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Gorge, Lookout Mountain
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Gorge, Lookout Mountain

By BARNARD, George N. (1819-1902)

1866. Mounted albumen photograph, approximately 10 3/4 x 14 1/4 inches. Printed caption beneath the image. Unique large albumen Civil War photograph by George Barnard. Barnard had worked as a photographer documenting the Civil War from about 1861, initially working for Mathew Brady and Edward Anthony, and then, from December 1863, for the Topographical Branch of the Department of Engineers, Army of the Cumberland, based in Nashville. Under the direction of Captain of Engineers Orlando M. Poe, Barnard ran the army's photographic operations. Bernard continued to work for the Union army until June 1865, recording a number of well-known locations, and taking part in Sherman's campaign, behind the front lines, taking photographs in his capacity as an official army photographer. In 1866, Barnard would publish his monumental Photographic Views of Sherman's Campaign . "[It] is a remarkable work of great symbolic, historic, and artistic power. It is a result of a complex interweaving of Barnard's personal vision, nineteenth-century pictorial conventions, and larger ideas about war and the American landscape. The album was the most ambitious project of Barnard's career, and has long been recognized as a landmark in the history of photography" (Davis p.170). Indeed, the work has been called the first great landscape photobook. Interestingly, the above image is not found in Barnard's Photographic Views of Sherman's Campaign, instead comprising part of the impressive work done at Lookout Mountain for General Orlando M. Poe and the Corps of Topographical Engineers. "Barnard's photographs from the summit of Lookout Mountain were taken in several positions. It is clear that he was fascinated by the aesthetic potential of this site, and used a set of visual motifs in a variety of permutations. These motifs included the majestic sweep of the landscape itself, the sinuous path of the Tennessee River, the contrast between rocky outcroppings in the foreground and the forested landscape below, and the presence of self-absorbed spectators within this natural grandeur. While central to the landscape art of this era, these themes had rarely been so eloquently expressed in photography" (Davis, p. 67). Keith F. Davis. George N. Barnard Photographer of Sherman's Campaign (Kansas City, 1990).

$2000.00

Anno Regni Georgii II. Regis Magnae Britanniae, Franciae, & Hiberniae, Vicesimo Secumndo. At the Parliament Begun and Holden at Westminster, the Tenth day of November, Anno Domini 1747...An Act for Amending, Explaining, and Reducing into One Act of Parliament, the Laws relating to the Government of His Majesty's Ships, Vessels, and Forces by Sea
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Anno Regni Georgii II. Regis Magnae Britanniae, Franciae, & Hiberniae, Vicesimo Secumndo. At the Parliament Begun and Holden at Westminster, the Tenth day of November, Anno Domini 1747...An Act for Amending, Explaining, and Reducing into One Act of Parliament, the Laws relating to the Government of His Majesty's Ships, Vessels, and Forces by Sea

By [GREAT BRITAIN] [GEORGE III]

London: Charles Eyre and William Strahan, 1780. Small 4to. 62pp. Full dark blue morocco, gilt, gilt inner dentelles; cover embellished with gilt-tooled Star, Garter, Royal Motto, and royal initials of King George III. In a custom clamshell box, gilt leather label. Provenance: King George III (arms in gilt) In a Full Royal Binding for George III, with an Astounding Provenance Two Acts of Parliament concerning the Navy and Naval Affairs which have been specially bound for King George III. The first act, passed under George II, explains and condenses several Acts of Parliament into one clearer and more manageable act. The second act, paginated continuously but with its own titlepage, is an act to explain and amend the previous act. We locate one copy on OCLC, at the Society of the Cincinnati. This work does not appear to be listed in the ESTC. This copy is remarkably of note due to its provenance. The binding is stamped with the arms and initials of King George III, tooled in the Star and Garter and topped with a crown. The front endpapers bear many bookplates, beginning with the bookplate of the Duke of Sussex, son of George III and the most famous book collector among his sons, with a clipping from the Sussex auction. Here it was evidently bought by his brother, the Duke of Clarence, and has his bookplate; a naval officer most of his life, he would have been particularly interested in the subject. Clarence later became William IV, and the volume passed to the First Earl of Munster, illegitimate son of William IV and his mistress Dorothy Jordan. Although he was treated well and made a member of the Privy Council by his cousin Victoria, the Earl killed himself in 1842. The volume was acquired by the 2nd Lord Stanley of Aderley, a prominent political figure and well-known collector. From the Stanley family the volume passed to another famous English book collector, Robert Hovenden, who made a fortune in the wig business and spent his profits on books. After him it was owned by Dr. Francis Gray Smart, another collector and antiquary. Sometime after Smart's death in 1913, the volume came into the hands of the great English collector Major J.R. Abbey, best remembered for his great bibliographies of English illustrated works (his collections now reside at the Yale Center for British Art). Abbey's penciled notes are on the flyleaf. This volume was sold with his remaining books and manuscripts at auction in the late 1960s. A wonderful volume with a truly stupendous provenance. OCLC 70821711.

$8500.00

Orchard Knob from Mission Ridge
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Orchard Knob from Mission Ridge

By BARNARD, George N. (1819-1902)

1866. Albumen photograph from a negative taken in 1864 or 1866, 10 5/8 x 14 1/16 inches, on period card mount, 18 x 21 3/4 inches. Captioned in pencil in the lower margin, later label on verso. A stunning Civil War landscape image by Barnard. This image was used by Barnard in his Photographic Views of Sherman's Campaign (plate 10), but is here separately printed at a contemporary date in slightly larger format than the image in the book and on a period mount with manuscript caption. The image is among the most iconic from the work, here with wonderful contrast and tone. " Photographic Views of Sherman's Campaign is a remarkable work of great symbolic, historic, and artistic power. It is a result of a complex interweaving of Barnard's personal vision, nineteenth-century pictorial conventions, and larger ideas about war and the American landscape. The album was the most ambitious project of Barnard's career, and has long been recognized as a landmark in the history of photography" (Davis p.170). Photographic Views of Sherman's Campaign , embraces scenes of the occupation of Nashville, the great battles around Chattanooga and Lookout Mountain, the campaign of Atlanta, March to the Sea, and the Great Raid through the Carolinas (1866). This album, together with Alexander Gardner's Photographic Sketchbook of the Civil War (1866) are the two greatest photographic monuments of the Civil War. Between them, they contain some of the most famous images of the War. The present image offers a poignant reminder of the trail of destruction left across the Confederacy by General William T. Sherman's army in 1864 to 1865 during his famous campaign from Nashville to Chattanooga then Atlanta and so to Savannah and the sea, then by-passing Charleston, north to Columbia. In the meantime a smaller force had occupied Charleston and Fort Sumter. To the North, the military campaign was brilliant, bold and decisive - an event worthy of the present monumental album. To the South, it was vicious, bloody and destructive. Barnard's album would be the first great landscape photobook, "but it is a wounded, brutalized land -- gouged and scarred and broken. Its tone is stoically calm, yet bleak, and is all the more so for being so lucidly understated ... [Barnard] shows himself to have been one of the finest landscape photographers, treating those culturally loaded Civil War sites -- already in the process of becoming mythic when he pictured them -- with respect, but also with a matter-of-factness that is heroic in itself, and served to punctuate the hyperbole of myth" (Parr and Badger). Keith F. Davis, George N. Barnard Photographer of Sherman's Campaign (Kansas City: 1990); Parr and Badger, The Photobook: A History , vol. I, p. 45.

$3800.00

Battle Ground of Resacca, Ga. No. 2
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Battle Ground of Resacca, Ga. No. 2

By BARNARD, George N. (1819-1902)

1866. Albumen photograph from a negative taken in 1866, 10 3/4 x 14 1/4 inches, on period card mount, 18 x 22 inches. Title caption attached. Excellent impression, A stunning Civil War landscape image by Barnard. This image was used by Barnard in his Photographic Views of Sherman's Campaign (plate 20), but is here separately printed at a contemporary date in slightly larger format than the image in the book without clouds superimposed and on a period mount. " Photographic Views of Sherman's Campaign is a remarkable work of great symbolic, historic, and artistic power. It is a result of a complex interweaving of Barnard's personal vision, nineteenth-century pictorial conventions, and larger ideas about war and the American landscape. The album was the most ambitious project of Barnard's career, and has long been recognized as a landmark in the history of photography" (Davis p.170). Barnard's album embraces scenes of the occupation of Nashville, the great battles around Chattanooga and Lookout Mountain, the campaign of Atlanta, March to the Sea, and the Great Raid through the Carolinas (1866). This album, together with Alexander Gardner's Photographic Sketchbook of the Civil War (1866) are the two greatest photographic monuments of the Civil War. Between them, they contain some of the most famous images of the War. Barnard's album would be the first great landscape photobook, "but it is a wounded, brutalized land -- gouged and scarred and broken. Its tone is stoically calm, yet bleak, and is all the more so for being so lucidly understated ... [Barnard] shows himself to have been one of the finest landscape photographers, treating those culturally loaded Civil War sites -- already in the process of becoming mythic when he pictured them -- with respect, but also with a matter-of-factness that is heroic in itself, and served to punctuate the hyperbole of myth" (Parr and Badger). The Battle of Resaca was the first confrontation of the Atlanta Campaign between Sherman and Joseph Johnston. It occurred in May of 1864. Though the outcome of the battle was inconclusive, the Confederates were forced to retreat farther south toward Atlanta. Keith F. Davis. George N. Barnard Photographer of Sherman's Campaig n (Kansas City: 1990); Parr and Badger, The Photobook: A Histor y, vol. I, p. 45. Cf. De Renne p.1317; cf. Howes B150, "b."; cf. Sabin 3462; cf. Taft Photography and the American Scene pp.232 & 486.

$2000.00

Freight Engine. New York & Erie R.R. An original drawing
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Freight Engine. New York & Erie R.R. An original drawing

By KRAUSCH, Theodore (19th century)

Susquehanna Depot, 1855. Pencil, pen and ink. Signed in ink: "Theodore Krausch. Susquehana [sic] Depot. N.Y. and Erie Railroad. October 13, 1855." A very handsome drawing of a locomotive by a prominent inventor and engineer Theodore Krausch, dates unknown, was employed by what was then known as the New York and Erie Railroad at Susquehanna Depot where railway cars and locomotives were designed, built and repaired. The town in northeastern Pennsylvania, just below the New York border and Binghamton, came into existence with the coming of the railroad. Krausch, who obtained several patents during his life, (one for innovations in railway chair design), also received a Silver Medal from the American Institute of the City of New York for a drawing of a locomotive, no doubt similar to this one. During the 1850's, when railway lines and companies were spreading out across the country, each railroad customized its engines and cars to its specific needs. There was a large degree of standardization, and this Krausch drawing is a perfect rendition of the 4-4-0 wheel arrangement and overall design that was used almost universally in 19th century America.

$2750.00

The Rich Man Being Led To Hell
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The Rich Man Being Led To Hell

By EARLOM, Richard (1743-1822) after David TEINIERS the YOUNGER (1610-90)

John Boydell, 1786. Proof before letters. Mezzotint. Not in Wessely. The painting by Teniers the Younger had been acquired by Sir Robert Peel in 1784 and brought to England. It is now in the National Gallery, London. The composition illustrates, in a very imaginative way, a parable related in the Gospel of Luke: a rich man, dying, sees a beggar named Lazarus ascending to Heaven as he is dragged toward Hell. In this image, we don't see Lazarus, but there is a very memorable representation of the rich man, which is far from unsympathetic. David Teniers the Younger (1610-1690) was the last of the great Flemish masters. The son of a painter, he was married to Pieter Bruegel's granddaughter, and clearly was influenced by the great Flemish master. Like Bruegel, his work was enriched by the study of demonic creatures in Hieronymous Bosch (d. 1516). The original painting is in the National Gallery, London. Interestingly, Teniers did a mate to this painting which shows Mad Meg (a Flemish folk figure) marching out of Hell with a sword in one hand and a basket of loot in the other, a striking and humorous contrast to the poor "rich" man. Richard Earlom (1743 - 1822) was one of the best mezzotint engravers in England. His reputation rests primarily on the renditions of Old Master paintings, like this one, that he did for the Boydells. His mastery of tone and light has never been exceeded and is beautifully exemplified in this proof pull. Earlom has altered Teniers original, adding Cerberus on the left (mixing mythologies in effect) and intensifying the demonic hilarity.

$2250.00

An original watercolour and bodycolour caricature portrait of the High Court Judge, Lord Warrington
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An original watercolour and bodycolour caricature portrait of the High Court Judge, Lord Warrington

By SPY [pseudonym of Sir Leslie WARD (1851-1922, artist)]

[London, 1907. Watercolour and bodycolour, signed `Spy'. A fine watercolour character portrait by `Spy' of Thomas Rolls Warrington, the original of an image that was reproduced in `Vanity Fair' on 27 November 1907, under the title `A very Sound Judge. Mr. Justice Rolls Warrington'. 'Spy' was the pseudonym adopted by Leslie Ward when he began his career as a caricaturist for Vanity Fair Magazine in 1873. Ward was born in 1851 into an artistic dynasty, both his parents were painters, and on his mother's side her father and grandfather were artists or engravers, as was her uncle, and her great uncle was George Morland. Unsurprisingly, given heredity and environment, Ward showed a precocious talent and in 1871 was studying at the Royal Academy Schools. John Everett Millais was struck by his caricatures and introduced him to Thomas Gibson Bowles, the proprietor of Vanity Fair. For the next thirty six years his character portraits of the rich and famous of the day enjoyed tremendous popularity, and in 1918 he was knighted in recognition of his contribution. Thomas Rolls Warrington (1851-1937) was called to the bar by Lincoln's Inn in 1875, where he became a pupil of F. Millar, Q.C. `He soon acquired a reputation as a junior and, to quote from the letterpress of a cartoon of him in Vanity Fair , `by dint of care, industry and ability, acquired a large practice on the Chancery side'. He took silk in 1895, and, in accordance with the system then in force, attached himself to the court of Sir Arthur Kekewich... He soon established a considerable influence over that judge. The possibility of such influence was one of the main objections to the `tied silk' system, but it can be said with certainty that Warrington never abused the influence which he obtained and thoroughly deserved the confidence of the judge. To other counsel he set a fine example. He knew his papers thoroughly; he treated his junior with a courtesy almost amounting to deference and his opponent, whether experienced leader or young junior, with exemplary politeness and respect. He was elected a bencher of his Inn in 1897. In April 1904 Warrington was appointed a judge of the Chancery division of the High Court. His appointment was universally approved and he at once gained, and retained, the respect and affection of those who practiced before him. In 1915 he was promoted to the Court of Appeal and sworn of the Privy Council.' ( Dictionary of National Biography ). He was raised to the peerage, on his retirement in October 1926, as Baron Warrington of Clyffe. Literature: Published in Vanity Fair Magazine, 27 November 1907 (a copy of the published print mounted on the verso of the frame of the present work).

$18500.00

Ruth and Boaz
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Ruth and Boaz

By ANONYMOUS

1820. Watercolor heightened with india ink, repaired tear lower left, small spots of gum arabic lower center, otherwise in good condition, the colors very fresh. This fine Biblical scene is from the Book of Ruth, chapter 2, in which Boaz, owner of the fields being worked, tells Ruth that she is welcome to glean there (gather what has been left behind) and that she will be safe. Ruth kneels to the ground: "Then she fell on her face, and bowed herself to the ground, and said unto him, 'Why have I found grace in they eyes that thou shouldst take knowledge of me, seeing I am a stranger?" verse 3. Boaz answers, in effect, that it is because he knows she is an orphan and a stranger that he welcomes her.

$2800.00

The Pedlar and his Pack or the Desperate Effort, an Over Balance
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The Pedlar and his Pack or the Desperate Effort, an Over Balance

By AKIN, James (attrib.)

[Philadelphia, 1828. Etched with aquatinting. Excellent condition. Image size: 9 5/8 x 14 1/4 inches. Rare American political caricature from the famous 1828 race This is an interesting cartoon satirizing the paradoxical effect that negative attacks on Andrew Jackson were having in the famous campaign of 1828. An editor-publisher in Philadelphia named John Binns had published several harsh hand-outs called "coffin hand bills" that accused Jackson of arbitrary executions of American militia volunteers under his command and Native American prisoners, as well as violent episodes from Jackson's personal history. All this, though hardly altogether false, had the effect of increasing Jackson's popularity. It isn't clear whether the hand bills failed because they exaggerated Jackson's excesses or because an important portion of the population approved of the implied excesses, probably the latter. It was, of course, an all male electorate and fighting Indians was a recent if not immediate experience for much of white America. The cartoon shows Binns being crushed by the weight of the coffins, Henry Clay and John Quincy Adams, the other leading candidates, hanging on. Adams is holding the Presidential chair, soon to be lost to the military hero. Not in Murrell, A History of American Graphic Humor ; Reilly, American Political Prints 1828 - 3; Weitenkampf, page 21.

$1150.00

[Walpi, Arizona]
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[Walpi, Arizona]

By BOREIN, Edward (1872-1945)

Etched, printed in sepia, signed lower right, remarque of cowboy on horseback in pencil lower left. "Walpi, Arizona" written lower left in pencil in another hand. Superb and unusual Borein etching of the famous Hopi Pueblo. Edward Borein was a largely self-trained Western artist, who, having been a cowboy for a number of years, usually depicted the joys and hardships of cowboy life. Depictions of Native American architecture are quite rare in his work. The most successful of these is unquestionably this view of Walpi, Arizona, one of the oldest continuously occupied towns in the United States. Standing near the long bridge-like entry, we are impressed by the massive stone walls and the very permanent looking pyramidal town in the distance. Borein manages to convey the grim determination of the builders and inhabitants, who defiantly survive enemies of all sorts, natural and human. Galvin 215.

$4000.00

[Navajo Visitors at Oraibi]
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[Navajo Visitors at Oraibi]

By BOREIN, Edward (1872-1945)

1930. Etched, signed lower right, remarque of a cowboy on horseback in pencil, lower left. Rare sepia printed example of a superb Edward Borein print, signed and with a pencil drawn remarque Edward Borein (1872-1945) was born near San Francisco. He showed a very early talent for drawing which developed with very little training. He spent a number of years working as a cowboy throughout the southwest and Mexico, sketching at the same time. His career as an artist evolved beginning with magazine illustrations and going on to more ambitious oil and watercolor paintings. He spent a number of years in New York City where he met Charles Russell and Will Rogers, then returned to California, based in Santa Barbara as of 1921. By this time, he was working largely in etching, a method he perfected, always working with cowboys, Indians and the West as his subject matter. This fine sepia printed etching of the Navajo is especially desirable because of its setting in Oraibi, an ancient, continuously inhabited Hopi town in Navajo County, Arizona, in the northeastern portion of the state. The etching is unusual too for the mild psychological drama evoked: the four Navajo riders face in various directions as if they were uncomfortable or uncertain, none is actually looking at the village, and one is prepared to ride away. Galvin 210.

$3500.00

Savannah, Ga. No. 2
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Savannah, Ga. No. 2

By BARNARD, George N. (1819-1902)

[New York, 1866. Albumen photograph from a negative taken in 1866, 10 x 14 inches, on original two-tone gilt-edged thin card mount, 16 1/8 x 20 inches, with plate title and photographer's credit. Image somewhat faded; mild discolouration in places; mount creased upper left; occasional foxing mostly in the mount. A stunning image from Barnard's 'Photographic Views of Sherman's Campaign', an album which is one of the two greatest photographic monuments to the Civil War and 'a landmark in the history of photography' (Keith F. Davis). A contemporary reviewer wrote of this image and its companions: 'These photographs... surpass any other photographic views which have been produced in this country - whether relating to the war or otherwise' ('Harper's Weekly', 8 December, 1866, p.771) This image comes from George N. Barnard's album titled Photographic Views of Sherman's Campaign, embracing scenes of the occupation of Nashville, the great battles around Chattanooga and Lookout Mountain, the campaign of Atlanta, March to the Sea, and the Great Raid through the Carolinas (1866). This album, together with Alexander Gardner's Photographic Sketchbook of the Civil War (1866) are the two greatest photographic monuments of the Civil War. Between them, they contain some of the most famous images of the War. This handsome example of this photograph shows the warehouses on the Savannah River looking south, which may well have contained some of the 250,000 bales of cotton that Sherman mentioned in the telegram to Lincoln in which he offered Savannah as a Christmas present. It is in any event a wonderful photograph illustrating one of the great non-casualties of the war. When Sherman arrived at the outskirts of Savannah and connected with the U. S. Naval forces on the coast, the destruction and agony of the city appeared to be inevitable. However, the Conferate troops evacuated the city and the Mayor surrendered, and Savannah was spared. The bright sunny day enhanced by Barnard's transposition of a sunny sky above the horizon, enhancing the overall feeling of peace and prosperity. (Note two steamboats and a tall ship docked across the river, and other ships downstream). Cf. De Renne p.1317; cf. Howes B150, "b."; cf. Sabin 3462; cf. Taft Photography and the American Scene pp.232 & 486. See also: George N. Barnard Photographic Views of Sherman's Campaign... with a new preface by Beaumont Newhall New York: 1977 Keith F. Davis. George N. Barnard Photographer of Sherman's Campaign Kansas City, Miss.: 1990.

$1500.00

[Steam Locotmotive] An original ink and watercolour drawing of an American steam locomotive
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[Steam Locotmotive] An original ink and watercolour drawing of an American steam locomotive

By CUSHMAN, G. H.

[United States, 1875. Original pen, ink and watercolour drawing on wove paper of a Mogul type locomotive, all within original ink ruled border, signed by the artist on the rail at the far right side. An expertly rendered drawing of one of the most powerful locomotives from the golden age of steam locomotion in the United States. The first American-built locomotive, the Best Friend, came into service in 1830. Lomomotive production reached its zenith in the decade following the Civil War, at the time of the present drawing. This "mogul" type locomotive is shown with cowcatcher and a 2-6-0 wheel configuration (2 small wheels at the front and six large driving wheels in the rear), a large headlamp with an American eagle emblem on its side, a wooden cab on which is neatly written "Mogul" and a riveted fire box below the boiler which shows a B within a six-pointed star within a circle. This powerful Mogul type locomotive was used primarily as a freight engine and was produced by the Baldwin Locomotive Works and Brooks Locomotive Works. The artist of the present drawing, G. H. Cushman, has signed his work at the bottom right on the rail.

$4850.00

El de la rollona
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El de la rollona

By GOYA Y LUCIENTES, Francisco (1746-1828)

Calcografía for the Real Academia, 1878. Etching and aquatint. From the 4th edition of "Los Caprichos" - plate 4. Goya's pitiless caricature of a grown up "mama's boy" Los Caprichos was Goya's first collection of completely original etchings. They were and remain startlingly original in style and frequently shocking in their satirical assaults. They are strikingly modern and are his most popular prints today, though they were received with little favor in 1799 when they first appeared for sale. But even within Goya's lifetime enthusiasm grew. El de la rollona is uncompromising in its mockery of the mama's boy who is dressed in baby clothes, has his fingers in his mouth and a look of terror in his eyes, though he's bearded and obviously strong. The nanny or mother grieves in the shadow behind him, so disappointed in his failure to become a man. Goya's textual comment about this engraving is: "Negligence, tolerance and spoiling make children capricious, naughty, vain, greedy, lazy and insufferable. They grow up and yet remain childish. Thus is nanny's little boy." The fourth edition of Caprichos , from which this print comes, was made about 1878, as witnessed by the beveled platemark and the "strong, absorbent, wove paper" and "dark umber ink". Harris, v. 1, 95-109; v.II, p. 74; Delteil 41; Hind p.253 - 5.

$900.00

The Raven by Edgar Allen Poe Etchings and wood engravings by Alan James Robinson
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The Raven by Edgar Allen Poe Etchings and wood engravings by Alan James Robinson

By CHELONIIDAE Press. - Edgar Allan POE (1809-1849)

[Easthampton, Massachusetts: Cheloniidae Press, 1980. 2 volumes (including a chemise with an additional suite of plates), folio. (15 x 11 inches). Bound volume: title in red and black with integral wood-engraved vignette of a quill pen, text in black with one red initial, colophon leaf signed and numbered with text in red around a wood-engraved vignette of the Raven's head. 5 etched plates by Robinson, each titled and signed in pencil by the artist, and 2 wood-engravings (duplicates of those printed on the title and colophon leaf) signed and numbered in pencil, printed on thin small format Kitakata paper; Chemise: an additional suite of the 5 etched plates, unbound, signed, numbered and titled in pencil, extra-illustrated with an original pencil portrait of Poe signed by Robinson; an original pencil drawing of the raven's head signed by Robinson (on a bi-folium including the title-page in red and black); a 1p. printed prospectus signed in pencil by Robinson; a 1p. note signed by Robinson on Cheloniidae Press headed note-paper; a 1p. photocopied wholesale price list. Bound volume: black and red marbled rag paper-covered boards, the backstrip titled in gilt; Chemise: unbound as issued in original black cloth chemise. All contained within the original red morocco-backed black cloth box, spine lettered in gilt This copy is one of five artists proofs which contain an extra suite of plates, and this particular copy also contains two additional drawings A unique copy with original drawings of the first book from Alan James Robinson's Cheloniidae Press: a thoughtful design, beautiful plates and illustrations, immaculate execution. In this copy the bound volume is numbered 5/100 and is signed by Robinson, the unbound additional suite of etchings are numbered 17/50, but as Robinson's typed note makes clear, this is actually one of only five "artists proofs" which can be recognized by the "red leather spine to the accompanying box." According to the prospectus: "This book was designed by Alan James Robinson. The five original etchings were printed by the artist at the Cheloniidae Press ... Harold McGrath printed the text ... and the two wood engravings at The Hampshire Typothetae in Northampton, Massachusetts. The type ... is 24pt. Centaur, all hand-set. The edition, hand-bound by David Bourbeau at Thistle Bindery, Northampton, has a special marbled cover design by Stephen Auger. The book is printed on Arches Cover in an edition of 125 copies, signed by the artist and numbered 1-100 with a deluxe edition I-XXV ... A separate edition of fifty prints has been taken from each [etched] plate and an edition of two hundred from each of the two wood engravings." "All of the books are designed and illustrated by Robinson, however, it is a unique collaborative press. The finest craftsmen and the highest quality materials have been sought out to create works of the utmost integrity and beauty ... The Press endeavors to create beautiful yet scholarly renditions of contemporary and antiquarian texts. The books are produced as they might have been one hundred or more years ago, using handmade inks, marbled endpapers, hand-set type, and handsewn design bindings. The works are printed by Harold P. McGrath, a Master Printer for over 55 years who has worked with such artists as Leonard Baskin, Fritz Eichenberg, Clare Leighton, and Barry Moser. The result of this attention to detail are works of art ..." (Alan James Robinson's website).

$4500.00

Design No. 429. Jan. 19, 1939
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Design No. 429. Jan. 19, 1939

By NEWPORT, Herbert J. (1907-91)

Detroit, 1939. Colored pencil, pastel and gouache on black construction paper. Signed and dated with an inscription: "Design No. 429. Jan. 19 1939." Minimal pre-war concept car by Herb Newport Herbert J. Newport, Jr. (1907-1991). Herb Newport went to work at Duesenberg in the 1920s. From 1932-35, he was the Chief Designer. During this period he designed Duesenbergs for Clark Gable and for Gary Cooper. After leaving Duesenberg, Newport opened his own design studio and worked as a consultant for Nash, Chrysler and others, branching out into all sorts of industrial design. This design was probably done for Hudson (despite a label of a previous owner that suggests it was a design for Nash), as it bears more resemblance to the 1939 and 1940 Hudson Terraplane convertibles than it does to the Nash convertibles of that time. The drawing has a couple of unusual features, one being the headlight at the nose of the hood, complemented by small parking lights where headlights would usually be found. The other unusual feature is the rather threatening egg tooth in the middle of the front bumper. The design is conveyed in a most dramatic fashion, in simple red, white and gray lines on a deep black construction paper, underlined by a thicker red line that contains the title, date and signature and a logo "Styling for Industry". This was the period in which "streamlining" and "ultra-streamlining" came into fashion, and one is reminded of the effects of a stream on anything that sits in its path long enough.

$3500.00

Strange Concept Car with Beautiful Woman
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Strange Concept Car with Beautiful Woman

By ARBIB, Richard (1917-19950

1954. Mixed media on charcoal gray composition board. Signed "R. Arbib '54" Highly imaginative concept car by Richard Arbib This unusual, bird-like front design was conceived of and drawn by Richard Arbib. It is clearly a notion derived from something other than other cars and represents an invitation to a world of creature-like vehicles that car manufacturers turned down. It is enticingly odd, and the beautiful, laughing woman leaning against it seems to be there to reassure the fearful viewer. If someone that beautiful and well-dressed is comfortable with it, why shouldn't I?

$3500.00

"Riviera Coupe" Concept Art
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"Riviera Coupe" Concept Art

By ARBIB, Richard H. (1917-1995)

[Detroit], 1940. Mixed media on paper. Signed "Richard H. Arbib" and dated "9/24/40" A conceptual precursor of the famous Riviera of a later era This Arbib drawing was from his early involvement with GM's Styling Section under Harley Earl. It anticipates the famous Buick Riviera, which first appeared in 1949, also a 2 door hardtop. The Riviera Buick is most famous for the one which appeared on the market in 1963. Like this distant predecessor, it was sleek and sexy, comfortable and speedy. Arbib's drawing emphasizes the sleek contoured shape that seems the antithesis of the boxy cars of the 20's. At evening, in a California-like (or Riviera) seaside setting, the stylish coupe with its stylish driver pull up in front of a neo-Moorish portal where woman who looks like a model awaits him, cool and handsome like the car. Richard Arbib was a tireless industrial designer whose work ranged from watches to yachts, and included many lasting automotive innovations. Born in Gloversville, New York of Egyptian parentage, he attended Pratt. He worked on GM's exhibition at the 1939 World's Fair, and then various automotive, industrial and military designers (during the war) until he set up his own firm in New York in 1949. His work during the 1950's was especially important to the future as many of his dynamic and "space-age" designs were incorporated into production models of the late 50's, 60's and 70's. He also supplied illustrations to science fiction magazines and novels. Frederick Sharf, Richard H. Arbib 1917-1995 Visionary American Designer. 2006.

$4500.00

Concept Design for the Lincoln Continental (?)
seller photo

Concept Design for the Lincoln Continental (?)

By HAMMOND

1954. Mixed media on brown composition board with gum arabic. Signed and dated "Hammond 6 - 8- 54" A beautiful concept for a large, two door luxury car The name and logo on the car are so vague that it is not clear whether this beautifully drawn concept is for the Lincoln Continental or not, but it certainly could be. A long, slightly downward sloping line runs from the headlight to the backlight, similar to the Ford Fairlane, but this a larger, more aggressive car with a long hood that comes to a point over a pointed front bumper. The roof is a small missile-like figure. The chrome back fenders and hubcaps add to the richness, as does the two-tone, cappuccino and brown coloring.

$3500.00

1977 Concept Car
seller photo

1977 Concept Car

By HUTTING, R.

1977. Mixed media on composition board. Signed "R. Hutting 2/77" Beautifully executed concept car This design by R. Hutting anticipates the look of American cars in the 1980s and early 90's. It has a finely chiselled, sharply defined look that is elegant and commanding.

$2800.00

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