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The Cabinet of Natural History, and American Rural Sports with Illustrations
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The Cabinet of Natural History, and American Rural Sports with Illustrations

By [DOUGHTY, JOHN AND THOMAS]

Philadelphia: J. and T. Doughty, 1833. Quarto. Three volumes. vii,[1],298,[2]; vii,[3],292; 96pp. Text in two columns. Three uncolored steel-engraved titles with vignettes, two uncolored steel-engraved portrait frontispieces, and fifty-seven plates (three uncolored). Contemporary three-quarter dark green morocco and marbled boards, spines gilt; volume three rebound to style in a modern binding. Extremities lightly worn; head of spine on second volume slightly chipped. Bookplate on front pastedowns of first two volumes. First Major American Color Plate Sporting Book A scarce complete set of the American Rural Sports containing the "first colored sporting prints made in America" (Henderson), including twenty-three original lithographs by Thomas Doughty, the founding father of the Hudson River School. The Cabinet of Natural History , "an amalgam of natural history, sporting accounts, travel narratives, and practical advice for the countryman" (Reese), was started by the brothers Thomas and John Doughty in Philadelphia. It was issued in monthly parts and ran from the end of 1830 until the spring of 1834 when it abruptly ceased publication. The first volume (made up of twelve parts) was certainly the work of both Doughty brothers, with virtually all the plates being the work of Thomas, but, by the time the third part of the second volume had been issued the partnership had been disbanded. Thomas had moved to Boston to pursue his career as a painter, and as of May 17, 1832, John Doughty was the sole proprietor. Evidently Thomas' input was sorely missed and by mid-summer John was advising his subscribers that unless the level of support improved he would have to discontinue the publication. In the end, the periodical continued for almost another year before John Doughty's prediction was fulfilled and the publication came to a sudden halt with part IV of the third volume. The abrupt termination of the third volume accounts for its great rarity, with most extant sets comprised of only the first two volumes. Despite its relatively short life, The Cabinet of Natural History left behind an important legacy as the "first major sport print color plate book produced in America" (Bennett). The prints contained within the work are among few by Thomas Doughty, a significant American artist. "Of all the predecessors to [Thomas] Cole and his followers, the single artist who could most reasonably claim Cole's mantle as the founder of the [Hudson River] school is the appealing figure of Thomas Doughty, who at one juncture was hailed as 'the all-American Claude Lorrain'"' - Howat, p.31. As a painter Doughty "holds a place unique among artists of this country as having initiated the American discovery of the American landscape" (Looney). His importance as a printmaker, however, has yet to be fully recognized or adequately defined, for though "there are many prints to which Doughty's name is attached as artist only, there are only a few for which he was initially completely responsible...These are the 23 lithographs made specifically for Volume I of... The Cabinet of Natural History " (op. cit.). Doughty initially trained as a leather currier but by 1820 was listing himself in the Philadelphia City Directory as a landscape painter. "He was restless…energetic...gifted...[and] was popular almost from the start. People obviously liked his vision of a benevolent natural world...He exhibited frequently in Philadelphia and elsewhere" (op.cit.). His work was engraved for use in various publications from the early 1820s onwards, but his "major contribution to the world of printmaking, however, lies not in the 40-odd illustrations taken from his paintings and drawings but rather in the plates he himself made for [the present work]" (op.cit). American lithography was still in its infancy when the Doughtys began their periodical, and it is not clear where Thomas learned the art. "He proved himself an able practitioner in the plates of Volume I of the Cabinet , which are important as the first sporting prints in color made in America" (op.cit.). This volume also has the distinction of being the first major book of any kind with colored lithographic plates printed in America. There were two earlier minor works but "their lithographic illustrations, being chiefly diagrams, have not the same artistic quality as those of the Cabinet of 1830 with its studies of birds and animals in natural settings and dramatic landscapes. Moreover, the Cabinet was widely distributed, and the first eight issues at least were a popular success. In this way, introducing the colored lithograph to a wide audience, it made an important contribution to the development of American lithography...1830 was thus crucial in the history of American lithography for the lithographic print came of age, and this was largely through the work of Thomas Doughty" (Looney). "It marks the beginning of dominance of lithography in book illustration" - Reese. Bennett, p.35; Gee, pp.48-49; Henderson, p.37; J.K. Howat, The Hudson River and Its Painters (1972), p.31; Howes D433; Robert F. Looney, "Thomas Doughty, Printmaker" in Philadelphia Printmaking (West Chester, 1976), pp.130-48; McGrath, p.187; Meisel III, p.404 (vols. I and II only); Phillips, Sporting Books , p.69. . . Reese, Stamped with a National Character 12; Sabin 9795 (vols. I and only); Wood, p.275.

$9500.00

Lake Superior: its Physical Character, Vegetation, and Animals
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Lake Superior: its Physical Character, Vegetation, and Animals

By AGASSIZ, Louis (1807-1873)

Boston: Gould, Kendall, and Lincoln, 1850. 8vo. 16 lithographed plates, lithographed outline map. 20pp. publisher's ads. Publisher's purple cloth, spine faded First edition of this scarce and celebrated account of the natural life and landscape of the Lake Superior region. Swiss biologist and geologist Louis Agassiz was renowned for his innovative scholarship of natural history, eventually emigrating to the U.S. where he became a professor of zoology and geology at Harvard. "Considered to be the most authoritative work on the Lake Superior region for that time" (Lande). Howes A88; TPL 3044; Sabin 506; Lande 1531.

$650.00

Catalogues of the birds, shells, and some of the more rare plants, of Dorsetshire. From the new and enlarged edition of Mr. Hutchins's history of that county ... With additions; and a brief memoir of the author
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Catalogues of the birds, shells, and some of the more rare plants, of Dorsetshire. From the new and enlarged edition of Mr. Hutchins's history of that county ... With additions; and a brief memoir of the author

By PULTENEY, Richard (1730-1801); and Thomas RACKETT (1757-1841)

[London: Printed by and for J. Nichols, Son, and Bentley, 1813. Folio. (19 1/2 x 12 inches). Text in two columns. iv, 110pp. Engraved portrait, 24 engraved plates on 13 sheets. Uncut. Some foxing. Later cloth-backed grey paper boards. Large-paper issue of the first illustrated edition of a rare catalogue of British birds, plants and shells. Richard Pulteney received his doctorate in medicine from the University of Edinburgh in 1764, before serving as the personal physician to the Earl of Bath. Following the Earl's death, he resided and practiced in Blandford, Dorset. Besides membership in a host of medical societies, Pulteney was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society, as well as a Fellow of the Linnean Society. Indeed, he was an early promoter of Linnaean taxonomy, and authored the first English biography of Linnaeus in 1781. His cabinet of specimens, noted particularly for its shells, was donated to the Linnean Society following his death in 1801. The first edition of 1799 was privately-published by Pulteney with few copies printed. An inscription in an extant copy by the editor of this new edition reveals that copies of the first edition were further destroyed by fire: "The first Impression of Dr. Pulteney's Catalogues was printed in 1801 [i.e. 1799], but never published, the whole having been destroyed by the fire, at Mr. Nichols's printing office [in 1808]. I have been enabled to make considerable additions in this second impression, from communication by various scientific friends, and from my own obervations." Rackett's revised edition was the first to be illustrated, containing a portrait of Pulteney, a plate depicting 17 shells titled Melbury Fossils (engraved by J. Cary after Mary Foster), and 23 engraved plates of shells on 12 sheets. The plates numbered I-XXIII are new engravings of those by De Costa in his Historia Naturalis Testaeorum Britanniae, with several additions, depicting over 200 species. The present copy is a very rare large-paper issue, printed on wove paper (the 1799 and regular issue of 1813 being on laid paper), with a variant title without imprint. This large-paper issue is not recorded by the usual bibliographies. BM(NH) IV:p. 1622; Pritzel 7367; Nissen, ZBI 3250.

$3500.00

The Magazine of Natural History, and Journal of Zoology, Botany, Mineralogy, Geology, and Meteorology ... [New Series, Vols. 1-4]
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The Magazine of Natural History, and Journal of Zoology, Botany, Mineralogy, Geology, and Meteorology ... [New Series, Vols. 1-4]

By CHARLESWORTH, Edward (1813-1893), editor

London: Longman, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1840. 4 volumes, 8vo. 19 engraved plates (one double-page). Publisher's green cloth, covers stamped in blind A complete run of Charlesworth's continuation of Loudon's Magazine of Natural History. Volume 4 includes an essay (with an engraved plate) by Waterhouse concerning two Carabideous insects collected by Charles Darwin in South America during the Beagle voyage. Also of Darwin interest is a review of the Zoology of the Beagle in vol. 3. This complete run of the new series includes submissions by many of the most notable natural historians of the day and include a number of submissions concerning the flora and fauna of Australia.

$1500.00

Antediluvian Phytology, Illustrated by a Collection of the Fossil Remains of Plants, peculiar to the coal formations of Great Britain
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Antediluvian Phytology, Illustrated by a Collection of the Fossil Remains of Plants, peculiar to the coal formations of Great Britain

By ARTIS, Edmund Tyrell (1789-1847)

London: Nichols & Son, 1838. Quarto. 25 engraved plates (one double-page, numbered 1-24, plus 3 bis), by Weddell after Curtis. Publisher's green cloth, covers stamped in blind Provenance: Timothy Bigelow (bookplate) Scarce work, with among the best palaeobotanical illustrations to have been published up to that time. The title continues: "Selected for their novelty and interest, from upwards of a thousand specimens now in the possession of the author, and systematically described, with the view of facilitating the study of this important branch of geology." First published in 1825, the present 1838 issue is comprised of the same text and plates with a cancelled title. Serving as the House Steward to the Earl Fitzwilliam, between 1816 and 1821 Artis collected plant fossils on the Fitzwilliam properties in South Yorkshire. Many of the fossils were collected by Artis himself in underground mines and the result was a personal collection of between 1000 and 1500 plant fossils, many of exceptional quality. In 1825, Artis published the present book, which included among the best palaeobotanical illustrations to have been published up to that time. Some of the illustrations were based on paintings by Artis himself (among his many skills, he was an accomplished artist and sculptor) but most were by the leading natural history illustrator John Curtis. Each plate was accompanied by a clear description, comparison and analysis of the fossils. Nissen BBI 51; Stafleu & Cowan I:191.

$950.00

An Account of Two Voyages to New England
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An Account of Two Voyages to New England

By JOSSELYN, John (circa 1608-1704)

London: Printed for Giles Widdows, 1674. 16mo. [8],279,[3] pp. License leaf (often lacking), errata and the leaf of advertisements at the end, woodcut printer's device on leaf preceding title. Full brown 19th century morocco Provenance: John Carter Brown (bookplate and duplicate stamp) First edition of a scarce 17th-century description of New England, including valuable observations on the natural history of the region: "the earliest work on the Natural History of New England" (Rich). Josselyn visited America in 1638-39, and again from 1663 to 1671. Though parts of his history are based on inaccurate references, the book is renowned for its first-hand observations of the natural history of New England and the description of the situation with the Indians prior to King Philip's War in 1675. Josselyn's work includes an herbal, with numerous botanical, as well as medical and surgical descriptions and is considered the "first complete description of the flora and fauna of the Middle Atlantic and New England States" (Winsor). The cranberry, wild turkey, blueberry and other northeastern species are fully described here for the first time. Besides its treatment of New England, the work is of considerable value for its fine contemporary English account of New Netherland, i.e. New York. The work also deals with the practicalities and provisions necessary for the long sea-voyage. It contains as well a catalogue of tools and supplies essential to begin a new life in the colonies. Church 627; European Americana 674/105; Field 780; Howes J254; Jones 129; Sabin 36672; Siebert Sale105; Streeter Sale II:635; Vail 162; Wing J1019.

$20000.00

The Fishes of North America that are captured on Hook and Line. With eighty colored plates made from oil portraits of living fishes before their color tints had faded
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The Fishes of North America that are captured on Hook and Line. With eighty colored plates made from oil portraits of living fishes before their color tints had faded

By HARRIS, William C.

New York: the Fishes of North America Publishing Co, 1898. Vol.I (all published), folio. (18 3/4 x 12 inches). 40 chromolithographic plates by Armstrong & Co (24), Geo. H. Walker (4) and others after John L. Petrie (4 plates mounted, as issued), one full-page uncoloured illustration, numerous uncoloured illustrations of fish within the text. (Old repairs to three text leaves and 1 plate: "Spanish Mackerel"). Bound to style in green half morocco over contemporary green cloth-covered boards, the covers ruled in gilt and stamped with the gilt arms of a British Ducal family, spine in six compartments with raised bands, ruled and lettered in gilt A very rare work with forty "very beautifully drawn and color-printed plates of fishes" (Bennett). The original intention was that this work should be complete in two volumes with a total of 80 plates: only this first volume was ever published, yet it ranks along with Kilbourne and Goode's Game Fishes of the United States (New York, 1879) as one of the two greatest illustrated ichthyological works of the 19th century. The plates are printed by at least two firms: the majority are by Armstrong & Co. (The Riverside Press) of Cambridge, Mass., a few others are signed by Geo. H. Walker & Co of Boston. Twelve are without an imprint. As the preface makes clear this work was a labour-of-love for both the author and artist: "I have been engaged nearly a quarter of a century in gathering the notes from which the text of this book has been written, and twelve years in procuring the oil portraits of living fish, caught from their native waters, that I might obtain lithographic facsimiles ... The aggregate distance travelled was 28,558 miles, and the days occupied in transit and in catching and painting the fishes numbered nine hundred and seventy-two, or eighty-one working days of each angling season during twelve years. Mr. John L. Petrie, the artist, has been my steadfast companion during this protracted but pleasant task. He has painted the portraits of each fish represented ... from living specimens caught on my own rod, with the exception of the Pacific Salmons, which were taken alive in traps." Bennett p.51; Bruns H80; McGrath p.197 (parts issue); Nissen ZBI 1840; Wetzel 153.

$7500.00

The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America
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The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America

By AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851) and Rev. John BACHMAN (1790-1874)

New York: J.J. Audubon (-V.G. Audubon), 1849. Three volumes, elephant folio broadsheets. (27 1/4 x 21 1/4 inches). Three lithographic titlepages, three leaves of letterpress contents. 150 handcolored lithographic plates after John James Audubon and John Woodhouse Audubon, the backgrounds after Victor Audubon, printed and colored by J.T. Bowen of Philadelphia. Expertly bound to style in half dark purple morocco over period purple cloth covered boards, spine with raised bands lettered in the second and third compartments, the others decorated in gilt, marbled edges and endpapers [With:] The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America . New York: J. J. Audubon, 1846-1851-1854. 3 volumes, small 4to (10 x 7 inches). Half-titles, list of subscribers. 6 hand coloured lithographed plates [i.e. plate 124 and plates 151-155]. Expertly bound to style uniform to the above in half purple morocco over period purple cloth covered boards, marbled endpapers. A beautiful set of the first elephant folio edition of Audubon's Quadrupeds, complete with the separate text volumes. This is Audubon's final great natural history work. Unlike the double-elephant folio edition of the Birds of America, which was printed in London, the Quadrupeds was produced in the United States. It was the largest and most significant color plate book produced in America in the 19th century, and a fitting monument to Audubon's continuing genius. The work was originally published in thirty parts, each containing five plates, and priced at ten dollars per number. The first proofs were ready in 1842, but Audubon was fully employing the services of the lithographer J.T. Bowen on the octavo edition of The Birds of America, which was the greatest money-maker of any of the Audubon family ventures. Instead, Audubon and his sons busied themselves in gathering subscribers, signing up over 200 by the summer of 1844 (eventually the subscription list reached 300). The last part of the octavo Birds appeared in May, 1844, and publication of the folio Quadrupeds commenced immediately with the first number being issued in January, 1845 and the first volume completed within the year. Audubon's health began to fail dramatically, and responsibility for new art work fell mainly on his son John Woodhouse Audubon, with some help from his brother Victor. The second volume was completed in March, 1847. But, as John Woodhouse travelled first to Texas, then to London and Europe, the pace slowed further. The final number was issued early in 1849. By this time the elder Audubon had become completely senile ("his mind is all in ruins" Bachman wrote sadly in June, 1848). He died in early 1851. In the end, about half of the plates were based on the work of John James and half on the efforts of John Woodhouse. Audubon's collaborator on the text of the Quadrupeds was the naturalist and Lutheran clergyman, John Bachman, who was a recognized authority on the subject in the United States. The two began their association when Audubon stayed with Bachman and his family in Charleston for a month in 1831. This friendship was later cemented by the marriage of Audubon's sons, Victor and John to Bachman's daughters, Maria and Eliza. Audubon knew Bachman's contribution to the Quadrupeds would be crucial, especially because of his concerns over his own technical knowledge. By 1840, Bachman had become indispensable to the Quadrupeds project, and as Audubon showed increasing signs of vagueness, found himself writing most of the text, with some help from Victor (who was the primary business manager of the project). The text appeared between December, 1846 and the spring of 1854. Two issues of the third volume of the text are known, the present being the preferred second issue, with the supplementary text and the six octavo sized plates issued in 1854, being images not found in the folio atlas. The elephant folio edition of Audubon's Quadrupeds will always be compared to the incomparable Birds. It should be judged in its own right, as one of the grandest American works of natural history ever produced, and one of the greatest American illustrated works ever created. Bennett, p.5; Wood, p.208; Nissen 162; Reese, Stamped with a National Character 36; Sabin 2367; Ford, Audubon's Animals , New York, 1951; Boehme, Sarah, ed.: John James Audubon in the West, New York, 2000, especially Ron Tyler's essay, "The Publication of the Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America", pp. 119-182, and Robert Peck's essay "Audubon and Bachman, a Collaboration in Science", pp. 71-115.

$580000.00

The American Woods, exhibited by actual specimens and with copious explanatory text
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The American Woods, exhibited by actual specimens and with copious explanatory text

By HOUGH, Romeyn Beck (1857-1924)

Lowville, N.Y.: by the author, 1910. Volume I-V only (of 14), octavo. (9 x 6 inches). Illustrations. 387 samples of wood, each wafer-thin transverse, radial and tangential sections illustrating 129 species, window-mounted in 129 card mounts. (Occasional natural cracking and warping to a few samples). Text in original wrappers, samples in card mounts unbound as issued, each text volume and accompanying samples within original brown cloth cover in matching original cloth slipcase, with metal catch and bosses to covers. Each contained in a modern brown cloth box with morocco label. Mixed edition. A representative sample of a rare and remarkable work on the woods of America. Volumes I-IV cover all the trees of New York and adjacent states, vol.V is on the trees of Florida. A contemporary reviewer called it `one of the most marvelous and instructive books ever made ' (Art Education). This remarkable work was the lifetime achievement of Romeyn B. Hough, who devoted himself to the study of American trees, and who is best known for his Handbook of Trees of the Northern States and Canada , long a standard reference work in American dendrology. In this work, Hough sought to describe the woods found in America, with a detailed description in an accompanying pamphlet, and with thin cross-sections of actual woods mounted and labeled in accompanying stiff cardboard mounts. These provide a unique record of American wood types, arranged geographically. Generally each species is shown with wood cut on traverse section, radial section, and tangential section. The samples are so thin as to be easily translucent. The age of these specimens gives them tremendous importance from an ecological standpoint, as well as their great interest to students of American furniture and woodcrafts. The trees available to Hough at the time make such an endeavor impossible to contemplate today. Parts I-IV cover New York and adjacent states, part V covers Florida, parts VI-X describe the Pacific Slope, parts XI-XII cover the Atlantic states, and part XIII southern Florida. Part XIV contained a continuation of the work on the trees of Florida with text by Marjorie Hough, using specimens and notes prepared by her father before his death in 1924. Hough explained the unique nature of the work thus: it is `illustrated by actual specimens, and being in this way an exhibition of nature itself it possesses a peculiar and great interest never found in a press-printed book. The specimens are....about 2 x 5 in. in size, and sufficiently thin to admit of examination in transmitted light...Looked at in reflected light they appear as in the board or log... These specimens are mounted in durable frame-like Bristol-board pages, with black waterproofed surfaces...and each bears printed in gilt-bronze the technical name of the species and its English, German, French and Spanish names. The pages are separable...and are accompanied with a full text...giving information as to the uses and physical properties of the woods, and distributions, habits of growth, botanical characters, habitats, medicinal properties, etc,., of the trees.. The woods used for the specimens are personally collected by the author… and are sectioned and prepared by a process of his own device'. Complete sets of this work are very rare. The volumes were priced at five dollars each, a high price reflecting the work involved in assembling them. Since subscribers came and went over the 25-year period of publication and many only bought the volume or volumes on the areas that interested them. The rarity of complete sets can be judged from the fact that Stafleu and Cowan record the work as being complete in 6 volumes. Cf. BM (NH) II,p.880 (pts.1-8 only); cf. Stafleu & Cowan TL2 II, p.341.

$4500.00

Portraits of the Game and Wild Animals of Southern Africa, delineated in their native haunts, during a hunting expedition from the Cape Colony as far as the Tropic of Capricorn, in 1836 and 1837, with sketches of the field sports. By Captain W. Cornwallis Harris... drawn on stone by Frank Howard
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Portraits of the Game and Wild Animals of Southern Africa, delineated in their native haunts, during a hunting expedition from the Cape Colony as far as the Tropic of Capricorn, in 1836 and 1837, with sketches of the field sports. By Captain W. Cornwallis Harris... drawn on stone by Frank Howard

By HARRIS, Sir William Cornwallis (1807-1848)

London: printed by Green & Martin and H.W.Martin, published for the Proprietor by W.Pickering, and to be had of P.& D.Colnaghi and T.Cadell, 1842. Folio. (21 1/8 x 14 1/4 inches). Lithographic additional title with hand-coloured vignette, 30 hand-coloured lithographic plates by Frank Howard after Harris, 30 uncoloured lithographic vignette illustrations. Minor foxing to the text. Contemporary red half morocco over cloth boards, bound by Hammond, spine in seven compartments with raised bands, black morocco-lettering-piece in the second, the others with an animal decoration in gilt, marbled endpapers, gilt edges. A fine copy of the large paper issue of "one of the most important and valuable of the large folio works on South African fauna" (Mendelssohn). The work was issued in five parts between 1840 and 1842, either on Colombier paper with tailpieces [i.e. large paper, as here] or on smaller Imperial paper without tailpieces. It was re-issued in 1844 by Richardson and again in 1849 by Bohn. The present copy is in the work's most desirable form, with both titles in their first states, dated 1840. Captain Harris, an officer in the East India Company's Bombay Engineers, was invalided to the Cape for two years, from 1835-1837. In 1836, after conferring with the naturalist Dr. Andrew Smith, he and Richard Williamson set out from Algoa Bay, by way of Somerset and the Orange River and travelled in a north-easterly direction until they reached the kraals of the famous Matabele chief Moselikatze. He proved friendly and allowed them to return via a previously closed route. The first published account of the journey appeared in Bombay in 1838 ( Narrative of an Expedition in Southern Africa) , octavo, with a map and 4 plates); encouraged by the favourable reception, Harris went on to publish the present work which was based around his sketches of the game and wild animals he had encountered in his travels. In 1841 he was sent to open up trade relations with the ancient Christian kingdom of Shoa (Shwa, now the southern-most part of Ethiopia). His success was such that he received a knighthood in 1844, in the same year he published his account of this second journey. He returned to India in 1846 where he died in October 1848 (DNB) . Abbey Travel I, 335; Mendelssohn I, p.688; Nissen ZBI 1843; Schwerdt I, p.231; Tooley 247.

$17500.00

[Pink Flowered Rocu]
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[Pink Flowered Rocu]

By MERIAN, After Maria Sibylla (1647-1717)

Amsterdam, 1705. Counter Proof of plate 44 original colour. A very fine image from probably the most beautiful, and certainly the most famous illustrated natural history work of the early 18th century, The Metamorphoses of the Insects of Surinam. The Metamorphosis is justifiably Merian's most famous work, resulting from her trip with her daughter Dorothea to Surinam in 1699. The two women spent two years studying and recording plants and insects under incredibly difficult conditions. They returned to Amsterdam with finished drawings, sketches, and specimens, from which they continued to work. The Metamorphosis is 'easily the most magnificent work on insects so far produced ... [combining] science and art in unequal proportions, meeting the demands of art at the expense, when necessary, of science. Her portrayals of living insects and other animals were imbued with a charm, a minuteness of observation and an artistic sensibility that had not previously been seen in a natural history book' (Peter Dance, The Art of Natural History , pp.50-51). In 1719, Merian's daughters produced a second edition of their mother's 1705 work, making use the "counter proof" method to double the number of plates produced at each inking. Using sheets fully coloured, this produced in the counter proof pages lovely, soft hues. Cf. Dunthorne 205; cf. Hunt 467; cf. Nissen BBI 6105.

$2500.00

[Red Lily with Moth]
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[Red Lily with Moth]

By MERIAN, After Maria Sibylla (1647-1717)

Amsterdam, 1705. Engraving, coloured by hand, by Pieter Sluyter. A very fine image from probably the most beautiful, and certainly the most famous illustrated natural history work of the early 18th century, The Metamorphoses of the Insects of Surinam. The Metamorphosis is justifiably Merian's most famous work, resulting from her trip with her daughter Dorothea to Surinam in 1699. The two women spent two years studying and recording plants and insects under incredibly difficult conditions. They returned to Amsterdam with finished drawings, sketches, and specimens, from which they continued to work. The Metamorphosis is 'easily the most magnificent work on insects so far produced ... [combining] science and art in unequal proportions, meeting the demands of art at the expense, when necessary, of science. Her portrayals of living insects and other animals were imbued with a charm, a minuteness of observation and an artistic sensibility that had not previously been seen in a natural history book' (Peter Dance, The Art of Natural History , pp.50-51). Cf. Dunthorne 205; cf. Hunt 467; cf. Nissen BBI 6105.

$1850.00

[Soursop with Owlet Moth]
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[Soursop with Owlet Moth]

By MERIAN, After Maria Sibylla (1647-1717)

Amsterdam, 1705. Counter Proof of plate 14 original colour. A very fine image from probably the most beautiful, and certainly the most famous illustrated natural history work of the early 18th century, The Metamorphoses of the Insects of Surinam. The Metamorphosis is justifiably Merian's most famous work, resulting from her trip with her daughter Dorothea to Surinam in 1699. The two women spent two years studying and recording plants and insects under incredibly difficult conditions. They returned to Amsterdam with finished drawings, sketches, and specimens, from which they continued to work. The Metamorphosis is 'easily the most magnificent work on insects so far produced ... [combining] science and art in unequal proportions, meeting the demands of art at the expense, when necessary, of science. Her portrayals of living insects and other animals were imbued with a charm, a minuteness of observation and an artistic sensibility that had not previously been seen in a natural history book' (Peter Dance, The Art of Natural History , pp.50-51). In 1719, Merian's daughters produced a second edition of their mother's 1705 work, making use the "counter proof" method to double the number of plates produced at each inking. Using sheets fully coloured, this produced in the counter proof pages lovely, soft hues. Cf. Dunthorne 205; cf. Hunt 467; cf. Nissen BBI 6105.

$2500.00

{Moths, Caterpillars on Fig Tree]
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{Moths, Caterpillars on Fig Tree]

By MERIAN, After Maria Sibylla (1647-1717)

Amsterdam, 1705. Counter Proof of plate 67 original colour. A very fine image from probably the most beautiful, and certainly the most famous illustrated natural history work of the early 18th century, The Metamorphoses of the Insects of Surinam. The Metamorphosis is justifiably Merian's most famous work, resulting from her trip with her daughter Dorothea to Surinam in 1699. The two women spent two years studying and recording plants and insects under incredibly difficult conditions. They returned to Amsterdam with finished drawings, sketches, and specimens, from which they continued to work. The Metamorphosis is 'easily the most magnificent work on insects so far produced ... [combining] science and art in unequal proportions, meeting the demands of art at the expense, when necessary, of science. Her portrayals of living insects and other animals were imbued with a charm, a minuteness of observation and an artistic sensibility that had not previously been seen in a natural history book' (Peter Dance, The Art of Natural History , pp.50-51). In 1719, Merian's daughters produced a second edition of their mother's 1705 work, making use the "counter proof" method to double the number of plates produced at each inking. Using sheets fully coloured, this produced in the counter proof pages lovely, soft hues. Cf. Dunthorne 205; cf. Hunt 467; cf. Nissen BBI 6105.

$2500.00

De natura aquatilium carmen, in universam Gulielmi Rondeletii
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De natura aquatilium carmen, in universam Gulielmi Rondeletii

By BOUSSUET, Francois (1520-1572)

Lyon: M. Bonhomme, 1558. 2 parts in 1, small 4to. (7 3/4 x 5 3/8 inches). Bonhome's woodcut Perseus device on both titles, woodcut portrait of the author, 466 large woodcut illustrations of fish and marine life. One folding leaf with illustration in the second part. Late 19th century brown morocco by De Samblanx and Weckesser, covers panelled with gilt rules, gilt fleuron cornerpieces, spine with five raised bands, lettered in the second compartment, the others with gilt fleurons, gilt edges, marbled endpapers First and only edition of Bossuet's pictorial history in verse of fishes and aquatic animals. Based on Guillaume Rondelet's authoritative work on fishes and marine life, each illustration is captioned by epigrammatic verses in Latin by Boussuet, a medical doctor, with much information about the taste and nature of fish meat and shells. The first part deals with fish only, the second part largely deals with shells. Although Baudrier attributes the woodblocks to Georges Reverdy, Mortimer states that the series of fishes, shells and various sea creatures had been cut for Rondelet's Libri de piscibus marinis , printed by Bonhomme in Lyon in 1554-55 and in French in the same year as this publication. Among the extraordinary illustrations is a depiction of a "monk" sea monster, a drawing of which was supposedly given to Rondelet by Margurite d'Angoulme, Queen of Navarre. Brunet I, 1184; Baudrier X, p. 257; Durling 660; Nissen ZBI 511; Mortimer/Harvard French Sixteenth Century Books I, 118; Petit 253.

$4250.00

Catalogues of the birds, shells, and some of the more rare plants, of Dorsetshire. From the new and enlarged edition of Mr. Hutchins's history of that county
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Catalogues of the birds, shells, and some of the more rare plants, of Dorsetshire. From the new and enlarged edition of Mr. Hutchins's history of that county

By PULTENEY, Richard (1730-1801)

London: Printed by, J. Nichols, for the use of the compiler and his friends, 1799. Folio. (14 5/8 x 9 1/8 inches). Text in two columns. [2],92pp. Contemporary half calf and marbled paper covered boards, flat spine tooled and lettered in gilt, marbled endpapers (expert repairs at spine) Very rare first edition of a rare catalogue of British birds, plants and shells. Richard Pulteney received his doctorate in medicine from the University of Edinburgh in 1764, before serving as the personal physician to the Earl of Bath. Following the Earl's death, he resided and practiced in Blandford, Dorset. Besides membership in a host of medical societies, Pulteney was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society, as well as a Fellow of the Linnean Society. Indeed, he was an early promoter of Linnaean taxonomy, and authored the first English biography of Linnaeus in 1781. His cabinet of specimens, noted particularly for its shells, was donated to the Linnean Society following his death in 1801. This work is divided into three sections, viz. birds (pp. 1-22), shells (pp. 22-54) and plants (pp. 55-92), each with a prefatory note, and all preceded by a cancel title. Nissen and BM(NH) erroneously cite a portrait in this edition. Privately-published by Pulteney, few copies were printed; bookseller John Bohn cites fifty copies printed in an 1843 catalogue. Furthermore, it is believed that many printed copies were destroyed in the 1808 fire at Nichols' warehouse. ESTC cites but 7 extant examples, with only one being in North America (Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia). ESTC T140194; BM(NH) IV:p. 1622; Pritzel 7367; Nissen, ZBI 3250.

$6800.00

Catalogues of the birds, shells, and some of the more rare plants, of Dorsetshire. From the new and enlarged edition of Mr. Hutchins's history of that county ... With additions; and a brief memoir of the author
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Catalogues of the birds, shells, and some of the more rare plants, of Dorsetshire. From the new and enlarged edition of Mr. Hutchins's history of that county ... With additions; and a brief memoir of the author

By PULTENEY, Richard (1730-1801); and Thomas RACKETT (1757-1841)

London: Printed by and for J. Nichols, Son, and Bentley, 1813. Folio. (15 1/8 x 9 1/2 inches). Text in two columns. iv, 110pp. [errors in pagination to pp. 53-68 corrected with printed overslips at a contemporary date]. Engraved portrait, 24 engraved plates on 13 sheets. Contemporary half calf over marbled paper covered boards, flat spine tooled and lettered in gilt, marbled endpapers (expert repair at bottom of spine) Provenance: Dawson Turner (inscribed by Rackett on the title and with an additional inscription on the endpaper concerning publication) Inscribed copy of the first illustrated edition of a rare catalogue of British birds, plants and shells. Richard Pulteney received his doctorate in medicine from the University of Edinburgh in 1764, before serving as the personal physician to the Earl of Bath. Following the Earl's death, he resided and practiced in Blandford, Dorset. Besides membership in a host of medical societies, Pulteney was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society, as well as a Fellow of the Linnean Society. Indeed, he was an early promoter of Linnaean taxonomy, and authored the first English biography of Linnaeus in 1781. His cabinet of specimens, noted particularly for its shells, was donated to the Linnean Society following his death in 1801. The first edition of 1799 was privately-published by Pulteney with few copies printed. An inscription in this copy by the editor of this new edition reveals that copies of the first edition were further destroyed by fire: "The first Impression of Dr. Pulteney's Catalogues was printed in 1801 [i.e. 1799], but never published, the whole having been destroyed by the fire, at Mr. Nichols's printing office [in 1808]. I have been enabled to make considerable additions in this second impression, from communication by various scientific friends, and from my own obervations." Rackett's revised edition was the first to be illustrated, containing a portrait of Pulteney, a plate depicting 17 shells titled Melbury Fossils (engraved by J. Cary after Mary Foster), and 23 engraved plates of shells on 12 sheets. The plates numbered I-XXIII are new engravings of those by De Costa in his Historia Naturalis Testaeorum Britanniae, with several additions, depicting over 200 species. This copy with important provenance to Dawson Turner (1775-1858), a noted botanist, antiquary and Fellow of the Royal Society. Turner's scientific studies centered on cryptogamic plants and he formed large botanical collections, mainly of algae, which are preserved at Kew within the herbarium of his son-in-law and fellow botanist Hooker. BM(NH) IV:p. 1622; Pritzel 7367; Nissen, ZBI 3250.

$4500.00

Index testarum conchyliorum quae adservantur in Museo Nicolai Gualtieri Philosophi et Medici Collegiati Florentini, Regiae Botanices Florentinae Academiae Socii in Pisano Athenaeo Medicinae Professoris emeriti et methodice exhibentur tabulis CX
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Index testarum conchyliorum quae adservantur in Museo Nicolai Gualtieri Philosophi et Medici Collegiati Florentini, Regiae Botanices Florentinae Academiae Socii in Pisano Athenaeo Medicinae Professoris emeriti et methodice exhibentur tabulis CX

By GUALTIERI, Niccolo (1688-1744)

Florence: Caietani Albizzini, 1742. Folio. (17 7/8 x 12 1/4 inches). Titles printed in red and black. Engraved frontispiece, portrait, 110 numbered full-page plates, 17 vignettes on section titles, 18 other vignettes and plates in text. Expertly bound to style in half period mottled calf and patterned paper covered boards A lovely wide-margined first edition of this beautiful shell book, depicting the author's famed collection of specimens. Niccolo Gualtieri (1688-1744) was a professor at the University of Pisa and physician to Cosimo III, Grand Duke of Tuscany. The Duke was a keen collector, whose cabinet of shells included 360 species sent to him by Rumphius. The present work shows Gualtieri's collection, including examples given to him by Cosimo III. One of the most beautiful books on shells ever published, the plates are engraved by P.A. Pazzi after drawings by Giuseppe Menabuoni, which depict many of the shells standing on their apices. Gualtieri's collection is extant and can be found in the Museo storia naturale in Pisa. Cobres p 110 n 23; Nissen ZBI 1736; Dance, p. 57.

$15000.00

[Large paper proof impressions of the plates from his History of Quadrupeds]
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[Large paper proof impressions of the plates from his History of Quadrupeds]

By PENNANT, Thomas (1726-1798)

[London: B. and J. White, 1793. Folio. (13 x 9 inches). 112 engraved plates, proof impressions before letters printed on laid paper, engraved by Mazell (i.e. 111 plates, plus the title vignette). Contemporary red straight-grained morocco by Kalthoeber, covers bordered in gilt, spine with double-raised bands in seven compartments, lettered in gilt, marbled endpapers, gilt edges Provenance: William Beckford (Sotheby's London, 6 May 1817, lot 289); George Chetwynd (bookplate and Glendon Hall blind-stamp on first plate); H.J.B. Clements (bookplate); Robert Pirie (bookplate) Beckford's copy of large paper, proof impressions of the plates from Pennant's History of the Quadrupeds, elegantly bound by Kalthoeber. While large paper editions of many of Pennant's works were available to purchase, albeit at significantly higher costs than regular issues, the present complete set of large paper proof impressions of the plates, printed before letters, was likely produced only for special patrons. The provenance of the volume to William Beckford, arguably the most influential patron of arts and letters in late 18th and early 19th century Great Britain, bears out that theory. The only other similar collection of large paper proofs we can trace was sold in 1803 in the Bibliotheca Woodhousiana, sold by Leigh and Sotheby, December 1803, lot 640. Dibdin chose the copy as one of the most valuable books in that collection. A Welsh naturalist and traveler, Pennant was one of the foremost zoologists of his time, frequently corresponding with the leading naturalists of Great Britain and Europe. The present work was first published in 1771 as Synopsis of Quadrupeds , but was enlarged to become the History of Quadrupeds , with editions published in 1781 (with 52 plates) and expanded again in 1793 (111 plates). The present proofs are from that final, most complete edition. "Pennant's name stands high among the naturalists of the eighteenth century" (DAB) Nissen ZBI 3108; Dibdin, Bibliomania pp. 594-596.

$24000.00

Catalogues of the birds, shells, and some of the more rare plants, of Dorsetshire. From the new and enlarged edition of Mr. Hutchins's history of that county ... With additions; and a brief memoir of the author
seller photo

Catalogues of the birds, shells, and some of the more rare plants, of Dorsetshire. From the new and enlarged edition of Mr. Hutchins's history of that county ... With additions; and a brief memoir of the author

By PULTENEY, Richard (1730-1801); and Thomas RACKETT (1757-1841)

[London: Printed by and for J. Nichols, Son, and Bentley, 1813. Folio. (19 1/2 x 12 inches). Text in two columns. iv, 110pp. Engraved portrait, 24 engraved plates on 13 sheets. Uncut. Contemporary boards, expertly rebacked to style with period paper Large-paper issue of the first illustrated edition of a rare catalogue of British birds, plants and shells. Richard Pulteney received his doctorate in medicine from the University of Edinburgh in 1764, before serving as the personal physician to the Earl of Bath. Following the Earl's death, he resided and practiced in Blandford, Dorset. Besides membership in a host of medical societies, Pulteney was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society, as well as a Fellow of the Linnean Society. Indeed, he was an early promoter of Linnaean taxonomy, and authored the first English biography of Linnaeus in 1781. His cabinet of specimens, noted particularly for its shells, was donated to the Linnean Society following his death in 1801. The first edition of 1799 was privately-published by Pulteney with few copies printed. An inscription in an extant copy by the editor of this new edition reveals that copies of the first edition were further destroyed by fire: "The first Impression of Dr. Pulteney's Catalogues was printed in 1801 [i.e. 1799], but never published, the whole having been destroyed by the fire, at Mr. Nichols's printing office [in 1808]. I have been enabled to make considerable additions in this second impression, from communication by various scientific friends, and from my own obervations." Rackett's revised edition was the first to be illustrated, containing a portrait of Pulteney, a plate depicting 17 shells titled Melbury Fossils (engraved by J. Cary after Mary Foster), and 23 engraved plates of shells on 12 sheets. The plates numbered I-XXIII are new engravings of those by De Costa in his Historia Naturalis Testaeorum Britanniae, with several additions, depicting over 200 species. The present copy is a very rare large-paper issue, printed on wove paper watermarked 1810 (the 1799 and regular issue of 1813 being on laid paper), with a variant title without imprint. This large-paper issue is not recorded by the usual bibliographies. BM(NH) IV:p. 1622; Pritzel 7367; Nissen, ZBI 3250.

$4500.00

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