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To the Captains, other Officers & Seamen, who (with a detachment of Boats from the Fleet commanded by Admiral Boscawen) Burnt the Prudent & Took the Bienfaisant in Louisbourgh Harbour, about 1 o'Clock in the morning of the 26th. July 1758. In Memory of that Singular & Brave Action. This Representation is humbly Inscribed, By their Most Obedient Servant Richd. Paton
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To the Captains, other Officers & Seamen, who (with a detachment of Boats from the Fleet commanded by Admiral Boscawen) Burnt the Prudent & Took the Bienfaisant in Louisbourgh Harbour, about 1 o'Clock in the morning of the 26th. July 1758. In Memory of that Singular & Brave Action. This Representation is humbly Inscribed, By their Most Obedient Servant Richd. Paton

By FRENCH & INDIAN WAR - After Richard PATON (1717-1791)

London: John Boydell, 1771. Copper-engraving by Pierre-Charles Canot after Paton. Sheet size: 16 1/2 x 24 inches. Repair to the lower right corner with minor facsimile. A very fine representation of one of the most decisive moments in the French & Indian War. Paton (1717-1791) specialized, with great success, in depicting great British naval encounters. The capture of Louisbourg, at the mouth of the St. Lawrence, was the first of two tasks that the British had to overcome in their battle for control of Canada. The present action during the early hours of 26 July 1758 led to the capitulation of the town, thus opening up the river all the way to Quebec (the second target) which was to fall to General Wolfe's assault the following year. The text beneath the print goes into some detail: "Captn. Laforey with 25 Boats Attack'd and took the Prudent of 74 Guns, but finding her aground, was obliged to burn her ... Captn. Balfour with 25 Boats Attack'd, Took and Towed off the Bienfaisant of 64 Guns into the N.E. Harbour, then in possession of the British Troops." Paton's depiction of Louisbourg harbor in dead of night lit by the flames of the French battleship is a triumph of realism. Parker 61a, Spendlove, The Face of Early Canada ,Toronto: 1958, p. 12.

$4500.00

To the Right Honorable Charles Yorke, First Lord of the Admiralty, &c. &c. Plate 2nd. Representing the British Line after Wearing to renew the Action, Starboard division of the Enemy passing under the Amphion's Stern and raking her Larboard division hawling to the Wind on the laboard Tack, engaging the Gerberus, Active and Volage ... [With:]  To the Right Honorable Charles Yorke, First Lord of the Admiralty, &c. &c. Plate 3rd. Representing the Favorite of 44 Guns, Commodore Dubordieu on Shore and on Fire_ Active and Cerberus taking possession of the Corona of 44 Guns, and a Boat from the Amphion boarding the Bellona of 32 Guns_ The Flora of 44 Guns escaping after having struck her Colours owing to the crippled state of the British Squadron
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To the Right Honorable Charles Yorke, First Lord of the Admiralty, &c. &c. Plate 2nd. Representing the British Line after Wearing to renew the Action, Starboard division of the Enemy passing under the Amphion's Stern and raking her Larboard division hawling to the Wind on the laboard Tack, engaging the Gerberus, Active and Volage ... [With:] To the Right Honorable Charles Yorke, First Lord of the Admiralty, &c. &c. Plate 3rd. Representing the Favorite of 44 Guns, Commodore Dubordieu on Shore and on Fire_ Active and Cerberus taking possession of the Corona of 44 Guns, and a Boat from the Amphion boarding the Bellona of 32 Guns_ The Flora of 44 Guns escaping after having struck her Colours owing to the crippled state of the British Squadron

By WHITCOMBE, T.; and R. & D. HAVELL, engraver

London: George Andrews, 1812. Pair of color printed aquatints, with hand-coloring, engraved by R. and D. Havell. Expert restoration. Lovely pair of color aquatints depicting a naval battle between the British and French in the Adriatic Sea during the Napoleonic Wars A pair of engravings from a suite of hand-colored plates recounting the Battle of Lissa on March 13, 1811. "The Battle of Lissa (sometimes called the Battle of Vis; French: Bataille de Lissa; Italian: Battaglia di Lissa; Croatian: Viška bitka) was a naval action fought between a British frigate squadron and a larger squadron of French and Italian frigates and smaller ships on 13 March 1811 during the Adriatic campaign of the Napoleonic Wars. The engagement was fought in the Adriatic Sea for possession of the strategically important island of Lissa (also known as Vis), from which the British squadron had been disrupting French shipping in the Adriatic. The French needed to control the Adriatic to supply a growing army in the Illyrian Provinces, and consequently dispatched an invasion force in March 1811 consisting of six frigates, numerous smaller craft and a battalion of Italian soldiers. The French invasion force under Bernard Dubourdieu was met by Captain William Hoste and his four ships based on the island. In the subsequent battle, Hoste sank the French flagship, captured two others, and scattered the remainder of the Franco-Venetian squadron. The battle has been hailed as an important British victory, due to both the disparity between the forces and the signal raised by Hoste, a former subordinate of Horatio Nelson. Hoste had raised the message "Remember Nelson" as the French bore down, and had then manoeuvred to drive Dubourdieu's flagship ashore and scatter his squadron in what has been described as "one of the most brilliant naval achievements of the war." (Wikipedia).

$3750.00

Anno Regni Georgii II. Regis Magnae Britanniae, Franciae, & Hiberniae, Vicesimo Secumndo. At the Parliament Begun and Holden at Westminster, the Tenth day of November, Anno Domini 1747...An Act for Amending, Explaining, and Reducing into One Act of Parliament, the Laws relating to the Government of His Majesty's Ships, Vessels, and Forces by Sea
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Anno Regni Georgii II. Regis Magnae Britanniae, Franciae, & Hiberniae, Vicesimo Secumndo. At the Parliament Begun and Holden at Westminster, the Tenth day of November, Anno Domini 1747...An Act for Amending, Explaining, and Reducing into One Act of Parliament, the Laws relating to the Government of His Majesty's Ships, Vessels, and Forces by Sea

By [GREAT BRITAIN] [GEORGE III]

London: Charles Eyre and William Strahan, 1780. Small 4to. 62pp. Full dark blue morocco, gilt, gilt inner dentelles; cover embellished with gilt-tooled Star, Garter, Royal Motto, and royal initials of King George III. In a custom clamshell box, gilt leather label. Provenance: King George III (arms in gilt) In a Full Royal Binding for George III, with an Astounding Provenance Two Acts of Parliament concerning the Navy and Naval Affairs which have been specially bound for King George III. The first act, passed under George II, explains and condenses several Acts of Parliament into one clearer and more manageable act. The second act, paginated continuously but with its own titlepage, is an act to explain and amend the previous act. We locate one copy on OCLC, at the Society of the Cincinnati. This work does not appear to be listed in the ESTC. This copy is remarkably of note due to its provenance. The binding is stamped with the arms and initials of King George III, tooled in the Star and Garter and topped with a crown. The front endpapers bear many bookplates, beginning with the bookplate of the Duke of Sussex, son of George III and the most famous book collector among his sons, with a clipping from the Sussex auction. Here it was evidently bought by his brother, the Duke of Clarence, and has his bookplate; a naval officer most of his life, he would have been particularly interested in the subject. Clarence later became William IV, and the volume passed to the First Earl of Munster, illegitimate son of William IV and his mistress Dorothy Jordan. Although he was treated well and made a member of the Privy Council by his cousin Victoria, the Earl killed himself in 1842. The volume was acquired by the 2nd Lord Stanley of Aderley, a prominent political figure and well-known collector. From the Stanley family the volume passed to another famous English book collector, Robert Hovenden, who made a fortune in the wig business and spent his profits on books. After him it was owned by Dr. Francis Gray Smart, another collector and antiquary. Sometime after Smart's death in 1913, the volume came into the hands of the great English collector Major J.R. Abbey, best remembered for his great bibliographies of English illustrated works (his collections now reside at the Yale Center for British Art). Abbey's penciled notes are on the flyleaf. This volume was sold with his remaining books and manuscripts at auction in the late 1960s. A wonderful volume with a truly stupendous provenance. OCLC 70821711.

$8500.00

American Steamboats on the Hudson, passing the Highlands
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American Steamboats on the Hudson, passing the Highlands

By CURRIER & IVES, pub

New York: Currier & Ives, 1874. Lithograph with hand-coloring by Parsons & Atwater. Two of the "floating palaces" that sailed the Hudson River This very handsome portrait of two of the great Hudson River steamboats: the Drew and the St. John, was drawn by the artistic team of Charles R. Parsons and Lyman Atwater, who provided Currier & Ives some their best martime scenes and city views. Here Parsons and Atwater capture two of the luxury steamers that plied the Hudson during what could be called the Golden Age of steamboat travel. Once it was discovered that trains could make the trip from Albany to New York in half the time the stemboats could, owners needed to find alternative attractions. One attraction was to race the steamboats, and several great Curriers chronicle that phenomenon, but racing caused overheated boilers and explosions, and a much more lasting and appealing alternative was found in luxury cruises. Launched in the 1860's, during the war, the Drew and St. John (named after Daniel Drew and Alanson J. St. John, founders of the People's Line Steamers) became the favored way to travel to Saratoga Springs and Lake George and back. Elegantly designed and enormous, these boats with grand, inlaid mahogany staircases, huge mirrors and paintings, magnificent restaurants and arcades could serve as symbols of the Gilded Age. All New York society traveled thus. The title, "American Steamboats on the Hudson..." with its seemingly unnecessary "American", is actually a competitive reference to British steamboats, such as the Great Eastern, that were transforming world travel and trade, and maintaining Britain's dominance at sea. The patriotic message is that these beautiful, perfectly tailored and luxurious steamships exceeded the British boats in every way that truly mattered. Gale, 0210; Arthur G. Adams, "The Hudson Through the Years" p. 185.

$5500.00

Francisvs Draeck Nobilissimvs Eqves Angliæ AN. ÆT SVE 43
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Francisvs Draeck Nobilissimvs Eqves Angliæ AN. ÆT SVE 43

By [DRAKE, Sir Francis (1540-1596)] - Thomas DE LEU (c.1555 - c.1612) after Jean RABEL, the elder

Paris, 1583. Engraved portrait, oval with surrounding legend and text beneath, on laid paper (6 7/8 x 4 ¼ inches). Cut to just within platemark and inlaid into later wove paper sheet. Later ink inscription on verso reading "from Holland / 1809." Minor wear and soiling. Very good. A very early engraved portrait of Sir Francis Drake A clean impression of the second state of this famous portrait of Sir Francis Drake at age forty-three, shortly after he returned from circumnavigating the globe, the basis for most of the later images of him. The image is taken from a portrait purportedly painted from life by Jean Rabel the Elder and is said to be a credible likeness of the famed navigator. The legend beneath the portrait indicates the dates of Drake's circumnavigation, listing Rabel as the painter and Thomas de Leu as the engraver. Thomas de Leu (1560-1612), a pupil of Rabel's, moved to Paris around 1576 and became one of the most noted portrait engravers of his time. This engraving of Drake was the basis for many later images of him, including the well-known engravings by Jodocus Hondius and Crispin van de Passe. The earliest graphic image of one of the greatest figures in maritime history. Marianne Grivel, "Au Sieur Rabel, Parangon du la 'pourtraicture'..." in H. Zerner and M. Bayard's RENAISSANCE EN FRANCE (Paris, 2009), pp. 227-92 (2d state).

$7500.00

Perry's Victory
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Perry's Victory

By (PERRY, Oliver H.)

mid-19th century. Copper printing plate 14 1/8 x 18 inches; image: 12 1/2 x 17 1/4 inches. Based on a painting in the National Museum of the United States Navy An original copper printing plate depicting Oliver Hazard Perry's famous victory on Lake Erie, September 10, 1813. Though it shows the smoke and chaos of a large naval battle, the plate clearly shows American ships on either side of several British ships. In the event, nine American vessels defeated 6 British ships and American kept control of the lake for the duration of the conflict. They were subsequently able to re-take Detroit. The painting that served as the basis for this engraving was done by an unknown but clearly very accomplished artist, quite knowledgeable about the battle and 19th century warships in general.

$1250.00

R. E. Lee
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R. E. Lee

By JACKMAN, W. G. (engraver)

New York: Blelock & Co, 1870. Steel-faced copper plate: 10 x 7 inches; image: 5 x 3 inches. Title in facsimile signature. Three-quarter length portrait of General Lee in full dress uniform with sword Robert E. Lee (1807-1870) is probably the most revered soldier in American history, and he epitomised many soldierly virtues. The calm dignity of his bearing, which comes through clearly in all the images of him, is especially well communicated in this photogravure by an unknown photographer, taken in 1863.

$675.00

Battle of Cerro Gordo
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Battle of Cerro Gordo

By NEBEL, After Carl (1805-1855)

Plon Brothers of Paris for D. Appleton & Co. and George S. Appleton, 1851. Hand-coloured lithograph, heightened with gum arabic, printed by Lemercier. A superb image from Kendall's, "The War between the United States and Mexico illustrated…", one of the most important pictorial works relating to the Mexican-American War, the first offensive war fought by the United States. Kendall was America's first great war correspondent, and an ardent proponent of the necessity of America's war with Mexico. When hostilities broke out, he went at once to the Rio Grande where he joined with the Rangers, and later attached himself to the Scott expedition. Kendall's highly detailed account of the war was accompanied by the work of the French artist Carl Nebel, who painted each of the twelve major clashes of the war. Kendall notes in the preface to his work that `Of the twelve illustrations accompanying his work… the greater number were drawn on the spot by the artist. So far as regards the general configuration of the ground, fidelity of the landscape, and correctness of the works and buildings introduced, they may be strictly relied upon…. The artist has ever chosen what he deemed the more interesting as well as exciting points of each combat… the greatest care has been taken to avoid inaccuracies.' Cf. Bennett, p. 65; cf. Haferkorn, p. 47; cf. Howes K76; cf. Raines p,132; cf. Sabin 37362; cf. Tyler, Prints of the West p.78.

$1250.00

H.M. Brig Pilot. To the Commander and Officers of H.M. Brig Pilot This Print is respectfully dedicated
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H.M. Brig Pilot. To the Commander and Officers of H.M. Brig Pilot This Print is respectfully dedicated

By BRIERLY, After Sir Oswald Walters (1817-1894)

London & Plymouth: Edmund Fry & Son, Edmund Fry Junr, 1860. Tinted lithograph, coloured by hand, after Brierly, printed by Day & Haghe. A fine ship portrait of the brig Pilot, by one of the most successful marine painters of the latter part of the 19th century. Sir Oswald Brierly, after an adventurous early life when he emigrated to New South Wales and took part in a number of exploring expeditions, returned to Britain in 1851. He recorded the French and English fleets' operations in the Baltic during the war with Russia, and developed a close artistic association with the British Royal family. Upon the death of Schetky in 1874 he was appointed marine painter to Queen Victoria, and at the same time was made marine painter to the Royal Yacht Squadron. He was eventually knighted in 1885.

$1400.00

The Royal Review at Hatfield Herts June 13 1800
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The Royal Review at Hatfield Herts June 13 1800

By STADLER, J. C. after ROBERT LIVESAY

Portsea: Livesay, 1802. Colour-printed aquatint with hand-coloring. A brilliant panorama of a patriotic convocation during the Napoleonic Wars As George III raises his hat, seated upon a white horse and the rest of the Royal Family watches from carriages, the smartly uniformed volunteer troops of Hertfordshire march and ride through Hatfield Park. Painted in 1800 by Richard Livesay (1750-1823), the aquatint print was done by J. C. Stadler and published in 1802. The parade seems to stretch on for miles, though the military display seems to be somewhat secondary to the beautiful rolling landscape in the distance and Hatfield House, symbol of British stability and ascendency. By 1802, fighting the French to preserve Britannia had become a perpetual task for every generation since William and Mary. And of course enthusiasm for it had to be constantly re-ignited by demonstrations of the glamour of soldiery and war, and reminders of the greatness and loveliness of England. Livesay's print does all of these things extremely well, giving us an elevated view of the King and family, row upon row of earnest young men in dress uniforms and an infinite landscape.

$2000.00

The situation of His Mtys. Ship Blanche, of 32 Guns & 180 Men, & the French Frigate La Pique, of 40 Guns & 400 Men, at a quarter past 5 o'Clock in the Morning, about a quarter of an hour before the Pique surrendered, having been towed in that way near 3 hours and a half, and having made frequent attempts to board the Blanche without success
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The situation of His Mtys. Ship Blanche, of 32 Guns & 180 Men, & the French Frigate La Pique, of 40 Guns & 400 Men, at a quarter past 5 o'Clock in the Morning, about a quarter of an hour before the Pique surrendered, having been towed in that way near 3 hours and a half, and having made frequent attempts to board the Blanche without success

By ORDE, After Lieutenant Thomas

London: Published by Js. Bretherton, 1797. Hand-coloured aquatint by C. Rosenberg after Orde. The second of a pair of images of the `longest and most determined engagement ever fought' (Parker) `The Blanche frigate, Captain R. Faulknor, while off Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadaloupe, on... [4 January 1795], engaged the French frigate Pique. The fight having lasted an hour, the Pique fouled the Blanche , and the Frenchman made several attempts to board, but each time gallantly repulsed. Then the English sailors lashed the bowsprit of the Pique to the stump of the Blanche 's mainmast, and towed her before the wind. To bring more guns into play, part of the stern of the main deck of the Blanche was blown out, but it was not until the action had lasted seven hours... that the Pique surrendered.' (Parker p.111) Cf. Parker 105b (pair of prints).

$2000.00

In Commemoration of the Establishment of Steam Navigation between Great Britain and America, the Magnificent Steam Ship the Great Western
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In Commemoration of the Establishment of Steam Navigation between Great Britain and America, the Magnificent Steam Ship the Great Western

By WALTER, Joseph

London: R. Ackermann, 1840. Aquatint, hand-colored, by R.G. & A.W. Reeve. The Great Western, creation of legendary engineer Sir Isambard Kingdom Brunel, was the first ship to be designed to carry enough coal, specifically to steam across the Atlantic. She set off on her maiden voyage from Bristol in April 1838, apparently unaware that the Sirius, a smaller ship from a rival company, had left Cork three days earlier on the same run. The Sirius arrived in New York on the morning of April 23 and the Great Western came in four hours later - her passage had taken fifteen days, and she had averaged 8.2 knots, an impressive speed. This was one of the most important events the port of New York had witnessed and it was the main story in the newspapers. One writer observed that "the problem of…establishing a regular intercourse by steam between Europe and America is considered to be solved by the arrival of these vessels." Over the eight years of her transatlantic service, the Great Western made about ninety voyages. This is the largest recorded print of the Great Western. The Marine Collection at India House, pages 86-87; Parker and Bowen, Mail and Passenger Steamships of the XIX century, pages 140-141, number (i).

$4500.00

"The United States Gunboat "Eutaw". Built by John J. Abrahams & Son Baltimore, Md. Engine by Haxlehurst & Weigan Vulcan Works, Baltimore, Md. Hull Length...240 feet. Breadth...35 feet. Depth 12ft. 974 Tons. Engine. Diameter of Cylinder 59 inches. Inclined L.P. Stroke 8 feet 9 inches."
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"The United States Gunboat "Eutaw". Built by John J. Abrahams & Son Baltimore, Md. Engine by Haxlehurst & Weigan Vulcan Works, Baltimore, Md. Hull Length...240 feet. Breadth...35 feet. Depth 12ft. 974 Tons. Engine. Diameter of Cylinder 59 inches. Inclined L.P. Stroke 8 feet 9 inches."

By PARSONS, Charles (1821 - 1910)

New York: Endicott & Co, 1863. Lithograph printed in colours with additional hand-colouring. Signature in lithograph: "C. Parsons, '63" The Eutaw was one of twenty-seven doubler-ender, paddle wheel gunboats of the "Sassacus class" (named for the vessel of that name which rammed the Confederate Albermarle ). A lithograph of a sister ship, the Chenango , was also published by Endicott & Co. She was built of wood in 1862 and fitted with eight guns. The duty of these rams was to open up and protect the Union ports and guard the river traffic in the Gulf and along the Mississippi. She was broken up in 1867, soon after hostilities ended. Charles Parsons (1821-1910) British born, spent most of his long life in America creating superb marine prints and paintings. Much of his print work was published by the two major New York lithography firms: Currier & Ives and Endicott & Co. His ship portraits are among the finest of the era and demonstrate a love and a profound understanding of boats and life at sea. Catalogue of the Marine Collection at India House , number 282.

$4500.00

Clipper Ship Dreadnought off Tuskar Light, 12 1/2 days from New York on her celebrated passage into dock at Liverpool in 13 days 11 hours Decr. 1854. To her Commander S. Samuels Esq this Print is respectfully dedicated
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Clipper Ship Dreadnought off Tuskar Light, 12 1/2 days from New York on her celebrated passage into dock at Liverpool in 13 days 11 hours Decr. 1854. To her Commander S. Samuels Esq this Print is respectfully dedicated

By CURRIER, Nathaniel (publisher) - After Charles PARSONS

New York: N. Currier, 1915. Lithograph, coloured by hand, from a painting by D. McFarlane. A fine image of the fastest ship of her day, A second impression of this great image, taken from the original stone in 1915. The famed 'Blue Ribband' wasn't introduced until the 1860's, and then only for the fastest voyage by steam-powered passenger liners, but the clipper `Dreadnought' captured the public's imagination with the speed of her Atlantic crossings. Under the captainship of Samuel Samuels, her fastest accredited time is 9 days, 21 hours, from Sandy Hook to Queenstown. Conningham 1144; Gale 1261; Peters 5.

$2250.00

The iron steam yacht "Peterhoff", 416 tons. Built for H.I.M. the Emperor of Russia, by C.I. More & Co. of Blackwall
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The iron steam yacht "Peterhoff", 416 tons. Built for H.I.M. the Emperor of Russia, by C.I. More & Co. of Blackwall

By ROBINS, After Thomas

London: published by Messrs. Fores, 1850. Tinted lithograph, coloured by hand, by E.T. Dolby after Robins, printed by M. & N. Hanhart. A fine view of the Imperial Russian Steam Yacht. The legend beneath the image gives some details of the yacht, which was designed by Mr. Watermann and fitted with a 140 hp engine by Sir John & Mr. George Rennie. The ship's length was 195 feet with a breadth of 21ft. 7in.

$2750.00

Calais
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Calais

By FRANCIA, François-Louis-Thomas

Paris: chez l'Editeur.. Imprime par Sauniée, 1832. A fine and rare separately issued view of the main French port on the north coast after `one of the earliest and most accomplished of English water-colourists' (DNB Hand-coloured aquatint engraving by Paul Legrand after Francia, printed by Sauniée. Francia (1772-1839) `was born at Calais…, and was brought early in life to London by his father, a refugee… He commenced to exhibit at the Royal Academy in 1795, and contributed from that year to 1821 (inclusive) eighty-five works in all to its exhibitions. He was one of the sketching society formed by Thomas Girtin about 1799… He was a member of the (now Royal) Society of Painters in Water-Colours, and for some time its secretary, but he resigned his membership, and became in 1816 an unsuccessful candidate for the associateship of the Royal Academy. The next year he retired to Calais, where he resided till his death on 6 Feb. 1839. Here he gave instruction to R. P. Bonington, whose coast scenes bear much resemblance to the later works of Francia. Francia's earlier drawings are broad and simple in execution, rich, but sombre in colour, like those of Girtin; but his later work, while still retaining its breadth and harmony, is brighter and lighter in tone, and more subtle in handling. Though he painted landscape of different kinds, his favourite subjects were shore scenes, which he executed with great truth and beauty of aerial effect. He was an excellent draughtsman of boats and shipping, and some of his drawings were engraved to illustrate a book of sketches of shipping by E. W. Cooke. He was one of the earliest and most accomplished of English water-colourists, and his works are distinguished by their fine colour and poetical feeling.' (DNB).

$2500.00

Ships of the General Steam Navigation Company. The Leith, of 1000 Tons, arriving at Granton Pier, Edinburgh. - The Monarch, of 875 Tons, leaving for London
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Ships of the General Steam Navigation Company. The Leith, of 1000 Tons, arriving at Granton Pier, Edinburgh. - The Monarch, of 875 Tons, leaving for London

By HUGGINS, After William John (1781-1845)

London: Published by Mr. Huggins, 1841. Aquatint engraving, coloured by hand, by E. Duncan after Huggins. A fine double portrait of two early steamers William Huggins served for several years at sea in the service of the East India Company, and on his return to London used his intimate knowledge of shipping to paint detailed ship portraits. Here he pictures two of the vessels owned by the General Steam Navigation Company which was founded in 1824 as one of the first steam ship operators and continued in operation until the 1960s when the company was taken over by the P. & O. Line.

$3500.00

Wreck of the U.S. Steam Ship "Arctic". Off Cape Race Wednesday September 27th. 1854
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Wreck of the U.S. Steam Ship "Arctic". Off Cape Race Wednesday September 27th. 1854

By BUTTERSWORTH, After James Edward (circa 1817-1894)

New York: Published by N. Currier, 1854. Tinted lithograph, coloured by hand, by Charles Parsons after Buttersworth (working from a sketch by James Smith), printed by N. Currier. A dramatic image of a disaster at sea. James Smith of Jackson, Missouri, supplied the original sketch of the scene. The 2,850-ton 'Arctic' was relatively luxurious and fast, with a top speed of over 12 knots, and along with the 'Atlantic', 'Pacific' and 'Baltic' formed the core of Collins Line fleet (the main American opponent of Cunard in the 1850s). The 'Arctic' on 'her homeward voyage from Liverpool, during dense fog... came in collision with the French iron propeller "Vesta", and was so badly injured that in about 5 hours she sank stern foremost, by which terrible calamity nearly 300 persons are supposed to have perished'. In fact 322 people drowned and only 86 were saved. Conningham 679; Gale 7340.

$2500.00

This Plate representing the Royal Squadron in Leith Roads, at the moment of King George 4ths. leaving the Royal Yacht to Land in Scotland. is most respectfully dedicated to His most Gracious Majesty
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This Plate representing the Royal Squadron in Leith Roads, at the moment of King George 4ths. leaving the Royal Yacht to Land in Scotland. is most respectfully dedicated to His most Gracious Majesty

By SCHETKY, After John Christian (1778-1874)

London, 1824. Aquatint printed in blue, coloured by hand, by W. Bennett after Schetky. A fine aquatint by William James Bennett after Schetky recalling the landing of King George IV at Leith in Scotland. Following his coronation in July of 1821, George IV visited Ireland in August and September of the same year. The following summer he sailed for Scotland landing at Leith on 14 August, he remained in Edinburgh until 29 August before returning to England. Schetky, Marine Painter Extraordinary to the King and the Duke of Clarence, here recalls the events at Leith. Not in Deak William James Bennett Master of the Aquatint View New York, 1988.

$2750.00

The Right Honourable Lord Yarborough's yacht, The Falcon of 351 tons
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The Right Honourable Lord Yarborough's yacht, The Falcon of 351 tons

By HUGGINS, After William John (1781-1845)

London: Published by W.J. Huggins, 1835. Colour-printed aquatint, finished by hand, by C. Rosenberg after Huggins. A fine image of Lord Yarborough's `new' yacht William Huggins, one of the best English marine artists of the 19th century, served for several years at sea in the service of the East India Company. On his return to London used his intimate knowledge of sailing vessels to gain regular employment painting carefully detailed ship portraits. The present image falls into this category and represents the yacht that Lord Yarborough (1781-1846) had built after he was elected the first commodore of the Royal Yacht Squadron in 1824. Huggins' painting was very ably aquatinted by Charles Rosenberg, who translated several Huggins ship paintings to print. This is a superb example of 19th century marine printmaking.

$3500.00

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