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Leo Belgicvs ... Arrificiosa & Geographica tabula sub Leonis figura a 17 inferioris Germaniae Provincias ..
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Leo Belgicvs ... Arrificiosa & Geographica tabula sub Leonis figura a 17 inferioris Germaniae Provincias ..

By VAN DER KEERE, Pieter

Amsterdam, 1617. Engraved map, Latin text on verso. Wide margins. Among the most decorative maps of the Golden Age of mapmaking: the famous depiction of the Provinces of the Low Countries in the shape of a lion. The Netherlands, depicted in the form of a lion originated with the Austrian mapmaker Michael von Aitzing (c. 1530-98), who inserted one in his book De Leone Belgico (1583). Various depictions followed, each with decorative variation reflecting in part political events. The present map, engraved by Hendrik Floris van Langren, is from Petri Kaerii Germania Inferior id est, XVII provinciarum ejus novae et exactae Tabulae Geographicae, cum Luculentis Singularum descriptionibus additis. À Petro Montano (Amsterdam, 1617). It is the third incarnation of the Aitzinger form of the Leo Belgicus: the lion rampant facing right, with the right paw raised. The text within the cartouche translates to read: "A skilfully made geographical map representing the XVII Provinces of the Netherlands in the form of a lion, showing also the coats-of-arms of the provinces, their boundaries and their governors, as defined and appointed by the supreme authorities in 1559". The present example is the second state of the map; the first state of circa 1609 being known in only three examples. "Michael Aitzinger's novel design was first printed in 1583 and was copied by many of the Low Countries engravers in various forms. Some versions are fabulously ornate, others more plain, but this is one of the most decorative forms" (Potter). Van der Heijden 4.2; Potter, Antique Maps, p. 187.

$17500.00

Les Provinces Des Pays-Bas Catholiques ou A Most Exact Map of Flanders or Austrian Netherlands & c.
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Les Provinces Des Pays-Bas Catholiques ou A Most Exact Map of Flanders or Austrian Netherlands & c.

By MOLL, Herman (fl. 1678-1732)

London: "Sold by H. Moll over against Devereux Court ... D. Midwinter ... & T. Bowles", 1715. Copper-engraving, with outline period hand-colouring, on two joined sheets, overall sheet size: 24 3/4 x 41inches. Good condition apart from a few small expertly repaired tears. A fine large format map inspired by the War of the Spanish Succession, and showing the 'Austrian' Netherlands as they stood following the treaty of Utrecht in 1713 This fascinating map can be dated to after the treaty of Utrecht (which was signed in 1712) as this was when Austria was given the Netherlands and they are designated the 'Austrian Netherlands' in the title. The 'no-later than' date is based on the assumption that Moll would have removed the Duke of Ormond as the dedicatee very soon after his impeachment in June 1715 for siding with the Jacobins. In addition to the main map, the engraved area also includes three smaller 'vignettes': one a small scale map of the main roads to Paris from the north, the second an extension of an area on the main map, and a final image, with a key beneath, that attempts to explain the various 'works used in Fortification with the method of an Attack' Herman Moll came to London around 1678 from either Holland or Germany. He found work as a cartographical engraver, working for Moses Pitt, among others. By 1688 he had his own shop. Moll had a gift for making interesting friends and these included Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift (he provided "maps" for Robinson Crusoe and for Gulliver's Travels ), William Dampier and Woodes Rogers, explorer-buccaneers and Robert Hooke, the scientist.

$675.00

Partes confines Trium Magnorum Imperiorum Austriaci Russici et Osmanici
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Partes confines Trium Magnorum Imperiorum Austriaci Russici et Osmanici

By RHODE, Johann Christoph (1713-1786)

[Berlin: Royal Prussian Academy of Sciences], 1785. Engraved case map, full period hand colouring, dissected and linen-backed as issued. Housed in period green morocco backed case, with armorial bookplate of the Borghese family. Highly-detailed 18th century large-scale map of the Black Sea region: fine example from the celebrated library of the Borghese family. Centered on the Black Sea, this map depicts the region from the Ionian Sea in the west, to as far eastward as the western edge of the Caspian Sea, as far south as Cyprus and as far north as just above Tsaritsyn (i.e. Volgograd), taking in much of southeastern Europe (Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary, Greece, etc.), all of Turkey, Georgia and parts of Ukraine and Russia. Rhode served as geographer of the Royal Russian Academy of Sciences from 1752 until his death. The present map was accomplished in the midst of the Austro-Turkish and Russo-Turkish wars, between the Austrian and Ottoman Empires. On the slip case is the engraved bookplate of the library of the Borghese Princes, with their coat of arms: "Ex libris M. A. Principis Burhesii." Camillo Filippo Ludovico (1775-1832), Prince Borghese and son of Marco-Antonio III (1730-1800), married Napoleon's sister, Pauline, in 1803.

$4500.00

A New and Exact Map of the United Provinces, or Netherlands &c
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A New and Exact Map of the United Provinces, or Netherlands &c

By MOLL, Herman (1654-1732)

London: Moll, Midwinter & T. Bowles, 1710. Copper engraving with period, outline colour. Printed on laid paper. In excellent condition. A stunning large-scale map of the Netherlands by Herman Moll, the celebrated English cartographer. Herman Moll came to London around 1678 from Germany. He found work as a cartographical engraver, working for Moses Pitt, among others. By 1688 he had his own shop. Unlike many great cartographers, Moll had a gift for making interesting friends and these included Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift (he provided maps for Robinson Crusoe and for Gulliver's Travels), William Dampier and Woodes Rogers, explorer/buccaneer and Robert Hooke, the scientist. This grand map of the Netherlands exemplifies Moll's particular virtues as a mapmaker. It is drawn on a large scale and has a wealth of geographical details including all the principal towns and major roads. Atlas maps on this scale were a recent innovation, and Moll made scale, readability and what would now be called user-friendliness hallmarks of his style. There is an inset map of the Channel and the North Sea along with seven panoramic and aerial views of the major towns, including views of Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Middelburg, Utrecht, Gronningen as well a plan of Arx Britannica, (an ancient Roman fort at the mouth of the Rhine) and a view of King William's palatial hunting lodge Het Loo . This is a stunning example of Moll's very interesting map and a wonderful impression with period colour. This map was part of Herman Moll's magnificent folio work, A New and Compleat Atlas . Moll was the most innovative and important cartographer working in London during his era, a career that spanned over fifty years. His origins have been a source of some scholarly debate; however, the prevailing opinion suggests that he hailed from the Hanseatic port city of Bremen, Germany. Joining a number of his countrymen, he fled the turmoil of the Scanian Wars for London, and in 1678 is first recorded as working there as an engraver for Moses Pitt on the production of the English Atlas. It was not long before Moll found himself as a charter member of London's most interesting social circle, which congregated at Jonathan's Coffee House at Number 20 Exchange Alley, Cornhill. It was at this establishment that speculators met to trade equities (most notoriously South Sea Company shares). Moll's coffeehouse circle included the scientist Robert Hooke, the archaeologist William Stuckley, the authors Jonathan Swift and Daniel Defoe, and the intellectually-gifted pirates William Dampier, Woodes Rogers and William Hacke. From these friends, Moll gained a great deal of privileged information that was later conveyed in his cartographic works, some appearing in the works of these same figures (Moll contributed maps to Gulliver's Travels and Robinson Crusoe , for instance). He was highly astute, both politically and commercially, and he was consistently able to craft maps and atlases that appealed to the particular fancy of wealthy individual patrons, (this map has a dedicatory cartouche with family crest to Charles, Lord Townshend) as well as the popular trends of the day. In many cases, his works are amongst the very finest maps of their subjects ever created with toponymy in the English language. Dictionary of National Biography.

$750.00

I. Carte Particuliere des Costes de Normandie Depuis Dieppe jusqu'a la pointe de la Perçée en Bessin. Faite Par Ordre Exprez du Roy de France
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I. Carte Particuliere des Costes de Normandie Depuis Dieppe jusqu'a la pointe de la Perçée en Bessin. Faite Par Ordre Exprez du Roy de France

By MORTIER, Pierre (1661-1711)

Paris [but Amsterdam: Mortier], 1693. Engraved with full, period colour. This large scale, beautifully coloured chart which shows the coast of France from Sainte Mère-Englise to Dieppe, comes from Le Neptune François , a lavish collection of charts produced collaboratively by Hubert Jaillot and Pierre Mortier. As Koeman discovered in his research on this work (see P. Mortier, Atlantes Neerlandici, Maritime Atlases, p. 423-4), Mortier re-engraved the plates after the original French prototype Neptune François by Charles Pène and others in a richly coloured edition and added to the titles the words "Levée et Gravée par ordre du Roy à Paris 1693" though they were in fact engraved, coloured and published in Amsterdam by Mortier. Pierre Mortier's grandparents were French émigrés, who left France in about 1625 to live in Leiden. His parents settled in Amsterdam in 1661 or 1662. Pierre Mortier grew up in Amsterdam but lived in Paris from 1681 to about 1685 where he must have gotten into the book trade. Once he was in Amsterdam again he specialized in French books and maintained his relationships with Parisian publishers. Amsterdam was at this time the international marketplace for books, especially books forbidden by repressive governments. He established himself in the field of cartographical publishing by offering editions of French maps, primarily Sanson's and Jaillot's to a public tired of the superb but dated Dutch offerings. Working on a scale larger than the typical Dutch folio map and providing the new insights of French geography, he was immensely successful. The charts in his version of Le Neptune François are outstanding examples of cartographical art. They are among the most beautiful printed sea charts ever made. This chart gives the soundings and shorelines for this area of French coastline along the English Channel including towns Bayeux and Rouen. Koeman, M. Mor 1, #16.

$1500.00

A New & Exact Map of the Electonate of Brunswick-Lunenburg and ye rest of ye Kings Dominion in Germany
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A New & Exact Map of the Electonate of Brunswick-Lunenburg and ye rest of ye Kings Dominion in Germany

By MOLL, Herman (1654-1732)

London: H. Moll, T. & J. Bowles, P. Overton & J. King, 1730. Copper-engraved map, with original outline colour, in excellent condition. A magnificent map celebrating the ascension of the House of Hanover to the British throne, depicting the new King's German possessions Herman Moll first printed this map immediately after George I came to the throne of Great Britain. Queen Anne (Stuart) died without heir, and after the legislated exclusion of her close, but Catholic, relatives, her distant Protestant cousin, the Elector of Hanover, was deemed to be her legitimate heir. It is amusing to note that even though George I ruled from 1714 to 1728, it is said that he never learned to speak more than a few words of the "King's English." This map principally focuses on the large region of northern Germany that was ruled by George, one of the princes of the Holy Roman Empire. As depicted on the map, this realm included the great port of Hamburg, as well as the important cities of Lünenberg and Hanover, and the university town of Göttingen. As noted in the lines and table in the lower-right of the map, this domain contained vast natural wealth, including numerous forests and 110 mines which yielded vast quantities of silver. A cartographic inset in the upper left details the Elector's newest possession, the Duchy of Saxon Lauwenberg. The inset to the upper left depicts the King's triumphal route through the North Sea from Hamburg to London. This grand composition is finished by a spectacular title cartouche featuring all manner of armaments, surmounted by the Royal coat of arms. The King was so delighted by Moll's finished manuscript that he awarded the fellow German "a Gold Medal" as a "mark of his Royal Favour." The present map was part of Herman Moll's magnificent folio work, a New and Compleat Atlas . Moll was the most important cartographer working in London during his era, a career that spanned over fifty years. His origins have been a source of great scholarly debate; however, the prevailing opinion suggests that he hailed from the Hanseatic port city of Bremen, Germany. Joining a number of his countrymen, he fled the turmoil of the Scanian Wars for London, and in 1678 is first recorded as working there as an engraver for Moses Pitt on the production of the English Atlas . It was not long before Moll became a charter member of London's most interesting social circle, which congregated at Jonathan's Coffee House at Number 20 Exchange Alley, Cornhill. It was at this establishment that speculators met to trade equities (most notoriously South Sea Company shares). Moll's coffeehouse circle included the scientist Robert Hooke, the archaeologist William Stuckley, the authors Jonathan Swift and Daniel Defoe, and the intellectually-gifted pirates William Dampier, Woodes Rogers and William Hacke. From these friends, Moll gained a great deal of privileged information that was later conveyed in his cartographic works, some appearing in the works of these same figures. Moll was highly astute, both politically and commercially, and he was consistently able to craft maps and atlases that appealed to the particular fancy of wealthy individual patrons, as well as the popular trends of the day. In many cases, his works are amongst the very finest maps of their subjects ever created with toponymy in the English language. Shirley, Maps in the Atlases of the British Library I, T.Moll-4b, 20; Cf. Reinhartz, The Cartographer and the Literati: Herman Moll and his Intellectual Circle.

$850.00

Tertia Europe Tabula
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Tertia Europe Tabula

By PTOLEMY, Claudius (90-168 A.D.)

[Rome: Petrus de Turre, 1490. Copper-engraved map, in very good condition apart from expert repairs to left and right lower corners. A highly important and elegant map from the second edition of the 'Rome Ptolemy' This map is one of the earliest and most important printed maps of France and Belgium, being one of the trapezoidal tabulae , or regional maps of the Classical world, contained in the 1490 edition of Ptolemy's Cosmographia .. The image embraces an areas extending from southern England down to the Mediterranean. France is shown traversed by major rivers, and curiously features an exaggerated mountain range linking the Pyrenees with the Alps. It is most fascinating as one of the last Classical-medieval maps of France and Belgium, before the advent of modern surveying techniques would dramatically modify the cartographic appearance of the region. As part of the 1490 'Rome Ptolemy', this map was printed from the same plates used for the first edition of 1478. R.A. Skelton stated that the 1490 edition was issued 'in response to the geographical curiosity aroused by the Portuguese entry into the Indian Ocean', with Bartholemew Dias's rounding of the Cape of Good Hope in 1488 (Skelton, p.X), and appropriately Christopher Columbus heavily annotated a copy of the 1478 edition. The 'Rome Ptolemy' maps occupy an extremely important place in the history of early printing, and the story of their genesis is most fascinating. It begins with Conrad Swenheym, who is widely thought to have been present at the birth of printing while an apprentice of Johann Guttenberg. After Mainz was sacked in 1462, Swenheym fled south to Italy and arrived at the Benedictine monastery of Subiaco, likely at the suggestion of the great humanist and cartographer Cardinal Nicholas of Cusa. In 1464-5, Swenheyn, in partnership with another German émigré, Arnold Pannartz, introduced the first printing press to Italy. Over the next few years, Pope Paul II was to become so enthusiastic about the new medium that he liquidated scriptoria and commissioned several newly established printers to publish vast quantities of religious and humanist texts. In 1467, Swenheym and Pannartz moved to Rome under the Pope's patronage where they printed over fifty books from their press at the Massimi Palace. Unfortunately, when the pope died in 1471, the new pontiff Sixtus IV disavowed the numerous unpaid orders of his predecessor. In this new climate, Swenheym and Pannartz elected to move away from mass printing and to rededicate their efforts to creating the first printed illustrated edition of Ptolemy's Cosmographia, a work which was one of the greatest sensations of the Italian renaissance. By 1474 this immensely challenging endeavor was well under way, and Swenheym is recorded as having trained "mathematicians" to engrave maps on copper. They did, however have competition in the form of Taddeo Crivelli of Bologna, who was determined to be the first to the goal, even allegedly poaching one of Swenheym's employees who was privy to the project in Rome. Crivelli raced to complete the project, while Swenheym painstakingly guided the quality of his work, an endeavor slowed by the death of Pannartz in the plague of 1476. Crivelli's work was finally published on June 29th, 1477, making it the first printed Cosmography and the first ever set of engraved maps. Swenheym died in 1577, and the project was taken up by Arnold Buckinck, originally from Cologne, who saw the project to completion on October 10, 1478. While it may not have been the first printed edition, Rodney Shirley notes that 'The copper plates engraved at Rome ... [were] much superior in clarity and craftsmanship to those of the 1477 Bologna edition ... Many consider the Rome plates to be the finest Ptolemaic plates produced until Gerard Mercator engraved his classical world atlas in 1578' (Shirley p.3). Swenheym's close supervision of his engravers saw that 'The superior craftsmanship of the engraved maps in the Rome edition, by comparison with those of the [1477] Bologna edition, is conspicuous and arresting. The cleanliness and precision with which the geographical details are drawn; the skill with which the elements of the map are arranged according to their significance, and the sensitive use of the burin in working the plates - these qualities ... seem to point to the hand of an experienced master, perhaps from North Italy' (Skelton, p.VIII). A number of authorities have suggested a principal engraver from either Venice or Ferrara. Another aspect of these maps which stands out is the fine Roman letters used for the place names on the plates. In an apparently unique experiment, these letters were not engraved with a burin but punched into the printing plate using metal stamps or dies. These fine prints represent a milestone in the medium, being some of the earliest successful intaglio engravings, quite apart from their undeniable cartographic importance. While the artists who carried out Swenheym's vision will likely never be known, they produced the most important and artistically virtuous printed maps of the fifteenth-century. Upon the publication of the Rome Ptolemy, a frustrated Crivelli saw potential clients abandon his edition in favour of its superior rival. Petrus de Turre (Pietro de la Torre) purchased these same plates and on November 4th, 1490 first used them to print a second Rome edition, of which this map was a part. The plates had remained in excellent condition and the original sharpness and quality was preserved. This map remains one of the most historically important and visually striking images of France and Belgium available to collectors. Cf. BMC IV , p.133; Campbell, The Earliest Printed Maps , pp.131-133; Destombes, Catalogue des Cartes gravées au XVe siècle , 41(1); cf. Goff, P-1086; cf. Hain, 13541; Indice Generale , 8128; cf. Klebs, Incunabula, 812.7; cf. Proctor, 3966; cf. Sabin, Ptolemy , 66474; cf. Sander, 5976; Shirley, The Mapping of the World , 4; cf. Skelton, Claudius Ptolomaeus Cosmographia Rome 1478, p.XIII; cf. Stevens, Ptolemy's Geography , 42; cf. Stilwell, P-992.

$3500.00

Quarta Europe Tabula
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Quarta Europe Tabula

By PTOLEMY, Claudius (90-168 A.D.)

[Rome: Petrus de Turre, 1490. Copper-engraved map, in very good condition apart from a small marginal repair to the lower blank margin and a small rust-hole in the image area, rebacked centerfold, overall soiling. A highly important and elegant map from the second edition of the 'Rome Ptolemy' This map is one of the earliest and most important printed maps of the region embracing the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark, being one of the trapezoidal tabulae , or regional maps of the Classical world, contained in the 1490 Rome edition of Ptolemy's Cosmographia .. This map is also fascinating as one of the last representations of the region to be published before triangulated surveys dramatically modified the depiction of the region in the sixteenth-century. The image takes in the vast area of 'Magna Germania', the heart of Europe, running north of the Alps and extending up into Scandinavia. As part of the 1490 'Rome Ptolemy', this map was printed from the same plates used for the first edition of 1478. R.A. Skelton stated that the 1490 edition was issued 'in response to the geographical curiosity aroused by the Portuguese entry into the Indian Ocean', with Bartholemew Diaz's rounding of the Cape of Good Hope in 1488 (Skelton, p.X), and appropriately Christopher Columbus heavily annotated a copy of the 1478 edition. The 'Rome Ptolemy' maps occupy an extremely important place in the history of early printing, and the story of their genesis is most fascinating. It begins with Conrad Swenheym, who is widely thought to have been present at the birth of printing while an apprentice of Johann Guttenberg. After Mainz was sacked in 1462, Swenheym fled south to Italy and arrived at the Benedictine monastery of Subiaco, likely at the suggestion of the great humanist and cartographer Cardinal Nicholas of Cusa. In 1464-5, Swenheyn, in partnership with another German émigré, Arnold Pannartz, introduced the first printing press to Italy. Over the next few years, Pope Paul II was to become so enthusiastic about the new medium that he liquidated scriptoria and commissioned several newly established printers to publish vast quantities of religious and humanist texts. In 1467, Swenheym and Pannartz moved to Rome under the Pope's patronage where they printed over fifty books from their press at the Massimi Palace. Unfortunately, when the pope died in 1471, the new pontiff Sixtus IV disavowed the numerous unpaid orders of his predecessor. In this new climate, Swenheym and Pannartz elected to move away from mass printing and to rededicate their efforts to creating the first printed illustrated edition of Ptolemy's Cosmographia, a work which was one of the greatest sensations of the Italian renaissance. By 1474 this immensely challenging endeavor was well under way, and Swenheym is recorded as having trained "mathematicians" to engrave maps on copper. They did, however have competition in the form of Taddeo Crivelli of Bologna, who was determined to be the first to the goal, even allegedly poaching one of Swenheym's employees who was privy to the project in Rome. Crivelli raced to complete the project, while Swenheym painstakingly guided the quality of his work, an endeavor slowed by the death of Pannartz in the plague of 1476. Crivelli's work was finally published on June 29th, 1477, making it the first printed Cosmography and the first ever set of engraved maps. Swenheym died in 1577, and the project was taken up by Arnold Buckinck, originally from Cologne, who saw the project to completion on October 10, 1478. While it may not have been the first printed edition, Rodney Shirley notes that 'The copper plates engraved at Rome ... [were] much superior in clarity and craftsmanship to those of the 1477 Bologna edition ... Many consider the Rome plates to be the finest Ptolemaic plates produced until Gerard Mercator engraved his classical world atlas in 1578' (Shirley p.3). Swenheym's close supervision of his engravers saw that 'The superior craftsmanship of the engraved maps in the Rome edition, by comparison with those of the [1477] Bologna edition, is conspicuous and arresting. The cleanliness and precision with which the geographical details are drawn; the skill with which the elements of the map are arranged according to their significance, and the sensitive use of the burin in working the plates - these qualities ... seem to point to the hand of an experienced master, perhaps from North Italy' (Skelton, p.VIII). A number of authorities have suggested a principal engraver from either Venice or Ferrara. Another aspect of these maps which stands out is the fine Roman letters used for the place names on the plates. In an apparently unique experiment, these letters were not engraved with a burin but punched into the printing plate using metal stamps or dies. These fine prints represent a milestone in the medium, being some of the earliest successful intaglio engravings, quite apart from their undeniable cartographic importance. While the artists who carried out Swenheym's vision will likely never be known, they produced the most important and artistically virtuous printed maps of the fifteenth-century. Upon the publication of the Rome Ptolemy, a frustrated Crivelli saw potential clients abandon his edition in favour of its superior rival. Petrus de Turre (Pietro de la Torre) purchased these same plates and on November 4th, 1490 first used them to print a second Rome edition, of which this map was a part. The plates had remained in excellent condition and the original sharpness and quality was preserved. This map remains one of the most historically important and visually striking images of the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark available to collectors. Cf. BMC IV , p.133; Campbell, The Earliest Printed Maps , pp.131-133; Destombes, Catalogue des Cartes gravées au XVe siècle, 41(1); cf. Goff, P-1086; cf. Hain, 13541; Indice Generale , 8128; cf. Klebs, Incunabula , 812.7; cf. Proctor, 3966; cf. Sabin, Ptolemy , 66474; cf. Sander, 5976; Shirley, The Mapping of the World , 4; cf. Skelton, Claudius Ptolomaeus Cosmographia Rome 1478 , p.XIII; cf. Stevens, Ptolemy's Geography , 42; cf. Stilwell, P-992.

$3250.00

[English Channel] Canalis inter Angliæ et Galliæ Littora. Pasecaert van 't Canaal tusschen Engeland en Vranckryck
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[English Channel] Canalis inter Angliæ et Galliæ Littora. Pasecaert van 't Canaal tusschen Engeland en Vranckryck

By RENARD, Louis (1678-1746)

[Amsterdam: Renard, 1739. Copper-engraved sea chart, with full orginal colour, in very good condition. A highly decorative sea chart of the English Channel, by the master-engraver Renard. The marine atlases of 17th and 18th century Holland were best sellers. The nation that led the world in overseas commerce also led in the arts of engraving and cartography. Plus, there was a large audience of mariners and mariners' parents, who needed to study the obscure straits and recently discovered island groups their sons were seeing. Louis Renard (1678-1746) was from a Huguenot family. He moved from France to the Netherlands and became a book dealer and publisher in Amsterdam in 1703. Louis Renard first published Atlas de la Navigation, et du Commerce qui se fait dans toutes les parties du monde in 1715. It was re-issued unchanged by the Ottens in 1739. The charts were printed from plates made by Frederick de Wit in 1675, Orbis Maritimus ofte Zee Atlas . These were corrected by Renard, using, primarily, van Keulen. Koeman, Atlantes Neerlandici, Ren 1.

$2400.00

L'Europe Dressée Sur les Nouvelles observations faites en toutes les parties de la Terre Rectifiée
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L'Europe Dressée Sur les Nouvelles observations faites en toutes les parties de la Terre Rectifiée

By [NOLIN, Jean-Baptiste (1657-1725)] and Jean-Baptiste NOLIN II (1686-1762)

Paris: Chez le fils de l'auteur Rue St.Jacques a lenseigne de la Place des Victoires, 1740. Copper-engraved wall map, with original outline colour, backed onto old linen, with contemporary wooden rollers, overall in very good condition. A rare and monumental wall map of Europe by one of the great masters of French cartography. Jean-Baptiste Nolin was one of the most accomplished and certainly the most ambitious French cartographer of his era. He founded what ultimately became a family empire in Paris in the 1680s. Exceptionally, he managed to marry superlative decorative ornamentation with the serious objective of producing maps that reflected the most advanced rendering of geographical detail. The artistic élan of his compositions evinced a style that preserved the rhetorical ambitions of the Baroque ethic, while anticipating the playful elegance of the Rococo period. His masterpieces, many like the present wall map, were monumental in scale and represented Nolin's desire to overwhelm his competition in what was a very challenging market. Highly controversial, Nolin occasionally described himself as "the Engraver to the King," an appointment of which the royal court was curiously never apprised. In his endeavour to include the very latest geographical details on his maps, he seldom hesitated to acquire information from his eminent contemporaries, most notably Guillaume De L'Isle and Vincenzo Maria Coronelli, Jean-Dominique Cassini and the Sieur de Tillemon. At times these rivals were not appreciative of Nolin's adoption of their intellectual property, and De L'Isle successfully sued Nolin for plagiarism in 1705. However, the larger-than-life Nolin always seemed to transcend these challenges, leaving a thriving enterprise to be taken up by his son. The present map was created in 1740 by Jean-Baptiste Nolin II, largely based on earlier maps produced by his father. It is a highly detailed and refined image of Europe, which was then in the process of intensifying its imperialistic grip over the other continents. This map is an artistically virtuous composition on a monumental scale, the image being surrounded by thirty vignettes, each framed in individualised Baroque borders, that depict various events from European history, along with textual narratives. The greatest decorative flourish of the composition is surely the title cartouche, located in the upper-left of the main image. Exquisitely engraved classical gods and allegorical personifications border the construction. Iconologically, they are meant to imbue Europe with the various strengths and virtues that they represent. For instance, Mercury, the messenger god of travel, trade and theft, is present to protect and speed European ships as they sail the seas on global missions of conquest and commerce. This wall map is one of the greatest subjects of the Nolins' legacy, not only being a masterful work of art and a fascinating image that tests the very limits of European geographical knowledge, but a vivid record of a dramatic transitional period in the history of cartography, and of society in general.

$18500.00

Europe
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Europe

By ORTELIUS, Abraham (1527-1598)

Antwerp: Ortelius, 1595. Copper-engraved map, with full original colour, Latin text on verso of one half of the sheet, in excellent condition, apart from a small expert repair to the left blank margin, and a small section of the upper blank margin torn away. A superb map of Europe by one of the greatest names in the history of cartography This important map of Europe derives in large part from Mercator's work; Russia from Jenkinson's map; Scandinavia from Olaus Magnus. The relatively modest cartouche shows a partially covered and apparently distraught Europa sitting on the back of Zeus in the form of a placid bull (he, the unwelcome lover of Europa), both gazing toward Europe, curious about its future. Published in a Latin edition of Ortelius' s ground-breaking atlas Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. van den Broecke, Ortelius Atlas Maps, 5.

$2250.00

[Denmark] Carte de Detroit du Sond Contenant les Costes de L'Isle de Zélande Comprises ente Nicopen et L'Isle de Meun, et Celles du Schonen Depuis la Pointe de Kol, jusqu'a Valsterbon. Levée et Gravée Par Ordre du Roy
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[Denmark] Carte de Detroit du Sond Contenant les Costes de L'Isle de Zélande Comprises ente Nicopen et L'Isle de Meun, et Celles du Schonen Depuis la Pointe de Kol, jusqu'a Valsterbon. Levée et Gravée Par Ordre du Roy

By MORTIER, Pierre (1661-1711)

Paris [Amsterdam: Pierre Mortier], 1693. Engraved with full, period colour and gold embellishment. A magnificent 17th century sea chart of Copenhagen and surrounding regions. This large scale, beautifully coloured coastal chart of the coast of Sjaelland (Zéland), Denmark and the south-western tip of Sweden comes from Le Neptune François , a lavish collection of charts produced collaboratively by Hubert Jaillot and Pierre Mortier. As Koeman discovered in his research on this work (see P. Mortier, Atlantes Neerlandici , Maritime Atlases, p. 423-4), Mortier re-engraved the plates after the original French prototype Neptune François by Charles Pène and others in a richly coloured version and added to the titles the words "Levée et Gravée par Ordre du Roy à Paris 1693. though they were in fact engraved, coloured and published in Amsterdam by Mortier. The Netherlands and France were engaged in the War of the Grand Alliance at this time. Pierre Mortier's grandparents were French refugees, who left France in about 1625 to live in Leiden. His parents settled in Amsterdam in 1661 or 1662. Mortier grew up in Amsterdam but lived in Paris from 1681 to about 1685 where he must have gotten into the book trade. Once he was in Amsterdam again he specialized in French books and maintained his relationships with Parisian publishers. Amsterdam was at this time the international marketplace for books, especially books forbidden by repressive governments. He established himself in the field of cartographical publishing by offering editions of French maps, primarily Sanson's and Jaillot's to a public tired of the great but dated Dutch offerings. Working on a scale larger than the typical Dutch folio map and providing the new insights of French geography, he was immensely successful. The charts in his version of Le Neptune François are outstanding examples of cartographical art, indeed, among the most beautiful printed sea charts ever made. This chart, which is oriented so that the west is at the top of the page, shows the north-eastern island of Denmark, Sjaelland on which is located Copenhagen and the neightboring shore of south-western Sweden, then called Schonen. There is an inset map showing Copenhagen in greater detail. Koeman, M.Mor 1, #4.

$1250.00

Partie Septentrionale De La Souabe [and] Partie Meridionale De La Souabe
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Partie Septentrionale De La Souabe [and] Partie Meridionale De La Souabe

By DE L'ISLE, Guillaume/ Covens & Mortier

Amsterdam: Cóvens & Mortier, 1742. Engraved with period outline colour. Collection stamp on verso. This attractive pair of maps of Swabia is from a Dutch edition of De L'Isle entitled, Atlas Nouveau, Contenant Toutes Les Parties Du Monde, Ou sont exactement Remarquées les Empires, Monarchies, Royaumes, Etats, Republiques &c. Par Guillaume de l'Isle. Premier Géographe de sa Majesté. It was published by Covens and Mortier, brothers-in-law who continued the firm established by Pierre Mortier. Guillaume de l'Isle (1675-1726) was son of a cartographer and a pupil of Jean Dominique Cassini, who among other important contributions, aligned the study of astronomy to the study of geography. Under Cassini's direction, observations were made from locations all over the world that enabled longitudinal calculations to be made with much greater accuracy. De l'Isle carried on this exacting work with remarkable dedication and integrity, constantly revising and improving his maps. While precision was his primary goal, his maps are invariably elegant and attractive. This pair of maps form at large, detailed view of Swabia, one of the ten circles of the Holy Roman Empire and containing some of the historically most interesting and culturally rich parts of Germany. The region includes towns prosperous and important in the Northern Renaissance : Nuremberg, Augsburg, Ulm, and others, the Necker and Danube Rivers and the Bodensee at the border with Switzerland. Koeman, C & M 7, #54 & #55.

$650.00

[Normandy] Le Duché et Gouvernement de Normandie divisée en Haute et Basse Normandie en divers Pays; et par evêchez, avec le Gouvernement General du Havre de Grace
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[Normandy] Le Duché et Gouvernement de Normandie divisée en Haute et Basse Normandie en divers Pays; et par evêchez, avec le Gouvernement General du Havre de Grace

By JAILLOT, Alexis Hubert (1632-1712), after Nicolas SANSON (1600-1667)

Paris: Alexis Hubert Jaillot, 1696. Copper-engraved map, with full original colour and gold embellishment, in excellent condition. A stunning map of Normandy by Alexis Jaillot, an exceptional example with gilt embellishments One of the most important figures in French cartography, Nicolas Sanson initiated the great school of French geographers. Born in Abbeville in 1600, Sanson established his first printing house in Paris in 1638. He soon became geographer to the king, establishing himself as one of the most influential cartographers on the Continent. He was succeeded by his sons, Adrien, and Guillaume, and by his son in law Pierre Duval, who continued to publish a wealth of maps using Sanson's name. At the close of the seventeenth century, Sanson's plates were purchased by the influential cartographer Alexis Hubert Jaillot, who continued to publish his maps and atlases under Sanson's title. This stunning map of Normandy is based on Sanson's map published in 1650, but was redrawn and enlarged by Jaillot. It shows the provinces of Normandy as well as the northern tip of Brittany and part of the English Channel. Both Jersey and Guernsey are included as is Mont St. Michel off the coast of St. Malo. In keeping with all of Sanson's and Jaillot's superb maps, forests, rivers, and towns are meticulously identified and named. The map includes an ornate cartouche in the upper section as well as a scale and key. Tooley, Maps & Map-Makers , pp. 40-41.

$2750.00

A Correct Map Shewing all Towns, Villages, Roads the Seats of ye Nobility and Gentry, Wth. Whatever else is remarkable within 30 miles of London
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A Correct Map Shewing all Towns, Villages, Roads the Seats of ye Nobility and Gentry, Wth. Whatever else is remarkable within 30 miles of London

By PRICE, Charles (fl.1680-1720)

London: Charles Price, 1712. Copper-engraved map, with full original colour, printed on laid paper, in excellent condition. A very fine impression of Charles Price's rare map of London and its environs, which became one of the most copied maps in England. Charles Price was a land surveyor and mapmaker, whose maps were nearly all collaborative efforts. After his association with John Senex, he worked with Jeremiah Seller and later George Willdey. During these collaborations he published a number of fine maps, which were all very decorative and extremely detailed. His maps are now extremely rare and are not often found on the market. This is one of the few maps that Price seems to have produced through his own efforts, and it is considered by many to be his finest work. It proved so popular upon publication that it quickly became one of the most pirated maps in England. Henry Overton, George Willdey, Thomas Bowles, Thomas Jefferys, and Laurie and Whittle all printed copies of Price's large London map. Needless to say, the original Price map is by far the rarest and most valuable publication and therefore it is a true collector's item for anyone interested in London maps. With London in the center, the map extends outward for thirty miles in every direction. The course of the river Thames is beautifully plotted and great attention has been paid to the various geographical features of the terrain. The chart is flanked on either side by two long location keys, which list the principle towns, villages, roads, and manor houses. This is a lovely impression of this rare map of London and its environs, and is perhaps the best example of Price's workmanship. Darlington & Howgego, Printed Maps of London circa 1553-1850 ; 55; Tooley, Dictionary of Mapmakers (1979 ed.), p.518.

$2500.00

A Plan of the City's of London, Westminster and Borough of Southwark with the new Additional Buildings Anno 1720
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A Plan of the City's of London, Westminster and Borough of Southwark with the new Additional Buildings Anno 1720

By SENEX, John (1678-1740)

London: Senex, 1720. Copper-engraved map by Samuel Parker, with full modern colour, skilfully repaired split at top of centerfold, overall in very good condition. A fascinating, highly detailed map of London by one of the leading English cartographers of the period. This is an excellent parish by parish, block by block map of the London that was built after the Great Fire of 1666. (St. Paul's was completed in 1710). The map includes an index that locates the 87 parishes in London and Westminster, and eight in Southwark. Many parishes had new churches built between the years 1670 and 1711, 52 of which were designed and executed by Christopher Wren. Samuel Parker, the engraver, did a superb job of drawing and engraving so that minute details of the city's topography are shown. The attractive cartouche includes symbols of London's greatness: two cornucopeias, one of fruit and one of precious metal objects and jewels. At the base is a picture of a king, presumably George I, whose sword and scepter are supported by two dragons. To the sides and behind these are symbols of British cultural and mercantile superiority. The map is dedicated to Sir Peter Delme, a very wealthy and powerful gentleman, one of the first residents of Grosvenor Square, and, for a time, Lord Mayor. Darlington & Howgego, Printed Maps of London, 65.

$2250.00