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The Novels and other Works of Lyof N. Tolstoï
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The Novels and other Works of Lyof N. Tolstoï

By TOLSTOY, Leo (1828-1910)

New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1904. 22 volumes, 8vo. (8 x 5 3/8 inches). Frontispiece plates. Full blue crushed morocco, covers elaborately tooled in gilt, spines with raised band in six compartments, lettered direct in the second and third, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt, red morocco doublures with wide gilt dentelles, red silk endpapers, top edge gilt, the others uncut Copy number one of twenty-four sets of the deluxe autograph edition, including a full-page autograph manuscript signed by Tolstoy and bound in an elaborate full morocco binding. The autograph manuscript within the present set comprises a lengthy quotation from Tolstoy's short-story Walk in the Light While There Is Light (1893), which aptly summarizes his Christian anarchist and pacifist beliefs: "You are seeking your best advantage, and so are we; the only difference is that we see our advantage in different things. You believe that your well- being consists in riches and honors; we believe in something else. Our belief shows us that our advantage is not in violence, but in submissiveness; not in wrath, but in giving everything away. And we, like plants in the light, cannot help striving in the direction where we see our advantage."

$45000.00

The Second World War
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The Second World War

By CHURCHILL, Sir Winston Leonard Spencer (1874-1965)

London, Toronto, Melbourne, Sydney & Wellington: Cassell & Co. Ltd, 1954. 6 volumes, octavo. (8 x 5 1/4 inches). Half-titles. Numerous folding maps, 1 folding facsimile letter, 1 folding facsimile letter, 1 folding facsimile document. MInor scattered foxing. Full dark blue crushed morocco by Zaehnsdorf, spines with raised bands in 6 compartments, ruled and lettered in gilt, marbled endpapers, gilt edges A finely bound set of Churchill's masterpiece. Churchill's pivotal role in the defeat of Hitler and the other Axis Powers, allied with his abilities as a historian and author all combined to make this a seminal work on the Second World War. It has not been bettered. The first volume here is the November 1949 revised issue, the other volumes being the first trade editions. Woods A123 (b).

$4000.00

The Canterbury Tales
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The Canterbury Tales

By GOLDEN COCKEREL PRESS - Geoffrey CHAUCER (1340?-1400); and Eric GILL (1882-1940), illustrator

Waltham, Saint Lawrence: Golden Cockerel Press, 1929. 4 volumes, small folio. On hand-made paper. Wood-engraved border illustrations by Eric Gill, initials printed in red, blue and black. Publisher's niger morocco-backed patterned boards by Sangorski and Sutcliffe, top edge gilt, others uncut. One of 485 from a total edition of 500, this copy number 128: one of the most acclaimed and beautiful books of the private press movement. Printed by Robert & Moira Gibbings with excellent illustrations by Gill (the text from the edition of the Rev. Walter W. Skeat), this is one of the finest works to come out of the Golden Cockerel Press. The bibliography of the press describes this set quite simply as "beautiful books". Publication of Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales followed on from the highly successful edition of Troilus and Criseyde, the first of the great books produced by the Press, which Gill and Gibbings had worked on intensively for publication in 1927. Publication of The Canterbury Tales was regarded as a major literary event and was widely covered in the press throughout the four-year period. It proved a profitable title for the Press and one that enhanced its reputation. Sanford, Chanticleer, 63; Sister Elizabeth Marie, Eric Gill, p. 31; Gill 281; Cave and Manson pp.53-55.

$9500.00

The Book of Snobs
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The Book of Snobs

By THACKERAY, William M.

London: Punch Office, 1848. 12mo. viii, 180pp. 65 woodcut illustrations and initials by the author. Publisher's ads preceding the title. Publisher's illustrated green stiff wrappers, sympathetically rebacked with the original spine laid down. Housed in a green cloth chemise and full green crushed morocco slipcase First edition, first issue. This example with page 126 misnumbered 124, indicating the earliest issue. The back cover is an advertisement for the monthly parts issue of Vanity Fair. Snobs first appeared in Punch from 1846 to 1847 under the title "The Snobs of England. By one of Themselves. With illustrations." "When reprinted in book form, seven chapters were omitted. Thackeray, in a note, gave his reason for their omission, as follows: "On re-perusing these papers, I have found them so stupid, so personal, so snobbish, in a word, that I have withdrawn them from this collection" (Van Duzer 14). Van Duzer 14.

$650.00

Indian Antiquities: or, Dissertations, relative to the ancient geographical divisions, the pure system of primeval theology, the grand code of civil laws, the original form of government and the various and profound literature of Hindostan
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Indian Antiquities: or, Dissertations, relative to the ancient geographical divisions, the pure system of primeval theology, the grand code of civil laws, the original form of government and the various and profound literature of Hindostan

By MAURICE, Thomas (1754-1824)

London: Printed for the Author and sold by W. Richardson, 1800. 7 volumes, octavo. Folding map, 30 engraved plates (most folding). 7pp. list of subscribers. Some foxing. Contemporary half calf and marbled paper covered boards, minor wear at joints, neat repairs to spines First edition. The plates mostly depict Indian buildings and sculptures, but also include views in Persia, Egypt and Greece. Includes views of Indian pagodas, a Persian fire temple, the sculptures on an ancient mausoleum at Persepolis; Temple at Dindara; Temple of Luxor; great Pagoda of Tanjore; a Mexican temple to the Sun and Moon; Stonehenge; Pantheon (Rome); Temple of Esnay (Egypt); Pagodas of Deogue (India); Peacock Mogul Throne, etc.

$1500.00

[Trade catalogue for John Slater's patented steam kitchen]
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[Trade catalogue for John Slater's patented steam kitchen]

By TRADE CATALOGUE - John Slater

[Birmingham, 1810. Oblong small folio. 16 engraved leaves. With 4 small letterpress explanatory handbills mounted (one on front pastedown, the others on verso of first three plates). Contemporary manuscript annotations, including prices. Contemporary calf-backed marbled paper wrappers Provenance: Elizabeth David (booklabel) Rare early illustrated trade catalogue for steam ovens. James Slater's steam kitchen was primarily used in workhouses, hospitals, or other such high-volume, low-cost kitchens. The cast iron stoves, which also included a roasting oven, heated water to create steam, which was then carried by internal pipes to reservoirs which held custom-built rectangular pots. The letterpress advertisement on verso of the first plate describes the process: "The Patent Steam Kitchen possess the Advantage of cooling in the most delicate manner, either by steam or by water, separately or conjointly, at one and the same time; and when combined with a roaster, and with or without a hot closet, will cook victuals, both roast and boiled, for from ten to fifty persons and upwards, with one small fire only, and that not larger than is necessary for the boiling of one small pot or kettle in the usual mode of cooking. The great savings of fuel bears but a small proportion to its other advantages, as there is a saving of one pound of meat in ten, and a superabundance of rich gravy produced ... [It] forms, in a very small compass, the most compact, clean and best cooking apparatus in the world, for steaming, boiling, roasting, broiling, baking and stewing, in the highest perfection ..." The engravings depict both larger and smaller, portable models, all in various configurations, as well as many of the internal fittings and necessary pots and utensils. Winterthur notes copies with 18 leaves of plates (circa 1810) and 42 leaves of plates (1819). This copy from the library of noted gastronomy writer Elizabeth David, and would appear complete as issued.

$2800.00

A Safe and Easy Remedy proposed for the relief of the Stone and Gravel, the Scurvy, Gout, &c. and for the Destruction of Worms in the Human Body
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A Safe and Easy Remedy proposed for the relief of the Stone and Gravel, the Scurvy, Gout, &c. and for the Destruction of Worms in the Human Body

By MEDICINE - Dr. Nathaniel HULME (1732-1807)

London: Printed by James Phillips, 1778. Small 4to. [8], 38, [2]pp. Expertly bound to style in half period russia and marbled paper covered boards, spine with raised bands, black morocco lettering piece First edition After service as a surgeon's mate in the Royal Navy, Dr. Hulme became the first physician at the General Dispensary for the Relief of the Poor and subsequently became physician to the City of London Lying-in Hospital. In 1774 he was appointed physician to the London Charterhouse and was elected fellow of the Royal Society in 1794. In the present work, Hulme advocates for the multiple benefits, including the cure of scurvy at sea, of salt of tartar (potassium carbonate) together with a weak spirit of Vitriol. ESTC T47015.

$2000.00

Letter signed ("Edward") to architect James Wyatt, concerning repairs and alterations at Kensington Palace, including proposed work on the library
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Letter signed ("Edward") to architect James Wyatt, concerning repairs and alterations at Kensington Palace, including proposed work on the library

By EDWARD Augustus, Duke of Kent (1767-1820)

Kensington Palace, 1809. 6pp., on 3 sheets of paper, each 9 3/4 x 7 3/4 inches. Each sheet inlaid at a later date. Renovating Kensington Palace. In this lengthy letter, the father of Queen Victoria consults architect James Wyatt concerning repairs to Kensington Palace. Wyatt had been previously employed by Edward to renovate Castle Hill Lodge, but here discusses proposed improvements at Kensington Palace, which were "in a very dilapidated state, & really disgraceful." Among the needed repairs he requests were the walls of the footman's waiting room, the installation of bookcases and other renovation in the library and changes to the garden room.

$1750.00

A Quaint Treatise on "Flees, and the Art of Artyfichall Flee Making" By an Old Man Well Known on the Derbyshire Streams as a First-Class Fly-Fisher a Century Ago
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A Quaint Treatise on "Flees, and the Art of Artyfichall Flee Making" By an Old Man Well Known on the Derbyshire Streams as a First-Class Fly-Fisher a Century Ago

By ALDAM, W. H.

London: John B. Day, 1876. Quarto. 2 chromolithographed plates, 2 completed flies and 23 flies with dressing materials displayed in 22 sunken mounts on six cards. Minor foxing. Publisher's green cloth, elaborately blocked in gilt and black Provenance: Annie Cowdray (bookplate) First edition, second issue. The manuscript upon which Aldam based his text appeared at auction in 1999; the author's name was revealed to be Robert Whitehead, but nothing further of the author is known. Both issues of this scarce work bear the date 1876 on the spine; a very few are recorded with a title page date of 1875, but it appears that no copies were actually sold until the Spring of 1876. Approximately 200 copies were sold over a period of several years. Heckscher 18; Litchfield 49; Gee 84; Kerridge 79; Westwood & Satchell 3; Flyfisher's Journal, Summer 2000, pp.31-36.

$4200.00

The Theory of Moral Sentiments ... The Seventh Edition
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The Theory of Moral Sentiments ... The Seventh Edition

By SMITH, Adam (1723-1790)

London: A. Strahan, T. Cadell [and others], 1792. 2 volumes, 8vo. [iii]-xv, [1], 488; [iii]-viii, 462pp. Lacks half-titles. Expertly bound to style in half russia and period marbled paper covered boards. Eighteenth century edition of Adam Smith's first published work. Adam Smith's first published work (first printed in 1759), would lay the basis for The Wealth of Nations, and establish his reputation as a philosopher of note. ESTC T121726; Alston, III.829; Goldsmiths 15514.

$3750.00

The Art of Making and Colouring Ivorytypes, Photographs, Talbotypes, and Miniature Painting on Ivory & c. together with valuable Receipts never before published
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The Art of Making and Colouring Ivorytypes, Photographs, Talbotypes, and Miniature Painting on Ivory & c. together with valuable Receipts never before published

By COOPER, Peregrine F.

Philadelphia: By the Author, 1863. 12mo. 52pp. With a hand-painted manuscript colour chart mounted on verso of the title and a signed and inscribed photograph of the author bound in following the title. With a letterpress ad for Cooper's Photographic Gallery mounted onto the rear pastedown. Publisher's cloth, covers stamped in blind and titled in gilt, rebacked and with endpapers renewed Rare American manual detailing an unusual hand coloured photographic process. This rare mid-19th-century American technique involved hand colouring salted paper or albumen prints, mounting them to white board and then specially glazing a piece of glass with a wax-based heated mixture and adhering the photograph face down to the glass on the waxed side. The effect is soft and beautiful and has the appearance of a hand-painted ivory miniature. The process was first used in America in the late 1850s by photographer Frederick Wenderoth, which he called the Toovytype. The author of this manual operated from a studio on Chestnut Street, according to his ad on the rear pastedown, and specialized in equestrian pictures, views of buildings, cased portrait images and the colouring of prints and photographs. In addition, the author offered lessons "in painting photographs of all sizes" and sold the present book to aid his students.

$4500.00

Severall Chirurgicall Treatises
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Severall Chirurgicall Treatises

By WISEMAN, Richard (1621-1676)

London: E. Flesher and J. Macock, 1676. Quarto. (12 1/2 x 7 1/2 inches). [16], 498, 79, [1], [14]pp. Contemporary mottled calf, spine with raised bands, later paper label, worn Provenance: Jonathan Fisher (signatures dated as early as 1692); Jacobus Fisher (signature dated 1707); John Hare (early signature) First edition of a landmark in western medicine. Richard Wiseman (1621-1676) was the most prominent surgeon during the English civil war. His primary work, Several Surgical Treatises, is now seen as a landmark in the history of western medicine. The work details over 600 case histories of surgical procedures. The treatises include works on Tumors, Ulcers, Diseases of the Anus, Kings-evill, Wounds, Gunshot Wounds, Fractures and Luxations, and with a separately paginated section on Lues Venerea. Among the most significant contributions is Wiseman's practice of early amputation of infected limbs, before disease could spread throughout the body, which was contrary to common practice. Wing W3107; ESTC R12081; Garrison & Morton 5573; Heirs of Hippocrates 350; Norman 2253; Osler 4258.

$3000.00

Coleccion de Poesias Castellanas
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Coleccion de Poesias Castellanas

By SANCHEZ, Tomás Antonio, editor

Madrid: por Don Antonio de Sancha, 1790. 4 volumes, 8vo. (7 3/8 x 4 1/2 inches). [18], lxii, 404, [2]; [4], xxiv, 559, [1]; [4], lvi, 443, [1]; [4], xxxviii, 333, [1]pp. Half titles. Ex-library, with inked stamps on titles and other library markings on the endpapers. Modern green cloth, red lettering pieces First edition of Sanchez's important collection of medieval Castilian poetry. Sanchez's monumental undertaking of editing and printing Castilian medieval texts, nearly all of which published here for the first time. Contents include: Poema del Cid; Poesias de Don Gonzalo de Berceo; Poema de Alexandro Magno; and Poesias del Arcipreste de Hita. "Sanchez' still irreplacable Coleccion contains the oldest Spanish poems, among them the Poema del Cid, the famous letter of the Marques de Santillana about the old Castilian poets, and other works which were published in his collection for the first time. He also tried to make them understandable by his introductions, commentaries, and glossaries" (Groeber, Grundriss). Palau II, 229.

$1250.00

Cries of London No: 4 Do You Want any Brick-dust

By ROWLANDSON, Thomas (1756-1827) engraved by MERKE

London: Published by R. Ackermann's 101 Strand, 1799. Coloured aquatint. Early colour. Printed on wove paper. In excellent condition with the exception of being trimmed to the image. A wonderful image from Thomas Rowlandson's satirical interpretation of the "Cries of London". The "Cries of London" was a re-occurring theme in English printmaking for over three centuries. These colourful prints form a visual record of London's "lower orders", the pedlars, charlatans, street hawkers, milkmaids, and grocers who made their living on the city streets. They give us a glimpse of a long forgotten London where tradesmen would advertise their wares with a musical shout or a melodic rhyme. Different versions of the "Cries" vary in tone from idealistic visions of happy street vendors to satirical caricatures. One of the most famous series of "London Cries" is the group of somewhat sentimental pictures executed by Francis Wheatley. Wheatley's series was immensely popular and enjoyed a long period of success in the English print shops. This popularity undoubtedly inspired Rowlandson to execute his satirical versions of the "Cries". In a set of eight prints, (number seven is missing and not recorded), Rowlandson created a group of witty images mimicking Wheatley's more earnest criers. Under his biting pen the "Cries" metamorphose into lascivious caricatures, Rowlandsonesque versions of London's street people. In this amusing image, which is number four in the series, Rowlandson gives a brick dust vendor, who puts his apish mug face to face with the pretty young maidservant while he pours brick dust into her bowl. And obviously the question: "Do you want any brick-dust?" is, for him, laden with other hopes. Behind her an old woman looks on in horror while the dog barks at the ill-favored vendor.

$750.00

A True State of the Proceedings at the Leicestershire Election
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A True State of the Proceedings at the Leicestershire Election

By [BRITISH ELECTIONS]

Leicester, 1715. 10pp. Disbound. Early stab holes in left margin. Mild foxing. Untrimmed and unopened. Discovered in a bound volume of ca. 1713-15 British petitions to Parliament, this is a rare and early example of British lobbying literature, which first began proliferating in the lobby of the House of Commons during the major changes in British government of the mid-1710s. ESTC records four copies: at the British Library, Oxford, the National Library of Wales, and the Folger Library. A fascinating political pamphlet relating to charges of fraud, intimidation, and violence in the Leicestershire election of February 1714. The author of the pamphlet rebuts recent charges made in the "Flying Posts and other printed News Papers" that William Baresby, Under-Sheriff and overseer of the election, was attacked by partisans of the two winning candidates, forced from the polling station, and then sent fleeing with a bounty on his head. It is responded that numerous witnesses can verify that no such violence occurred and that Baresby, in fact, had attempted to commit voting fraud in favor of his friends, George Ashby and Thomas Bird, who were losing by an overwelming margin (and ultimately lost) to the baronets Sir Thomas Cave and Sir Jeffrey Palmer. Baresby's injuries, further, are said to have been caused by a drunken night at a pub: after cordially drinking wine with the baronets, Baresby "left the Court, and went to a Publick House hard by, call'd the Round-Head's Inn, with some of his Friends, he Supt there, and drank plentifully of strong Ale, and was very merry; and a young Woman Daughter of the Mistress of the House, coming about her occasions to the Kitchen Fire, where he was Drinking, he fell to Kissing her very eagerly, and in that action (not regarding the Fire that was near him) burnt his Coat...and it is Credibly reported in the Country, that this burnt Coat has been shewn, as a Proof of the Dangers and Sufferings he underwent, for faithfully executing his Office" (p.9).

$900.00

A short account of the Roman Senate, and the manner of their proceedings
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A short account of the Roman Senate, and the manner of their proceedings

By BURGESS, Daniel

London: J. Roberts, 1729. Quarto. [4], 60pp. Disbound ESTC T145862.

$200.00

The history of Marcus Attilius Regulus; collected from Polybius, Appian, Aurelius Victor, Valerius Maximus, Aulus Gellius, and other ancient authors
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The history of Marcus Attilius Regulus; collected from Polybius, Appian, Aurelius Victor, Valerius Maximus, Aulus Gellius, and other ancient authors

By (REGULUS, Marcus Atilius)

London: Jacob Robinson, 1744. 8vo. [2], 30pp. Disbound ESTC T36419.

$150.00

A Short Discourse in Honour, and for the Advancement and Incouragement of our Trade of Woollen Manufactures
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A Short Discourse in Honour, and for the Advancement and Incouragement of our Trade of Woollen Manufactures

By HIDE, Ralph

[London], 1660. Quarto. [4], 14pp. Contemporary annotations. Disbound Rare early pamphlet on Great Britain's woollen manufacturing industry. The author, a Quaker merchant, argues for limiting the export of raw wool and the revival of trading companies to encourage the domestic wollen manufacturing industry. Not in ESTC and with only a single example located in North America by OCLC (Columbia University). Not in Kress.

$500.00


Homer his Iliads Translated, Adorn'd with Sculpture, and Illustrated with Annotations
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Homer his Iliads Translated, Adorn'd with Sculpture, and Illustrated with Annotations

By HOMER - John OGILBY (1600-1676)

London: printed by Thomas Roycroft, to be had at the Author's House, 1660. Folio. Letterpress title in red and black. Engraved frontispiece, engraved portraits of Ogilby and Charles II, engraved statue of Homer and 48 (of 49) plates engraved by W. Hollar and others after Cleyn and others. Lacks plate illustrating Book 6, verse 340. Contemporary red morocco, expertly rebacked to style retaining the five central compartments of the original spine, marbled endpapers Provenance: S.P. (initials in gilt on the spine) First edition of Ogilby's lavishly illustrated edition of Homer's Iliad, among the most beautiful editions ever printed. John Ogilby began his professional life a far cry from the world of publishing, as an apprentice to a dancing master. Having no formal education, he began learning Latin in his forties with the help of members of the University of Cambridge whom he had befriended. In 1649, having had some success at a young age with creating his own verse, he attempted a translation of Virgil. Meeting with a positive response, he turned his study to Greek so that he could translate Aesop and Homer. Beyond simple translations, his editions of such classics include significant marginal annotations, synthesizing previous scholarship. However, the common thread among his works, and the principal reason for his success in his lifetime and beyond, are the numerous illustrations which adored his works. The illustrated folio editions of such classics were a new and welcome addition to the mid-17th century English book market and led to the larger more expansive geographical works for which he is best remembered. For the lavish illustrations in his works, Ogilby commissioned prints from some of the best designers and engravers working in England, including Francis Cleyn ( d. 1658), Wenceslaus Hollar (1607-1677), William Faithorne ( c. 1620-1691), and Pierre Lombart (1612/13-1682). To subsidize his publications, particularly costly because of the quality of both paper and illustrations, Ogilby was one of the first publishers to be fully successful at using a combination of subscription and lotteries. Ogilby's version of the Iliad first appeared in 1660; five years later, he published his translation of the Odyssey. A second edition of the Iliad followed in 1669 (although with fewer plates than the original). "The versions of [Homer by] John Ogilby fired the enthusiasms of a youthful Alexander Pope, and despite his later reservations, furnished many rhymes and potential couplet-shapings for his own versions. Both were lavishly illustrated folios 'replete with magnificent plates which depicted the Greek and Trojan heroes in dignified costumes, settings and attitudes in the grand manner of Renaissance painting', and which offered a more coherent impression of Homer than the text" (Oxford History of Classical Reception in English Literature, p. 170). The provenance of this volume is intriguing. At the Ham House sale (Sotheby's, 24-5 November 1947), a third folio Shakespeare similarly bound in morocco with the same initials on the spine, was suggested at the time to have been from Samuel Peyps's library. However Nixon, in his 1984 work on Pepys's bindings, refutes the attribution: "The suggestion made 'tentatively' in the Ham House sale catalogue ... that the fine turkey copy of the Third Folio with the initials 'SP' on the spine might have been Pepys's is wildly improbable. He certainly did not use turkey leather for any of his bindings during the 1660s nor did he add his initials to the spine of any of his books." The owner of this fine copy of The Iliad remains an unidentified collector of the Restoration period. Wing H-2548; Schuchard 7.

$12000.00

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