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History of the Indian Tribes of North America, with Biographical Sketches and Anecdotes of the Principal Chiefs. Embellished with one hundred and twenty portraits, from the Indian Gallery in the Department of War, at Washington
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History of the Indian Tribes of North America, with Biographical Sketches and Anecdotes of the Principal Chiefs. Embellished with one hundred and twenty portraits, from the Indian Gallery in the Department of War, at Washington

By MCKENNEY, Thomas L. (1785-1859) & James HALL (1793-1868)

Philadelphia: Frederick W. Greenough (vol.I) and Daniel Rice & James G. Clark (vols.II & III), 1844. 3 volumes, folio. (20 1/4 x 13 5/8 inches). 120 hand-coloured lithographic plates after Karl Bodmer, Charles Bird King, James Otto Lewis, P.Rhindesbacher and R.M.Sully, drawn on stone by A.Newsam, A. Hoffy, Ralph Trembley, Henry Dacre and others, printed and coloured by J.T. Bowen and others, vol.III with two lithographic maps and one table printed recto of one leaf, 17pp. of lithographic facsimile signatures of the original subscribers (subscriber leaves bound out of order). Contemporary half red morocco and period marbled paper covered boards, spines with raised bands in seven compartments, black morocco lettering pieces in the second and third, the others with a repeat Indian head decoration in gilt, marbled endpapers, gilt edges, expertly recased Lovely set of the first edition of "One of the most costly and important [works] ever published on the American Indians"(Field), "a landmark in American culture" (Horan) and an invaluable contemporary record of a vanished way of life, including some of the greatest American hand-coloured lithographs of the 19th century. After six years as superintendent of Indian Trade, Thomas McKenney had become concerned for the survival of the Western tribes. He had observed unscrupulous individuals taking advantage of the Native Americans for profit, and his vocal warnings about their future prompted his appointment by President Monroe to the Office of Indian Affairs. As first director, McKenney was to improve the administration of Indian programs in various government offices. His first trip was during the summer of 1826 to the Lake Superior area for a treaty with the Chippewa, opening mineral rights on their land. In 1827, he journeyed west again for a treaty with the Chippewa, Menominee, and Winebago in the present state of Michigan. His journeys provided an unparalleled opportunity to become acquainted with Native American tribes. When President Jackson dismissed him from his government post in 1830, McKenney was able to turn more of his attention to his publishing project. Within a few years, he was joined by James Hall, the Illinois journalist, lawyer, state treasurer and, from 1833, Cincinnati banker who had written extensively about the west. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin whom they tried to enlist in their publishing enterprise, saw their book as a way of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The text, which was written by Hall based on information supplied by McKenney, takes the form of a series of biographies of leading figures amongst the Indian nations, followed by a general history of the North American Indians. The work is now famous for its colour plate portraits of the chiefs, warriors and squaws of the various tribes, faithful copies of original oils by Charles Bird King painted from life in his studio in Washington (McKenney commissioned him to record the visiting Indian delegates) or worked up by King from the watercolours of the young frontier artist, James Otto Lewis. All but four of the original paintings were destroyed in the disastrous Smithsonian fire of 1865 so their appearance in this work preserves what is probably the best likeness of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the early 19th century. Numbered among King's sitters were Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. This was the most elaborate plate book produced in the United States to date, and its publishing history is extremely complex. The title pages give an indication of issue and are relatively simple: volume I, first issue was by Edward C. Biddle and is dated 1836 or more usually 1837, the second issue Frederick W. Greenough with the date 1838, and the third issue is by Daniel Rice & James G. Clark dated 1842. Volume II, first issue is by Frederick W. Greenough and dated 1838 and the second issue by Rice & Clark and dated 1842. Volume III is by Daniel Rice & James G. Clark and dated 1844. BAL 6934; Bennett p.79; Field 992; Howes M129; Lipperhiede Mc4; Reese Stamped With A National Character 24; Sabin 43410a; Servies 2150.

$160000.00

Illustrations of the Manners, Customs, and Condition of the North American Indians with letters and notes written during eight years of travel and adventure among the wildest and most remarkable tribes now existing

By CATLIN, George (1796-1872)

London: J.E. Adlard for Henry G.Bohn, 1866. 2 volumes, octavo. (9 5/16 x 5 3/4 inches). 313 hand-coloured etchings on 180 plates, including 3 maps (1 folding). Contemporary red half morocco and marbled paper covered boards, spines in six compartments with raised bands, the second and fourth with coloured morocco lettering-pieces, the other compartments with alternate decoration of either a large tool of a shoulder-length portrait of an Indian, or a tool showing a crossed peace-pipe and tomahawk, marbled endpapers, gilt edges Provenance: Frederick S. Peck (bookplate) Deluxe issue: one of twelve copies with the plates printed in outline and entirely coloured by hand. This book was and is one of the most widely circulated works on American Indians written in the 19th century, and the illustrations so beautifully presented here remain the most important body of illustrative material of American Indian life in the American West. This is a later edition of Catlins' Letters and Notes , the London publisher, Henry Bohn, took over publication in 1845 and altered the title to that given above. What is important in this copy is the coloured plates. According to Sabin "Mr. Bohn had twelve or more copies colored after the fancy of the artist who did the work, but tolerably well." Sabin knew Bohn personally and was therefore certainly in a position to know. He goes on to state that "Such copies are worth $60 a set" (this was probably a bit optimistic, and, in fact, a set brought $24 at the Field sale in 1875. But, in comparison, a copy of the Indian Portfolio... sold for only $1.50). Howes disagrees with Sabin and states that various editions published by Bohn appear with the plates coloured, however, given the quality of the work involved and the lack of any contemporary evidence amongst Bohn's advertising material of a more generally available coloured issue, it would seem likely that Sabin is correct. The plates themselves are clean, fresh, and very handsomely coloured. It is impossible to identify the colourist, but it was quite possibly was one of the Catlin copyists working in England at that time, John Cullum or Rosa Bonheur. The plates illustrate scenes of Indian life in the West, and include a number of portraits of individual Indians. Copies of the work with such contemporary hand colouring are known in a variety of editions, suggesting that Bohn coloured sets on a bespoke basis, with whatever copies of the work he had on hand. The present set, with early uniform provenance, is stated on the titltes as the ninth edition of vol. 1 and tenth edition of vol. 2. Clark III:141; Field 260; Howes C241; McCracken 8K; cf. G.A.Miles & W.S.Reese America Pictured to the Life 55 (1848 edition); Pilling 685; Sabin 11537; Streeter Sale 4277; Wagner-Camp 84.

$27500.00

Admiranda narratio fida tamen, de commodis et incolarum ritibus Virginiae, ... Anglico scripta sermone a Thoma Hariot
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Admiranda narratio fida tamen, de commodis et incolarum ritibus Virginiae, ... Anglico scripta sermone a Thoma Hariot

By HARIOT, Thomas; [and John WHITE]. - Theodor DE BRY and Johann Theodor DE BRY

Frankfurt: Theodor De Bry, 1590. Folio. Engraved title to text, letterpress title to plates, engraved arms on dedication leaf, colophon leaf F6, 1 double-page engraved map of Virginia [Burden 76, state 2], 1 engraved plate of Adam and Eve (first state with inscription "Iodocus a Winghe in / Theodore de Bry fe"), 27 engraved plates after John White. Expertly bound to style in early red morocco, spine with raised bands in six compartments, lettered in the second, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt, early marbled endpapers A fine copy of the De Bry first edition in Latin of Hariot's Virginia: the first eyewitness pictorial record of the American southeast and the first illustrated account wholly dedicated to any portion of what is now the United States. The publication of this work by De Bry launched what would later become known as his Grand Voyages. It is without question the most important of the series both in terms of contemporary influence and modern historical and ethnographic value. The text describes the first British colony to be established in the New World and is here united by De Bry with engravings based on watercolours by John White, a member of the expedition. This work offered the first accurate accounts and eyewitness depictions of native Americans. In 1584, Sir Walter Raleigh received a ten-year charter to establish the first permanent English settlement in Virginia and over the course of the next five years four expeditions landed at Roanoke for that purpose. The second of those expeditions included mathematician and navigator Thomas Hariot and artist and later colonial governor John White. Upon his return to London, Hariot would privately publish in 1588 A Brief and True Account of the New Found Land of Virginia (extant in only 6 known copies) which detailed the explorations and discoveries during the 1585 expedition. The following year Hakluyt would include the text in his seminal Principall Navigations . In 1589, master engraver and publisher Theodor De Bry traveled to London where he met Hakluyt, who told him of the British expeditions to Virginia and shared with him both Hariot's journal and White's watercolours from the expedition. Hakluyt suggested the publication of a series of illustrated voyages to America, beginning with Hariot/White. De Bry returned to Frankfurt and in 1590 published the work in Latin and German. John White's illustrations are among the most famous of early American images. White was the lieutenant-governor of the abortive colony, and a skilled artist. His carefully executed watercolours are remarkably accurate renderings of the Carolina Indians and their customs, costumes, rituals, hunting practices and dwellings. No other artist so carefully rendered American Indians until Karl Bodmer worked on the Missouri in the 1830s. The engravings after White are the best pictorial record of American Indians before the 19th century, while the important map within the work is the first detailed depiction of the Virginia coast and Carolina capes, showing the coast from the mouth of the Chesapeake to Wilmington, North Carolina. Arents 37; Church 140; Cumming & De Vorsey 12; European Americana 590/31; JCB I:396; Sabin 8784; Vail 7 (note).

$65000.00

[View on the Delaware, near Bordentown] (German and French titles only)
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[View on the Delaware, near Bordentown] (German and French titles only)

By BODMER, Karl (1809-1893)

Paris, Coblenz, 1839. Hand-coloured aquatint engraving by Ch. Vogel after Bodmer, blindstamp. Provenance: Donaldson, Lufkin &Jenrette Americana Collection A delightful, lively scene of the banks of the Delaware in high summer. A steamer awaits the arrival of passengers who are disembarking from their coaches. One coach pulls up full of late arrivals. Some passengers who boarded at an earlier stop take advantage of the delay to stretch their legs: all this and the tranquil landscape are brilliantly captured by Bodmer in this image executed on 24th July 1832 close by the 300 acre estate of Joseph Bonaparte, the exiled elder brother of the notorious former French Emperor. Karl Bodmer's images show great versatility and technical virtuosity and give us a uniquely accomplished and detailed picture of a previously little understood (and soon to vanish) way of life. Swiss-born Bodmer was engaged by Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied (1782-1867) specifically to provide a record of his travels in North America, principally among the Plains Indians. In the company of David Dreidoppel (Prince Maximilian's servant and hunting companion), their travels in North America were to last from 1832 to 1834. They arrived in Boston in July 1832, traveled on to Philadelphia, where they stayed with Napoleon Bonaparte's elder brother Joseph. From here they headed west across Pennsylvania across the Alleghenies to Pittsburgh and the Ohio country, visiting all the important German settlements en route. Their most important stop on their route west was at the utopian colony of New Harmony in Indiana. The Prince spent five months there in the company of some of the country's leading scientific men, and studying all the relevant literature on backcountry America. On 24 March 1833 the party reached St. Louis, Missouri, and the start of the journey into Indian country. Graff 4648; Howes M443a; Pilling 2521; Sabin 47014; Wagner-Camp 76:1.

$950.00

O-Kee-Pa: a religious ceremony; and other customs of the Mandans
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O-Kee-Pa: a religious ceremony; and other customs of the Mandans

By CATLIN, George (1796-1872)

Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott & Co, 1867. Octavo. (10 x 6 3/4 inches). Half-title. 13 coloured lithographic plates by Simonau & Toovey, all after Catlin. Minor foxing. Publisher's green cloth, upper cover blocked in gilt, expertly rebacked with green cloth First American edition of one of the rarest works by the noted painter of American Indians: this is Catlin's last major publication. Catlin's account of O-Kee-Pa, or Buffalo Dance, a controversial Mandan religious ceremony, is of particular importance as he witnessed the sexually-charged and barbaric dance first hand shortly before the upper Missouri tribe was decimated by a small pox epidemic in 1837. Catlin here gives a full account of the ceremony, illustrating the rituals and self-tortures of the Buffalo dance in thirteen beautifully executed colour lithographs. An unauthorized account of the ceremony was privately circulated by the Philobiblon Society in 1865, prompting several, including Henry Schoolcraft, to question Catlin's descriptions. Thus, Catlin published the present work, and included within a letter by Prince Maximilian Wied zu Wied, who visited the Mandan with Karl Bodmer, though did not witness the ceremony first hand. The explicit details of the sexual elements of the ceremony were considered too shocking for the general public and were included in a very rare separately-issued three-page "Folium Reservatum," purportedly issued in an edition of approximately 25 copies (not present here, as usual). Bennett p.22; Field 262; Howes C244,"b"; McCracken Catlin pp.101-108; Pilling 693.

$12500.00

Encampment of the Piekann Indians, near Fort McKenzie on the Muscleshell River
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Encampment of the Piekann Indians, near Fort McKenzie on the Muscleshell River

By MCKENNEY, Thomas L. (1785-1859) and James HALL (1793-1868)

Philadelphia: Daniel Rice & James G. Clark, 1842. Hand-coloured lithograph. Very good condition apart from some minor soiling on the sheet. A fine image from McKenney and Hall's 'Indian Tribes of North America': `One of the most important [works] ever published on the American Indians' (Field),` a landmark in American culture' (Horan) and an invaluable contemporary record of a vanished way of life. A detailed print of the bustling military camp of the nomadic Piekann Indians near Fort McKenzie. A subgroup of the Blackfoot tribe, the Piekann or Piegan inhabited the Plains and Prairies of North America and were the quintessential Plains Indians. McKenney and Hall's 'Indian Tribes of North America' has long been renowned for its faithful portraits of Native Americans. The portraits are largely based on paintings by the artist Charles Bird King, who was employed by the War Department to paint the Indian delegates visiting Washington D.C., forming the basis of the War Department's Indian Gallery. Most of King's original paintings were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian, and their appearance in McKenney and Hall's magnificent work is thus our only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century. Numbered among King's sitters were Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola.After six years as Superintendent of Indian Trade, Thomas McKenney had become concerned for the survival of the Western tribes. He had observed unscrupulous individuals taking advantage of the Native Americans for profit, and his vocal warnings about their future prompted his appointment by President Monroe to the Office of Indian Affairs. As first director, McKenney was to improve the administration of Indian programs in various government offices. His first trip was during the summer of 1826 to the Lake Superior area for a treaty with the Chippewa, opening mineral rights on their land. In 1827, he journeyed west again for a treaty with the Chippewa, Menominee , and Winebago in the present state of Michigan. His journeys provided an unparalleled opportunity to become acquainted with Native American tribes. When President Jackson dismissed him from his government post in 1839, McKenney was able to turn more of his attention to his publishing project. Within a few years, he was joined by James Hall, a lawyer who had written extensively about the west. McKenney and Hall saw their work as a way of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. (Gilreath). Cf. BAL 6934; cf. Bennett p.79; cf. Field 992; cf. Howes M129; cf. Lipperhiede Mc4; cf. Reese, Stamped With A National Character p. 24; Sabin 43410a.

$2000.00

War Dance of the Sauks and Foxes
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War Dance of the Sauks and Foxes

By MCKENNEY, Thomas L. (1785-1859) and James HALL (1793-1868)

Philadelphia: F.W. Greenough, 1838. Hand-coloured lithograph. Very good condition apart from some overall light soiling and several small light brown spots in the image and margins. A fine image from McKenney and Hall's 'Indian Tribes of North America': `One of the most important [works] ever published on the American Indians' (Field),` a landmark in American culture' (Horan) and an invaluable contemporary record of a vanished way of life. Based on a painting by Peter Rindisbacher, a Swiss artist who resided in the Red River Settlement established in Winnipeg by Lord Selkirk in 1811, this work depicts a war dance, possibly the Dance of the Wabana, in which its Sauk and Fox participants are chanting songs with "short, disjointed sentences, which allude to some victory...." Originally from Michigan, the Sauk tribe merged with the Fox tribe in the eighteenth century and inhabited the Great Lakes region of the United States. McKenney and Hall's 'Indian Tribes of North America' has long been renowned for its faithful portraits of Native Americans. The portraits are largely based on paintings by the artist Charles Bird King, who was employed by the War Department to paint the Indian delegates visiting Washington D.C., forming the basis of the War Department's Indian Gallery. Most of King's original paintings were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian, and their appearance in McKenney and Hall's magnificent work is thus our only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century. Numbered among King's sitters were Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Keokuk, and Black Hawk. After six years as Superintendent of Indian Trade, Thomas McKenney had become concerned for the survival of the Western tribes. He had observed unscrupulous individuals taking advantage of the Native Americans for profit, and his vocal warnings about their future prompted his appointment by President Monroe to the Office of Indian Affairs. As first director, McKenney was to improve the administration of Indian programs in various government offices. His first trip was during the summer of 1826 to the Lake Superior area for a treaty with the Chippewa, opening mineral rights on their land. In 1827, he journeyed west again for a treaty with the Chippewa, Menominee , and Winebago in the present state of Michigan. His journeys provided an unparalleled opportunity to become acquainted with Native American tribes. When President Jackson dismissed him from his government post in 1830, McKenney was able to turn more of his attention to his publishing project. Within a few years, he was joined by James Hall, a lawyer who had written extensively about the west. McKenney and Hall saw their work as a way of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. (Gilreath). Cf. BAL 6934; cf. Bennett p.79; cf. Field 992; cf. Howes M129; cf. Lipperhiede Mc4; cf. Reese, Stamped With A National Character p. 24; Sabin 43410a.

$2500.00

Qua-Ta-Wa-Pea or Col. Lewis. A Shawnnee Chief
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Qua-Ta-Wa-Pea or Col. Lewis. A Shawnnee Chief

By MCKENNEY, Thomas L. (1785-1859) and James HALL (1793-1868)

Philadelphia: E.C. Biddle, 1836. Hand-coloured lithograph. Very good condition apart from some minor foxing in the margins. A fine image from McKenney and Hall's 'Indian Tribes of North America': `One of the most important [works] ever published on the American Indians' (Field),` a landmark in American culture' (Horan) and an invaluable contemporary record of a vanished way of life. A courageous Shawnee chief, Qua-Ta-Wa-Pea, also known as Colonel Lewis, was rumored to have been elected leader because the Shawnee interpreted President Jefferson's act of honoring him with a medal during a post-Revolution visit to Washington as a sign that that was the will of the United States. As was frequently the custom among Indians, Qua-Ta-Wa-Pea adopted the name of a respected white friend, that of Officer John Lewis. The Shawnee, an Algonquin speaking tribe, inhabited the Southeastern region of the United States. McKenney and Hall's 'Indian Tribes of North America' has long been renowned for its faithful portraits of Native Americans. The portraits are largely based on paintings by the artist Charles Bird King, who was employed by the War Department to paint the Indian delegates visiting Washington D.C., forming the basis of the War Department's Indian Gallery. Most of King's original paintings were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian, and their appearance in McKenney and Hall's magnificent work is thus our only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century. Numbered among King's sitters were Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Keokuk, and Black Hawk. After six years as Superintendent of Indian Trade, Thomas McKenney had become concerned for the survival of the Western tribes. He had observed unscrupulous individuals taking advantage of the Native Americans for profit, and his vocal warnings about their future prompted his appointment by President Monroe to the Office of Indian Affairs. As first director, McKenney was to improve the administration of Indian programs in various government offices. His first trip was during the summer of 1826 to the Lake Superior area for a treaty with the Chippewa, opening mineral rights on their land. In 1827, he journeyed west again for a treaty with the Chippewa, Menominee , and Winebago in the present state of Michigan. His journeys provided an unparalleled opportunity to become acquainted with Native American tribes. When President Jackson dismissed him from his government post in 1830, McKenney was able to turn more of his attention to his publishing project. Within a few years, he was joined by James Hall, a lawyer who had written extensively about the west. McKenney and Hall saw their work as a way of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. (Gilreath). Cf. BAL 6934; cf. Bennett p.79; cf. Field 992; cf. Howes M129; cf. Lipperhiede Mc4; cf. Reese, Stamped With A National Character p. 24; Sabin 43410a.

$350.00

Timpoochee Barnard, an Uchee Warrior
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Timpoochee Barnard, an Uchee Warrior

By MCKENNEY, Thomas L. (1785-1859) and James HALL (1793-1868)

Philadelphia: F.W. Greenough, 1838. Lithograph "Drawn Printed and Coloured at J.T. Bowen's Lithographic Establishment", after a C.B.King portrait painted in 1825. In excellent condition apart from some light off-setting in the plate. A fine image from McKenney and Hall's 'Indian Tribes of North America'. A venerated Yuchi chief, Timpoochee Barnard had a Scotish father and Yuchi mother. He was a commissioned major who valiantly fought under General Jackson against the Creeks in the 1814 Battle of Callabee Creek.. Major Barnard's distinguished military career continued with his gallant participation in the 1818 Seminole War and the battle at Econaffinnah or Natural Bridge of the same year. After travelling to Washington to contest the Indian Springs Treaty of 1825, he settled near Fort Mitchell, where he remained until his death. Of Timpoochee, President Jackson once remarked to his son, "A braver man than your father never lived." Also known as the Choya'ha or Tsoya'ha, meaning 'children of the sun', the Yuchi tribe inhabited the Southeastern region of the United States. They had been practically eliminated by the Creeks and Cherokees and lived uneasily in their midst. McKenney and Hall's 'Indian Tribes of North America' has long been renowned for its faithful portraits of Native Americans. The portraits are largely based on paintings by the artist Charles Bird King, who was employed by the War Department to paint the Indian delegates visiting Washington D.C., forming the basis of the War Department's Indian Gallery. Most of King's original paintings were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian, and their appearance in McKenney and Hall's magnificent work is thus our only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century. Numbered among King's sitters were Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Keokuk, and Black Hawk. After six years as Superintendent of Indian Trade, Thomas McKenney had become concerned for the survival of the Western tribes. He had observed unscrupulous individuals taking advantage of the Native Americans for profit, and his vocal warnings about their future prompted his appointment by President Monroe to the Office of Indian Affairs. As first director, McKenney was to improve the administration of Indian programs in various government offices. His first trip was during the summer of 1826 to the Lake Superior area for a treaty with the Chippewa, opening mineral rights on their land. In 1827, he journeyed west again for a treaty with the Chippewa, Menominee , and Winebago in the present state of Michigan. His journeys provided an unparalleled opportunity to become acquainted with Native American tribes. When President Jackson dismissed him from his government post in 1830, McKenney was able to turn more of his attention to his publishing project. Within a few years, he was joined by James Hall, a lawyer who had written extensively about the west. McKenney and Hall saw their work as a way of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. (Gilreath). Cf. BAL 6934; cf. Bennett p.79; cf. Field 992; cf. Howes M129; cf. Lipperhiede Mc4; cf. Reese, Stamped With A National Character p. 24; Sabin 43410a; Horan 344; Johansen & Gringe, 24.

$650.00

Payta Kootha A Shawanee Warrior
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Payta Kootha A Shawanee Warrior

By MCKENNEY, Thomas L. (1785-1859) and James HALL (1793-1868)

Philadephia: E. C. Biddle, 1836. Hand-coloured lithograph after Charles Bird King, printed by Lehman & Duval. A fine image from McKenney and Hall's 'Indian Tribes of North America': `One of the most important [works] ever published on the American Indians' (Field),` a landmark in American culture' (Horan) and an invaluable contemporary record of a vanished way of life. Payta Kootha, Flying Clouds, was a Shawnee chief. He signed several treaties including the Treaty of Greenville in 1795. His last treaty was signed in 1825 by which the Shawnee surrendered all claim to land east of the Mississippi. An early impression printed by Lehman & Duval and published by Edward Biddle. Based on paintings by the artist Charles Bird King, who was employed by the War Department to paint the Indian delegates visiting Washington D.C., forming the basis of the War Department's Indian Gallery. Most of King's original paintings were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian, and their appearance in McKenney and Hall's magnificent work is thus our only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century. Numbered among King's sitters were Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Keokuk, and Black Hawk. After six years as Superintendent of Indian Trade, Thomas McKenney had become concerned for the survival of the Western tribes. He had observed unscrupulous individuals taking advantage of the Native Americans for profit, and his warnings about their future prompted his appointment by President Monroe to the Office of Indian Affairs. As first director, McKenney was to improve the administration of Indian programs in various government offices. His first trip was during the summer of 1826 to the Lake Superior area for a treaty with the Chippewa, opening mineral rights on their land. In 1827, he journeyed west again for a treaty with the Chippewa, Menominee , and Winebago in the present state of Michigan. His journeys provided an unparalleled opportunity to become acquainted with Native American tribes. When President Jackson dismissed him from his government post in 1830, McKenney was able to turn more of his attention to his publishing project. Within a few years, he was joined by James Hall, a lawyer who had written extensively about the west. McKenney and Hall saw their work as making a record of a rapidly disappearing culture. (Gilreath). Cf. BAL 6934; cf. Bennett p.79; cf. Field 992; cf. Howes M129; cf. Lipperhiede Mc4; cf. Reese, Stamped With A National Character 24; Sabin 43410a; Viola, The Indian Legacy of Charles Bird King, 75-79; Horan, 160.

$750.00

Me-Te-A, a Pottawatomie Chief
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Me-Te-A, a Pottawatomie Chief

By MCKENNEY, Thomas L. (1785-1859) and James HALL (1793-1868)

Philadelphia: F.W. Greenough, 1836. Hand-coloured lithograph. A fine image from McKenney and Hall's 'Indian Tribes of North America': `One of the most important [works] ever published on the American Indians' (Field),` a landmark in American culture' (Horan) and an invaluable contemporary record of a vanished way of life. A dignified and extremely influential Potawatomi chief, Me-Te-A was a prominent spokesman for his tribe at the 1821 council that convened in Washington to negotiate the 1821 Treaty of Chicago, in which the Potawatomi relinquished much of their land in Michigan to the federal government. In accordance with his belief in the importance of education, he sent several boys from his tribe to the Fort Wayne Indian agent in 1827, who enrolled them in the Choctaw Academy in Kentucky. The Potawatomi were closely associated with the Chippewa and Ottawa tribes and inhabited the Northeastern region of the United States. McKenney and Hall's 'Indian Tribes of North America' has long been renowned for its faithful portraits of Native Americans. The portraits are largely based on paintings by the artist Charles Bird King, who was employed by the War Department to paint the Indian delegates visiting Washington D.C., forming the basis of the War Department's Indian Gallery. Most of King's original paintings were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian, and their appearance in McKenney and Hall's magnificent work is thus our only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century. Numbered among King's sitters were Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. After six years as Superintendent of Indian Trade, Thomas McKenney had become concerned for the survival of the Western tribes. He had observed unscrupulous individuals taking advantage of the Native Americans for profit, and his vocal warnings about their future prompted his appointment by President Monroe to the Office of Indian Affairs. As first director, McKenney was to improve the administration of Indian programs in various government offices. His first trip was during the summer of 1826 to the Lake Superior area for a treaty with the Chippewa, opening mineral rights on their land. In 1827, he journeyed west again for a treaty with the Chippewa, Menominee , and Winebago in the present state of Michigan. His journeys provided an opportunity to become acquainted with Native American tribes. When President Jackson dismissed him from his government post in 1830, McKenney was able to turn more of his attention to his publishing project. Within a few years, he was joined by James Hall, a lawyer who had written extensively about the west. McKenney and Hall saw their work as a way of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. (Gilreath). Cf. BAL 6934; cf. Bennett p.79; cf. Field 992; cf. Howes M129; cf. Lipperhiede Mc4; cf. Reese, American Color Plate Books p. 24; Sabin 43410a.

$750.00

Ki-On-Twog-Ky, or Cornplant
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Ki-On-Twog-Ky, or Cornplant

By MCKENNEY, Thomas L. (1785-1859) and James HALL (1793-1868)

Philadelphia: [E. C. Biddle, 1836. Hand-coloured lithograph by Lehman & Duval. A fine image from McKenney and Hall's 'Indian Tribes of North America': `One of the most important [works] ever published on the American Indians' (Field),` a landmark in American culture' (Horan) and an invaluable contemporary record of a vanished way of life. The son of a Seneca mother and the Dutch trader John O'Bail, Ki-On-Twog-Ky or Cornplanter was one of three principal leaders of the Iroquois Confederacy of Six Nations and a renowned Seneca war chief who fought in the French and Indian War (1754-1763). In opposition to Joseph Brant's insistence on the Confederacy allying itself with the British in the American Revolution, Cornplanter, like Red Jacket, favored neutrality, claiming that the war was a white man's affair in which they shouldn't intervene. Despite his initial protestations and the uncustomary dissension among the members of the Grand Council regarding the issue of participating in the war, the Seneca eventually yielded to majority opinion and agreed to fight for the British. In the aftermath of the war, Cornplanter intended to act as a diplomatic mediator between the Seneca and the colonists, negotiating auspicious terms for his nation. However, he became increasingly unpopular among his people after signing treaties at Fort Stanwix (1784), Fort Harmar (1789), and Genesee (1797), which ceded tracts of their ancestral homelands to the Federal government. Although his conciliatory actions earned him the contempt of his nation and political rivals such as Red Jacket, he obtained the respect of the U.S. government, which, in return for his cooperation in the Genesee treaty, awarded him an annual pension and a plot of land in Ohio. In 1786, he traveled to Philadelphia to attend a ceremony given by the Tammany Society, an organization devoted to synthesizing European and Native American culture, and then went to New York to meet with Congress regarding the distribution of Iroquois lands. Cornplanter later journeyed to Washington to visit President Jefferson in 1801-2, and, despite his depleted authority, rallied the Seneca to the American cause in the War of 1812. One of the most revered and feared tribes, the Seneca inhabited the most westerly location of the six tribes constituting the Iroquois Confederacy. They were directly south of Lake Ontario. McKenney and Hall's 'Indian Tribes of North America' has long been renowned for its faithful portraits of Native Americans. The portraits are largely based on paintings by the artist Charles Bird King, who was employed by the War Department to paint the Indian delegates visiting Washington D.C., forming the basis of the War Department's Indian Gallery. Most of King's original paintings were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian, and their appearance in McKenney and Hall's magnificent work is thus our only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century. Numbered among King's sitters were Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Keokuk, and Black Hawk. After six years as Superintendent of Indian Trade, Thomas McKenney had become concerned for the survival of the Western tribes. He had observed unscrupulous individuals taking advantage of the Native Americans for profit, and his vocal warnings about their future prompted his appointment by President Monroe to the Office of Indian Affairs. As first director, McKenney was to improve the administration of Indian programs in various government offices. His first trip was during the summer of 1826 to the Lake Superior area for a treaty with the Chippewa, opening mineral rights on their land. In 1827, he journeyed west again for a treaty with the Chippewa, Menominee , and Winebago in the present state of Michigan. His journeys provided an unparalleled opportunity to become acquainted with Native American tribes. When President Jackson dismissed him from his government post in 1830, McKenney was able to turn more of his attention to his publishing project. Within a few years, he was joined by James Hall, a lawyer who had written extensively about the west. McKenney and Hall saw their work as a way of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. (Gilreath). Cf. Howes M129; cf. Bennett 79; cf. Field 992; cf. Lipperheide Mc 4; cf. Reese American Color Plate Books 24; cf. Sabin 43410a.

$1750.00

View of Bethlehem (Pennsylvania)
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View of Bethlehem (Pennsylvania)

By BODMER, Karl (1809-1893)

Paris, Coblenz and London, 1842. Hand-coloured aquatint engraving by Lucas Weber after Bodmer, blindstamp. Provenance: Donaldson, Lufkin &Jenrette Americana Collection A pastoral landscape scene of great serenity: the wheat has been cut and the stubble has yet to be ploughed in, the farming community takes a momentary rest from their labours. Another harvest safely gathered in. In the early-morning sun few people are around as Bodmer completes his sketch. After a day long journey Bodmer and Prince Maximilian had arrived on the evening of July 25 1832 at Bethlehem, a settlement of Moravians established in 1740 on the Lehigh River. Whilst the Prince toured the district with a German physician, Lewis Saynisch, Bodmer occupied himself by sketching the town and the surrounding countryside. This is the view from one of the highest points in Bethlehem, The buildings in the view still stand. Karl Bodmer's images show great versatility and technical virtuosity and give us a uniquely accomplished and detailed picture of a previously little understood (and soon to vanish) way of life. Swiss-born Bodmer was engaged by Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied (1782-1867) specifically to provide a record of his travels in North America, principally among the Plains Indians. In the company of David Dreidoppel (Prince Maximilian's servant and hunting companion), their travels in North America were to last from 1832 to 1834. They arrived in Boston in July 1832, traveled on to Philadelphia, where they stayed with Napoleon Bonaparte's elder brother Joseph. From here they headed west across Pennsylvania across the Alleghenies to Pittsburgh and the Ohio country, visiting all the important German settlements en route. Their most important stop on their route west was at the utopian colony of New Harmony in Indiana. The Prince spent five months there in the company of some of the country's leading scientific men, and studying all the relevant literature on backcountry America. On 24 March 1833 the party reached St. Louis, Missouri, and the start of the journey into Indian country. Graff 4648; Howes M443a; Pilling 2521; Sabin 47014; Wagner-Camp 76:1.

$1200.00

Cave-In-Rock. view on the Ohio
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Cave-In-Rock. view on the Ohio

By BODMER, Karl (1809-1893)

Paris, Coblenz and London, 1839. Hand-coloured aquatint engraving by Lucas Weber after Bodmer, blindstamp, issue with one figure at the rail on the right hand side of the deck of the paddle-steamer, extensive use of aquatint on the river and scrub and small trees next to the boat on the far right. Provenance: Donaldson, Lufkin &Jenrette Americana Collection En route to St. Louis, Missouri, Bodmer, Prince Maximilian and Dreidoppel traveled via the Ohio river. About twenty-five miles beyond Shawnee Town, Bodmer sketched this intriguing geological rock formation known as Cave-In-Rock on the Illinois side of the river near Cave-In-Rock Island. The scene also includes an Ohio steamer flanked by two Ohio keelboats, all caught against a late evening sky. Unsurprisingly, the area is now part of a National Park. Karl Bodmer's images show great versatility and technical virtuosity and give us a uniquely accomplished and detailed picture of a previously little understood (and soon to vanish) way of life. Swiss-born Bodmer was engaged by Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied (1782-1867) specifically to provide a record of his travels in North America, principally among the Plains Indians. In the company of David Dreidoppel (Prince Maximilian's servant and hunting companion), their travels in North America were to last from 1832 to 1834. They arrived in Boston in July 1832, traveled on to Philadelphia, where they stayed with Napoleon Bonaparte's elder brother Joseph. From here they headed west across Pennsylvania across the Alleghenies to Pittsburgh and the Ohio country, visiting all the important German settlements en route. Their most important stop on their route west was at the utopian colony of New Harmony in Indiana. The Prince spent five months there in the company of some of the country's leading scientific men, and studying all the relevant literature on backcountry America. On 24 March 1833 the party reached St. Louis, Missouri, and the start of the journey into Indian country. Graff 4648; Howes M443a; Pilling 2521; Sabin 47014; Wagner-Camp 76:1.

$1500.00

[The Aboriginal Portfolio]
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[The Aboriginal Portfolio]

By LEWIS, James Otto (1799-1858)

[Philadelphia, 1836. Folio. 18 1/4 x 11 inches). Blue upper wrapper to original part number 8 bound as title, 72 hand-coloured lithographed plates after Lewis by Lehman & Duval, bound without the three letterpress broadside prospectus Advertisement leaves to parts 1-3. (Occasional expert repairs.). Bound to style in dark green quarter morocco over contemporary patterned cloth-covered boards First edition. Scarcer than McKenney and Hall's 'History of the Indian Tribes', Prince Maximilian's 'Reise in das Innere von Nord-America' or Catlin's 'North American Indian Portfolio', Lewis' work records the dress of the Potawatomi, Winnebago, Shawnee, Sioux, Miami, Fox, Iowa and other tribes at treaties of Prairie du Chien, Fort Wayne, Fond du Lac and Green Bay. Publication of the work was costly and time consuming. The work was originally issued in 10 parts with 8 plates per number in printed wrappers. The publisher was forced into bankruptcy while part nine was in the press, however, reducing the edition and forcing part ten to be just barely finished and sparsely distributed. A projected eleventh part would have contained "Historical and Biographical Description of the Indians," but was never completed. The title and three advertisement leaves are therefore the only text in the work, excluding that on the wrappers. Copies are found with 72 plates (as here, being the first 9 numbers), others with 77 and occasionally 80. Bennett p.68; Field 936; Howes L315; Reese, Stamped With A National Character 23; Sabin 40812.

$85000.00

Hunting the Buffaloe
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Hunting the Buffaloe

By MCKENNEY, Thomas L. (1785-1859) and James HALL (1793-1868)

Philadelphia: E.C. Biddle, 1837. Hand-coloured lithograph heightened with gum arabic by J. T. Bowen after a painting by Peter Rindisbacher. In excellent condition apart from some light off-setting in the plate. A fine image from McKenney and Hall's 'Indian Tribes of North America': `One of the most important [works] ever published on the American Indians' (Field),` a landmark in American culture' (Horan) and an invaluable contemporary record of a vanished way of life. This exciting scene is based on a painting by Peter Rindisbacher, a Swiss artist, who visited America between 1821 and 26. He lived at Lord Selkirk's Red River colony where he made a series of artistic studies of Native American life. McKenney and Hall's 'Indian Tribes of North America' has long been renowned for its faithful portraits of Native Americans. The portraits are largely based on paintings by the artist Charles Bird King, who was employed by the War Department to paint the Indian delegates visiting Washington D.C., forming the basis of the War Department's Indian Gallery. Most of King's original paintings were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian, and their appearance in McKenney and Hall's magnificent work is thus our only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century. Numbered among King's sitters were Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Keokuk, and Black Hawk. After six years as Superintendent of Indian Trade, Thomas McKenney had become concerned for the survival of the Western tribes. He had observed unscrupulous individuals taking advantage of the Native Americans for profit, and his vocal warnings about their future prompted his appointment by President Monroe to the Office of Indian Affairs. As first director, McKenney was to improve the administration of Indian programs in various government offices. His first trip was during the summer of 1826 to the Lake Superior area for a treaty with the Chippewa, opening mineral rights on their land. In 1827, he journeyed west again for a treaty with the Chippewa, Menominee , and Winebago in the present state of Michigan. His journeys provided an unparalleled opportunity to become acquainted with Native American tribes. When President Jackson dismissed him from his government post in 1830, McKenney was able to turn more of his attention to his publishing project. Within a few years, he was joined by James Hall, a lawyer who had written extensively about the west. McKenney and Hall saw their work as a way of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. (Gilreath). Cf. BAL 6934; cf. Bennett p.79; cf. Field 992; cf. Howes M129; cf. Lipperhiede Mc4; cf. Reese, Stamped With A National Character p. 24; Sabin 43410a; Horan 356.

$2000.00

[Catlin's North American Indian Portfolio. Hunting Scenes and Amusements of the Rocky Mountains and Prairies of America. From Drawings and Notes of the Author, made during Eight Years' Travel amongst Forty-Eight of the Wildest and most Remote Tribes of Savages in North America]
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[Catlin's North American Indian Portfolio. Hunting Scenes and Amusements of the Rocky Mountains and Prairies of America. From Drawings and Notes of the Author, made during Eight Years' Travel amongst Forty-Eight of the Wildest and most Remote Tribes of Savages in North America]

By CATLIN, George (1796-1872)

[London: Chatto & Windus, 1875. Large folio. (23 3/8 x 17 inches). 31 tinted lithographs after Catlin and McGahey. Without title or list of plates, found in few copies. Contemporary dark blue morocco backed marbled paper covered boards, morocco lettering piece on the upper cover, spine lettered in gilt (expert repairs to joints) The Indian Portfolio in the rare 31-plate tinted issue. This issue of Catlin's famous work on American Indians includes the rare six unnumbered lithographs, comprising two portraits, a group portrait of Ojibways, two tribal dance scenes, and a hunting scene. These six plates were evidently executed on lithographic stones in 1844 when Catlin envisioned a whole series of "Indian "Portfolios," but were not printed and issued until Chatto & Windus acquired Henry Bohn's stock of, and copyright for, Catlin's North American Indian Portfolio in 1871. This copy does not have any title or text leaves, as usual for this issue. Catlin's North American Indian Portfolio contains the results of his years of painting, living with and travelling amongst the Great Plains Indians. In a famous passage, Catlin describes how the sight of several Indian chiefs in Philadelphia led to his resolution to record their vanishing way of life: "the history and customs of such a people, preserved by pictorial illustrations, are themes worthy of the lifetime of one man, and nothing short of the loss of my life shall prevent me from visiting their country and becoming their historian." From 1832 to 1837 he spent the summer months sketching the western tribes, finishing his pictures in oils during the winter. He painted around 600 highly realistic and powerfully projected portraits of Indians, carefully recording their costume, culture and way of life. Catlin then exhibited his Indian Gallery in London beginning in 1841. Encouraged by his warm reception, he planned a series of four portfolios, with a total of 100 plates, to illustrate Indian life. By the time the first Indian Portfolio appeared in late 1844, Catlin had desperately overstrained his budget, and was forced to sell the entire project, lithographic stones and all, to the preeminent English publisher of color plate books, Henry Bohn. Research by William Reese has demonstrated that Henry Bohn issued the Indian Portfolio in several variant versions while he controlled the copyright, from 1845 until his retirement in the late 1860s. In 1871 he sold the copyright and working materials for a number of his books to the firm of Chatto & Windus. According to the surviving Chatto & Windus records, they acquired the original lithographic stones made in 1844, including an additional six, never printed, which must have been prepared for Catlin's next projected Indian Portfolio. Thus, the extra six plates only appear here. The thirty-one-plate issue is far rarer than any of the twenty-five-plate issues, by a ratio of about four to one. Reese located fifteen other copies of this issue (out of 165 copies in his census on copies of the Indian Portfolio). The plates are as follow: 1) "North American Indians." 2) "Buffalo Bull Grazing." 3) "Wild Horses, at Play." 4) "Catching the Wild Horse." 5) "Buffalo Hunt, Chase." 6) "Buffalo Hunt, Chase." 7) "Buffalo Hunt, Chase." 8) "Buffalo Dance." 9) "Buffalo Hunt, Surround." 10) "Buffalo Hunt, White Wolves attacking a Buffalo Bull." 11) "Buffalo Hunt, Approaching a Ravine." 12) "Buffalo Hunt, Chasing Back." 13) "Buffalo Hunt, Under the White Wolf Skin." 14) "Snow Shoe Dance." 15) "Buffalo Hunt, on Snow Shoes." 16) "Wounded Buffalo Bull." 17) "Dying Buffalo Bull, in Snow Drift." 18) "The Bear Dance." 19) "Attacking the Grizzly Bear." 20) "Antelope Shooting." 21) "Ball Players." 22) "Ball-Play Dance." 23) "Ball Play." 24) "Archery of the Mandans." 25) "Wi-Jun-Jon an Assiniboine Chief." [unnumbered] "Joc-O-Sot, the Walking Bear." [unnumbered] "Mah-To-Toh-Pah, The Mandan Chief." [unnumbered] "O-Jib-Be-Ways." [unnumbered] "Buffaloe Hunting." [unnumbered] "The War Dance." [unnumbered] "The Scalp Dance." Wagner-Camp 105a; Howes C243; Field 258; Abbey Travel 653 (ref); McCracken 10; William S. Reese, "The Production of Catlin's North American Indian Portfolio, 1844-1876," issue 11.

$58000.00

Buffalo Hunt under the White Wolf Skin. An Indian Stratagem on the Level Prairies
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Buffalo Hunt under the White Wolf Skin. An Indian Stratagem on the Level Prairies

By CATLIN, George (1796-1872)

New York: Currier & Ives, 1858. Lithograph, coloured by hand. Sheet size: 18 1/8 x 23 1/16 inches. A very rare Currier and Ives issue of this classic image of life on the Western Plains before the coming of the white man. Nathaniel Currier & James Ives, the most successful print publishers of their era, published only a few of Catlin's images and all are now particularly rare. Catlin's description of his own version of this plate ("Buffalo Hunt, Wolf Skin Mask", plate 13 from Catlin's North American Indian Portfolio ) is equally valid when applied to the present Currier & Ives issue "The Indian, superior in craft to both... [the buffalo and wolf], and... [not owning] a horse, has [adopted]... the stratagem represented in this plate, of profiting by these circumstances, by placing himself under the skin of a white wolf, with his weapons in hand, in which plight he often creeps over the level prairies (where there is no object to conceal him) to close company with the unsuspecting herd... In this plate is a just representation of the level prairies which often occur for many miles together, affording to the eye of a traveller, in all directions, a complete type of the ocean in a calm; green near and around him, but changing to blue in the distance; without tree or shrub, or slightest undulation to break the perfect line of the surrounding horizon." Catlin summarized the Native American as "an honest, hospitable, faithful, brave, warlike, cruel, revengeful, relentless, -- yet honourable, contemplative and religious being". In a famous passage from the preface of his North American Indian Portfolio, Catlin describes how the sight of several tribal chiefs in Philadelphia led to his resolution to record their way of life: "the history and customs of such a people, preserved by pictorial illustrations, are themes worthy of the lifetime of one man, and nothing short of the loss of my life shall prevent me from visiting their country and becoming their historian". He saw no future for either their way of life or their very existence, and with these thoughts always at the back of his mind he worked, against time, setting himself a truly punishing schedule, to record what he saw. From 1832 to 1837 he spent the summer months sketching the tribes and then finished his pictures in oils during the winter. The record he left is unique, both in its breadth and also in the sympathetic understanding that his images constantly demonstrate. The present image is both a work of art of the highest quality and a fitting memorial to a vanished way of life. Conningham 728; Gale 814; Peters 1519a.

$2850.00

The Buffalo Hunt: Surrounding the Herd
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The Buffalo Hunt: Surrounding the Herd

By CATLIN, George (1796-1872)

New York: Currier & Ives, 1858. Lithograph, coloured by hand. Sheet size: 18 1/8 x 23 1/16 inches. A very rare Currier and Ives issue of this classic image of life on the Western Plains before the coming of the white man. Nathaniel Currier & James Ives, the most successful print publishers of their era, published only a few of Catlin's images and all are now particularly rare. Catlin summarized the Native American as "an honest, hospitable, faithful, brave, warlike, cruel, revengeful, relentless, -- yet honourable, contemplative and religious being". In a famous passage from the preface of his North American Indian Portfolio, Catlin describes how the sight of several tribal chiefs in Philadelphia led to his resolution to record their way of life: "the history and customs of such a people, preserved by pictorial illustrations, are themes worthy of the lifetime of one man, and nothing short of the loss of my life shall prevent me from visiting their country and becoming their historian". He saw no future for either their way of life or their very existence, and with these thoughts always at the back of his mind he worked, against time, setting himself a truly punishing schedule, to record what he saw. From 1832 to 1837 he spent the summer months sketching the tribes and then finished his pictures in oils during the winter. The record he left is unique, both in its breadth and also in the sympathetic understanding that his images constantly demonstrate. The present image is both a work of art of the highest quality and a fitting memorial to a vanished way of life. Conningham 728; Gale 814; Peters 1519a.

$2850.00

History of the Indian Tribes of North America, with Biographical Sketches and Anecdotes of the Principal Chiefs. Embellished with One Hundred Portraits from the Indian Gallery in the War Department at Washington
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History of the Indian Tribes of North America, with Biographical Sketches and Anecdotes of the Principal Chiefs. Embellished with One Hundred Portraits from the Indian Gallery in the War Department at Washington

By MCKENNEY, Thomas Loraine (1785-1859) [and James HALL (1793-1868)]

Philadelphia: Caxton Press of Sherman & Co. for D. Rice & Co, 1874. 3 volumes (text: 2 volumes, royal 8vo [10 7/16 x 7 1/4 inches; atlas of plates. folio [20 x 14 inches]). Text: "Billy Bowlegs" portrait as frontispiece to volume II of text; atlas of plates: 120 hand-coloured lithographs after Karl Bodmer, Charles Bird King, James Otto Lewis, P. Rhindesbacher and R.M. Sully, drawn on stone by A. Newsam, A.Hoffy, Ralph Tremblay, Henry Dacre and others, printed and coloured by J.T. Bowen and others. Expertly bound to style in uniform navy half morocco over the original blue cloth-covered, richly gilt spines divided into five compartments with raised bands, lettered in the second and fourth, the others with repeat decorative motif built up from small tools, marbled endpapers, gilt edges The last folio edition of one of the most important 19th-century works on the American Indian, and one of the most important colour plate books produced in America in the age of lithography The first folio edition was issued by E.C. Biddle from 1836 to 1844, and reissued by F.W. Greenough and Daniel Rice. The number of different printers and lithographers involved in the project speaks to the complicated production of the most elaborate plate book published in the United States up to that time. The present final edition of McKenney & Hall was issued by the firm of D. Rice, whose father took over the initial project as publisher in the early 1840's. This edition differs from the original folio edition in significant ways. Most importantly, a plate is added, the portrait of the Seminole chief Billy Bowlegs which appears as a frontispiece in the second text volume, making this the most complete form of the work. Also, this edition was published without the map, table, and facsimile signatures of subscribers which appeared in the original edition, and also removes James Hall's name from the titlepage, only crediting McKenney. This edition is also unusual for the number plates that are included with no publisher's credit line. The reason for this is not known, but Christopher W. Lane states that 'there was no single date at which these no-imprint variants were run off'. In other words, they could date from the 1830's onwards, although he goes on to note that their first recorded appearance is in an 1842 issue of volume I of the 3-volume folio edition. McKenney and Hall's Indian Tribes of North America has long been renowned for its faithful portraits of Native Americans. The portrait plates are based on paintings by the artist Charles Bird King, who was employed by the War Department to paint the Indian delegates visiting Washington D.C., forming the basis of the War Department's Indian Gallery. Most of King's original paintings were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian, and their appearance in McKenney and Hall's magnificent work is thus our only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century. Numbered among King's sitters were Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. After six years as Superintendent of Indian Trade, Thomas McKenney had become concerned for the survival of the Western tribes. He had observed unscrupulous individuals taking advantage of the Native Americans for profit, and his vocal warnings about their future prompted his appointment by President Monroe to the Office of Indian Affairs. As first director, McKenney was to improve the administration of Indian programs in various government offices. His first trip was during the summer of 1826 to the Lake Superior area for a treaty with the Chippewa, opening mineral rights on their land. In 1827, he journeyed west again for a treaty with the Chippewa, Menominee , and Winebago in the present state of Michigan. His journeys provided an unparalleled opportunity to become acquainted with Native American tribes. When President Jackson dismissed him from his government post in 1830, McKenney was able to turn more of his attention to his publishing project. Within a few years, he was joined by James Hall, a lawyer who had written extensively about the west. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their publishing enterprise, saw their book as a way of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. (Gilreath). McKenney provided the biographies, many based on personal interviews, and Hall wrote the general history of the North American Indian. OCLC 35709791; this edition not in Field, Howes, or Sabin.

$75000.00

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