chart of the coast of Yemen and Oman from the celebrated Third Book of 'The English Pilot' This very attractive sea chart depicts the coast of the Arabian Peninsula from Al Makullah in Yemen to Dhofar in Oman. The coastal view is bisected into two images, separated by a border formed by the elegant tendrils of a vine. The upper view depicts the southern, while the lower portrays the northern aspect of the coast. Prominent features of the desert coastline are depicted, while compass roses, from which radiate rhumb lines, decorate the seas. In 1671, the London cartographer John Seller (fl.1664-97) commenced work on The English Pilot, a work that intended to challenge Dutch hegemony in the sea atlas market. Intended to be published in four books covering different regions of the globe, Seller published an uncompleted book on 'Oriental navigation' in 1675. Unable to continue this Herculean endeavour, Seller sold his rights to John Thornton, the official hydrographer to the English East India Company. Thornton took up the project with great fervour, publishing his first editions in 1689. Thornton did not publish his first edition of the Third Book, detailing navigation in the East Indies, until 1703. While Thornton largely based his charts on those of earlier Dutch cartographers, most notably those found in Pieter Goos' Zee-Spiegel and Lucas Janz Waghenaer's Mariner's Mirror , The English Pilot proved to be enormously popular. When John Thornton died in 1708, his brother Samuel took over the business and added to and modified existing charts. All four books were produced in editions until the 1760s, the Third Book ran into twelve editions up to 1761. The project succeeded in giving the English dominance in the sea chart market as the eighteenth-century progressed. Tibbetts, Arabia in Early Maps , 177; Cf. Phillips, Atlases , 4278-18; Verner & Skelton (eds.), John Thornton - The English Pilot: The Third Book (Facsimile 1703 edition).

$750.00

A Large Draught of the North Part of China Shewing the Passages and the Chanells into the Harbour of Chusan
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A Large Draught of the North Part of China Shewing the Passages and the Chanells into the Harbour of Chusan

By THORNTON, John (1641-1708) & Samuel (fl.1703-39)

London: William Mount & Thomas Page, 1734. Copper-engraved sea chart, in excellent condition, apart from an expertly repaired centre fold, and mild creases where the map folded. A very fine sea chart of China's Zhejiang Province, from the celebrated Third Book of 'The English Pilot' This elegant and large sea chart captures China's modern day Zhejiang province. Located on the East China sea, just below the Yangtze Delta, this region was of major interest to European traders during the eighteenth-century. It features the major port of Zhousan (Chusan), and was the location of the entrance of the Grand Canal of China. The canal, construction of which began in the 5th-century B.C., was then the oldest and longest man-made waterway in the world, which allowed barges to travel hundreds to Beijing. In 1671, the London cartographer John Seller (fl.1664-97) commenced work on The English Pilot , a work that intended to challenge Dutch hegemony in the sea atlas market. Intended to be published in four books covering different regions of the globe, Seller published an uncompleted book on 'Oriental navigation' in 1675. Unable to continue this Herculean endeavour, Seller sold his rights to John Thornton, the official hydrographer to the English East India Company. Thornton took up the project with great fervour, publishing his first editions in 1689. Thornton did not publish his first edition of the Third Book, detailing navigation in the East Indies, until 1703. While Thornton largely based his charts on those of earlier Dutch cartographers, most notably those found in Pieter Goos' Zee-Spiegel and Lucas Janz Waghenaer's Mariner's Mirror, The English Pilot proved to be enormously popular. When John Thornton died in 1708, his brother Samuel took over the business and added to and modified existing charts. All four books were produced in editions until the 1760s, the Third Book ran into twelve editions up to 1761. The project succeeded in giving the English dominance in the sea chart market as the eighteenth-century progressed. Cf. Phillips, Atlases , 4278-36; Verner & Skelton (eds.), John Thornton - The English Pilot: The Third Book (Facsimile 1703 edition).

$1200.00

Recentissima Asiae Delineatio, Qua Status et Imperia Totius Orientis unacum Orientalibus Indiis exhibentur..
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Recentissima Asiae Delineatio, Qua Status et Imperia Totius Orientis unacum Orientalibus Indiis exhibentur..

By HOMANN, Johann Christoph (1703-1730)

Nuremberg: J. B. Homann, 1730. Engraving with hand-colouring. Excellent condition. An early map of Asia that includes the northern tip of Australia and Papua, New Guinea, by the celebrated German cartographer, J. B. Homann. Johann Baptiste Homann established in the early years of the 18th century the most successful map publishing firm in Germany. His prolific business, which his family continued after his death, dominated Germany's map market for over a century and produced some of the finest maps and atlases of the age. He started the firm in Nuremberg, and,in 1715, he was appointed Geographer to the Emperor. After his death in 1724, his son, Johann Christoph, assumed control of the firm and this is his issue ot his father's map of Asia. This is a lovely example includes the northern tip of Australia (Nova Hollandia) Carpentaria, Nova Britannia and the Marianas. Hokkaido is identified as Terra Yedso and the fictional Compagnie Land, to the northeast of Japan. Dampier's passage shown stretching between New Guinea and New Britain and marks his discovery of New Britain in 1700. The map is a wonderful example of Homann's ornate, Baroque style. The title cartouche shows an Asian potentate pointing his scepter at three subjects, who bow on their hands and knees before him. The other cartouche in the upper right corner with a note to the viewer shows a procession of soldiers carrying a Hindu idol followed by men playing gongs, drums and wind instruments. Tooley, Maps and Map-makers 27, 107-108.

$950.00

L'Asie/reveue et augmentée
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L'Asie/reveue et augmentée

By DU VAL, Pierre (1618-1683)

Paris, 1684. Engraved with period outline colour. Good condition, expertly repaired split at centerfold and parallel tear from the base. Mild toning due to age. Small crease lower left. Pierre Duval was Nicholas Sanson's nephew, and his work was primarily editing and augmenting Sanson's innovative cartography. He and Hubert Jaillot were most important in bringing Sanson's work to the world, both in improved editions and in bringing to print previously unpublished manuscripts. This map of Asia bears the characteristic clarity and more "scientific" air of the 17th-century French map. Though many sites are mis-located, a vast amount of material has been examined and assessed. Most placenames represent geographical entities that currently exist or once existed. The rendition of the lower islands of Japan and the peninsula of Korea are improved over earlier studies. Details of the Great Wall of China are also visible. This map, dated 1684, was issued by Pierre's daughter, "Mlle." Duval, the year after his death. Pastoureau, Duval II E, (9).

$1800.00

L'Asie Dressée sur les Nouvelles Observations Faites en toutes les Parties de la Terre et Rectifieés
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L'Asie Dressée sur les Nouvelles Observations Faites en toutes les Parties de la Terre et Rectifieés

By [NOLIN, Jean-Baptiste (1657-1725)] and Jean-Baptiste NOLIN II (1686-1762)

Paris: Chez J.B. Nolin le Fils Geografe sur le Quay de l'Horloge du Palais a l'Enseigne de la Place des Victoires entre le Rue de Harlay et le Pont Neuf, 1740. Copper-engraved wall map, with original outline colour, of four joined sheets, surrounded by text and vignettes printed on separate sheets, backed onto old linen, with contemporary wooden rollers, overall in very good condition. A rare and monumental wall map of Asia by one of the great French masters of cartography. Jean-Baptiste Nolin was one of the most accomplished and certainly the most ambitious French cartographer of his era. He founded what ultimately became a family empire in Paris in the 1680s. Exceptionally, he managed to marry superlative decorative ornamentation with the serious objective of producing maps that reflected the most advanced rendering of geographical detail. The artistic élan of his compositions evinced a style that preserved the rhetorical ambitions of the Baroque ethic, while anticipating the playful elegance of the Rococo period. His masterpieces, many like the present wall map, were monumental in scale and represented Nolin's desire to overwhelm his competition in what was a very challenging market. Highly controversial, Nolin occasionally described himself as "the Engraver to the King," an appointment of which the royal court was curiously never apprised. In his endeavour to include the very latest geographical details on his maps, he seldom hesitated to acquire information from his eminent contemporaries, most notably Guillaume De L'Isle and Vincenzo Maria Coronelli, Jean-Dominique Cassini and the Sieur de Tillemon. At times these rivals were not appreciative of Nolin's adoption of their intellectual property, and De L'Isle successfully sued Nolin for plagiarism in 1705. However, the larger-than-life Nolin always seemed to transcend these challenges, leaving a thriving enterprise to be taken up by his son. The present map was created in 1740 by Jean-Baptiste Nolin II, largely based on an earlier maps produced by his father. While the geographical depiction of most of the continent is quite assured for the time, this map is one of the eighteenth-century's most fascinating experiments in cartographic speculation. Published on the very eve of Vitus Bering's voyage to Alaska and eastern Siberia, this map shows that contemporary Europeans had no real concept of what lands might have occupied these regions. North America is thus shown as reaching down to a point just north of Japan. On the other side of the continent, an absurdly large Greenland looms closely over the northern coast of Siberia to a point past Nova Zemlya. On the main map the Mariana Islands, or Nouvelle Phillipines, adorn the Pacific in a configuration consistent with the account of the Jesuit explorer Paul Clain. Curiously, the inset in the upper right corner depicts a different rendering of the same islands as suggested in a Jesuit report of 1697. Nolin's work is an artistically virtuous composition on a monumental scale, the image being surrounded by thirty vignettes that depict various events from Greek, Roman, Jewish, Christian, and Islamic history. In turn, each vignette is set within an elaborate baroque frame of a unique design, accompanied by textual narratives. The extensive text along the lower margin is entitled "Description Géographique de l'Asie." The upper left of the main image is adorned with an especially resplendent cartouche, featuring Jesuit priests evangelizing to the diverse peoples of the continent. This wall map is one of the greatest subjects of the Nolins' legacy, not only being a masterful work of art and a fascinating image that tests the very limits of European geographical knowledge, but a vivid record of a dramatic transitional period in the history of cartography, and of society in general.

$45000.00