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Amérique Septentrionale dressée sur les Relations les plus modernes des Voyageurs et Navigateurs, et divisée suivant les differentes possessions des Européens ... Corrigee en 1775

By ROBERT DE VAUGONDY, Didier (1723-1786)

Paris: Vaugondy, 1775. Copper-engraved map, with period hand-colouring in outline. Inset of the Northwest coast. Contemporary manuscript addition of the island of Bermuda. A very fine eighteenth-century map depicting all of North America, by one of France's greatest cartographers: this issue with significant additions to the northwest coast. This highly attractive map depicts North America during an especially fascinating time in its history, the period immediately before the American Revolution. Vaugondy consulted several sources in devising his map including Bellin's excellent rendering of the Great Lakes, and Guillame De L'Isle's and Jean-Baptiste D'Anville's maps of the Mississippi Basin. The British Thirteen Colonies hug the Atlantic seaboard, while the immense Gallic empire, embracing both New France (Canada) and Louisiana (the Mississippi Basin) occupy the majority of the interior of the continent. This highly detailed map labels numerous native villages and European forts in the interior of the continent. Spanish Mexico reaches all the way north to modern-day Colorado, and Baja California is shown accurately to be a peninsula, and not an island as previously thought. The map also depicts the islands of the Caribbean, which are shown to be in the possession of the various European powers. The map was first issued in the 1750s, though in the present "corrected" issue of 1775, the cartouche has been moved to the upper right corner (and re-designed) and a large inset of the Northwest coast appears in the upper left. This includes information gleaned from a number of sources, though the only mentioned on the map itself is Cluny.

$950.00

[Gloucester, Massachusetts] le Beau port
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[Gloucester, Massachusetts] le Beau port

By CHAMPLAIN, Samuel de (1567-1635)

Paris: Chez Pierre Le-Mur, 1613. Engraved map of Gloucester, Massachusetts, from 'Les Voyages dv Sievr de Champlain', in excellent condition, map size: 6 x 9 1/2 inches, sheet size: 8 1/4 x 10 inches. A highly important map by Samuel de Champlain, one of a series of the very first printed sea charts of North America This is a highly important map of what is now known as Stage Harbor, near Chatham, on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Philip Burden describes it as "one of the finest in the series" of what were the very first printed sea charts of North America, devised by the great explorer Samuel de Champlain. It is also the earliest map of this region. From 1605 to 1606, Champlain explored the Massachusetts coast in search of a location to build a settlement that might be even better than the existing French base of Port Royal, that was established in the spring of 1605 in Nova Scotia. Champlain's pinnace sailed into what later became known as Gloucester Harbor in September, 1606. The party stayed in the port for a few days, and found the location to be physically most agreeable for a potential settlement. However, they soon found the disposition of the indigenous peoples to be remarkably hostile, a problem that would ultimately drive the Frenchman away from the region all together. The harbour dominates the centre of the map, which is protected by a long narrow peninsula. Champlain's ship is shown anchored in the middle of the bay, at the head of a trail of depth soundings that lead to the mouth of the bay, where the map is adorned with an elegant compass rose. Numerous finely engraved fish decorate the scene, and the forested countryside is shown to be densely populated with native villages. A detailed legend is printed beneath that explains the various details marked by letters on the map. Perhaps the most curious aspect of the composition is the figure of an agitated man marked with the symbol 'V', to which the key explains, in translation, that this is an impression of Champlain himself "throwing his limbs about," as if to warn his comrades of the dangers posed by the natives. Samuel de Champlain was one of the greatest explorers and cartographers of his era, and the founding father of what would one day become Canada. Inspired by the voyages of his countryman, Jacques Cartier, he made his first voyage to Canada in 1603. Upon his return to France, his reports encouraged Henry IV to finance a colonizing expedition, and specifically the company was given a royal monopoly on all settlement and fur trading rights between the 40th and 45th parallels. In 1604, Champlain joined the venture as second in command to Sieur Dugua, Sieur de Monts, and it was on this voyage that Champlain explored the Massachusetts coast. In 1608, Champlain founded Quebec on an impressive promontory overlooking the St.Lawrence River. Having overcome much initial adversity, this settlement proved to be successful, eventually becoming the capital of a vast French domain that eventually extended down to the Gulf of Mexico and over to the Rockies. Champlain, passionately dedicated to the mission of securing the permanence of New France, had to return to France frequently to raise funds and encourage new settlers to join the enterprise. This map was published in 1613 as part of his greatest work, Les Voyages dv Sievr de Champlain , a detailed narrative of the founding of New France, intended to raise the profile of his venture. Champlain later became the governor of New France, and by the time he died on Christmas Day in 1635, he knew that he had succeeded in his mission. Burden Mapping of North America I 168; Morison, Samuel de Champlain, Father of New France , pp.79-81.

$9500.00

Nova Anglia. Septentrionali Americæ implantata Anglorumque coloniis florentissima geographice exhibita â Ioh. Baptista Homman, sac. cæs. maj. geographo
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Nova Anglia. Septentrionali Americæ implantata Anglorumque coloniis florentissima geographice exhibita â Ioh. Baptista Homman, sac. cæs. maj. geographo

By HOMANN, Johann Baptist (1663-1724)

Nuremberg: Homann Heirs, 1740. Copper-engraved map, with full original colour, in excellent condition, on a full untrimmed sheet. A highly fascinating and attractive map that showcases the curious nature of geographical knowledge of the American northeast, as considered by one of the greatest German cartographers This very fine map, in magnificent full original colour, focuses on New England, but embraces the entire territory from Philadelphia in the south up to the St. Lawrence Valley in the north. It depicts the region as it was considered before the British government commissioned advanced surveys of the subject. The geographic portrayal of the coast of New England is quite detailed, and features extensive hydrological information off of the coast. Curiously, however, Boston Harbor is shown to be dramatically larger than its actual appearance, and Cape Cod is shown to be an island. In the interior, Lake Champlain is depicted to be dramatically east of its true location, and New York's Lake Seneca is creatively shown to be a massive sea that drains into the Hudson Valley. To the north, the portrayal of New France is equally fanciful, as "Mont Royal" Island, the site of Montreal, takes on a massive, attenuated form immediately adjacent to Lake Ontario. True to Homann's artistic signature, the map features a finely-engraved cartouche in the lower right corner that depicts American scenes of commerce and nature. One of the most celebrated cartographers of his day, Johann Baptist Homann established the most successful German publishing house of the eighteenth century. His prolific business, which was inherited by his family after his death, dominated Germany's map market for over a century, and produced some of the finest maps and atlases of the age. He established himself in Nuremberg, and by 1715 was appointed Geographer to the Emperor. After Homann's death, the business was taken over by his son, Johann Christoph. From 1730, the firm was entrusted to committee of family members, the Homann Heirs, who published maps and atlases for the next two generations, maintaining the high standards set by Johann Baptist. McCorkle, New England in Early Printed Maps, 724.1; Portinaro & Knirsch, The Cartography of North America, 116, Goss, The Mapping of North America , 50; Sellers & Van Ee, Maps & Charts of North America & West Indies , 807;.

$3500.00

[Stage Harbor, Massachusetts] port. fortuné
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[Stage Harbor, Massachusetts] port. fortuné

By CHAMPLAIN, Samuel de (1567-1635)

Paris: Chez Pierre Le-Mur, 1613. Engraved map of Stage Harbor, from 'Les Voyages dv Sievr de Champlain', in excellent condition, map size: 6 x 9 1/2 inches, sheet size: 8 1/4 x 9 3/4 inches. A highly important map by Samuel de Champlain, and one of a series of the very first printed sea charts of North America This is a highly important and early map of what is now known as Stage Harbor, near Chatham, on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. It is one of a series of the very first printed sea charts of North America, devised by the great explorer Samuel de Champlain. From 1605 to 1606, Champlain explored the Massachusetts coast in search of a location to build a settlement that might be even better than the existing French base of Port Royal, that was establish in the spring of 1605 in Nova Scotia. In October, 1606 Champlain's pinnace became trapped on the shoals while rounding Cap Blanc (Cape Cod). The damaged ship made it down to Stage Harbor where for two weeks the men worked to repair the rudder of the ship. The local Monomoyick tribe did not take kindly to their presence, with the result that a few French sailors were killed. By this point, the ship had been repaired and Champlain ordered a hasty departure. The party then explored Nantucket Sound, but on their way back north they decided to visit the bay again to take revenge on the natives. However this sortie was unsuccessful, resulting in a few more Frenchmen losing their lives. Champlain then left the region for the relative security of Port Royal. Why the name 'port. fortuné' was given to such an improvident location remains a mystery. The map depicts the bay as being essentially formed by a large sandbar, with an island lying in the middle. Champlain's ship is depicted in between the island and the mainland, and an elegant compass rose, surrounded by depth soundings, occupies the mouth of the bay. The countryside is shown to be heavily populated with presumably hostile native villages, adding to the sense of siege experienced by the party. A detailed legend is printed beneath which explains the various details marked by letters on the map. Samuel de Champlain was one of the greatest explorers and cartographers of his era, and the founding father of what would one day become Canada. Inspired by the voyages of his countryman, Jacques Cartier, he made his first voyage to Canada in 1603. Upon his return to France, his reports encouraged Henry IV to finance a colonizing expedition, and specifically the company was given a royal monopoly on all settlement and fur trading rights between the 40th and 45th parallels. In 1604, Champlain joined the venture as second in command to Sieur Dugua, Sieur de Monts, and it was on this voyage that Champlain explored the Massachusetts coast. In 1608, Champlain founded Quebec on an impressive promontory overlooking the St.Lawrence River. Having overcome much initial adversity, this settlement proved to be successful, eventually becoming the capital of a vast French domain that eventually extended down to the Gulf of Mexico and over to the Rockies. Champlain, passionately dedicated to the mission of securing the permanence of New France, had to return to France frequently to raise funds and encourage new settlers to join the enterprise. This map was published in 1613 as part of his greatest work, Les Voyages dv Sievr de Champlain , a detailed narrative of the founding of New France, intended to raise the profile of his venture. Champlain later became the governor of New France, and by the time he died on Christmas Day in 1635, he knew that he had succeeded in his mission. Burden, The Mapping of North America I, 175; Cumming, Skelton & Quinn, The Discovery of North America , p.270; Morison, Samuel de Champlain, Father of New France , pp.79-87.

$9500.00

[Georgia, with the New Ebenezar Settlement] Plan von Neu Ebenezer
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[Georgia, with the New Ebenezar Settlement] Plan von Neu Ebenezer

By SEUTTER, Matthäus (1678-1757)

Augsburg: Seutter, 1747. Three copper-engraved maps on a single sheet, with full period colour. One margin neatly extended with neat line in facsimile. The first large-scale map of Georgia, together with the finest plan of one of the American South's most interesting early settlements. Importantly, this composition includes the first large-scale map that specifically focuses on Georgia, engraved by Tobias Conrad Lotter, which takes up most of the left side of the sheet. The map embraces all of the coastal regions from St.Augustine, Florida up to Charleston, South Carolina. In the centre of the map is the grid outline of the city of Savannah, the capital of Georgia, founded by James Ogelthorpe in 1733. The map details all major settlements, and the trails that connect them. The coast's numerous islands are highlighted in different colours, creating an attractive aesthetic effect. In the lower right corner of this map is an inset detailing St.Simon's Island, the location of a British settlement and Fort Frederica, which was built to protect Georgia's southern flank from both the Spaniards and marauding pirates. The right side of the sheet is dominated by the Plan von Neu Ebenezar , the finest cartographic record of one of the American South's most interesting early settlements. The 'Salzburgers' were a group of Lutherans who fled persecution in heavily Catholic Austria. In 1734, the English Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge , a Protestant activist group, sponsored a party of Salzburgers to emigrate to Georgia. They founded the Ebenezar Settlement on a small tributary of the Savannah River (depicted on the previous map), but soon found the location to be unsuitable, and moved their settlement to 'New Ebenezar' on the main river itself. This map is a large detailed plan of this settlement, which was actually designed by Oglethorpe himself, directly modelled on the grid of Savannah. A key decribes various features of this plan, including the location of market squares, public gardens and housing plots. Outside of the town, are details such as plantations, pasturelands, orchards, and a mill. The compostion is finely adorned with a rococo title cartouche, featuring a native bird and flora, and a two-masted ship sailing down the Savannah River. Related to this plan, is the diagram at the lower left of the sheet, an encyclopaedic view of the town's mill. These two maps were originally published on separate sheets, and appeared in Samuel Urlsberger's promotional tract, Aussfürliche Nachricht von den Saltzburischen . This tract was published in parts between 1735 and 1752, and was specifically intended for prospective German immigrants to Georgia. The present maps comprise the most desirable issue, being printed together on a single sheet. This version was included in some copies of the composite atlases published by Seutter in Augsburg. Cumming, The Southeast in Early Maps, 165 and 264; Deák, American Views , 95; Lane, Savannah Revisited: A Pictorial History, p. 27; Reps, Frontier America, p.247.

$13500.00

Chart of the West Indies and Spanish Dominions in North America ... To Admiral John Willett Payne, A distinguished Native of the West Indies ... This Chart is respectfully Dedicated by his most obedient Servt. A. Arrowsmith
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Chart of the West Indies and Spanish Dominions in North America ... To Admiral John Willett Payne, A distinguished Native of the West Indies ... This Chart is respectfully Dedicated by his most obedient Servt. A. Arrowsmith

By ARROWSMITH, Aaron (1750-1823)

London: Published ... by A. Arrowsmith No. 24 Rathbone Place, 1803. Engraved map, on four sheets, period hand colouring in outline. Approximately 48 x 75 inches, if joined. Expert repairs to splits at folds. The first edition of Arrowsmith's sweeping survey of the Caribbean: "this map is the largest scale and most accurate map of those areas published to date, preceding Pike's and Humboldt's maps by several years" (Rumsey). First edition of Arrowsmith's four-sheet map of Florida, the Gulf Coast, West Indies, Mexico to the Pacific and Central America. At the time of publication, this spectacular large-scale work was the most detailed and accurate depiction of the region. Arrowsmith had access to the best available information, basing the map in part on the pre-Revolutionary War surveys of De Brahm and Bernard Romans. According to Streeter the coast line follows generally the Carta Esferica of 1799, but with the longitude of Sabine Pass nearly correct. "The 1810 second and later editions only extend to the east coast of Mexico .... In its coverage of Mexico and Central America, this map is the largest scale and most accurate map of those areas published to date, preceding Pike's and Humboldt's maps by several years." (Rumsey) Aaron Arrowsmith was the founder of one of the leading London map publishing houses in the early part of the nineteenth century. He came to London about 1770 from Durham, his birthplace, and worked as a surveyor for John Cary. In 1790 he set up his own business in Long Acre and soon established an international reputation as a specialist in compiling maps recording the latest discoveries in all parts of the world. He produced, and constantly revised, a great number of large-scale maps, many issued singly as well as in atlas form. After his death the business passed to his sons, Aaron and Samuel, and later to his nephew John who maintained his uncle's reputation, becoming a founder member of the Royal Geographical Society. Stevens and Tree cite editions of 1803 and 1810, with Phillips adding 1811 and 1816 issues. The present first edition, dedicated to Admiral John WIllett Payne, is greatly preferred as it depicts as far west as the Pacific coast of Mexico, which was removed from the later editions. Cf. Phillips, A List of Maps of America , p. 1061 (1811 edition); Rumsey 4121; Stevens & Tree, "Comparative Cartography" 89a, in Tooley, The Mapping of America ; Streeter Texas 1301; Tooley "Printed Maps of America", part I, #185 in Map Collector's Circle ... vol.VII, (1971).

$12500.00

A Map of North America, constructed according to the latest information
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A Map of North America, constructed according to the latest information

By TANNER, H. S. (1786-1858)

[Philadelphia]: H.S. Tanner, 1823. Copper-engraved map, with full original color, in very good condition. Several center folds soiled and have been repaired. Each sheet approx. 22 x 30"; images, approx.: 21 1/8 x 29". If joined, the whole map would be approx.: 42 1/4 x 58"; overall dimensions with margins: 44 1/2 x 60 1/4" A fine copy of the atlas version of Tanner's large-scale map of all of North America, including the Russian claim in Alaska and the locations of the Native American tribes throughout the continent Tanner's North America represents one of the high points of 19th century American cartography, incorporating as it does the exploratory expeditions of the first 20 years of the century of the Western territories. It includes a large cartouche illustration belneath the title showing a composite scene of the Natural Bridge in Virginia and Niagara Falls with various native flora and fauna. There are also two insets, one showing the 'western part of the Aleutians' and a second showing the 'Comparative altitudes of the mountains, towns, etc. of North America'. The map is found in four states. This, the first, was issued in the 1823 edition of Tanner's A New American Atlas . It includes the route of Major Long's second expedition to the Rocky Mountains and back along what was then the Mexican border. It also gives the Cherokee "grant" in Arkansas and a many of the still then existing tribal regions in the South, Mid-west and Far West. Henry Tanner's A New American Atlas was the most authoritative atlas published in America during the nineteenth century. The maps were carefully constructed from the best and most up-to-date surveys available. They were finely engraved on a large scale, printed on high quality paper, and carefully hand-colored. Owing to the great expense involved in both the production and publication of the atlas, it was initially published in five parts between 1819 and 1823, the complete edition first appeared later that year. Cf. Rumsey 2892; cf. Ristow, American Maps and Mapmakers , pp.191-198.

$16000.00

A Map of the United States of North America Drawn from a number of Critical Researches..

By ARROWSMITH, Aaron (1750-1823)

London, 1808. Engraved map, on four sheets joined, period hand colouring in outline. Linen-backed. Arrowsmith's famed wall map of the United States. First published in 1796, the map was updated in 1802. Three issues of the 1802 are noted, this being the third, with Arrowsmith's address given as "10 Soho Square." This copy on paper watermarked 1808. Of this issue, Stevens and Tree note: "Many new place names and rivers added." Aaron Arrowsmith was the founder of one of the leading London map publishing houses in the early part of the nineteenth century. He came to London about 1770 from Durham, his birthplace, and worked as a surveyor for John Cary for whom he carried out some of the road surveys which subsequently appeared in Cary's Travellers' Companion in 1790. In that year he set up his own business in Long Acre and soon established an international reputation. "Aaron Arrowsmith, Hydrographer to the King of England and Geographer to the Prince of Wales, was the most influential and respected map publishers of the first quarter of the nineteenth century ... His role in cartographic production was to gather the best information available from a wide variety of sources, weigh the relative merits of conflicting data, and compile from this the most accurate depiction possible of an area. " (Martin & Martin, p. 113.) Starting in 1796, Arrowsmith steadily improved the present map, incorporating the latest town names and geographical discoveries as they were made available to him: the present issue, for instance, includes "many new place-names and rivers", and by the time that the final issue appeared (in 1819 or later) whole new Territories and States had been added. The sequence forming not only a demonstration of Arrowsmith's working methods, but also a kind of time-lapse snap-shot of the development of the young nation. Stevens & Tree, "Comparative Cartography" 79e, in Tooley, The Mapping of America.

$12000.00

Map of the City of Providence, Rhode Island
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Map of the City of Providence, Rhode Island

By WALLING, H. F.

Providence: F. A. Baker, 1857. Hand-coloured, engraved folding wall map, sectioned and linen-backed as issued. Sheet size: approx. 57 3/4 x 62 inches. Ten lithographed inset views (trimmed and mounted as issued). Folds into publisher's cloth portfolio, upper cover lettered in gilt. Very rare wall map of the city of Providence, with individual buidings and landowners named. An extraordinary map, on the scale of 350 feet to the inch, with numerous individual buildings and landowners named. The views comprise: New Custom House, Post Office and U.S. court rooms; Brown University; Providence Institution for Savings; Butler Hospital for the Insane; First Baptist Meeting House; Grace Church; General railroad passenger station; Central Congregational Church; Providence Athenaeum; Central Baptist Church. Not in Rumsey or Phillips.

$6500.00

A Plan of the Operations of the Kings Army Under the Command of General Sr. William Howe, K.B. in New York and East New Jersey against the American Forces Commanded by General Washington, from the 12th of October to the 28th of November 1776. Wherein is particularly distinguished the encampment on the White Plains

By SAUTHIER, Claude Joseph (1736-1802); and William FADEN (1750-1836)

London: William Faden, 1777. Double-page engraved map and battle plan, period hand colouring. Sheet size: 30 x 21 inches. Rare Revolutionary war plan of the Battle of White Plains. The most accurate published delineation of the movements of the armies of Washington and Howe in Westchester published by Faden in February 1777 from drawings made by the British engineer Claude Joseph Sauthier who accompanied Howe on the October and November campaign. "Shows in detail movements and encampments of the British and American units from the north shore of Long Island north to the Croton River, south to Fort Washington on upper Manhattan, and west to Fort Lee New Jersey ... Many engraved notations describe maneuveurs and engagements" (Nebenzahl). Following the Battle of Long Island (August 1776), Washington retreated with the American forces into Manhattan and further north to White Plains. Howe pursued Washington, and this map shows the various landing places and camps of British and Hessian troops at Myers Point in Pelham, New Rochelle and Mamaroneck as well as the location of five war ships blocking the entrance to the Croton River. The map focusses largely on the 28 October Battle of White Plains and the subsequent retreat of the Americans to North Castle. On the west side of the Hudson, the map also shows the location of Cornwallis' camp after the taking of Fort Lee as late as November 18th. First edition, second state with the addition of five ships off Sarak Island (the Tartar, Phoenix, and Roebuck) and a dotted line charting their course. A later edition of the map was published within Stedman's History. Nebenzahl. A Bibliography of Printed Battle Plans of the American Revolution , 101; Nebenzahl, Atlas of the American Revolution , 13.

$15000.00

Plat of the Seven Ranges of Townships being part of the Territory of the United States N.W. of the River Ohio which by a late Act of Congress are directed to be sold
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Plat of the Seven Ranges of Townships being part of the Territory of the United States N.W. of the River Ohio which by a late Act of Congress are directed to be sold

By [OHIO]

Philadelphia: Mathew Carey, 1796. Engraving. The Original Township Ranges: Remaking the American Landscape A fundamentally important map in the westward development of the United States and the mapping of Ohio and the Old Northwest. This map was created as a result of the Land Ordinance of 1785, which set out an orderly method for surveying and selling western lands. The Confederation Congress hoped that proceeds from these sales would help settle the debts growing out of the American Revolution. The map was created from the surveys of Thomas Hutchins, who had been Geographer to the United States until his death in 1789. Hutchins had already surveyed the area several times, and he and his assistants mapped out four of the original seven township ranges before he died. The final three ranges were subsequently mapped, and the "Seven Ranges" became the first portion of Ohio surveyed under the Land Ordinance of 1785. The area surveyed under the Ordinance and depicted on this map is in the form of a triangle, with a ninety-one mile western boundary, a forty-two mile northern boundary, and with the Ohio River forming the eastern boundary. Each township range would consist of thirty-six square miles of territory divided into thirty-six separately numbered square mile sections, each made up of 640 acres. Certain sections were reserved for the federal government, and others were earmarked for sale. Section sixteen in each township was set aside for a public school. The map is drawn on a scale of four miles to the inch. The true importance of this map is not its immediate cartography, but what it set in motion. From these townships westward, all of the United States (excepting those areas along the Mississippi or in the Southwest, where French and Spanish settlement had created different land patterns) were laid out in the township grids from Ohio to the Pacific Ocean. More than any other act of man, this has transformed the landscape of America, as anyone looking out an airplane window can readily see. "Very few printed pieces are of more importance in the history of Ohio than this survey of a part of the future state" - Fifty Ohio Rarities . The present map is in Wheat & Brun's first state, without the publisher's imprint below the neat line at the bottom. Clements Library, Fifty Ohio Rarities 39; Evans 30918; Karrow (Ohio) 2441; Ristow, pp.145-47; Sabin 94884; Smith, Mapping of Ohio pp.123-25; Vail 1081; Wheat & Brun 676.

$5000.00

A Plan of the City of Philadelphia, the Capital of Pennsylvania, from an Actual Survey by Benjamin Easburn, Surveyor General; 1776.  [Inset] A Chart of  Delaware Bay and River, after Mr. Fisher of Philadlephia. 1776
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A Plan of the City of Philadelphia, the Capital of Pennsylvania, from an Actual Survey by Benjamin Easburn, Surveyor General; 1776. [Inset] A Chart of Delaware Bay and River, after Mr. Fisher of Philadlephia. 1776

By EAS[T]BURN, Benjamin [but after Nicholas SCULL, Matthew CLARKSON and Mary BIDDLE]

London: Andrew Dury, 1776. Double-page engraved map, hand colored, on watermarked laid paper. Sheet size: 21 1/2 x 28 5/8 inches. Excellent condition. 1st state without the engraver's name. The most detailed map of Philadelphia issued at the start of the Revolution "With the start of the Revolution, demand arose in Europe in 1776 for detailed information about the centers of population in America. Andrew Dury, a print publisher in London, was the first person to respond as to Philadelphia. He reissued the Clarkson-Biddle map of 1762 in the same size as the original, showing all important buildings inside the city" (Snyder). The Clarkson-Biddle map was originally published by Philadelphia engraver and print seller Matthew Clarkson and Nicholas Scull's daughter Mary Biddle. Famed Philadelphia cartographer Nicholas Scull (1687-1761) had drafted the original plan for the map, but died before it could be realized. Published in Philadelphia in 1762, the map was the most detailed depiction of the interior of the city produced to that time. There were two inset maps on the Clarkson-Biddle map, one of which was by Benjamin Eastburn, (who was Scull's predecessor as Surveyor General). Eastburne's name appeared as the cartographer of one of the inset maps on Scull's chart and is presumably the cause of the mis-attribution by Dury. The Easburn map was issued just 4 months after the signing of the Declaration of Independence. It is a faithful rendition of Scull's map with the addition of an inset map of Fisher's Delaware River and Bay, first issued in 1756. Andrew Dury's re-engraving of the Clarkson-Biddle map (which makes the erroneous attribution of the map to Eastburn, and the misspelling "Easburn") reproduces Scull's map with its extraordinary detail: all slips and wharves are identified (with the names of their owners), numerous churches including the Swede's Church, Christ Church, St. Paul's Chuch, the Lutheran Church and many more, various Quaker meeting houses, the Quaker School, the Court House and Market (additionally identified as the location of the Continental Congress), the State House, the jail, Pennsylvania Hospital, the Loganian Library, the Academy and College, and much more. Nebenzahl, Atlas of the American Revolution 27; Nebenzahl & Higgenbotham illustrated 120-121; Phillips Maps 699; Sellers & Van Ee 1312-1313; Snyder, COI 44 (this copy illustrated as colorplate 3); Streeter Sale 979.

$9500.00

Map of Northern Georgia, made under the Direction of Capt. W. E. Merrill

By [CIVIL WAR] - W. E. MERRILL

Chattanooga, 1864. Lithographed folding map, sectioned and linen-backed as issued, the rivers hand coloured. Original card covers, printed paper label. (Minor foxing). Provenance: Colonel McCrerey (signature on cover label). Housed in a black morocco backed box. A remarkable Union Army field map, printed for Sherman's operations in Georgia. A highly detailed map of the northern part of Georgia, made under the direction of Capt. W. E. Merrill, Chief Topographical Engineer of the Army of the Cumberland. The map shows all the major roads and rail lines, in addition to natural topographical features, in northern Georgia. The map extends as far north as Chattanooga near the Georgia/Tennessee state line, and far enough south and east to include the northwest sixth of the state. The capture of Chattanooga in November 1863 gave the Union the foothold they needed to cut off supply lines and advance into the deep South. In the spring of 1864 the forces under Gen. William T. Sherman were poised to strike. As soon as Chattanooga was taken, Sherman's chief topographical engineer, Capt. William E. Merrill, "the most innovative and conscientious exponent of mapping during the Civil War", began to compile a map of northwest Georgia. Merrill had his own complete establishment for map production -- a printing press, lithographic presses, and draughtsmen. Equally importantly, Merrill's assistant Sgt. N. Finnegan developed an extraordinary body of intelligence, drawing on spies, prisoners, refugees, peddlars, itinerant preachers and scouts, what Merrill called "his motley crew". All of this information was digested by Merrill day by day, until he was notified that the campaign would begin within the week. At this point the topographers finished their work, and two hundred copies were produced, mounted on linen for field use, and distributed to field commanders down to the brigade level. In five months Merrill and his men had produced a remarkably accurate map of country that lay mostly behind enemy lines. The Merrill map was a critical aid to Sherman's campaigns in Georgia. Five days after the map was completed, on May 7, Sherman's army left Chattanooga and began its hard-fought push to the southeast, slowly driving the Confederates back to the railroad hub of Atlanta (which is in the lower right quadrant of this map). In a campaign of continual attempts by both armies to outflank each other, the understanding of the ground it would have brought the Union commanders was invaluable. Sherman took possession of Atlanta in September, and used it as a base of operations for the next two and a half months while he raided in every direction, all within the boundaries of this map. On November 15 the Federal forces burned the city, cut loose from their rail communications with Chattanooga, and began the famous March to the Sea, heading east toward Savannah, burning and pillaging everything in their path. About a week later they moved off the east edge of this map. An examination shows why this map would have been an invaluable aid to the Union commanders in the Georgia campaign. It details topography, rivers, existing roads and railroads, towns and other features on a very small scale of four miles to the inch. Conveying the latest in Union military intelligence and combining new and existing information, it would have guided Sherman and his officers through eight months of the hardest-fought campaigning of the entire Civil War. A triumph of coordinated intelligence and map-making, it is one of the most remarkable cartographic productions of the Civil War. Indeed, it might be called the "Holster Atlas" of the Georgia campaign. Stephenson, Civil War Maps in the Library of Congress , S28-29; Miller, Great Maps of the Civil War, p.39.

$12000.00

Map of the Bounty Lands in Illinois Territory

By GARDINER, John (d. 1839)

[Washington: General Land Office, 1817. Engraved map, 21 x 16 3/4 inches. Signed by Gardiner. Matted. The earliest obtainable map to name Illinois and one of the earliest maps issued by the General Land Office. An early and important map of Illinois Territory. This is the earlier of two issues of the map, without the printed township grid. This copy includes a portion of manuscript corresponding to the very southern "tail" of the range, here highlighted in red. This grid at lower left is Gardiner's enlargement of this red area, with the river hand-colored blue and a description of one quarter section, with the following manuscript notation: "Fractional township 13 South of Range 1 West / Description of the SE 1/4 section 20 in Township 13 south of range 1 West from the surveyors returns. Rolling woodland / Timber Oak Hickory &c / Underwood Sassafrass hazel &c." Underneath the additional manuscript notation, the map is signed by John Gardiner, the Chief Clerk of the General Land Office. In May 1812, Congress passed a law which set aside lands in what is now Arkansas, Michigan, and Illinois as payment for service in the War of 1812 (they had similarly given out lands in the Northwest Territory to Revolutionary War veterans). Offering western lands was a means of doing well by doing good: the free lands would attract settlers and push the frontiers of American civilization westward. One hundred sixty acres in bounty lands in Illinois Territory were offered to each prospective settler for free. Some war veterans actually did move westward, while others sold the rights to their lands to those more eager to go to the frontier. Ultimately, thousands went west to Illinois in the decade, and the territory became a state in 1818. John Gardiner was the chief clerk of the General Land Office and composed a handful of maps of available western lands during the 1810s. This map shows a wide swath of territory available in Illinois between the Illinois and Mississippi rivers. The lands are neatly divided into squares, with "Ranges East" and "Ranges West" on either side of a north-south "Principal Meridian" line, and with an east-west dividing "Base Line" passing through the center of the territory. Lake Peoria is called "Lake Peoire" and the creek flowing into the Illinois River at the lower end of the lake is called "Kickaboo or Red Bud Cr." The attractive map was drawn by C. Schwarz of Washington, D.C., though the identity of the firm that actually engraved the map is unknown. The map can be dated to 1817 based on a letter from Gardiner to James Madison dated Oct. 29, 1817, sending him a copy of the map "which I have engraved for the use of soldiers of the late Army." This appears to be the first issue of the map, without the printed "townships maps" often found in the lower left corner. This map is also often found with a few words or lines of manuscript text describing particular areas, and bearing the signature of John Gardiner, as in the present copy. "This is the first map that Phillips lists under Illinois, and it is perhaps the first map showing a considerable part of Illinois with 'Illinois' in the title" - Streeter. An early and important map of Illinois, and of American efforts to push westward into unsettled territories. Phillips, Maps, p.326; Streeter Sale 1430; Karrow, Checklist of Printed Maps of the Middle West to 1900 (Illinois), p.290; American Imprints (1812) 27202; Graff 1505.

$9500.00

Map of Eastern Kansas
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Map of Eastern Kansas

By KANSAS - WHITMAN, E. B. and A. D. SEARL

Lawrence, Kansas [Boston: J. P. Jewett and Co.], 1856. Lithographed [by L. H. Bradford & Co.] folding pocket map, Indian lands hand-coloured, three vignette views of buildings in Kansas. Folds into original green cloth covers, covers decoratively blocked in blind, upper cover titled in gilt, printed letter by Whitman and Searl on the inside front pastedown. A Bleeding Kansas cartographic rarity: a map intended to promote Free Soil, anti-slavery activists to the region. The passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 created those territories with the provision that the settlers in those states would decide whether slavery would be lawful. The border state of Kansas thus became a breeding ground for anti- and pro-slavery conflict. Pro-slavery Missourians, known as border ruffians, flooded into the eastern half of the state, specifically along the Missouri River where slave-based agriculture would be feasible. Anti-slavery forces rallied, sending settlers from the North, with most coming from New England. Free state settlements were created in Topeka (identified on the map as the "temporary state capital") and Lawrence (depicted here on the map as a red dot with a small American flag). On this map, both of those free soil strongholds are shown with encampments of "Shannon's Posse" nearby, dated December 1855 -- pro-slavery forces intended to intimidate the Topeka Constitutional Convention. The Kansas troubles are further depicted with the three vignette views, two showing the before and after images of the Eldrige House. Also known as the Free State Hotel, the house served as temporary quarters to incoming New Englanders. Border ruffians destroyed the building on May 21, 1856. It was in retaliation to this attack and others in Lawrence on that day that John Brown attacked pro-slavery settlers in what would become known as the Pottawatomie Massacre, igniting further violence in the region, and making Bleeding Kansas a major portent to the Civil War. Interestingly, on the advertisement by Whitman and Searle on the inside front wrapper, no mention is made of the troubles, even though Whitman was a known abolitionist and Jewett, the publisher, was the publisher of "Uncle Tom's Cabin". The two land agents offer their services to immigrants, offering to find plots, supply information to interested parties, and complete surveys. The primary colored features on the map are Native American tribal lands, shown as separate and with defined boundaries meant to entice settlers to a region without Indian troubles. Forts shown on the map include Fort Riley (both on the larger map and as an unbordered inset at lower left), Fort Leavenworth, and Fort Scott (abandoned). Also shown are Fort Laramie Road, California Road, Oregon Road, and Santa Fe Road. This map, however, is at its essence a cartographic representation of the slavery conflict and the events leading to the Civil War. Phillips, A List of Maps of America , p. 346; Streeter sale 3903; Graff 4640; Heaston, Kansas Pocket Maps 4; Baughman, Kansas in Maps , pp. 52-53; Eberstadt 137:24; Jones, Adventures in Americana 1354; Rumsey 3069; Siebert sale 717.

$4750.00

New England. The most remarqueable parts thus named. by the high and mighty Prince Charles, nowe King of great Britaine
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New England. The most remarqueable parts thus named. by the high and mighty Prince Charles, nowe King of great Britaine

By SMITH, Captain John (1580-1631)

London: Printed by James Reeve, 1635. Copper engraved map, engraved by Simon de Passe. With an oval portrait of Smith in the upper left corner titled "The Portraictuer of Captayne John Smith / Admirall of New England" and with a poem in homage to Smith below. With the arms of the Council of New England in the center of the map. Neatly repaired tear extending from the left margin. State 9. One of the legendary early maps of Colonial America: "the foundation map of New England cartography, the one that gave [New England] its name and the first devoted to the region" (Burden 187). This copy is the rare final state, with the correct location of Boston shown and named. After a period of inactivity following his Virginia escapades, Captain John Smith was invited by four London merchants to explore the coastline north of Virginia, with instructions to return with a profitable cargo. Smith arrived off the Kennebec River with two ships in May 1614. One of Smith's ships concentrated on catching fish and gathering other valuable commodities, while Smith continued down the coast to chart and explore. Smith immediately recognized the poor state of the existing cartography for the region. He noted that he had six or seven maps "of those northern parts, so unlike each to other, and most so differing from any true proportion, or resemblance of the Countrey, as they did me no more good, then so much waste paper." Returning to England in December 1615, Smith had the map published with his A Description of New England in June 1616. According to a legend on the map, much of the nomenclature was provided by Charles, Prince of Wales, the future Charles I. Several of these placenames are still in use, including Cape Anne, Charles River, and Plymouth. The decorative elements were engraved by the outstanding Dutch engraver Simon de Passe, who worked in London from 1616 to 1621. De Passe was most famous for his portraits. Griffiths notes that de Passe's English portraits "marked an epoch not only in the British print but in the development of European portrait engraving," most importantly for his introduction of "a new type of auricular frame ... It is curious that such an advanced type should first be popularized in England." The separately dated ("Ao 1616") portrait of Smith on the map, which may have been de Passe's first published in England, predates his auricular style. But the "scale of leagues" in the lower right corner clearly exhibits the "extraordinary curling and folding decoration" that he soon incorporated into his portrait frames. De Passe may have also been responsible for the map itself, but it was probably Robert Clark, whose name appears below de Passe's, who engraved the topographical detail. This is state nine of the map, which appeared in the atlas Historia Mundi , published in London between 1635 and 1639. For this state, Reeve's imprint appears in the lower right corner, the arms of the Council of New England have been added at the center of the map, a school of fish appears off of Cape Cod, text relating to Wood's New England Prospect appears below the compass rose and the town of Boston is shown in the correct location (previously appearing near present day York, Maine). Benes, New England Prospect, 3; Burden, Mapping of North America I: 187 (state 9); Deak, Picturing America , 19; Fite & Freeman, A Book of Old Maps , 34; Krieger & Cobb, Mapping Boston , pp. 82-83; McCorkle, New England in Early Printed Maps , 614.1; Degrees of Latitude , 6; Schwartz & Ehrenberg, The Mapping of America , plate 53; Suarez, Shedding the Veil, 42. For Simon de Passe, see Anthony Griffiths, The Print in Stuart Britain 1603-1689, pp. 56-63.

$70000.00

[Buzzards Bay and Vineyard Sound.]
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[Buzzards Bay and Vineyard Sound.]

By DES BARRES, JOSEPH FREDERICK WALLET (1721-1824) and SAMUEL HOLLAND

London: J. F. W. Des Barres for The Atlantic Neptune, 1776. Large engraved chart from Des Barres' Atlantic Neptune on two sheets of laid paper, joined, each bearing "J Bates" watermark. 43x31 inches sheet size, nice margins; contemporary hand-color in outline; slightest offsetting, a superior copy. State 4 of 7. Fine chart depicting the waters between New Bedford and Martha's Vineyard. Buzzards Bay and the Vineyard Sound including the Elizabeth Islands and the western half of Martha's Vineyard. Showing much more on-shore information than is typical for a Des Barres chart, there are details of property boundaries, structures, even a road from Menemshaw Pond to Tisbury. Native names throughout remain largely unchanged today. Joseph Des Barres was born in Switzerland in 1721 and educated in Basel before emigrating to England and entering the Royal Military College where he learned engineering and the art of surveying. In 1756, Des Barres was commissioned a Lieutenant in the Royal American Regiment and dispatched to North America. He served in America during the Seven Years War under Colonel Bouquet, Lord Howe and General Amherst, and participated in the Quebec campaign as General Wolfe's engineer. Though Des Barres was responsible for the surveys done of Nova Scotia and the Isle of Sable, the surveying of the coastline of what became the United States was undertaken by Major Samuel Holland, a Dutchman, who joined the British army during the French and Indian War as an engineer, and became ultimately Surveyor General for North America. Holland was in charge of a rather large staff, that included Charles Blaskowitz and George Gauld. They ultimately provided greatly improved charts for the entire coastline and the Gulf of Mexico. All this work was done prior to the Revolution, which necessarily brought the surveys to an end. The publishing supervised by Des Barres continued throughout the war years. Des Barres compiled and edited the atlas, maintaining a high standard throughout. His primary motive seems to have been the navigational usefulness of the charts. He clearly envisioned a navigator's needs in approaching a shoreline. The Atlantic Neptune was the first new survey of American coastlines in a century, and the need was very great. The charts were plagiarized for the next thirty or forty years. Des Barres also had a flare for making charts aesthetically appealing, so that they are invariably handsome as well as unfailingly interesting. Stevens 88D; John Carter Brown Library Charting the East Coast of North America, The Atlantic Neptune (Providence: 1972); Robert Lingel 'The Atlantic Neptune' in the Bulletin of the New York Public Library, July 1936, pp.571-603; Augustus P. Loring 'The Atlantic Neptune' in American Maritime Prints (New Bedford: 1985).

$28500.00

Isthmus of Nova Scotia
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Isthmus of Nova Scotia

By DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824)

London: Published by J.F.W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', 1780. Engraved and etched map with roulette work and aquatint, with original color, 6th state of six. Watermarked "JBates" and countermarked "JB". Some off-setting and soiling. A magnificent large scale map of the isthmus that bridges modern-day Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, featuring superlative detail applied with the greatest artistic virtuousity A monumental map of what is now the Isthmus of Chignecto, which connects Nova Scotia to the mainland. This land bridge had been fiercely contested between the British and French. and many battles were fought there during the 18th century. Fort Beausèjour at the head of the Bay of Fundy had become Fort Cumberland in 1755, at the beginning of the French and Indian War, and Fort Cumberland had repulsed an attack by American sympathisers in 1776. This final state of Des Barres' chart includes a great deal of topographical detail and many settlements in the region, shown as rectangular plots. There are of course many soundings and the title cartouche includes some interesting navigational information: " Chignecto, the North East Branch of the Bay of Fundy is Navigable up to Cumberland, Petcudiac, &c. Tides flow here with great rapidity and rise at Equinoctial Times from 60 to 70 feet perpendicular. By means of these huigh Tides, the Bason of Mines and several fine Rivers which discharge themselves about the Head of the Bay of Fundy are rendered Navigable. The Gulph of St. Lawrence Tides in Bay Verte on the North East of the Isthmus rise only 8 Feet." The charts of Nova Scotia were surveyed under Des Barres' direct supervision in the 1760's. Des Barres, of Swiss-Huguenot extraction, studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. Upon the outbreak of hostilities with France in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to join his personal detail. During this period he also worked with the future legendary explorer James Cook on a monumental chart of the St. Lawrence River. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast. He also managed to gain access to some surveys of the American South, Cuba and Jamaica. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on The Neptune. His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The Atlantic Neptune, the most celebrated sea atlas, contained the first systematic survey of the east coast of North America. Des Barres's synergy of great empirical accuracy with the peerless artistic virtue of his aquatint views, created a work that "has been described as the most splendid collection of charts, plates and views ever published" (National Maritime Museum Catalogue). Upon the conclusion of the Seven Years War, Britain's empire in North America was greatly expanded, and this required the creation of a master atlas featuring new and accurate sea charts for use by the Royal Navy. Des Barres was charged with this Herculean task, publishing the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by three further volumes. Des Barres's monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and views, many being found in several states. Des Barres's charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information, and in many cases remained the most authoritative maps of the regions covered for several decades. National Maritime Museum (Greenwich), Henry Newton Stevens Collection, 15f.

$5000.00

Chart of the Harbours of Salem, Marblehead, Beverly and Manchester from a Survey taken in the years 1804, 5, & 6
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Chart of the Harbours of Salem, Marblehead, Beverly and Manchester from a Survey taken in the years 1804, 5, & 6

By BOWDITCH, Nathaniel (1773-1838)

[Salem, Massachusetts], 1806. Hand-coloured engraved map, engraved by Hooker & Fairman, on laid paper watermarked "J. Whatman 1804" Minor tears in top margin repaired. Sheet size: 21 1/2 x 27 inches. An American cartographic rarity: the true first edition of Bowditch's famed chart of the coasts of Salem, Beverly, Marblehead and Manchester. Bowditch's separately-issued chart, the first accurate chart of those waters, was among the earliest nautical charts based on first-hand surveys by an American to be published in the United States. Born in Salem, Massachusetts, the son of a local cooper and shipmaster, at a young age Nathaniel Bowditch was apprenticed to a local ship chandlery. With his intelligence and mathematical skills evidenced in abundance, he was encouraged by three local Harvard-trained scholars and inventors: Nathan Read, John Prince, and William Bentley. Under their tutelage, he studied Latin, French, mathematics, natural philosophy, astronomy, navigation and he constructed his own surveying equipment. In 1794, Bowditch assisted Bentley and shipmaster John Gibaut in a land survey of Salem. Gibaut shortly thereafter appointed Bowditch as his clerk on a voyage to the East Indies. Between 1795 and 1803, Bowditch sailed to the East Indies five times, continuing his studies on chartmaking and navigation on board. By his final voyage, Bowditch served as master and part-owner of the ship. Practical sailing experience combined with his studies of astronomy made Bowditch one of the best navigators in America. In 1799, publisher and chartseller Edmund Blunt hired Bowditch to revise John Hamilton Moore's New Practical Navigator. Bowditch added much in the way of additional information to the work and contributed so much in the way of revisions, that Blunt decided to completely redo the book, publishing it in 1802 with a new title and with Bowditch listed as the author. Bowditch's American Practical Navigator would prove a fundamentally important work on the art of navigation, with scores of tables and diagrams, and a wealth of practical information, becoming known as the Seamen's Bible. Around the time of the first publication of Bowditch's Navigator, while serving as the President of the Essex Fire and Marine Insurance Company, it became evident that the existing charts of the waters around Salem and Marblehead were deficient. In a rare, separately-published 30-page text of sailing directions to accompany the present chart, Bowditch writes: "The only chart of the entrance of the harbours of Salem, Marblehead, Beverly and Manchester, is that published from the survey taken by Holland and his assistants, just before the American revolutionary war. That period was particularly unfavorable for obtaining an accurate survey of the sea-coast, as the Americans were generally opposed to its being done at that time, fearing that it would give the British the great advantage of being able safely to enter with their armed ships into any of our harbours. In consequence of this, Holland received but little assistance from our pilots, in exploring the sunken ledges and shoals off our harbours; and as it was almost impossible to discover them without such assistance, they were generally omitted by him. This deficiency renders those charts in a great degree useless, though they are accurate as respects the bearings and distances of the islands and the coast. From the time of Holland's survey, till the year 1794, nothing was towards obtaining a more accurate chart. In that year a general survey of the state was ordered by the legislature; but it is to be regretted that this survey was not directed to be made in a manner calculated to ensure accuracy in the execution of it ... the laudable intentions of the legislature were very imperfectly carried into execution; and the map ... was such as was to have been expected." He continues by describing his first-hand surveys to produce this chart by himself, assisted by George Burchmore & William Ropes III: "To do this an excellent theodolite, made by Adams, furnished with a telescope and cross wires, was procured to measure the angles and a Rood chain to measure the distances. With these instruments, the bearings and distances of the shore from Gales point in Manchester, to Phillips point in Lynn (the two extremities of this survey) were carefully ascertained; and the necessary observations were taken for fixing with accuracy the situation of the islands. Soundings were taken throughout the whole extent of the survey, particularly round the dangerous ledges and shoals, several of which were explored, that were hardly known by our best pilots ... most of which were so little known, that names had not been given to them; and during the whole time employed on the survey, which was above eighty days, from two to five persons were hired to assist in sounding and measuring. From these observations the new chart was plotted off, and an accurate engraving of it made, &c." Bowditch's original copperplate has survived and is located in the Peabody Essex Museum. Its survival, however, has resulted in later restrikes, as early as a second edition in 1834 (with additions by Charles M. Endicott listed in seven lines of text below the compass rose) but including others into the 20th century. However, the present first edition of the chart, without the Endicott additions and on paper watermarked 1804, is extremely rare. We find no other examples of the first edition chart on the market, and with only three institutional holdings (Boston Athenaeum, Boston Public Library and Harvard). Guthorn, United States Coastal Charts, p.34 (1834 edition); Garver, Surveying the Shore, p.51.

$35000.00

America Settentrionale colle nuove scoperte fin all' anno 1688
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America Settentrionale colle nuove scoperte fin all' anno 1688

By CORONELLI, Vincenzo Maria (1650-1718)

Venice: V. M. Coronelli, 1690. Copper-engraved map, on two joined sheets, in excellent condition. A superlative impression of Coronelli's important and innovative map, and a foundation map for any serious collection of the cartography of North America Vincenzo Maria Coronelli, a Venetian scholar and Minorite Friar, became one of the most celebrated map and globe makers of his era. Throughout his industrious life he produced more than one-hundred terrestrial and celestial globes, several hundred maps, and a wealth of cartographic publications. In 1683, he completed the Marly Globes for Louis XIV, the largest and most magnificent globes ever made. In 1684 he founded the Academia Cosmografica degli Argonauti, the first geographical society, and was appointed Cosmographer of the Republic of Venice. He published two atlases, the Atlante Veneto (Venice, 1691) and the Isolario (1696-98), and compiled the first encyclopaedia to be arranged alphabetically. This magnificent map of North America, published in the Atlante Veneto , is widely considered to be one of Coronelli's finest maps, and is cartographically similar to the scene depicted on his famous globe of 1688. Printed initially on two separate sheets, the present example has been carefully joined to form a wonderful unified image. The map is beautifully preserved in its uncoloured state, as originally intended. Artistically, it is a masterpiece of late Baroque engraving. Its title cartouche, featuring scenes of gods blessing the era of European expansion evince the sumptuous style of Coronelli's Venice. Finely engraved scenes of native Americans and real or imagined beasts adorn the land and seas. Apart from displaying a fine aesthetic sense, Coronelli has rendered the continent with far greater geographical detail than his contemporaries, having benefited enormously from his favour at the French court and his publishing partnership with Paris cartographer Jean-Baptiste Nolin. The Great Lakes are drawn with unrivalled accuracy, drawing on information gleaned in 1673 by the Quebecois explorer Louis Jolliet, and his traveling companion, the French-born Jesuit Jacques Marquette. The Mississippi basin is rendered with great detail, reflecting French discoveries, most notably those by René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle on his first expedition of 1679-82. This map depicts La Salle's dramatic misplacement of the mouth of the Mississippi 600 miles to the west of its true location. Importantly, it is on the western portion of the map where Coronelli has added the most significant amount of new information, drawn mostly from a highly important manuscript map by Diego Dionisio de Peñalosa Briceño y Berdugo, which included numerous previously unrecorded place names and divided the Rio Grande into the Rio Norte and the Rio Bravo in the south. The manuscript map was probably originally prepared by Peñalosa between 1671 and 1687 as part of his attempts to interest the French King Louis XIV in his plans to mount an military expedition against New Spain. The most prominent geographical detail of the map is California's appearance as a massive island, this map being one of the best renderings of this beloved misconception. The precise geographical details are enlivened by the presence of numerous captions noting discoveries or details of the terrain. Burden, The Mapping of North America II 643; Mapping the West pp.43-47; Cumming The Exploration of North America p.148; Leighly California as an Island 88; Martin Maps of Texas and the Southwest p.87; McLaughlin California as an Island 103; Portinaro pl.CII; Phillips Maps p. 795; Shirley 548; Tooley America p.125 ; cf. Tooley Maps & Map-Makers p. 21; Wheat Trans-Mississippi West I, 70.

$22000.00

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