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Report on the Medical History of the Campaign. China Field Force, 1900-1901
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Report on the Medical History of the Campaign. China Field Force, 1900-1901

By CHINA, Boxer Rebellion

Simla: Government Central Printing Office, 1901. Folio. [4], 30pp. Signed in print at the end by Lieut. Genl. Alfred Gaselee. Publisher's lettered blue paper wrappers, lacks lower wrapper. Unstitched and chipped. Housed in a cloth box. Provenance: Simla, Record Room Copy, Military Department (paper label on upper wrapper) Rare medical report, printed in Simla, relating to the Indian relief force sent into China during the Boxer Rebellion. This report provides detailed eyewitness descriptions of the relief of Peking during the Boxer Rebellion, being accounts not published elsewhere. Printed for distribution among the medical officers of the British forces in India, this ephemeral work is very rare with no copies cited in OCLC.

$1500.00

Illustrations of the Effects of Poisons ... The Plates from Original Drawings by Andrew Melville M'Whinnie

By ROUPELL, George Leith (1797-1854)

London: George and William Nicol, 1833. 2 parts [all printed], folio. (17 x 13 inches). viii, [8]; [8]pp. 8 hand-coloured lithographed plates, by Joseph Perry after M'Whinnie. Bound with the original parts front wrappers. Expertly bound to style in half red morocco and period marbled paper covered boards, spine gilt with raised bands Provenance: Dr. Harwood (presentation inscription by the author on wrapper) Rare illustrated work of forensic medicine. The plates depict the effects of arsenic, nitric acid, sulphuric acid, oxalic acid, and corrosive sublimate on the stomachs and esophagus of both dogs and humans. The author, a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and a noted lecturer on forensic medicine, explains in the preface: "When lecturing last year on the subject of poisons I had frequent occasion to regret, in speaking of the appearances resulting from their action, that my portfolio of drawings was so scantily supplied. During my course this season I was anxious to procure a more complete series of plates, but could not find on enquiry that any work containing delineations of the effects of poison existed either here or abroad. I was therefore under the necessity of instituting some experiments on animals to furnish illustrations of the different subjects of which I had to treat ... Having thus obtained a highly interesting series of drawings exhibiting the effects of the most ordinary irritants on the mucous membranes, I determined to send them to press, in the belief that such a publication would not only prove interesting to those who like myself were engaged in lecturing, and to the general Pathologist, but useful also to those members of the profession resident in the country who can meet with few opportunitites of witnessing such injuries and who may occasionally be called upon to give evidence in criminal cases." Not in Waller or Wellcome.

$6000.00

Du Contract Social; ou, Principes du Droit Politique
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Du Contract Social; ou, Principes du Droit Politique

By ROUSSEAU, Jean-Jacques (1712-1778)

Amsterdam: Marc Michel Rey, 1762. 8vo. [2], viii, 323, [1] pages; lacks the half-title. Publisher's ads on the verso of the final leaf. Expertly bound to style in period red morocco, flat spine divided into compartments, lettered direct in the second compartment, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt, marbled endpapers Provenance: early collector's blindstamp on the title First edition, with the very rare first state of the title: " ... Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains ..." "The Contrat Social remains Rousseau's greatest work ... his fundamental thesis that government depends absolutely on the mandate of the people, and his genuine creative insight into a number of political and economic problems, give his work an indisputable cogency. It had the most profound influence on the political thinking of the generation following its publication" (PMM). The first edition of Rousseau's masterpiece was refused entry into France, and French booksellers were prohibited from selling or reprinting it, thus accounting for its great rarity today. The earliest issues, like the present, include Dufour's state A of the title page, featuring the full title as above and an engraved vignette by Boilly after Bolomey depicting Justice, helmet on her head, holding a scale in her right hand and a lance raising a hat in the left. Because Rousseau felt the page too crowded and disliked the vignette, the publisher re-issued the title (i.e. state B) with the first words of the title removed to the half-title ("Du Contract Social") and with a new vignette, also by Boilly after Bolomey, featuring a seated lady liberty, with liberty cap held aloft in her right hand, with a cat to her right and Greco-Roman pillars in the background. In addition, two states of the final two leaves have been identified. In the first state, the final leaf recto includes a chapter on civil marriage, with the concluding chapter on the verso; in the second, cancelled state, the chapter on civil marriage has been removed (at the request of Rousseau who felt the strong wording might be used as a pretext for suppressing the entire book), and the concluding chapter moved recto and publisher's advertisements added on the verso (as in the present example). There would seem to be some confusion about the penultimate leaf, of which two states have been identified. In one state, the 9th line from the top of page 321 is unjustified, whereas in another state, this line is justified. While traditionally, the unjustified version has been considered the first state, it stands to reason that the corrected version (i.e. the unjustified version, the line being the final line of the paragraph) would be the second state. The present example includes the justified version of the penultimate leaf. Dufour 132; Leigh, Unsolved Problems in the Bibliography of J.-J. Rousseau, page 22; Printing and the Mind of Man 207.

$15000.00

Indian Antiquities: or, Dissertations, relative to the ancient geographical divisions, the pure system of primeval theology, the grand code of civil laws, the original form of government and the various and profound literature of Hindostan
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Indian Antiquities: or, Dissertations, relative to the ancient geographical divisions, the pure system of primeval theology, the grand code of civil laws, the original form of government and the various and profound literature of Hindostan

By MAURICE, Thomas (1754-1824)

London: Printed for the Author and sold by W. Richardson, 1800. 7 volumes, octavo. Folding map, 30 engraved plates (most folding). 7pp. list of subscribers. Some foxing. Contemporary half calf and marbled paper covered boards, minor wear at joints, neat repairs to spines First edition. The plates mostly depict Indian buildings and sculptures, but also include views in Persia, Egypt and Greece. Includes views of Indian pagodas, a Persian fire temple, the sculptures on an ancient mausoleum at Persepolis; Temple at Dindara; Temple of Luxor; great Pagoda of Tanjore; a Mexican temple to the Sun and Moon; Stonehenge; Pantheon (Rome); Temple of Esnay (Egypt); Pagodas of Deogue (India); Peacock Mogul Throne, etc.

$1500.00

[Mexican illuminated missal on vellum, titled:] Libro Primero de las Missas de la Virgen Nuestra Señora: Missas Votibas de Santos, Fiestas Moviles. Para el uso del Convento y Hospital de Nuestra Señora de Bethlem de Mexico
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[Mexican illuminated missal on vellum, titled:] Libro Primero de las Missas de la Virgen Nuestra Señora: Missas Votibas de Santos, Fiestas Moviles. Para el uso del Convento y Hospital de Nuestra Señora de Bethlem de Mexico

By ILLUMINATED MANUSCRIPT - Mexican School, 18th century

Mexico, 1702. Large folio. (20 7/8 x 15 inches). Manuscript in Latin and Spanish on 140 vellum leaves ([2], 1-134, [4]). Text in two different hands: 1. leaves numbered 1-134, plus 3 unnumbered pages of tables at the end; 2. five-stave musical notation in black only on pastedowns, 3 unnumbered pages at the beginning, leaf 134 verso, and 6 unnumbered pages at the end. Illumination: 56 illuminated initials in colors and gold (6 x 6 inches and smaller). Contemporary Mexican olive green morocco over wooden boards, covers elaborately tooled in gilt with a wide border built up from four fillets, a pomegranate and diamond roll, and a stylized foliage roll, each of the inner corners of the border tooled with a drawer handle tool from which radiate five stylized fan-leaves each enclosing a stylized flower-spray, beyond these a foliage tool repeated three times, at the center of the inner panel is a circular design which re-uses the tools used at the corners: a central circle formed by two drawer handle tools, from which radiates a larger circle formed from the fan-leaf tool repeated sixteen times, outside this the foliage tool repeated eight times, the flat spine divided into five compartments by gilt fillets, the four lower compartments each with a large single stylized flower-spray tool, iron clasps, small expert repairs to head and foot of spine, some scuffing to extremities, gilt edges Provenance: Bethlemite Brothers of Mexico City An exceptional Mexican illuminated missal and a fine example of Baroque Mexican book arts. The fifty-six gorgeously illuminated initials of this missal, made by the Bethlemite brothers of Mexico City, depict New World flora and fauna, including a wild turkey. Their style melds the traditional Renaissance book arts to an Andalusian decorative aesthetic, with a strong mannerist influence. The palate used for the illuminations consists of liquid gold, lavender, red, pink, black, white, yellow, and purple. Many of the initials are adorned with miniatures of animals, birds, flowers, and insects, and the remaining are presented on elaborate fields of geometric patterns. Besides the turkey, animals portrayed include foxes, parrots, a peacock, squirrels, a monkey, herons, finches, crested birds, dogs, storks, deer, ducks, an owl, and butterflies, to name a sampling. The flowers and foliage include a wide variety of stylized and occasionally exotic flowers. The initials that are presented on geometric patterned fields represent two styles: traditional European of the sort found in Renaissance manuscripts, and clearly Hispano-Moresque influenced, of a type more usually associated with Southern Spain. The contents of the missal include: The Kyrie, Gloria, and Credo; Masses of the Virgin; Masses from the Sanctoral and Temporal; with a Hymn to the Virgin on the front pastedown and flyleaf, and the Asperges on the endleaf and rear pastedown. The manuscript was produced during a second golden age for Mexico City. During the 18th-century it was the largest and richest city in the New World. After a century of decline, Mexico's silver production was again robust thanks to new technologies and other sometimes cut-throat business practices; additionally, much of Spain's trade with the Spice Islands, China, and the rest of Asia passed through Mexico City. This brought additional wealth to its merchants, a fact that was reflected in the opulence of the life-style. This opulence meant that the city was able to support artists and artisans of the highest caliber in many fields, including manuscript illumination. From the beginning in the 16th century onwards, Mexico had adopted a Spanish tradition of illuminated manuscript works on vellum that had two branches to it: a secular and religious. The secular arm was supported by the constant demand for beautifully-produced 'patents of nobility' that were so much a part of every conquistador's quest for respectability. On the religious side, the Church benefited from the newly-created wealth via substantial bequests and donations, some of which were used to pay for the famously-beautiful choir books of the city's cathedral. The demand for these manuscripts was met by both European and locally-trained artists and artisans: by 1557 there was actually a formal organization for painters in Mexico, called the 'Ordenzas de Pintores y Doradores', which provided for the establishment of workshops with apprentices. The embellishment of religious texts with miniatures and illumination continued throughout the colonial period, the style changing from the Mannerism of the Lagarto family-illuminated manuscripts of the 16th and early 17th centuries, to the Baroque and Rococo of the later 17th century as exemplified by the artist, Juan Correa, to the formal Neo-Classical of the period after 1720. The present manuscript dates from the transitional period from Rococo to Neo-Classical and, with 57 individual illuminated initials, is an exquisite example of the art of the era. The title, index and occasional lines of introductory summary are written in a roman hand in black or red with occasional colored decoration initials. The main text is written in very large modified rounded gothic bookhand in black and red, twelve lines per page, within a red double-ruled border. The text consists of Kyrie, Gloria and Credo (ff. 1-7); Masses of the Virgin (ff. 7v-60); Masses from the Sanctoral and Temporal (ff. 60v-134). Hymn to the Virgin (front pastedown and end leaf); Asperges (rear pastedown and end leaf). This is the first volume of what would have been a monumental series of possibly four to six volumes. No other volumes from the series have been traced, and it is likely either that they have not survived or that the series was never completed. The artist of the miniatures is not known but the manuscript created for the use of the Convent and Hospital of Our Lady of Bethlehem in Mexico City, and according to the colophon, completed by "a servant of Mary" in 1702. A further name is added at the foot of the page of music facing the first page of the index: " El P[adre]. San Geronimo, [lo] escribio." The Bethlemites were the first religious order created in the New World, founded by Pedro de San José de Betancur, a native of the Canary Islands, who arrived in Guatemala in 1650 and founded the first hospital for convalescents in the world. The Bethlemites went on to become one of the New World's most important orders of the hospitalers. Their importance may be judged from the fact that by the middle of the 18th century, the convent and hospital of Nuestra Senora de Belen in Mexico City had attracted such generous benefactions that splendid new buildings were commissioned from the influential architect, Lorenzo Rodriguez. María Concepción Amerlinck de Corsi El Ex Convento Hospitalario de Betlemitas (México: Banco de México, 1996).

$120000.00

Iconologie Tirée de divers Auteurs. Ouvrage Utile aux Gens de Lettres, aux Poëtes, aux Artistes, & généralement à tous les Amateurs des Beaux-Arts
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Iconologie Tirée de divers Auteurs. Ouvrage Utile aux Gens de Lettres, aux Poëtes, aux Artistes, & généralement à tous les Amateurs des Beaux-Arts

By BOUDARD, Jean Baptiste (1710-1768)

Parma: De l'Imprimerie de Philippe Carmignani, 1759. Three volumes, folio. (13 x 8 3/4 inches). [10], 16, 203, [1]; [4], 219, [9]; [4], 208, [8]pp. Engraved title vignettes in each vol., engraved dedication in vol. 1, engraved headpiece in vol. 1, 630 engraved emblematic illustrations. Contemporary marbled calf backed paper covered boards, flat spine ruled in gilt, citron and green morocco labels, expert repairs to tops and tails of spines Provenance: Giuseppe de Lama (manuscript book label in vol. 1) A lovely 18th century emblem book: the rare folio edition. Known for his work as a sculptor, the present work is arguably Boudard's most enduring masterpiece, containing over six hundred engraved emblematic illustrations. The work is organized alphabetically, creating a visual dictionary of vices, virtues, emotions, professions and more. More commonly found is the 1766 octavo second edition; the present first edition in folio is quite rare. This set with provenance to Giuseppe de Lama, the biographer and bibliographer of Bodoni. Praz p.28.

$4800.00

[Trade catalogue for John Slater's patented steam kitchen]
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[Trade catalogue for John Slater's patented steam kitchen]

By TRADE CATALOGUE - John Slater

[Birmingham, 1810. Oblong small folio. 16 engraved leaves. With 4 small letterpress explanatory handbills mounted (one on front pastedown, the others on verso of first three plates). Contemporary manuscript annotations, including prices. Contemporary calf-backed marbled paper wrappers Provenance: Elizabeth David (booklabel) Rare early illustrated trade catalogue for steam ovens. James Slater's steam kitchen was primarily used in workhouses, hospitals, or other such high-volume, low-cost kitchens. The cast iron stoves, which also included a roasting oven, heated water to create steam, which was then carried by internal pipes to reservoirs which held custom-built rectangular pots. The letterpress advertisement on verso of the first plate describes the process: "The Patent Steam Kitchen possess the Advantage of cooling in the most delicate manner, either by steam or by water, separately or conjointly, at one and the same time; and when combined with a roaster, and with or without a hot closet, will cook victuals, both roast and boiled, for from ten to fifty persons and upwards, with one small fire only, and that not larger than is necessary for the boiling of one small pot or kettle in the usual mode of cooking. The great savings of fuel bears but a small proportion to its other advantages, as there is a saving of one pound of meat in ten, and a superabundance of rich gravy produced ... [It] forms, in a very small compass, the most compact, clean and best cooking apparatus in the world, for steaming, boiling, roasting, broiling, baking and stewing, in the highest perfection ..." The engravings depict both larger and smaller, portable models, all in various configurations, as well as many of the internal fittings and necessary pots and utensils. Winterthur notes copies with 18 leaves of plates (circa 1810) and 42 leaves of plates (1819). This copy from the library of noted gastronomy writer Elizabeth David, and would appear complete as issued.

$2800.00

A Safe and Easy Remedy proposed for the relief of the Stone and Gravel, the Scurvy, Gout, &c. and for the Destruction of Worms in the Human Body
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A Safe and Easy Remedy proposed for the relief of the Stone and Gravel, the Scurvy, Gout, &c. and for the Destruction of Worms in the Human Body

By MEDICINE - Dr. Nathaniel HULME (1732-1807)

London: Printed by James Phillips, 1778. Small 4to. [8], 38, [2]pp. Expertly bound to style in half period russia and marbled paper covered boards, spine with raised bands, black morocco lettering piece First edition After service as a surgeon's mate in the Royal Navy, Dr. Hulme became the first physician at the General Dispensary for the Relief of the Poor and subsequently became physician to the City of London Lying-in Hospital. In 1774 he was appointed physician to the London Charterhouse and was elected fellow of the Royal Society in 1794. In the present work, Hulme advocates for the multiple benefits, including the cure of scurvy at sea, of salt of tartar (potassium carbonate) together with a weak spirit of Vitriol. ESTC T47015.

$2000.00

Letter signed ("Edward") to architect James Wyatt, concerning repairs and alterations at Kensington Palace, including proposed work on the library
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Letter signed ("Edward") to architect James Wyatt, concerning repairs and alterations at Kensington Palace, including proposed work on the library

By EDWARD Augustus, Duke of Kent (1767-1820)

Kensington Palace, 1809. 6pp., on 3 sheets of paper, each 9 3/4 x 7 3/4 inches. Each sheet inlaid at a later date. Renovating Kensington Palace. In this lengthy letter, the father of Queen Victoria consults architect James Wyatt concerning repairs to Kensington Palace. Wyatt had been previously employed by Edward to renovate Castle Hill Lodge, but here discusses proposed improvements at Kensington Palace, which were "in a very dilapidated state, & really disgraceful." Among the needed repairs he requests were the walls of the footman's waiting room, the installation of bookcases and other renovation in the library and changes to the garden room.

$1750.00

A Quaint Treatise on "Flees, and the Art of Artyfichall Flee Making" By an Old Man Well Known on the Derbyshire Streams as a First-Class Fly-Fisher a Century Ago
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A Quaint Treatise on "Flees, and the Art of Artyfichall Flee Making" By an Old Man Well Known on the Derbyshire Streams as a First-Class Fly-Fisher a Century Ago

By ALDAM, W. H.

London: John B. Day, 1876. Quarto. 2 chromolithographed plates, 2 completed flies and 23 flies with dressing materials displayed in 22 sunken mounts on six cards. Minor foxing. Publisher's green cloth, elaborately blocked in gilt and black Provenance: Annie Cowdray (bookplate) First edition, second issue. The manuscript upon which Aldam based his text appeared at auction in 1999; the author's name was revealed to be Robert Whitehead, but nothing further of the author is known. Both issues of this scarce work bear the date 1876 on the spine; a very few are recorded with a title page date of 1875, but it appears that no copies were actually sold until the Spring of 1876. Approximately 200 copies were sold over a period of several years. Heckscher 18; Litchfield 49; Gee 84; Kerridge 79; Westwood & Satchell 3; Flyfisher's Journal, Summer 2000, pp.31-36.

$4200.00

The Theory of Moral Sentiments ... The Seventh Edition
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The Theory of Moral Sentiments ... The Seventh Edition

By SMITH, Adam (1723-1790)

London: A. Strahan, T. Cadell [and others], 1792. 2 volumes, 8vo. [iii]-xv, [1], 488; [iii]-viii, 462pp. Lacks half-titles. Expertly bound to style in half russia and period marbled paper covered boards. Eighteenth century edition of Adam Smith's first published work. Adam Smith's first published work (first printed in 1759), would lay the basis for The Wealth of Nations, and establish his reputation as a philosopher of note. ESTC T121726; Alston, III.829; Goldsmiths 15514.

$3750.00

The Art of Making and Colouring Ivorytypes, Photographs, Talbotypes, and Miniature Painting on Ivory & c. together with valuable Receipts never before published
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The Art of Making and Colouring Ivorytypes, Photographs, Talbotypes, and Miniature Painting on Ivory & c. together with valuable Receipts never before published

By COOPER, Peregrine F.

Philadelphia: By the Author, 1863. 12mo. 52pp. With a hand-painted manuscript colour chart mounted on verso of the title and a signed and inscribed photograph of the author bound in following the title. With a letterpress ad for Cooper's Photographic Gallery mounted onto the rear pastedown. Publisher's cloth, covers stamped in blind and titled in gilt, rebacked and with endpapers renewed Rare American manual detailing an unusual hand coloured photographic process. This rare mid-19th-century American technique involved hand colouring salted paper or albumen prints, mounting them to white board and then specially glazing a piece of glass with a wax-based heated mixture and adhering the photograph face down to the glass on the waxed side. The effect is soft and beautiful and has the appearance of a hand-painted ivory miniature. The process was first used in America in the late 1850s by photographer Frederick Wenderoth, which he called the Toovytype. The author of this manual operated from a studio on Chestnut Street, according to his ad on the rear pastedown, and specialized in equestrian pictures, views of buildings, cased portrait images and the colouring of prints and photographs. In addition, the author offered lessons "in painting photographs of all sizes" and sold the present book to aid his students.

$4500.00

Severall Chirurgicall Treatises
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Severall Chirurgicall Treatises

By WISEMAN, Richard (1621-1676)

London: E. Flesher and J. Macock, 1676. Quarto. (12 1/2 x 7 1/2 inches). [16], 498, 79, [1], [14]pp. Contemporary mottled calf, spine with raised bands, later paper label, worn Provenance: Jonathan Fisher (signatures dated as early as 1692); Jacobus Fisher (signature dated 1707); John Hare (early signature) First edition of a landmark in western medicine. Richard Wiseman (1621-1676) was the most prominent surgeon during the English civil war. His primary work, Several Surgical Treatises, is now seen as a landmark in the history of western medicine. The work details over 600 case histories of surgical procedures. The treatises include works on Tumors, Ulcers, Diseases of the Anus, Kings-evill, Wounds, Gunshot Wounds, Fractures and Luxations, and with a separately paginated section on Lues Venerea. Among the most significant contributions is Wiseman's practice of early amputation of infected limbs, before disease could spread throughout the body, which was contrary to common practice. Wing W3107; ESTC R12081; Garrison & Morton 5573; Heirs of Hippocrates 350; Norman 2253; Osler 4258.

$3000.00

Coleccion de Poesias Castellanas
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Coleccion de Poesias Castellanas

By SANCHEZ, Tomás Antonio, editor

Madrid: por Don Antonio de Sancha, 1790. 4 volumes, 8vo. (7 3/8 x 4 1/2 inches). [18], lxii, 404, [2]; [4], xxiv, 559, [1]; [4], lvi, 443, [1]; [4], xxxviii, 333, [1]pp. Half titles. Ex-library, with inked stamps on titles and other library markings on the endpapers. Modern green cloth, red lettering pieces First edition of Sanchez's important collection of medieval Castilian poetry. Sanchez's monumental undertaking of editing and printing Castilian medieval texts, nearly all of which published here for the first time. Contents include: Poema del Cid; Poesias de Don Gonzalo de Berceo; Poema de Alexandro Magno; and Poesias del Arcipreste de Hita. "Sanchez' still irreplacable Coleccion contains the oldest Spanish poems, among them the Poema del Cid, the famous letter of the Marques de Santillana about the old Castilian poets, and other works which were published in his collection for the first time. He also tried to make them understandable by his introductions, commentaries, and glossaries" (Groeber, Grundriss). Palau II, 229.

$1250.00

Cries of London No: 4 Do You Want any Brick-dust

By ROWLANDSON, Thomas (1756-1827) engraved by MERKE

London: Published by R. Ackermann's 101 Strand, 1799. Coloured aquatint. Early colour. Printed on wove paper. In excellent condition with the exception of being trimmed to the image. A wonderful image from Thomas Rowlandson's satirical interpretation of the "Cries of London". The "Cries of London" was a re-occurring theme in English printmaking for over three centuries. These colourful prints form a visual record of London's "lower orders", the pedlars, charlatans, street hawkers, milkmaids, and grocers who made their living on the city streets. They give us a glimpse of a long forgotten London where tradesmen would advertise their wares with a musical shout or a melodic rhyme. Different versions of the "Cries" vary in tone from idealistic visions of happy street vendors to satirical caricatures. One of the most famous series of "London Cries" is the group of somewhat sentimental pictures executed by Francis Wheatley. Wheatley's series was immensely popular and enjoyed a long period of success in the English print shops. This popularity undoubtedly inspired Rowlandson to execute his satirical versions of the "Cries". In a set of eight prints, (number seven is missing and not recorded), Rowlandson created a group of witty images mimicking Wheatley's more earnest criers. Under his biting pen the "Cries" metamorphose into lascivious caricatures, Rowlandsonesque versions of London's street people. In this amusing image, which is number four in the series, Rowlandson gives a brick dust vendor, who puts his apish mug face to face with the pretty young maidservant while he pours brick dust into her bowl. And obviously the question: "Do you want any brick-dust?" is, for him, laden with other hopes. Behind her an old woman looks on in horror while the dog barks at the ill-favored vendor.

$750.00

Notes on Democracy
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Notes on Democracy

By MENCKEN, Henry Louis (1880-1956)

New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1926. 8vo. Uncut on two sides. Publisher's vellum, covers decorated in gilt, top edge gilt. Provenance: Sherman Kingsbury Ellis (bookplate) First edition, signed by Mencken, copy number 11 of 35 copies printed on vellum. A searing critique of the American political system written between the wars.

$1200.00

A True State of the Proceedings at the Leicestershire Election
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A True State of the Proceedings at the Leicestershire Election

By [BRITISH ELECTIONS]

Leicester, 1715. 10pp. Disbound. Early stab holes in left margin. Mild foxing. Untrimmed and unopened. Discovered in a bound volume of ca. 1713-15 British petitions to Parliament, this is a rare and early example of British lobbying literature, which first began proliferating in the lobby of the House of Commons during the major changes in British government of the mid-1710s. ESTC records four copies: at the British Library, Oxford, the National Library of Wales, and the Folger Library. A fascinating political pamphlet relating to charges of fraud, intimidation, and violence in the Leicestershire election of February 1714. The author of the pamphlet rebuts recent charges made in the "Flying Posts and other printed News Papers" that William Baresby, Under-Sheriff and overseer of the election, was attacked by partisans of the two winning candidates, forced from the polling station, and then sent fleeing with a bounty on his head. It is responded that numerous witnesses can verify that no such violence occurred and that Baresby, in fact, had attempted to commit voting fraud in favor of his friends, George Ashby and Thomas Bird, who were losing by an overwelming margin (and ultimately lost) to the baronets Sir Thomas Cave and Sir Jeffrey Palmer. Baresby's injuries, further, are said to have been caused by a drunken night at a pub: after cordially drinking wine with the baronets, Baresby "left the Court, and went to a Publick House hard by, call'd the Round-Head's Inn, with some of his Friends, he Supt there, and drank plentifully of strong Ale, and was very merry; and a young Woman Daughter of the Mistress of the House, coming about her occasions to the Kitchen Fire, where he was Drinking, he fell to Kissing her very eagerly, and in that action (not regarding the Fire that was near him) burnt his Coat...and it is Credibly reported in the Country, that this burnt Coat has been shewn, as a Proof of the Dangers and Sufferings he underwent, for faithfully executing his Office" (p.9).

$900.00

A short account of the Roman Senate, and the manner of their proceedings
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A short account of the Roman Senate, and the manner of their proceedings

By BURGESS, Daniel

London: J. Roberts, 1729. Quarto. [4], 60pp. Disbound ESTC T145862.

$200.00

The history of Marcus Attilius Regulus; collected from Polybius, Appian, Aurelius Victor, Valerius Maximus, Aulus Gellius, and other ancient authors
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The history of Marcus Attilius Regulus; collected from Polybius, Appian, Aurelius Victor, Valerius Maximus, Aulus Gellius, and other ancient authors

By (REGULUS, Marcus Atilius)

London: Jacob Robinson, 1744. 8vo. [2], 30pp. Disbound ESTC T36419.

$150.00

A Short Discourse in Honour, and for the Advancement and Incouragement of our Trade of Woollen Manufactures
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A Short Discourse in Honour, and for the Advancement and Incouragement of our Trade of Woollen Manufactures

By HIDE, Ralph

[London], 1660. Quarto. [4], 14pp. Contemporary annotations. Disbound Rare early pamphlet on Great Britain's woollen manufacturing industry. The author, a Quaker merchant, argues for limiting the export of raw wool and the revival of trading companies to encourage the domestic wollen manufacturing industry. Not in ESTC and with only a single example located in North America by OCLC (Columbia University). Not in Kress.

$500.00

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