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[The Northern Celestial Hemisphere of Classical Antiquity] Hæmisphærium Stellatum Boreale Antiquum
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[The Northern Celestial Hemisphere of Classical Antiquity] Hæmisphærium Stellatum Boreale Antiquum

By CELLARIUS, Andreas (c.1596-1665)

[Amsterdam: G.Valck & P.Schenk, 1708. Copper-engraved celestial map, with full original colour. One of the finest and most highly decorative celestial charts ever produced, from the Valk & Schenk edition of Cellarius. This composition, of great artistic élan, presents a view of the constellations of the Northern Sky from the Harmonia Macrocosmica by Andreas Cellarius, the finest celestial atlas ever produced. According to the Classical astronomy, championed by Aristotle and Ptolemy, the stars were mounted on a huge, transparent, crystal sphere that was part of a geocentric system, in which all of the stars and planets rotated around the Earth. The present image was created during the great era of Dutch map-making, a period that saw the perfection of the art of representing scientific ideas in engraving. It was reprinted by Janssonius in 1661, and again in 1708 by Gerard Valck and Petrus Schenk, who added their names to the plates. Andreas Cellarius was born in about 1596 in Neuhausen, a small town near Worms in the Rhine-Hesse region of Germany. From 1625 to 1637 Cellarius worked as a schoolmaster in Amsterdam and The Hague, and in 1637 moved to Hoorn, where he was appointed as headmaster or rector of the Latin School. He published a number of works during his lifetime, but the last and greatest was the Harmonia Macrocosmica. Cellarius resigned from his post as headmaster in early 1665 and died in Hoorn in November of the same year. Koeman, Atlantes Neerlandici, Cel. 3.

$7500.00

[Northern Constellations of Classical Antiquity] Haemisphaerium Stellatum Boreale Antiquum
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[Northern Constellations of Classical Antiquity] Haemisphaerium Stellatum Boreale Antiquum

By CELLARIUS, Andreas (c.1596-1665)

Amsterdam: G. Valk & P. Schenk, 1708. Copper-engraved celestial map, with full original colour. Unframed. One of the finest and most highly decorative celestial charts ever produced, from the Valk & Schenk edition of Cellarius The Classical constellations of the Northern Hemisphere. This composition, of great artistic élan, presents a view of the constellations. It is from the Harmonia Macrocosmica seu Atlas Universalis et Novus (Harmonious Universe or New and Universal Atlas) by Andreas Cellarius, the finest celestial atlas ever produced. According to Classical astronomy, championed by Aristotle and Ptolemy, the stars were mounted on a huge, transparent crystal sphere that was part of a geocentric system, in which all of the stars and planets revolved around the Earth. The present image was originally engraved in 1660 by Jan Janssonius, during the greatest era of Dutch map-making, a period that saw the perfection of the art of representing scientific ideas in a graphic form using engravings. It was reprinted by Janssonius in 1661, and again in 1708 by Gerard Valk and Petrus Schenk, who added their names to the plates. Andreas Cellarius was born in about 1596 in Neuhausen, a small town near Worms in the Rhine-Hesse region of Germany. From 1625 to 1637 Cellarius worked as a schoolmaster in Amsterdam and The Hague, and in 1637 moved to Hoorn, where he was appointed as headmaster or rector of the Latin School. He published a number of works during his lifetime, but the last and greatest was the Harmonia Macrocosmica . Cellarius resigned from his post as headmaster in early 1665 and died in Hoorn in November of the same year. Koeman, Atlantes Neerlandici , Cel. 3.

$7500.00

[The Motions of the Three Outer Planets] Theoria trium superiorum planetarum
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[The Motions of the Three Outer Planets] Theoria trium superiorum planetarum

By CELLARIUS, Andreas (c.1596-1665)

Amsterdam: Jan Jansson, 1660. Copper-engraved celestial map, with full original colour. Centerfold re-inforced at base. One of the finest and most decorative celestial charts ever produced, from the first edition of Cellarius This chart is from the Harmonia Macrocosmica seu Atlas Universalis et Novus (Harmonious Universe or New and Universal Atlas) by Andreas Cellarius, the finest celestial atlas ever produced. It demonstrates the Ptolemaic theory of epicycles. The epicycles theory addressed a problem that arose from the assumption that if the Earth was the center of the universe, then the circuit of the planets should be of a steady one-directional, circular progress. Observation showed, however, that the orbital progress of the planets was in fact irregular, and from these observations arose the ancient theory of epicycles illustrated here. It is a beautiful image, timeless in the abstract harmony of colour, shape and composition, and also a record of the restless search of the human mind to apprehend order in the universe. This chart was engraved during the greatest era of Dutch map-making, in 1660, by Johannes Janssonius of Amsterdam. It was reprinted by Janssonius in 1661, and again in 1708 by Gerard Valk and Petrus Schenk, who added their names to the plates. Andreas Cellarius was born in about 1596 in Neuhausen, a small town near Worms in the Rhine-Hesse region of Germany. From 1625 to 1637 Cellarius worked as a schoolmaster in Amsterdam and The Hague, and in 1637 moved to Hoorn, where he was appointed as headmaster or rector of the Latin School. He published a number of works during his lifetime, but the last and greatest was the Harmonia Macrocosmica . Cellarius resigned from his post as headmaster in early 1665 and died in Hoorn in November of the same year. Koeman, Atlantes Neerlandici, Cel. 1.

$1350.00

[The Southern Celestial Hemisphere of Classical Antiquity] Hæmisphærium Stellatum Australe Antiquum
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[The Southern Celestial Hemisphere of Classical Antiquity] Hæmisphærium Stellatum Australe Antiquum

By CELLARIUS, Andreas (c.1596-1665)

[Amsterdam: G.Valck & P.Schenk, 1708. Copper-engraved celestial map, with full original colour. Excellent condition. One of the finest and most highly decorative celestial charts ever produced, from the Valk & Schenck edition of Cellarius This artistically virtuous composition represents a view of the sky of the Southern Hemisphere as considered by Ancient Greek custom, forming part of the Harmonia Macrocosmica seu Atlas Universalis et Novus (Harmonious Universe or New and Universal Atlas) by Andreas Cellarius, the finest celestial atlas ever produced. According to Classical astronomy, championed by Aristotle and Ptolemy, the stars were mounted on a huge, transparent, crystal sphere part of a divine system in which all of the stars and planets rotated around the Earth. In this chart, the figures of the zodiac form a circle within which are the constellations of the Southern sky, including Orion, Hydra, and the Southern Cross, all represented by lively Baroque figures. The present image by Cellarius was created during the great era of Dutch map-making, a period that saw the perfection of the art of representing scientific ideas in graphic form by means of engraving. It was first printed by Janssonius in 1660, and reprinted in 1661. In 1708, Gerard Valck and Petrus Schenk, made their own edition, adding their names to the plates. Andreas Cellarius was born in about 1596 in Neuhausen, a small town near Worms in the Rhine-Hesse region of Germany. From 1625 to 1637 Cellarius worked as a schoolmaster in Amsterdam and The Hague, and in 1637 moved to Hoorn, where he was appointed as headmaster or rector of the Latin School. He published a number of works during his lifetime, but the last and greatest was the Atlas Coelestis seu Harmonia Macrocosmica . Cellarius resigned from his post as headmaster in early 1665 and died in Hoorn in November of the same year. Koeman, Atlantes Neerlandici, Cel. 3.

$7500.00

[The Northern Celestial Hemisphere, with the Terrestrial Hemisphere beneath] Hæmisphærium stellatum boreale cum subiecto hæmisphærio terrestri
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[The Northern Celestial Hemisphere, with the Terrestrial Hemisphere beneath] Hæmisphærium stellatum boreale cum subiecto hæmisphærio terrestri

By CELLARIUS, Andreas (c.1596-1665)

Amsterdam: G. Valk & P.Schenk, 1708. Copper-engraved celestial map, with full original colour, later marginal colour. One of the finest and most highly decorative celestial charts ever produced, from the Valk & Schenk edition of Cellarius This composition, of great artistic élan, presents a view of the constellations of the Northern Sky superimposed over the North Pole, Europe and northern Asia. It is from the Harmonia Macrocosmica seu Atlas Universalis et Novus (Harmonious Universe or New and Universal Atlas) by Andreas Cellarius, the finest celestial atlas ever produced. According to Classical astronomy, championed by Aristotle and Ptolemy, the stars were mounted on a huge, transparent crystal sphere that was part of a geocentric system, in which all of the stars and planets revolved around the Earth. The present image was first engraved in 1660 by Jan Janssonius, during the great era of Dutch map-making, a period that saw the perfection of the art of representing scientific ideas in graphic form through engraving. It was reprinted by Janssonius in 1661, and again in 1708 by Gerard Valk and Petrus Schenk, who added their names to the plates. Andreas Cellarius was born in about 1596 in Neuhausen, a small town near Worms in the Rhine-Hesse region of Germany. From 1625 to 1637 Cellarius worked as a schoolmaster in Amsterdam and The Hague, and in 1637 moved to Hoorn, where he was appointed as headmaster or rector of the Latin School. He published a number of works during his lifetime, but the last and greatest was the Harmonia Macrocosmica . Cellarius resigned from his post as headmaster in early 1665 and died in Hoorn in November of the same year. Koeman, Atlantes Neerlandici , Cel. 3.

$5500.00

[A portion of the celestial hemisphere showing part of Libra, Scorpio, Sagittarious and part of Capricorn] Globi Coelestis in Tabulas Planas Redacti Pars V in qua Longitudines Stellarum fixarum ad anum Christi completum 1730 tam Arithmetice quam Geometrice exhibentur..
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[A portion of the celestial hemisphere showing part of Libra, Scorpio, Sagittarious and part of Capricorn] Globi Coelestis in Tabulas Planas Redacti Pars V in qua Longitudines Stellarum fixarum ad anum Christi completum 1730 tam Arithmetice quam Geometrice exhibentur..

By DOPPELMAYR, Johann Gabriel (1677-1750)

Nuremburg: J. B. Homann, 1730. Hand-coloured engraving. Good condition, margins re-backed to restore several minor losses and tears. A dramatic star chart by Doppelmayr illustrating the autumnal and early winter zodiacal signs: part of Libra, Scorpio, Sagittarius, and part of Capricorn Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr (1677-1750) was a Nuremberg astronomer and mapmaker, who made globes, star charts, moon charts and completed Homann's Atlas Coelestis in 1742. This is part V of a group of six showing the entire panorama of the night sky as known and represented in the early 18th century. The stars are differentiated according to magnitude, and there is an extensive star index on each side of the chart. Johann Batiste Homann (1663-1724) began his professional life as an engraver for others, founding his own cartographical firm in 1702. He brought back to life German mapmaking, which virtually ceased in the early 16th century, using Dutch cartography as his guide and starting point.

$1700.00

[The Spiral Path of the Sun around the Earth] Solis Circa Orbem Terrarum Spiralis Revolutio
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[The Spiral Path of the Sun around the Earth] Solis Circa Orbem Terrarum Spiralis Revolutio

By CELLARIUS, Andreas (c.1596-1665)

Amsterdam: G. Valk & P. Schenk, 1708. Copper-engraved celestial map, with full period colour. This intriguing chart shows the apparent spiralling revolution of the Sun around the Earth, from the Valk & Schenk edition of Cellarius This beautiful chart is from the Harmonia Macrocosmica seu Atlas Universalis et Novus (Harmonious Universe or New and Universal Atlas) by Andreas Cellarius, the finest celestial atlas ever produced. It depicts, according to pre-Copernican belief, the apparent path of the sun as it revolves around the Earth, which through the year was thought to form a spiral pattern. It would pass from one climate zone to another, thus regulating the seasons. The Earth is shown on an axis far more pronounced than the 23.5 degrees that was later ascertained. This rather severe tilt makes the zodiacal band run almost vertically through the image. According to Classical astronomy, championed by Aristotle and Ptolemy, the universe was a geocentric system, in which the Sun, stars, and the planets revolved around the Earth. The present image was engraved during the great era of Dutch map-making, a period that saw perfection in the art of representing scientific ideas in graphic form by means of engraving. It was first printed by Janssonius in 1660, and reprinted in 1661, and again in 1708 by Gerard Valk and Petrus Schenk, who added their names to the plates. Andreas Cellarius was born in about 1596 in Neuhausen, a small town near Worms in the Rhine-Hesse region of Germany. From 1625 to 1637 Cellarius worked as a schoolmaster in Amsterdam and The Hague, and in 1637 moved to Hoorn, where he was appointed as headmaster or rector of the Latin School. He published a number of works during his lifetime, but the last and greatest was the Harmonia Macrocosmica . Cellarius resigned from his post as headmaster in early 1665 and died in Hoorn in November of the same year. Koeman, Atlantes Neerlandici, Cel. 3.

$3750.00

[Double Hemisphere Celestial Chart with Classical Constellations] Planisphærium  Coeleste
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[Double Hemisphere Celestial Chart with Classical Constellations] Planisphærium Coeleste

By SCHENCK, Peter (1645-1715)

Amsterdam, 1705. Copper-engraved celestial map, with full original colour. Very good condition apart from minor soiling. A magnificent double hemisphere celestial chart by one of the period's greatest mapamakers This double hemisphere celestial chart gives the Classical constellations north and south as well seven illustrations of various astronomical theories and phenomena including a comparison of stellar magnitudes, three theories of the planetary arrangement of our system, an illustration of lunar eclipses, the lunar influence on tides and the passage of the earth around the sun. Koeman, Atlantes Neerlandici , Sche 1 & p.119.

$3750.00

[The Southern Celestial Hemisphere superimposed over the Terrestial Sphere] Hæmisphærium Stellatum Australe Æquali Sphærarum Proportione
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[The Southern Celestial Hemisphere superimposed over the Terrestial Sphere] Hæmisphærium Stellatum Australe Æquali Sphærarum Proportione

By CELLARIUS, Andreas (c.1596-1665)

Amsterdam: G. Valk & P. Schenk, 1708. Copper-engraved celestial map, with full original colour. One of the finest and most highly decorative celestial charts ever produced. This artistically virtuous composition presents a view of the constellations of the Southern celestial hemisphere, as considered by Ancient Greek custom, superimposed on the southern portion of the western hemisphere, including Terra Australis, a large southern polar continent. It is from the Harmonia Macrocosmica seu Atlas Universalis et Novus (Harmonious Universe or New and Universal Atlas) by Andreas Cellarius, the finest celestial atlas ever produced. According to classical astronomy, championed by Aristotle and Ptolemy, the stars were mounted on a huge, transparent crystal sphere that was part of a geocentric system, in which all of the stars and planets rotated around the Earth. Cellarius's star-chart demonstrates three separate ideas about the motions of the spheres, longitude and the influences of the stars. It is a beautiful image, timeless in the abstract harmony of colour, shape and composition, and also a record of the restless search for cosmic understanding. The present image was originally engraved in 1660 by Jan Janssonius, during the great era of Dutch map-making, a period that saw perfection in the art of representing scientific ideas in graphic form by means of engraving. It was reprinted by Janssonius in 1661, and again in 1708 by Gerard Valk and Petrus Schenk, who added their names to the plates. Andreas Cellarius was born in about 1596 in Neuhausen, a small town near Worms in the Rhine-Hesse region of Germany. From 1625 to 1637 Cellarius worked as a schoolmaster in Amsterdam and The Hague, and in 1637 moved to Hoorn, where he was appointed as headmaster or rector of the Latin School. He published a number of works during his lifetime, but the last and greatest was the Harmonia Macrocosmica . Cellarius resigned from his post as headmaster in early 1665 and died in Hoorn in November of the same year. Koeman, Atlantes Neerlandici , Cel. 3.

$7500.00