Sign In | Register


RECENT ARRIVALS


Next >

Maison Rustique, Or, The Countrey Farme ... Now newly Reviewed, Corrected and Augmented, with divers large Additions

By ESTIENNE, Charles (1504-1564) and Jean LIEBAULT (d. 1595); Gervase MARKHAM (1568-1637), editor

London: Printed by Adam Islip for John Bull, 1616. Small folio, bound in sixes. (10 5/8 x 6 3/4 inches). Woodcut illustrations in text, ornamental headpieces and woodcut initials. [18], 732, [22] pp. Page 253 misnumbered, as issued. Early marginal annotations throughout. Contemporary calf, covers bordered in blind and with a central gilt device, expertly rebacked, sprine with raised bands in six compartments, lettered in the second, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt First edition of Markham's revised English translation of Charles Estienne and Jean Liebault's important late 16th century work on husbandry, gardening and country living. In this work, Markham, the most prolific English writer on agriculture and farming in the first half of the 17th century, adapts an earlier work by Charles Estienne (aka Charles Stevens, in English). "It was first published in Latin as the Praedium Rusticum in 1554. Charles Estienne himself translated it into French and Liebault brought it out shortly after Estienne's death in 1564. Surflet's first English translation appeared in 1600" (Hunt). This first Markham editiion, based on the Surflet translation, is noted for its additions, as well as its rarity. Fussell refers to this adapation of Estienne's work as among Markham's most important works on general farming. The text on verso of the title, under the caption The Contents, gives an accurate description of the work: "There is contained in this last Edition, whatsoever can be required for the building, or good ordering, of a Husbandrymans House, or Countrey Farme; as namely, to foresee the changes and alterations of Times; to know the motions and powers of the Sunne and Moone, upon the things about which Husbandry is occupied: as to cure the sicke labouring Man; to cure Beasts and flying Fowles of all sorts; to dresse, plant or make Gardens, as well as for the Kitchen, and Physicke use, as also in Quarters..." The description continues touching on a variety of subjects, including the planting and care of trees, the keeping of bees, the making of wine and beer, on distillation, as well as on hunting and hawking. The illustrations include several full-page woodcut plans for knot gardens (pp. 257-275), a garden labyrinth (p. 276), a tobacco plant (p. 217), plus large woodcuts of a cow (p. 99) and horse (p. 138) with references to various ailments, among others. A complete copy of a scare book, often found defective. McDonald, p. 90; Bitting, pp 146-47; Fussell, p. 28; Goldsmiths 451; Hunt 202; Kress 353; Arents 123; Poynter 31.1; STC 10549; ESTC S121357.

$5800.00

The Aurelian. A natural history of English moths and butterflies, together with the plants on which they feed ... Drawn, engraved, and coloured, from the natural subjects themselves
seller photo

The Aurelian. A natural history of English moths and butterflies, together with the plants on which they feed ... Drawn, engraved, and coloured, from the natural subjects themselves

By HARRIS, Moses (1730-c.1788)

London: Printed for the author ... and with great additions, for J. Robson, 1778. Folio. (18 x 10 7/8 inches). Text and plates printed on laid paper throughout. 2 letterpress titles in English and French (the English title with an engraved vignette), text in English and French in two parallel columns. Engraved frontispiece, 45 hand-coloured engraved plates (comprising: 1 anatomical key plate, 44 plates of butterflies and moths and their transformations). First plate inscribed: "Colour'd by Mr. Ms: Harris Sepr: 1778." Nineteenth century half brown morocco and pebbled cloth covered boards, spine with raised bands in six compartments, tooled in gilt and black on and on either side of each band, lettered in gilt in the second compartment, top edge gilt, marbled endpapers Second and best edition with four more plates than the first: this copy a very rare example colored by the author. Second edition, intermediate issue between Lisney's first and second issue. According to Lisney, the second edition exists in three distinct issues. The first issue is dated 1766 on the English title, has text in French and English, and includes dedications beneath plates 38 and 39. The second issue is dated 1778 on the English title, includes a dedication below plate one, but is otherwise similar to the first issue with text in French and English and dedications beneath 38 and 39. The third issue is dated 1778 (though published later), with text and French and English, but plates 38 and 39 have been re-engraved and the dedications are no longer present. The present example conforms to the first issue in every way (i.e without dedication on plate one, but with dedications on plates 38 and 39), but includes Lisney's second issue English title with the addition of Robson 1778 imprint and with plate two unmounted. Lisney deems Harris "one of the most outstanding authors of entomological literature during the eighteenth century." The present work is his masterpiece and displays a beautiful balance in text and illustration between accurate and innovative observation and plates of the highest artistic merit. "Harris began to take an active interest in entomology about the age of twelve and ... was an accurate and original observer. He was, it is believed, the first to draw attention to the importance of wing neuration [the arrangement or distribution of nerves] in the classification of lepidoptera and upon this principle he arranged the species in his published works, illustrating them in colour with a high degree of accuracy. Harris certainly contributed much to the knowledge of the science and was one of the leading entomologists of his century. He was also a miniature painter of no mean accomplishment" (Lisney p.156). The present an extremely rare example with the plates coloured by Harris himself, with a 1778 inscription below the first plate. Lisney makes mention of such special copies and states that the manuscript inscription "indicates that the plates were coloured by the author throughout." "Moses Harris did much to encourage entomology at a time when the original dynamism of the age of Ray and the first Aurelian Society was waning. He was probably the prime mover in founding the second Aurelian Society ... and in the unsurpassed plates of The Aurelian he left a timeless classic to future generations" (Salmon p.117). Hagen I, p. 341; Lisney 232; Nissen, ZBI 1835; Salmon The Aurelian Legacy (2000) pp.115-117.

$15000.00

Chinese Natural History Drawings selected from the Reeves Collection in the British Museum (Natural History)
seller photo

Chinese Natural History Drawings selected from the Reeves Collection in the British Museum (Natural History)

By WHITEHEAD, P. J. P. and P. I. EDWARDS

London: Trustees of the British Museum (Natural History), 1974. Folio. Color plates. Publisher's brown morocco backed cloth boards. Housed in the publisher's folding box. Limited to 400 numbered copies The Reeves collection of early nineteenth-century water-colours is one of the largest sets of natural history drawings in the British Museum (Natural History). Some 2000 animals and plants are depicted by Chinese artists under the supervision of John Reeves of Canton. Twenty selected drawings are reproduced in high quality in this volume using the collotype process.

$375.00

An Account of Two Voyages to New England
seller photo

An Account of Two Voyages to New England

By JOSSELYN, John (circa 1608-1704)

London: Printed for Giles Widdows, 1674. 16mo. (5 5/8 x 3 3/8 inches). [8],215, [1], [8], 227-279,[3] pp (with errors in pagination as issued). License leaf with woodcut printer's device preceding the title (often lacking), errata leaf following the dedication and 3pp. advertisements in the rear. Small paper flaw to S2 with loss to a few letters. Eighteenth century calf, covers bordered with a gilt rule, spine in six compartments with raised bands, green morocco lettering piece in the second compartment, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt, combed marbled endpapers First edition of a scarce 17th-century description of New England, including valuable observations on the natural history of the region: "the earliest work on the Natural History of New England" (Rich). Josselyn visited America in 1638-39, and again from 1663 to 1671. Though parts of his history are based on inaccurate references, the book is renowned for its first-hand observations of the natural history of New England and the description of the situation with the Indians prior to King Philip's War in 1675. Josselyn's work includes an herbal, with numerous botanical, as well as medical and surgical descriptions and is considered the "first complete description of the flora and fauna of the Middle Atlantic and New England States" (Winsor). The cranberry, wild turkey, blueberry and other northeastern species are fully described here for the first time. Besides its treatment of New England, the work is of considerable value for its fine contemporary English account of New Netherland, i.e. New York. The work also deals with the practicalities and provisions necessary for the long sea-voyage. It contains as well a catalogue of tools and supplies essential to begin a new life in the colonies. Church 627; European Americana 674/105; Field 780; Howes J254; Jones 129; Sabin 36672; Siebert Sale105; Streeter Sale II:635; Vail 162; Wing J1019.

$22500.00

Livre des differentes espèces d'Oiseaux de la Chine tires du Cabinet du Roy ... [Bound with:] Livre des differentes espèces d'Oiseaux, Fleurs, Plantes, et Trophés de la Chine ... 2.e Partie ... [Bound with:] ... 3.e Partie ... [Bound with] ... 4.e Partie
seller photo

Livre des differentes espèces d'Oiseaux de la Chine tires du Cabinet du Roy ... [Bound with:] Livre des differentes espèces d'Oiseaux, Fleurs, Plantes, et Trophés de la Chine ... 2.e Partie ... [Bound with:] ... 3.e Partie ... [Bound with] ... 4.e Partie

By HUQUIER, Gabriel (1695-1772), engraver; Jean Baptiste OUDRY (1686-1755), after; and others

Paris, 1745. Four parts in one, folio. (24 1/3 x 18 5/8 inches). 60 hand-coloured engraved plates by Huquier after Jean Baptiste Oudry and others (numbered 1-60), on laid paper watermarked 1742, each inlaid into a larger sheet of laid paper within the album at a contemporary date. Caption titles as above in the lower corner on the first plate of each part. Extra-illustrated with a contemporary original watercolour, also on laid paper, of plate 29. Expertly bound to style in period russia, covers elaborately bordered in gilt with a central gilt device comprised of small tools, spine with raised bands in eight compartments, red and black morocco lettering pieces in the second and third, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt, marbled endpapers and edges An extraordinary collection of large lavishly engraved plates with original 18th century hand-colouring of Chinese birds, flowers, vases and objects: the dénoument of French Rococo Chinoiserie. Huquier was among the most prominent French engravers, printsellers and tastemakers of the mid-18th century, designing or reproducing a prolific amount of ornamentation. The present collection of four suites containing sixty hand-coloured engravings of birds, flowers, botanical arrangements and objects presents the best Chinoiserie of the period. The first part is entirely dedicated to Asian birds; of the other three parts, approximately 25 plates depict intricate and colorful floral arrangements, many in elaborate chinoiserie inspired vases; six depict Asian flora with birds in natural settings; and the remaining illustrate Chinese objects including vessels, snuff boxes and other objects d'art. Besides being a talented designer and engraver, Huquier assembled an impressive collection of art, dispersed in three auctions in 1761, 1771 and 1772, including what is believed to be the largest collection of original watercolours by Oudry. An album of watercolours of birds by Oudry (and presumably from Huquier's collection) is now located at Harvard's Fogg Museum, and confirms that the images of birds in the plates present here were engraved by Huquier after Oudry. Besides having a relationship with Oudry, Huquier was known to have engraved Chinoiserie designs after Fraisse, Watteau, Boucher and others, suggesting other artists of the present engravings. However, given Huquier's own artistic talents, it is quite possible that many of the engravings are after his own work. The extra-illustration of a contemporary watercolour of plate 29, though unattributed, may be by Huquier. The strictly contemporary hand colouring of the plates in this album is simply superb. The extreme high quality of the colouring, coupled with the contemporary inlaid presentation of the plates and the original watercolour, suggests that the album was assembled for a collector of note in the mid-18th century. A similar album, also containing sixty plates, sold in the 1772 auction of Huquier's estate (as lot no. 157, selling for 380 livres). In addition, a similar album of the same four parts comprised of 60 hand coloured plates, extra illustrated with 12 original watercolours in the rear, is located at the Institut National d'Histoire de l'Art, Paris. We find no examples of this work selling at auction since the 18th century, Nissen IVB 465; Lewine, p. 248; Cohen, p. 274; Bruand and Hebert, Inventaire du Fonds Français, Graveurs du XVIIIe Siècle , #1953-2012. cf. Mary Morton, editor. Oudry's Painted Menagerie (2007); cf. Hal Opperman, Jean Baptiste Oudry (1977); Susan Miller, "Jean Antoine Fraisse, grave par Huquier" in Metropolian Museum Journal , vol. 31 (1996), pp. 127-130; Y. Bruand, "Un Grand Collectionneur, Marchand et Graveur du XVIIIe Siècle, Gabriel Huquier (1695-1772)," in Gazette des Beaux-Arts (1950), pp. 99-114.

$165000.00

The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: containing the figures of birds, beasts, fishes, serpents, insects, and plants; particularly, those not hitherto described, or incorrectly figured by former authors, with their descriptions in English and French
seller photo

The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: containing the figures of birds, beasts, fishes, serpents, insects, and plants; particularly, those not hitherto described, or incorrectly figured by former authors, with their descriptions in English and French

By CATESBY, Mark (1683-1749)

London: Printed for Charles Marsh, Thomas Wilcox and Benjamin Stichall, 1754. 2 volumes, folio. Titles in French and English and printed in red and black, parallel text printed in double columns in French and English. 1 double-page hand-coloured engraved map, 220 hand-coloured etched plates (218 by and after Catesby, most signed with his monogram, plates 61 and 96 in volume II by Georg Dionysius Ehret). With the 4pp. letterpress Catalogue of the Animals and Plants Represented in Catesby's Natural History, from the third edition, here inserted in the rear of the second volume. (Scattered minor foxing). Contemporary russia, covers bordered in gilt, expertly rebacked to style, expert restoration to the board edges and corners, marbled endpapers Provenance: Manchester Library (armorial bookplate) The second edition of the "most famous colorplate book of American plant and animal life ... a fundamental and original work for the study of American species" (Hunt). A beautiful and vastly important work by the founder of American ornithology, this book embodies the most impressive record made during the colonial period of the natural history of an American colony and is the most significant work of American natural history before Audubon. Trained as a botanist, Catesby travelled to Virginia in 1712 and remained there for seven years, sending back to England collections of plants and seeds. With the encouragement of Sir Hans Sloane and others, Catesby returned to America in 1722 to seek materials for his Natural History; he travelled extensively in Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and the Bahamas, sending back further specimens. His preface provides a lengthy account of the development of this work, including his decision to study with Joseph Goupy in order to learn to etch his copper plates himself to ensure accuracy and economy. The end result is encyclopaedic: Catesby provides information not only on the botany and ornithology of the area, but also on its history, climate, geology and anthropology. Catesby writes in the preface of his method of working: "As I was not bred a Painter, I hope some faults in Perspective, and other niceties, may be more readily excused: for I humbly conceive that Plants, and other Things done in a Flat, if an exact manner, may serve the Purpose of Natural History, better in some Measure, than in a mere bold and Painter-like Way. In designing the Plants, I always did them while fresh and just gathered: and the Animals, particularly the Birds, I painted while alive (except a very few) and gave them their Gestures peculiar to every kind of Birds, and where it could be admitted, I have adapted the Birds to those Plants on which they fed, or have any relation to. Fish, which do not retain their colours when out of their Element, I painted at different times, having a succession of them procured while the former lost their colours... Reptiles will live for many months...so that I had no difficulty in painting them while living" (Vol.I, p.vi). The first edition was published in ten parts, with the final part appearing in 1743, plus the twenty plate appendix, which was issued four years later. Work appears to have begun on the present second edition almost immediately, if not simultaneously with the publication of the Appendix in 1747. According to Stafleu & Cowan, the second edition was published between 1748 and 1756. Recent discoveries have suggested that there are multiple issues of the second edition, including early issues that may partly be comprised by sheets from the first edition. The present set includes the first twenty text leaves in their corrected state. References: Cf. Anker 94; cf. Dunthorne 72; cf. Fine Bird Books (1990) p.86; cf. Great Flower Books (1990) p.87; cf Hunt 486 (1st edition); cf. Jackson Bird Etchings p.76; cf. Meisel III, p.341; cf. Nissen BBI 336; cf. Nissen IVB 177; cf. Ripley Yale p.55; Sabin 11508; cf. Stafleu & Cowan TL2 1057; Wood p.281 ('A rare printing') Literature: E.G. Allen 'The History of American Ornithology before Audubon' in Transactions of the American Philosophical Society , new series, vol.41, part 3 (Philadelphia: October 1951) Amy Meyers & Margaret Pritchard Empire's Nature, Mark Catesby's New World Vision (Williamsburg, 1998) Edwin Wolf 2nd, A Flock of Beautiful Birds (Philadelphia, 1977), pp.5-7 (Catesby "was the first to observe and depict North American birds in their natural settings, combining ornithological details with botanic ones") E. Charles Nelson and David J. Elliott, The Curious Mister Catesby (University of Georgia Press, 2015).

$285000.00

An album of drawings and watercolours of natural history and topographical subjects, and including a original watercolour of a bouquet of bluebells and wood-anemones by Margaret Meen
seller photo

An album of drawings and watercolours of natural history and topographical subjects, and including a original watercolour of a bouquet of bluebells and wood-anemones by Margaret Meen

By ALBUM AMICORUM

[Great Britain, first quarter 19th century]. Quarto. (12 11/16 x 12 5/8 inches). 29 drawings or watercolours, each corner mounted. Early English red straight-grained morocco gilt, covers with border defined by an inner and outer single fillet rule, containing cornerpieces built up from an acorn-on-a-leaf tool and other small tools, spine in six compartments with double raised bands, lettered (in the second) 'Recueil / des / talens/' and 'et de / l'amitie' (in the third), the fourth and fifth compartments blank, the first and sixth with elaborate repeat tooling made up from numerous small tools and pointillé work, gilt turn-ins, marbled endpapers, g.e. Provenance: Marquis of Bute A rare and beautifully bound collection of original drawings and watercolours, including a work by Margaret Meen "the most outstanding woman painter associated with Kew [Gardens] in the eighteenth century" (Mabley) and an early representation of one of Australia's most spectacular butterflies, the Cape York Birdwing (Troides priamus pronomus) Although there is no indication of provenance, this is one of a number of albums recently sold from Mountstuart, the Bute family home on the island of Bute. The group of friends which this album commemorates likely came from the circle of John, Third Earl of Bute. He died in 1792, leaving a magnificent collection of botanical drawings, and this album was perhaps compiled by one of his children. The most outstanding natural history item within the album is a watercolour of bluebells and wood anemones by Margaret Meen whose very rare Exotic plants from the Royal Gardens at Kew was published in 1790. Amongst the other natural history items are botanical works by M. Austen (a watercolour and bodycolour drawing including crocus, snowdrop and roses), S. Smyth (a watercolour and bodycolour drawing of pink and white flowering mallows), and A. Holland (?) (a fine watercolour and bodycolour drawing on vellum of nasturtiums).Other natural history works include pen, ink and bodycolour drawing of a Baltimore Oriole by Lord de Tabley (dated 1826), and a gouache drawing of the Cape York Birdwing butterfly ( Troides priamus pronomus ) by E.Morland,and here titled 'Papilio priamus'. The other pictures include pieces by William Payne (romantic Italianate fishing village), Jane Machill (a finely executed watercolour of two angles , ?copied from an old master), S.Knott (a watercolour of a sailing vessel in a coastal landscape), C. Gibson (a charming watercolour of a mother and two children picnicing), G. Smyth (a watercolour of river valley), F. Dixon (a watercolour copy of a costume print, titled in German and in French 'Un Paysan de la haute Carniole en Habit d'Ete'), J. Rawstorne (a pencil drawing on vellum of a child), T. Sunderland (a drawing in brown ink with grey and blue washes of a stone bridge and cottage, figures and cattle in the foreground, with mountains in the background), M. Dixon (an oil sketch on thin card of a farmyard scene), A. Wickham (a watercolour sketch of an inn by a lakeside, hills in the background), H. Dalrymple (a watercolour in the neo-classical style with cupid in a chariot drawn by tigers all against a black background), and finally, an anonymous watercolour (inscribed on the verso 'Gorsey Lea Cottage - Miss Hopwood's. / near Middleton - Lancashire,' the mount is dated '1815'. For Meen see: Blunt & Stearn. The Art of Botanical Illustration (1994), pp.221-222; Henrey III, pp.248, 577; Richard Mabey The Flowering of Kew , (1988), p.42.

$8750.00

The Cabinet of Natural History, and American Rural Sports with Illustrations
seller photo

The Cabinet of Natural History, and American Rural Sports with Illustrations

By [DOUGHTY, JOHN AND THOMAS]

Philadelphia: J. and T. Doughty, 1833. Quarto. Three volumes. vii,[1],298,[2]; vii,[3],292; 96pp. Text in two columns. Three uncolored steel-engraved titles with vignettes, two uncolored steel-engraved portrait frontispieces, and fifty-seven plates (three uncolored). Contemporary three-quarter dark green morocco and marbled boards, spines gilt; volume three rebound to style in a modern binding. Extremities lightly worn; head of spine on second volume slightly chipped. Bookplate on front pastedowns of first two volumes. First Major American Color Plate Sporting Book A scarce complete set of the American Rural Sports containing the "first colored sporting prints made in America" (Henderson), including twenty-three original lithographs by Thomas Doughty, the founding father of the Hudson River School. The Cabinet of Natural History , "an amalgam of natural history, sporting accounts, travel narratives, and practical advice for the countryman" (Reese), was started by the brothers Thomas and John Doughty in Philadelphia. It was issued in monthly parts and ran from the end of 1830 until the spring of 1834 when it abruptly ceased publication. The first volume (made up of twelve parts) was certainly the work of both Doughty brothers, with virtually all the plates being the work of Thomas, but, by the time the third part of the second volume had been issued the partnership had been disbanded. Thomas had moved to Boston to pursue his career as a painter, and as of May 17, 1832, John Doughty was the sole proprietor. Evidently Thomas' input was sorely missed and by mid-summer John was advising his subscribers that unless the level of support improved he would have to discontinue the publication. In the end, the periodical continued for almost another year before John Doughty's prediction was fulfilled and the publication came to a sudden halt with part IV of the third volume. The abrupt termination of the third volume accounts for its great rarity, with most extant sets comprised of only the first two volumes. Despite its relatively short life, The Cabinet of Natural History left behind an important legacy as the "first major sport print color plate book produced in America" (Bennett). The prints contained within the work are among few by Thomas Doughty, a significant American artist. "Of all the predecessors to [Thomas] Cole and his followers, the single artist who could most reasonably claim Cole's mantle as the founder of the [Hudson River] school is the appealing figure of Thomas Doughty, who at one juncture was hailed as 'the all-American Claude Lorrain'"' - Howat, p.31. As a painter Doughty "holds a place unique among artists of this country as having initiated the American discovery of the American landscape" (Looney). His importance as a printmaker, however, has yet to be fully recognized or adequately defined, for though "there are many prints to which Doughty's name is attached as artist only, there are only a few for which he was initially completely responsible...These are the 23 lithographs made specifically for Volume I of... The Cabinet of Natural History " (op. cit.). Doughty initially trained as a leather currier but by 1820 was listing himself in the Philadelphia City Directory as a landscape painter. "He was restless…energetic...gifted...[and] was popular almost from the start. People obviously liked his vision of a benevolent natural world...He exhibited frequently in Philadelphia and elsewhere" (op.cit.). His work was engraved for use in various publications from the early 1820s onwards, but his "major contribution to the world of printmaking, however, lies not in the 40-odd illustrations taken from his paintings and drawings but rather in the plates he himself made for [the present work]" (op.cit). American lithography was still in its infancy when the Doughtys began their periodical, and it is not clear where Thomas learned the art. "He proved himself an able practitioner in the plates of Volume I of the Cabinet , which are important as the first sporting prints in color made in America" (op.cit.). This volume also has the distinction of being the first major book of any kind with colored lithographic plates printed in America. There were two earlier minor works but "their lithographic illustrations, being chiefly diagrams, have not the same artistic quality as those of the Cabinet of 1830 with its studies of birds and animals in natural settings and dramatic landscapes. Moreover, the Cabinet was widely distributed, and the first eight issues at least were a popular success. In this way, introducing the colored lithograph to a wide audience, it made an important contribution to the development of American lithography...1830 was thus crucial in the history of American lithography for the lithographic print came of age, and this was largely through the work of Thomas Doughty" (Looney). "It marks the beginning of dominance of lithography in book illustration" - Reese. Bennett, p.35; Gee, pp.48-49; Henderson, p.37; J.K. Howat, The Hudson River and Its Painters (1972), p.31; Howes D433; Robert F. Looney, "Thomas Doughty, Printmaker" in Philadelphia Printmaking (West Chester, 1976), pp.130-48; McGrath, p.187; Meisel III, p.404 (vols. I and II only); Phillips, Sporting Books , p.69. . . Reese, Stamped with a National Character 12; Sabin 9795 (vols. I and only); Wood, p.275.

$9500.00

Lake Superior: its Physical Character, Vegetation, and Animals
seller photo

Lake Superior: its Physical Character, Vegetation, and Animals

By AGASSIZ, Louis (1807-1873)

Boston: Gould, Kendall, and Lincoln, 1850. 8vo. 16 lithographed plates, lithographed outline map. 20pp. publisher's ads. Publisher's purple cloth, spine faded First edition of this scarce and celebrated account of the natural life and landscape of the Lake Superior region. Swiss biologist and geologist Louis Agassiz was renowned for his innovative scholarship of natural history, eventually emigrating to the U.S. where he became a professor of zoology and geology at Harvard. "Considered to be the most authoritative work on the Lake Superior region for that time" (Lande). Howes A88; TPL 3044; Sabin 506; Lande 1531.

$650.00

Catalogues of the birds, shells, and some of the more rare plants, of Dorsetshire. From the new and enlarged edition of Mr. Hutchins's history of that county ... With additions; and a brief memoir of the author
seller photo

Catalogues of the birds, shells, and some of the more rare plants, of Dorsetshire. From the new and enlarged edition of Mr. Hutchins's history of that county ... With additions; and a brief memoir of the author

By PULTENEY, Richard (1730-1801); and Thomas RACKETT (1757-1841)

[London: Printed by and for J. Nichols, Son, and Bentley, 1813. Folio. (19 1/2 x 12 inches). Text in two columns. iv, 110pp. Engraved portrait, 24 engraved plates on 13 sheets. Uncut. Some foxing. Later cloth-backed grey paper boards. Large-paper issue of the first illustrated edition of a rare catalogue of British birds, plants and shells. Richard Pulteney received his doctorate in medicine from the University of Edinburgh in 1764, before serving as the personal physician to the Earl of Bath. Following the Earl's death, he resided and practiced in Blandford, Dorset. Besides membership in a host of medical societies, Pulteney was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society, as well as a Fellow of the Linnean Society. Indeed, he was an early promoter of Linnaean taxonomy, and authored the first English biography of Linnaeus in 1781. His cabinet of specimens, noted particularly for its shells, was donated to the Linnean Society following his death in 1801. The first edition of 1799 was privately-published by Pulteney with few copies printed. An inscription in an extant copy by the editor of this new edition reveals that copies of the first edition were further destroyed by fire: "The first Impression of Dr. Pulteney's Catalogues was printed in 1801 [i.e. 1799], but never published, the whole having been destroyed by the fire, at Mr. Nichols's printing office [in 1808]. I have been enabled to make considerable additions in this second impression, from communication by various scientific friends, and from my own obervations." Rackett's revised edition was the first to be illustrated, containing a portrait of Pulteney, a plate depicting 17 shells titled Melbury Fossils (engraved by J. Cary after Mary Foster), and 23 engraved plates of shells on 12 sheets. The plates numbered I-XXIII are new engravings of those by De Costa in his Historia Naturalis Testaeorum Britanniae, with several additions, depicting over 200 species. The present copy is a very rare large-paper issue, printed on wove paper (the 1799 and regular issue of 1813 being on laid paper), with a variant title without imprint. This large-paper issue is not recorded by the usual bibliographies. BM(NH) IV:p. 1622; Pritzel 7367; Nissen, ZBI 3250.

$3500.00

The Magazine of Natural History, and Journal of Zoology, Botany, Mineralogy, Geology, and Meteorology ... [New Series, Vols. 1-4]
seller photo

The Magazine of Natural History, and Journal of Zoology, Botany, Mineralogy, Geology, and Meteorology ... [New Series, Vols. 1-4]

By CHARLESWORTH, Edward (1813-1893), editor

London: Longman, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1840. 4 volumes, 8vo. 19 engraved plates (one double-page). Publisher's green cloth, covers stamped in blind A complete run of Charlesworth's continuation of Loudon's Magazine of Natural History. Volume 4 includes an essay (with an engraved plate) by Waterhouse concerning two Carabideous insects collected by Charles Darwin in South America during the Beagle voyage. Also of Darwin interest is a review of the Zoology of the Beagle in vol. 3. This complete run of the new series includes submissions by many of the most notable natural historians of the day and include a number of submissions concerning the flora and fauna of Australia.

$1500.00

Antediluvian Phytology, Illustrated by a Collection of the Fossil Remains of Plants, peculiar to the coal formations of Great Britain
seller photo

Antediluvian Phytology, Illustrated by a Collection of the Fossil Remains of Plants, peculiar to the coal formations of Great Britain

By ARTIS, Edmund Tyrell (1789-1847)

London: Nichols & Son, 1838. Quarto. 25 engraved plates (one double-page, numbered 1-24, plus 3 bis), by Weddell after Curtis. Publisher's green cloth, covers stamped in blind Provenance: Timothy Bigelow (bookplate) Scarce work, with among the best palaeobotanical illustrations to have been published up to that time. The title continues: "Selected for their novelty and interest, from upwards of a thousand specimens now in the possession of the author, and systematically described, with the view of facilitating the study of this important branch of geology." First published in 1825, the present 1838 issue is comprised of the same text and plates with a cancelled title. Serving as the House Steward to the Earl Fitzwilliam, between 1816 and 1821 Artis collected plant fossils on the Fitzwilliam properties in South Yorkshire. Many of the fossils were collected by Artis himself in underground mines and the result was a personal collection of between 1000 and 1500 plant fossils, many of exceptional quality. In 1825, Artis published the present book, which included among the best palaeobotanical illustrations to have been published up to that time. Some of the illustrations were based on paintings by Artis himself (among his many skills, he was an accomplished artist and sculptor) but most were by the leading natural history illustrator John Curtis. Each plate was accompanied by a clear description, comparison and analysis of the fossils. Nissen BBI 51; Stafleu & Cowan I:191.

$950.00

An Account of Two Voyages to New England
seller photo

An Account of Two Voyages to New England

By JOSSELYN, John (circa 1608-1704)

London: Printed for Giles Widdows, 1674. 16mo. [8],279,[3] pp. License leaf (often lacking), errata and the leaf of advertisements at the end, woodcut printer's device on leaf preceding title. Full brown 19th century morocco Provenance: John Carter Brown (bookplate and duplicate stamp) First edition of a scarce 17th-century description of New England, including valuable observations on the natural history of the region: "the earliest work on the Natural History of New England" (Rich). Josselyn visited America in 1638-39, and again from 1663 to 1671. Though parts of his history are based on inaccurate references, the book is renowned for its first-hand observations of the natural history of New England and the description of the situation with the Indians prior to King Philip's War in 1675. Josselyn's work includes an herbal, with numerous botanical, as well as medical and surgical descriptions and is considered the "first complete description of the flora and fauna of the Middle Atlantic and New England States" (Winsor). The cranberry, wild turkey, blueberry and other northeastern species are fully described here for the first time. Besides its treatment of New England, the work is of considerable value for its fine contemporary English account of New Netherland, i.e. New York. The work also deals with the practicalities and provisions necessary for the long sea-voyage. It contains as well a catalogue of tools and supplies essential to begin a new life in the colonies. Church 627; European Americana 674/105; Field 780; Howes J254; Jones 129; Sabin 36672; Siebert Sale105; Streeter Sale II:635; Vail 162; Wing J1019.

$20000.00

The Fishes of North America that are captured on Hook and Line. With eighty colored plates made from oil portraits of living fishes before their color tints had faded
seller photo

The Fishes of North America that are captured on Hook and Line. With eighty colored plates made from oil portraits of living fishes before their color tints had faded

By HARRIS, William C.

New York: the Fishes of North America Publishing Co, 1898. Vol.I (all published), folio. (18 3/4 x 12 inches). 40 chromolithographic plates by Armstrong & Co (24), Geo. H. Walker (4) and others after John L. Petrie (4 plates mounted, as issued), one full-page uncoloured illustration, numerous uncoloured illustrations of fish within the text. (Old repairs to three text leaves and 1 plate: "Spanish Mackerel"). Bound to style in green half morocco over contemporary green cloth-covered boards, the covers ruled in gilt and stamped with the gilt arms of a British Ducal family, spine in six compartments with raised bands, ruled and lettered in gilt A very rare work with forty "very beautifully drawn and color-printed plates of fishes" (Bennett). The original intention was that this work should be complete in two volumes with a total of 80 plates: only this first volume was ever published, yet it ranks along with Kilbourne and Goode's Game Fishes of the United States (New York, 1879) as one of the two greatest illustrated ichthyological works of the 19th century. The plates are printed by at least two firms: the majority are by Armstrong & Co. (The Riverside Press) of Cambridge, Mass., a few others are signed by Geo. H. Walker & Co of Boston. Twelve are without an imprint. As the preface makes clear this work was a labour-of-love for both the author and artist: "I have been engaged nearly a quarter of a century in gathering the notes from which the text of this book has been written, and twelve years in procuring the oil portraits of living fish, caught from their native waters, that I might obtain lithographic facsimiles ... The aggregate distance travelled was 28,558 miles, and the days occupied in transit and in catching and painting the fishes numbered nine hundred and seventy-two, or eighty-one working days of each angling season during twelve years. Mr. John L. Petrie, the artist, has been my steadfast companion during this protracted but pleasant task. He has painted the portraits of each fish represented ... from living specimens caught on my own rod, with the exception of the Pacific Salmons, which were taken alive in traps." Bennett p.51; Bruns H80; McGrath p.197 (parts issue); Nissen ZBI 1840; Wetzel 153.

$7500.00

The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America
seller photo

The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America

By AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851) and Rev. John BACHMAN (1790-1874)

New York: J.J. Audubon (-V.G. Audubon), 1849. Three volumes, elephant folio broadsheets. (27 1/4 x 21 1/4 inches). Three lithographic titlepages, three leaves of letterpress contents. 150 handcolored lithographic plates after John James Audubon and John Woodhouse Audubon, the backgrounds after Victor Audubon, printed and colored by J.T. Bowen of Philadelphia. Expertly bound to style in half dark purple morocco over period purple cloth covered boards, spine with raised bands lettered in the second and third compartments, the others decorated in gilt, marbled edges and endpapers [With:] The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America . New York: J. J. Audubon, 1846-1851-1854. 3 volumes, small 4to (10 x 7 inches). Half-titles, list of subscribers. 6 hand coloured lithographed plates [i.e. plate 124 and plates 151-155]. Expertly bound to style uniform to the above in half purple morocco over period purple cloth covered boards, marbled endpapers. A beautiful set of the first elephant folio edition of Audubon's Quadrupeds, complete with the separate text volumes. This is Audubon's final great natural history work. Unlike the double-elephant folio edition of the Birds of America, which was printed in London, the Quadrupeds was produced in the United States. It was the largest and most significant color plate book produced in America in the 19th century, and a fitting monument to Audubon's continuing genius. The work was originally published in thirty parts, each containing five plates, and priced at ten dollars per number. The first proofs were ready in 1842, but Audubon was fully employing the services of the lithographer J.T. Bowen on the octavo edition of The Birds of America, which was the greatest money-maker of any of the Audubon family ventures. Instead, Audubon and his sons busied themselves in gathering subscribers, signing up over 200 by the summer of 1844 (eventually the subscription list reached 300). The last part of the octavo Birds appeared in May, 1844, and publication of the folio Quadrupeds commenced immediately with the first number being issued in January, 1845 and the first volume completed within the year. Audubon's health began to fail dramatically, and responsibility for new art work fell mainly on his son John Woodhouse Audubon, with some help from his brother Victor. The second volume was completed in March, 1847. But, as John Woodhouse travelled first to Texas, then to London and Europe, the pace slowed further. The final number was issued early in 1849. By this time the elder Audubon had become completely senile ("his mind is all in ruins" Bachman wrote sadly in June, 1848). He died in early 1851. In the end, about half of the plates were based on the work of John James and half on the efforts of John Woodhouse. Audubon's collaborator on the text of the Quadrupeds was the naturalist and Lutheran clergyman, John Bachman, who was a recognized authority on the subject in the United States. The two began their association when Audubon stayed with Bachman and his family in Charleston for a month in 1831. This friendship was later cemented by the marriage of Audubon's sons, Victor and John to Bachman's daughters, Maria and Eliza. Audubon knew Bachman's contribution to the Quadrupeds would be crucial, especially because of his concerns over his own technical knowledge. By 1840, Bachman had become indispensable to the Quadrupeds project, and as Audubon showed increasing signs of vagueness, found himself writing most of the text, with some help from Victor (who was the primary business manager of the project). The text appeared between December, 1846 and the spring of 1854. Two issues of the third volume of the text are known, the present being the preferred second issue, with the supplementary text and the six octavo sized plates issued in 1854, being images not found in the folio atlas. The elephant folio edition of Audubon's Quadrupeds will always be compared to the incomparable Birds. It should be judged in its own right, as one of the grandest American works of natural history ever produced, and one of the greatest American illustrated works ever created. Bennett, p.5; Wood, p.208; Nissen 162; Reese, Stamped with a National Character 36; Sabin 2367; Ford, Audubon's Animals , New York, 1951; Boehme, Sarah, ed.: John James Audubon in the West, New York, 2000, especially Ron Tyler's essay, "The Publication of the Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America", pp. 119-182, and Robert Peck's essay "Audubon and Bachman, a Collaboration in Science", pp. 71-115.

$580000.00

The American Woods, exhibited by actual specimens and with copious explanatory text
seller photo

The American Woods, exhibited by actual specimens and with copious explanatory text

By HOUGH, Romeyn Beck (1857-1924)

Lowville, N.Y.: by the author, 1910. Volume I-V only (of 14), octavo. (9 x 6 inches). Illustrations. 387 samples of wood, each wafer-thin transverse, radial and tangential sections illustrating 129 species, window-mounted in 129 card mounts. (Occasional natural cracking and warping to a few samples). Text in original wrappers, samples in card mounts unbound as issued, each text volume and accompanying samples within original brown cloth cover in matching original cloth slipcase, with metal catch and bosses to covers. Each contained in a modern brown cloth box with morocco label. Mixed edition. A representative sample of a rare and remarkable work on the woods of America. Volumes I-IV cover all the trees of New York and adjacent states, vol.V is on the trees of Florida. A contemporary reviewer called it `one of the most marvelous and instructive books ever made ' (Art Education). This remarkable work was the lifetime achievement of Romeyn B. Hough, who devoted himself to the study of American trees, and who is best known for his Handbook of Trees of the Northern States and Canada , long a standard reference work in American dendrology. In this work, Hough sought to describe the woods found in America, with a detailed description in an accompanying pamphlet, and with thin cross-sections of actual woods mounted and labeled in accompanying stiff cardboard mounts. These provide a unique record of American wood types, arranged geographically. Generally each species is shown with wood cut on traverse section, radial section, and tangential section. The samples are so thin as to be easily translucent. The age of these specimens gives them tremendous importance from an ecological standpoint, as well as their great interest to students of American furniture and woodcrafts. The trees available to Hough at the time make such an endeavor impossible to contemplate today. Parts I-IV cover New York and adjacent states, part V covers Florida, parts VI-X describe the Pacific Slope, parts XI-XII cover the Atlantic states, and part XIII southern Florida. Part XIV contained a continuation of the work on the trees of Florida with text by Marjorie Hough, using specimens and notes prepared by her father before his death in 1924. Hough explained the unique nature of the work thus: it is `illustrated by actual specimens, and being in this way an exhibition of nature itself it possesses a peculiar and great interest never found in a press-printed book. The specimens are....about 2 x 5 in. in size, and sufficiently thin to admit of examination in transmitted light...Looked at in reflected light they appear as in the board or log... These specimens are mounted in durable frame-like Bristol-board pages, with black waterproofed surfaces...and each bears printed in gilt-bronze the technical name of the species and its English, German, French and Spanish names. The pages are separable...and are accompanied with a full text...giving information as to the uses and physical properties of the woods, and distributions, habits of growth, botanical characters, habitats, medicinal properties, etc,., of the trees.. The woods used for the specimens are personally collected by the author… and are sectioned and prepared by a process of his own device'. Complete sets of this work are very rare. The volumes were priced at five dollars each, a high price reflecting the work involved in assembling them. Since subscribers came and went over the 25-year period of publication and many only bought the volume or volumes on the areas that interested them. The rarity of complete sets can be judged from the fact that Stafleu and Cowan record the work as being complete in 6 volumes. Cf. BM (NH) II,p.880 (pts.1-8 only); cf. Stafleu & Cowan TL2 II, p.341.

$4500.00

Portraits of the Game and Wild Animals of Southern Africa, delineated in their native haunts, during a hunting expedition from the Cape Colony as far as the Tropic of Capricorn, in 1836 and 1837, with sketches of the field sports. By Captain W. Cornwallis Harris... drawn on stone by Frank Howard
seller photo

Portraits of the Game and Wild Animals of Southern Africa, delineated in their native haunts, during a hunting expedition from the Cape Colony as far as the Tropic of Capricorn, in 1836 and 1837, with sketches of the field sports. By Captain W. Cornwallis Harris... drawn on stone by Frank Howard

By HARRIS, Sir William Cornwallis (1807-1848)

London: printed by Green & Martin and H.W.Martin, published for the Proprietor by W.Pickering, and to be had of P.& D.Colnaghi and T.Cadell, 1842. Folio. (21 1/8 x 14 1/4 inches). Lithographic additional title with hand-coloured vignette, 30 hand-coloured lithographic plates by Frank Howard after Harris, 30 uncoloured lithographic vignette illustrations. Minor foxing to the text. Contemporary red half morocco over cloth boards, bound by Hammond, spine in seven compartments with raised bands, black morocco-lettering-piece in the second, the others with an animal decoration in gilt, marbled endpapers, gilt edges. A fine copy of the large paper issue of "one of the most important and valuable of the large folio works on South African fauna" (Mendelssohn). The work was issued in five parts between 1840 and 1842, either on Colombier paper with tailpieces [i.e. large paper, as here] or on smaller Imperial paper without tailpieces. It was re-issued in 1844 by Richardson and again in 1849 by Bohn. The present copy is in the work's most desirable form, with both titles in their first states, dated 1840. Captain Harris, an officer in the East India Company's Bombay Engineers, was invalided to the Cape for two years, from 1835-1837. In 1836, after conferring with the naturalist Dr. Andrew Smith, he and Richard Williamson set out from Algoa Bay, by way of Somerset and the Orange River and travelled in a north-easterly direction until they reached the kraals of the famous Matabele chief Moselikatze. He proved friendly and allowed them to return via a previously closed route. The first published account of the journey appeared in Bombay in 1838 ( Narrative of an Expedition in Southern Africa) , octavo, with a map and 4 plates); encouraged by the favourable reception, Harris went on to publish the present work which was based around his sketches of the game and wild animals he had encountered in his travels. In 1841 he was sent to open up trade relations with the ancient Christian kingdom of Shoa (Shwa, now the southern-most part of Ethiopia). His success was such that he received a knighthood in 1844, in the same year he published his account of this second journey. He returned to India in 1846 where he died in October 1848 (DNB) . Abbey Travel I, 335; Mendelssohn I, p.688; Nissen ZBI 1843; Schwerdt I, p.231; Tooley 247.

$17500.00

Cours d'hippiatrique, ou traité complet de la médecine des chevaux
seller photo

Cours d'hippiatrique, ou traité complet de la médecine des chevaux

By LAFOSSE, Philippe Étienne (1738-1820)

Paris: Edme, 1772. Folio. (19 3/4 x 13 1/8 inches). Engraved frontispiece by B.L. Prevost after Sullier, engraved portrait frontispiece by J. Baptiste Michel after Harguinier, engraved title vignette by and after Prevost, engraved arms of Charles-Eugene de Lorraine on dedication, 56 hand-coloured engraved plates by B. Michel Adam [femme Fessard], F.A. Aveline, C. Baquoy, Benard, Ch. Beulier, L. Bosse, Prevost and others after Harguinier, Lafosse, Saullier (19 folding), and 7 engraved headpieces by Delaunay, Hubert, Levilain, Lucas, Mlle Massard, Mesnil, Michel after Le Carpentier, type-ornament headpieces, woodcut head- and tailpieces and initials. Contemporary calf, covers bordered with gilt double fillet, expertly rebacked to style, spine gilt retaining the original red morocco lettering piece, period marbled endpapers Deluxe hand coloured first edition of the best 18th century French work on equine medicine and the anatomy of the horse. Cours d'hippiatrique is distinguished not only by Lafosse's anatomical skill and knowledge of equitation, gained through both study and practice of the subject, but also by the excellence of its execution: "Ce livre est un veritable monument eleve a l'Hippologie. Papier, impression, dessin, gravure, sont egalement signes" (Mennessier de la Lance). The vivid colouring of the anatomical plates elevates this hand coloured issue far beyond the regular black and white edition. "Ouvrage fort bien execute et qui a ete longtemps le meilleur que l'on eut sur cette science" (Brunet). Brunet III, 765; Cohen-de Ricci col.587; Huth p.46; Mellon Books on Horses and Horsemanship 61; Mennessier de la Lance II, pp.20-21; Nissen ZBI 2360.

$18500.00

[Pink Flowered Rocu]
seller photo

[Pink Flowered Rocu]

By MERIAN, After Maria Sibylla (1647-1717)

Amsterdam, 1705. Counter Proof of plate 44 original colour. A very fine image from probably the most beautiful, and certainly the most famous illustrated natural history work of the early 18th century, The Metamorphoses of the Insects of Surinam. The Metamorphosis is justifiably Merian's most famous work, resulting from her trip with her daughter Dorothea to Surinam in 1699. The two women spent two years studying and recording plants and insects under incredibly difficult conditions. They returned to Amsterdam with finished drawings, sketches, and specimens, from which they continued to work. The Metamorphosis is 'easily the most magnificent work on insects so far produced ... [combining] science and art in unequal proportions, meeting the demands of art at the expense, when necessary, of science. Her portrayals of living insects and other animals were imbued with a charm, a minuteness of observation and an artistic sensibility that had not previously been seen in a natural history book' (Peter Dance, The Art of Natural History , pp.50-51). In 1719, Merian's daughters produced a second edition of their mother's 1705 work, making use the "counter proof" method to double the number of plates produced at each inking. Using sheets fully coloured, this produced in the counter proof pages lovely, soft hues. Cf. Dunthorne 205; cf. Hunt 467; cf. Nissen BBI 6105.

$2500.00

[Red Lily with Moth]
seller photo

[Red Lily with Moth]

By MERIAN, After Maria Sibylla (1647-1717)

Amsterdam, 1705. Engraving, coloured by hand, by Pieter Sluyter. A very fine image from probably the most beautiful, and certainly the most famous illustrated natural history work of the early 18th century, The Metamorphoses of the Insects of Surinam. The Metamorphosis is justifiably Merian's most famous work, resulting from her trip with her daughter Dorothea to Surinam in 1699. The two women spent two years studying and recording plants and insects under incredibly difficult conditions. They returned to Amsterdam with finished drawings, sketches, and specimens, from which they continued to work. The Metamorphosis is 'easily the most magnificent work on insects so far produced ... [combining] science and art in unequal proportions, meeting the demands of art at the expense, when necessary, of science. Her portrayals of living insects and other animals were imbued with a charm, a minuteness of observation and an artistic sensibility that had not previously been seen in a natural history book' (Peter Dance, The Art of Natural History , pp.50-51). Cf. Dunthorne 205; cf. Hunt 467; cf. Nissen BBI 6105.

$1850.00

Next >