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Rear Admiral Sir James Clark Ross, D.C.L:  F.R.S. From the Original Portrait in the Royal Hospital Greenwich by several Naval Officers & Scientific Men in honour of his great discoveries & Achievements in the Arctic and the Antarctic Regions
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Rear Admiral Sir James Clark Ross, D.C.L: F.R.S. From the Original Portrait in the Royal Hospital Greenwich by several Naval Officers & Scientific Men in honour of his great discoveries & Achievements in the Arctic and the Antarctic Regions

By [ROSS, James Clark (1800-1862)] - PEARCE, Stephen (1819-1904); after

[London, 1850. Mezzotint portrait, engraved by Alexander Scott after Stephen Pearce. Sheet size: approx. 23 x 17 1/2 inches. A fine portrait of Polar explorer James Clark Ross. The nephew of Arctic explorer Sir John Ross, James Clark Ross accompanied his uncle on his first voyage to the Arctic in 1818 before serving under William Parry on his expeditions to the Arctic between 1819 and 1827. His most noted Arctic accomplishment, however, would be on Sir John Ross' second voyage, where he led a small party to locate the position of the North Magnetic Pole on 1 June 1831 on the Boothia Peninsula. Following that success, James Clark Ross was given command of the ships Erebus and Terror (later of Sir John Franklin fame) on a voyage to the Antarctic. On that 1839-1843 expedition, Ross forced his way through the ice pack becoming the first to enter what would be named Ross Sea and to lay eyes on numerous Antarctic features, including the Ross Ice Shelf, Victoria Land, the Admiralty Mountains and more. Both his discovery of the Magnetic North Pole, as well as his attainment of the highest southern latitude to date are commemorated on this fine portrait. The artist, Stephen Pearce, painted two portraits of Ross (1800-1862): . the original of the present image which remains in Greenwich, as well as one now in the National Portrait Gallery, London.

$1500.00

The Hon.ble John Hancock. of Boston in New-England; President of the American Congress. Done from an original picture painted by Littleford
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The Hon.ble John Hancock. of Boston in New-England; President of the American Congress. Done from an original picture painted by Littleford

By SHEPHERD, C. (publisher)

London: C. Shepherd, 1775. Mezzotint portrait. Wide margins. Minor creases. A British portrait of one of the leading American Revolutionary war leaders. Public curiosity for prints of Revolutionary heroes was not limited to America but spread to the English and European print shops, where an inquisitive audience clamored for a glimpse of the key figures of the war. London and Augsburg publishers, using the names C. Shepard, Thomas Hart, and John Morris, issued a series of mezzotints of the officers of the American Revolution. Public interest reached such a frenzy that European printmakers published fictitious portraits before they had accurate likenesses of the sitters, often using old plates and simply changing the name of the sitter. This porthole portrait of Hancock may have been based on a Copley painted portrait, though it claims to be after "Littleford". Littleford is thought to have been a fictitious portraitist and the resemblance to Hancock is somewhat remote. Nevertheless, the figure is commanding and a gentleman, such as might well be President of the Continental Congress. As Fowble noted: "As president of the Continental Congress in 1775, Hancock was newsworthy in both London and the colonies, and he was a tailor-made subject for print publishers. Some entrepreneurs, like Shelpherd in his anxiety to get the first prints on the street, were willing to supplement truth with a generous portion of fiction." Fowble Two Centuries of Prints in America 1680-1880 #63; Russell ENA III.6; Smith British Mezzotinto Portraits III.5.

$4500.00

[Lafayette] Liberté. Conclusion de la Campagne de 1781 en Virginie. To his Excellency General Washington this Likeness of his friend, the Marquess de la Fayette, is humbly dedicated
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[Lafayette] Liberté. Conclusion de la Campagne de 1781 en Virginie. To his Excellency General Washington this Likeness of his friend, the Marquess de la Fayette, is humbly dedicated

By AMERICAN REVOLUTION - After Jean Baptiste LE PAON (1736-1785)

Paris: Chez Le Mire, 1784. Engraving by Noel Le Mire after Jean-Baptiste Le Paon, printed on thick laid paper. Sheet size: 20 x 14 inches. Old repairs to tears in the image. Scarce portrait of Lafayette, with James Armistead, the Battle of Yorktown raging in the background. Lafayette arrived in America in 1777 to join Washington's army, but returned temporarily to France in 1779-80 to secure financial aid for the Revolution. During that time, he commissioned French painter Le Paon paint a portrait of Washington as a present. The portrait was based on Peale's likeness, but with an elaborate military camp background and with numerous documents relating to the Revolution, including the Declaration of Independence and the Treaty of Alliance with France in Washington's right hand, and the torn papers on the ground concerning Britain's attempts at reconciliation with the colonies. Following the Battle of Yorktown and the American victory, Le Paon and Le Mire produced the present companion portrait of Lafayette, dedicating it to Washington. The portrait depicts the French general in full Continental Army uniform standing beside his horse, with African American Continental Army spy James Armistead (who later changed his name to Lafayette) holding his horse to his left, with the battle of Yorktown raging in the background. Le Mire announced subscriptions in the Journal de Paris on Oct. 4, anticipating that the engraving would be issued in December, 1783. One of two variants, the other without dedication to Washington and with added verse in French. Le Paon's original oil painting of this portrait is located at Lafayette College.

$4500.00

Youth Rescued from a Shark, This Representation is founded on the following Fact: a Youth bathing in the Harbour of Havannah, was twice seized by a Shark from which , (though with the Loss of the Flesh & Foot, torn from the Right Leg), He disentangled himself & was, by the assistance of a Boat's Crew, sav'd from the Jaws of the voracious Animal: for in the Moment it was attempting to seize its Prey (a third Time) a Sailor with a Boat Hook drove it from its pursuit. / Jeune Homme sauvé de l'attaque d'un Requien...[text repeated in French]
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Youth Rescued from a Shark, This Representation is founded on the following Fact: a Youth bathing in the Harbour of Havannah, was twice seized by a Shark from which , (though with the Loss of the Flesh & Foot, torn from the Right Leg), He disentangled himself & was, by the assistance of a Boat's Crew, sav'd from the Jaws of the voracious Animal: for in the Moment it was attempting to seize its Prey (a third Time) a Sailor with a Boat Hook drove it from its pursuit. / Jeune Homme sauvé de l'attaque d'un Requien...[text repeated in French]

By GREEN, Valentine after John Singleton COPLEY

London: Published by V. Green, Newman Street, Oxford Street, and at No. 52, Strand, 1779. Mezzotint. Printed on heavy laid paper. Several expertly repaired tears in top and bottom margins. Image size: 18 1/4 x 23 3/4 inches. Considered one of the most important eighteenth century mezzotints, "Youth Rescued from a Shark" made the fortunes of both Valentine Green and the expatriate American painter John Singleton Copley Brook Watson, a London merchant, commissioned his friend John Singleton Copley to paint a scene from his youth depicting the fateful night when he was attacked by a shark while swimming in Havana Harbor. Although Watson survived the attack, after being rescued by his fellow shipmen, he lost his leg during the encounter. "Watson and the Shark" launched Copley's career in London, making him one of the most celebrated American painters on the Continent. The painting became a metaphor for salvation and the triumph over adversity and was widely heralded as the most important painting of the age. Based on Copley's masterpiece, Green's large mezzotint became one of the most sought after prints on the market. It sold so well in fact, that Green was forced to scrape a second and a third plate of the image to satisfy public demand. The wide appeal of Green's mezzotint heightened Copley's fame and catapulted both engraver and painter to the top of the English art world. In the history of engraving, no printmaker has achieved such depth and precision as Valentine Green. He is considered the father of the English mezzotint because through his example we can see the pinnacle of mezzotint engraving. During his career, Green produced some of the most beautiful and sought after 18th century mezzotints. At an early age Green apprenticed himself to Robert Hancock of Worcester, where he produced his first published work 'A Survey of the City of Worcester'. In 1765 Green moved to London where his excellent scraping soon earned him a much-celebrated reputation. He soon became mezzotint engraver to George III, and a member of the Royal Academy. Throughout his industrious career, Green scratched over 400 plates working from works by Copley, Reynolds and West. Whitman, Valentine Green 152; Chaloner Smith, British Mezzotinto Portraits 209; Clayton, The English Print , p. 243, no. 38.

$9500.00

Mr. Grevil Verney
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Mr. Grevil Verney

By WILLIAMS, Robert (active 1680-1704) after Michael Dahl (1656-1743)

[London]: J. Smith at ye Lyon & Crown in Russel Street, Covent Garden, 1705. Mezzotint trimmed to plate mark, excellent condition. Fine impression of this mezzotint portrait Mr. Greville Verney (1687-1703), a handsome young aristocrat, looks straight at the viewer while pointing to Hudson's Bay on the large globe with one hand and holding a print in the other. His silk cloak and dressing gown fly around him, implying rapid movement. His enthusiasm for life is captured in the contentment on his face and his various interests. The original painting was done by Michael Dahl, a Swedish born portrait artist, who worked in London, and the mezzotint was by a Welsh engraver, Robert Williams, one of the earliest mezzotinters. Chaloner, British Mezzotint Portraits ; Meridew, A Catalogue of Engraved Portraits of Nobility, Gentry, Clergymen & Others Born, Resident in or Connected with the Countyr of Warwick (1848) p. 67; Smith 53.

$1750.00

Benjamin Franklin. Ne a Boston, dans la nouvelle Angleterre le 17 Janvier 1706
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Benjamin Franklin. Ne a Boston, dans la nouvelle Angleterre le 17 Janvier 1706

By [FRANKLIN, Benjamin] - Joh. Lorenz RUGENDAS, engraver

Augsburg: Johann Lorenz Rugendas, 1778. Mezzotint portrait, 14¾ x 10 inches. Matted. Lovely mezzotint portrait of Franklin, done during the American Revolution. This portrait shows Franklin seated at a writing desk, wearing a fur hat and spectacles in a fur-trimmed robe, facing left in three-quarter length profile. In his left hand he holds a sheet of paper, while his right hand reaches inside his robe at chest level; an ink stand, quill, and pen knife are also on the desk, along with a stack of correspondence. One of the letters is addressed to "Monsieur Franklin, A Paris." Upon his arrival in France as a commissioner from the newly independent United States, Charles-Nicolas Cochin engraved a portrait of Franklin wearing his audacious fur cap. The famous image drew many imitators and variations. Sellers says of the image: "Because of it, the sensational fact of Franklin's arrival in France and the sensational costume which so effectively dramatized his role as envoy from the New World to the Old reached every part of Europe, creating an image of tremendous value to Franklin's purpose." This variant of the image is not mentioned by Sellers. Sellers, Benjamin Franklin in Portraiture, pp.227-31.

$6000.00

Samuel Scott, the unfortunate American Diver
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Samuel Scott, the unfortunate American Diver

By [SCOTT, Samuel (c. 1813-1841)]

[London?], 1841. Lithographed portrait. Rare portrait of an American daredevil printed shortly after his deadly fall from Waterloo Bridge. Born in Philadelphia, Scott served in the U.S. Navy where he became well known for jumping off the masts of ships. This led to a career as a stuntman and daredevil, travelling the U.S. and Canada performing his death defying leaps, including a purported 593-foot jump from Niagara Falls. On January 11, 1841, Scott planned to run from the White Lion Pub in Drury Lane to Waterloo Bridge, jump from a scaffold on the bridge into the river, and return to the pub during the hour between 1:00 and 2:00 P.M. As per previous bridge jumps, a rope attached to the scaffold allowed Scott to swing away from the bridge before diving. But on this jump, the rope wrapped around Scott's neck. The spectators erroneously thought that this was part of Scott's act, no immediate action was taken and Scott inadvertently hung himself. The present rare portrait shows a young looking Scott with Waterloo bridge and scaffolding in the background. OCLC cites but one extant example in North Americana collections. A recorded example at the Wellcome Library includes a Day & Son stamp on verso of a mount.

$900.00

Fred. Tatham and Brother Arthur
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Fred. Tatham and Brother Arthur

By LINNELL, John (1792-1882)

1810. Pencil on paper. Title in pencil "Fred. Tatham & brother Arthur". Signed in ink l.r. "J. Linnell f" A delightful and very intriguing early pencil portrait of Frederick and Arthur Tatham by acclaimed Victorian portraitist, John Linnell Frederick Tatham was born in 1805, his brother, Arthur, in 1808. The boys would appear to be about five and two in the drawing, which would put the date of the drawing at circa 1810. John Linnell (1792-1882) began drawing at quite an early age, his father was a framemaker and art dealer. In 1805 he was admitted to the Royal Academy School, having studied with Benjamin West and John Varley. At some point clearly he made the acquaintance of Charles Heathcote Tatham, architect, and father of the two boys depicted. Children are notoriously hard to draw, and Linnell succeeded in capturing both the characters and youthful energy of the two boys, especially the elder, Frederick. Curiously enough, the two boys and the artist were involved in a long term dispute concerning William Blake later in life. In the 1820's the Tatham boys, now young adults, and their sister Julia, became members of a circle of devotees of William Blake and his wife. John Linnell too had for a long time been part of Blake's circle. Frederick Tatham meanwhile had established himself as a portrait artist, working in a neo-Renaissance style that Blake thought superior to the contemporary Romanticism. All three men, Frederick and Arthur Tatham and John Linnell were "Ancients", those who after Blake's death sought to continue his spiritual and artistic work. When Blake died in 1827, Tatham took in his widow Catherine, nominally as a housekeeper for his young family. When she died in 1831, Tatham claimed that she'd left all of Blake's works to him. John Linnell maintained that the works ought to go to Blake's sister. Tatham held on to the works, and this brought about a very unfortunate consequence. Frederick Tatham at a certain point after this dispute joined a millenial sect, the Irvingites, who held strong moralistic views. These convictions led him to destroy some of Blake's works as having been inspired by the Devil. Frederick Tatham later wrote a Life of Blake that was published in 1906 in A. G. B. Russell's "Letters of William Blake". The baby in the picture, Arthur (1808-1878), later became a rector of several parishes and prebendary of Exeter Cathedral.

$2800.00

His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales
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His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales

By BARTOLOZZI, Francesco after J. RUSSELL

London: Published by John Jeffryes, Ludgate Hill, 1795. Stipple engraving. Faint collectors stamp on verso of sheet. In pristine condition. This portrait of George IV, is one of the most celebrated eighteenth century archery prints. The latter half of the eighteenth century witnessed the emergence of numerous clubs and societies, which the English gentry were keen to join. The Society of Royal Kentish Bowmen, under the patronage of the Prince of Wales, later King George IV, is a perfect example of this burgeoning 18th century trend for exclusive sporting clubs. The Prince of Wales insisted that every member of the Society should wear a 'dandyish' uniform comprising of a grass green coat with a white waistcoat and breeches. In Russell's charming portrait, the Prince Regent is shown in the Bowman's uniform, in the background are the other members of the society participating in a shooting match. Russell's portrait not only identifies the Prince as an avid archer, but cleverly connects his person with the exclusive archery society. At the time of production this work was extremely popular both for its flattering depiction of the Regent, and for the publicity garnered by the Bowmen. This is a lovely impression from the collection of F. W. Hope (1797-1862). Vesme & Calabi, Francesco Bartolozzi 820, iv/iv; O'Donoghue, Catalogue of Engraved British Portraits... in the British Museum 50.

$850.00

A Man of the Sandwich Islands, Dancing
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A Man of the Sandwich Islands, Dancing

By WEBBER, John (1752-1793)

[London: G. Nicol & T. Cadell, 1784. Etched and engraved by C. Grignion after a drawing by Webber. Image size: 10 1/4 x 7 inches. Sheet size: 22 x 15 1/2 inches. John Webber, R.A. was born in London of Swiss parents. He was the draughtsman on Captain Cook's third and final voyage to the South Seas. In this attractive portrait, a young, muscular man dances what was then a sacred dance called Hula. In his right hand he holds a feather covered gourd. Virtually nude, he wears only a bark cloth "malo" or loin cloth, a coral necklace and dogtooth leggings. His body is tattooed in rhythmic patterns that flow down his arms and legs. Webber was the official artist on Cook's historic and final Pacific voyage. The drawings were the source for the engravings that illustrated Cook's "A Voyage to the Pacific", which was published in 1784.

$1200.00

A.J.H. Malartic, G.al en Chef, Gouverneur G.al des Isles de France et de la Reunion et C.Dant G.al des Eta. Ent Francais a l'Est Cap Bo.ne Esp.ce. Né a Montaubaun le 3 J.let 1730. Mort a l'Isle de France le 9 T.dor An 8e
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A.J.H. Malartic, G.al en Chef, Gouverneur G.al des Isles de France et de la Reunion et C.Dant G.al des Eta. Ent Francais a l'Est Cap Bo.ne Esp.ce. Né a Montaubaun le 3 J.let 1730. Mort a l'Isle de France le 9 T.dor An 8e

By [MAURITIUS]

1800. Engraving, 5 x 4 inches. Light soiling. A few contemporary ink notations on verso. Engraved portrait of Governor Anne Joseph Hippolyte de Maurès, Comte de Malartic, governor of the island of Mauritius. The portrait is a line-drawing, done in profile and framed in an oval. Flags flank either side of the oval frame and it is captioned beneath. There is some light wear to the tiny imprint information, causing it to be slightly obscured, but it is possible that the illustrator's name is "Girouai" and the engraver may be "Noiret." The engraving is a bit crude and printed on laid paper. It is likely that it was done shortly after Malartic's death in 1800. A most unusual and exotic image, a tribute to the rich culture of printing that flourished on the remote island in the south Indian Ocean.

$1000.00

Captain James Ross
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Captain James Ross

By MAGUIRE, Thomas Herbert (1821-1895)

[Ipswich: George Ransome, 1851. Tinted lithograph in octagonal format, signature as title: "James Ross, Captain". Artist's printed signature in image: "T. H. Maguire 1851" Rare Portrait of the great Polar explorer Sir James Clark Ross ((1800 - 1862) entered the British Navy at the age of 11 in the care of his uncle, Sir John Ross. In 1818, he travelled with Ross in search of a northwest passage. During the years 1819-27, he made four Arctic expeditions with Parry, and after 4 1/2 years as commander of his own Arctic expedition, he located the magnetic North Pole in Boothia Peninsula, Canada. He is best known however for his expedition to Antarctica, 1839-43. He commanded the Erebus and his close friend, Francis Crozier, the Terror . Joseph Dalton Hooker was the naturalist on this journey. Exploring, then retiring north to Tasmania or the Falklands for the "winter months", the expedition was a great success revealing a great deal about the unknown continent. Ross' "A Voyage of Discovery and Research in the Southern and Antarctic Regions: During the Years 1839-43" is a classic of Polar Exploration literature. In 1848, he commanded one of the ships sent to search for Sir John Franklin's 1845 Arctic exploration. The Franklin expedition consisted of the Erebus and the Terror , the latter again being commanded by Crozier. Thomas Herbert Maguire (1821-1895) was a British artist, who studied lithography with Richard James Lane. He is best known for the portraits of scientists, primarily naturalists, for which he was commissioned by George Ransome, F. L. S. in connection with the founding of the Ipswich Museum. Ransome gave the portraits as gifts to subscribing members and gave the entire portfolio, which ultimately ran to 60 portraits, to especially important figures, most notably Prince Albert when he visited the museum in 1851. Maguire brought to portrait making an unusual capacity to capture a person's type and character. His portraits did not try glorify their subject but rather showed their individuality. The subject's renown depended on their accomplishments, which would have been well-known to the observers.

$2500.00

William Jackson Hooker
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William Jackson Hooker

By MAGUIRE, Thomas Herbert (1821-1895)

Tinted lithograph in octagonal format, signature as title "W. J. Hooker"; artist's printed signature l. l. "T. H. Maguire 1851". Printed by M. & N. Hanhart. A fine, genial portrait of one of the leading botanists of the Victorian era Sir William Jackson Hooker (1785-1865) was born into a prominent Norwich family and was able to pursue his passion for botany his entire life, contributing greatly to the science of botany. After attending Norwich School, he made his first botanical expedition to Iceland in 1809. There was a fire on the boat coming back and he lost all his specimens. He wrote "Tour in Iceland" the same year. Over the next several years, he made similar trips to France, Switzerland and northern Italy. Thereafter, he married and settled in Halesworth, Suffolk, where he wrote books and articles, and built a herbarium, which was highly regarded among botanists worldwide. In 1820, he was made Regius professor of botany at Glasgow University. In 1821, his "Flora Scotica" was published. During his years in Scotland, he helped establish the Glasgow Botanic Gardens. In 1841, Hooker became the Director of the Royal Botanic Garden at Kew. During his tenure, he expanded the garden from 10 acres to 75 and the arboretum to 270 acres. Thomas Herbert Maguire (1821-1895) was a British artist, who studied lithography with Richard James Lane. He is best known for the portraits of scientists, primarily naturalists, for which he was commissioned by George Ransome, F. L. S. in connection with the founding of the Ipswich Museum. Ransome gave the portraits as gifts to subscribing members and gave the entire portfolio, which ultimately ran to 60 portraits, to especially important figures, most notably Prince Albert when he visited the museum in 1851. Maguire brought to portrait making an unusual capacity to capture a person's type and character. His portraits did not try glorify their subject but rather showed their individuality. The subject's renown depended on their accomplishments, which would have been well-known to the observers.

$1500.00

John Lindley
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John Lindley

By MAGUIRE, Thomas Herbert

{Ipswich: George Ransome, 1850. Tinted lithograph in octagonal format, signature "John Lindley" as title, artist's printed signature in image l.r "T. H. Maguire 1849". Printed by M. & N. Hanhart. Fine portrait of the great English botanist John Lindley (1799-1865) was born in Norwich and attended Norwich School. His father was a gardener and could not afford to send Lindley to university. At sixteen therefore, Lindley became agent to Belgium for a seed merchant. This eventually led to his meeting W. J. Hooker. Hooker introduced him to Sir Joseph Banks, who gave him a job in his herbarium. When Banks died, Lindley went to work for another wealthy plant collector, William Cattley (after whom he named the orchid genus, Cattleyea. Thus, through personal connections, shared passion for botany and hard work, Lindley rose to a position of prominence in the world of science. He wrote many books, including an Encyclopedia of Plants, in collaboration with John Claudius Loudon, that described 15,000 flowering plants and ferns. He helped classify the many intriguing, newly discovered species of plants that arrived in England from far-off regions of the realm, particularly Australia. He became a Professor of Botany at London University, a Fellow of the Royal Society and received numerous other honors. Thomas Herbert Maguire (1821-1895) was a British artist, who studied lithography with Richard James Lane. He is best known for the portraits of scientists, primarily naturalists, for which he was commissioned by George Ransome, F. L. S. in connection with the founding of the Ipswich Museum. Ransome gave the portraits as gifts to subscribing members and gave the entire portfolio, which ultimately ran to 60 portraits, to especially important figures, most notably Prince Albert when he visited the museum in 1851. Maguire brought to portrait making an unusual capacity to capture a person's type and character. His portraits did not try glorify their subject but rather showed their individuality. The subject's renown depended on their accomplishments, which would have been well-known to the observers.

$1500.00

William Jardine
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William Jardine

By MAGUIRE, Thomas Herbert

Ipswich: George Ransome, 1851. Tinted lithograph in octagonal format, signature as title "Wm Jardine", artist's printed signature in image l.r. "T. H. Maguire 1849". Printed by M. & N. Hanhart. A fine portrait of one of the great Scottish naturalists Sir William Jardine (1800- 1874). the 7th Baronet of Applegirth, Dumfriesshire, was an industrious naturalist, who through prodigious efforts produced a fine encyclopedia on the animals of the world. He was born in Edinburgh and graduated from Edinburgh University. Though ornithology was his primary passion, he also studied ichthyology, entomology, botany and geology. He epitomised the 19th century British amateur naturalist who, at that stage in the development of the science, could still make an important contribution. This he did in editing the 40 volume The Naturalist's Library (1833-43), much of which he wrote. He also collaborated with his friend Prideaux Selby on Illustrations of British Ornithology (1826), still one of the finest ornithological surveys. The Naturalist's Library was immensely popular. It is written for the general reader and consists of interesting stories and facts about the lives of the birds, mammals, insects and fish, each handsomely illustrated. Each volume also has a portrait and memoir about a famous or important naturalist, for example, Maria Sybilla Merian, Thomas Pennant, Sir Joseph Banks, Cuvier and Buffon. Thomas Herbert Maguire (1821-1895) was a British artist, who studied lithography with Richard James Lane. He is best known for the portraits of scientists, primarily naturalists, for which he was commissioned by George Ransome, F. L. S. in connection with the founding of the Ipswich Museum. Ransome gave the portraits as gifts to subscribing members and gave the entire portfolio, which ultimately ran to 60 portraits, to especially important figures, most notably Prince Albert when he visited the museum in 1851. Maguire brought to portrait making an unusual capacity to capture a person's type and character. His portraits did not try glorify their subject but rather showed their individuality. The subject's renown depended on their accomplishments, which would have been well-known to the observers, rather than on the impression they made. Maguire made no effort to dignify his sitters, only to show them as they were.

$1500.00

William Yarrell
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William Yarrell

By MAGUIRE, Thomas Herbert (1821-1895)

[Ipswich: George Ransome, 1850. Tinted lithograph, octagonal format, signature for title: "Wm. Yarrell"; artist's printed signature: "T. H. Maguire 1849" in image l.l. Printed by M & N. Hanhart. Blind stamped "Ipswich Museum" A handsome portrait of the author of "History of British Fishes" and "History of British Birds" William Yarrell (1784-1856), zoologist and bookseller, is best known as the author of two very popular books: A History of British Fishes, 2 volumes, 1835 and A History of British Birds, 3 volumes, 1843. Yarrell was born in London. His father and uncle had a book and newspaper shop, which he and his cousin later ran. Yarrell, who was one of 13 children, often left the shop to go fishing or shooting, gradually becoming an accomplished naturalist. He wrote his first book, "On the Occurrence of some Rare British Birds" in 1825 at the age of 40. Many more articles and books followed. He became a Fellow of the Linnean Society and helped found what became the Royal Entomological Society of London. As were most naturalists of the period, he was acquainted and corresponded with other leading natural historians, in particular, Jardine, Selby, Thomas Bewick and Audubon. Thomas Herbert Maguire (1821-1895) was a British artist, who studied lithography with Richard James Lane. He is best known for the portraits of scientists, primarily naturalists, for which he was commissioned by George Ransome, F. L. S. in connection with the founding of the Ipswich Museum. Ransome gave the portraits as gifts to subscribing members and gave the entire portfolio, which ultimately ran to 60 portraits, to especially important figures, most notably Prince Albert when he visited the museum in 1851. Maguire brought to portrait making an unusual capacity to capture a person's type and character. His portraits did not try glorify their subject but rather showed their individuality. The subject's renown depended on their accomplishments, which would have been well-known to the observers.

$1200.00

John Stevens Henslow
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John Stevens Henslow

By MAGUIRE, Thomas Herbert (1821-1895)

[Ipswich: George Ransome, 1851. Tinted lithograph in octagonal format, with signature as title: "J. S. Henslow", with artist's printed signature in image lower left: "T. H. Maguire 1851" A handsome portrait of a brilliant Anglican scientist John Stevens Henslow (1796-1861), passionate about natural history as a boy, grew up to be one of the leading botanists of his time as well as an Anglican minister. He attended Cambridge, made geological observations on the Isle of Wight with Adam Sedgwick and in 1822 became Professor of Mineralogy at the University of Cambridge. In 1824, his scientific interests had shifted to botany. In 1827, he gave up his Professorship in Mineralogy and in 1829 became Professor of Botany. It was in this year that his "Catalogue of British Plants" appeared. It was during his Botany Professorship that he had Charles Darwin as a student. And when he was offered the post of botanist on H. M. S. Beagle, he recommended Darwin for the position. Like many Anglican clergymen, Henslow was at first an absentee rector, taking the bulk of remuneration while leaving the ministerial work to a curate, but in 1839, he moved to his parish in Hitcham, Suffolk and devoted himself to his parish. He continued there for the rest of his life, keeping his Professorship at Cambridge. During his tenure in Suffolk, he established a school and encouraged the creation of the nearby Ipswich museum (for which this portrait was made). Ipswich was primarily a natural history museum and Henslow was elected president in 1850. Thomas Herbert Maguire (1821-1895) was a British artist, who studied lithography with Richard James Lane. He is best known for the portraits of scientists, primarily naturalists, for which he was commissioned by George Ransome, F. L. S. in connection with the founding of the Ipswich Museum. Ransome gave the portraits as gifts to subscribing members and gave the entire portfolio, which ultimately ran to 60 portraits, to especially important figures, most notably Prince Albert when he visited the museum in 1851. Maguire brought to portrait making an unusual capacity to capture a person's type and character. His portraits did not try glorify their subject but rather showed their individuality. The subject's renown depended on their accomplishments, which would have been well-known to the observers.

$1200.00

Joseph Dalton Hooker
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Joseph Dalton Hooker

By MAGUIRE, Thomas Herbert (1821-1895)

[Ipswich: George Ransome, 1851. Tinted lithograph in octagonal format with signature " Jos. D Hooker" as title, and artist's printed signature in image: "T. H. Maguire 1851" A fine, sensitive portrait of one of England's greatest botanists Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817-1912) was one of the leading lights of Victorian science. A close friend of Darwin's and son of the other towering figure in the study of botany of the Victorian Age, he established the scientific basis of geographical botany and advanced the study of paleobotany. His extensive travels in search of exotic plants earned him a reputation as an explorer as well. As a boy, Joseph Hooker began attending his father's lectures on botany at the University of Glasgow at the age of five, and the systematic study of plants was a life-long fascination. He and his older brother were tutored at home. Joseph then studied medicine at the University of Glasgow (the only way to study plants at that time was to study medicine), from which he received an M. D. in 1839. Hooker married John Stevens Henslow's daughter, Frances, with whom he had seven children in 1851. By this time he had gone on lengthy expeditions to Antarctica and Himalayas - indeed he was the first European to collect plants in Tibet. His travels provided plants for Kew Gardens, among others, and material for many books among them Flora Antarctica 1844-47; Flora Novae Zelandiae 1851-53; Flora Tasmaniae 1853-59. Despite his ever increasing family, Hooker loved making long explorations to exotic places. During the 1860's and 70's he made lengthy expeditions to Palestine, Morocco and the western United States. He is one of history's greatest plant explorers. In 1865, his father, William Jackson Hooker, died and Joseph was chosen to replace him as Director of the Royal Botanic Garden at Kew. He served in this position for 20 years. Thomas Herbert Maguire (1821-1895) was a British artist, who studied lithography with Richard James Lane. He is best known for the portraits of scientists, primarily naturalists, for which he was commissioned by George Ransome, F. L. S. in connection with the founding of the Ipswich Museum. Ransome gave the portraits as gifts to subscribing members and gave the entire portfolio, which ultimately ran to 60 portraits, to especially important figures, most notably Prince Albert when he visited the museum in 1851. Maguire brought to portrait making an unusual capacity to capture a person's type and character. His portraits did not try glorify their subject but rather showed their individuality. The subject's renown depended on their accomplishments, which would have been well-known to the observers.

$1500.00

Robert Brown
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Robert Brown

By MAGUIRE, Thomas Herbert

[Ipswich: George Ransome, 1850. Tinted lithograph in octagonal format, signature as title: "Robert Brown"; artist's printed signature, "T. H. Maguire 1850" in image l.r. Blind-stamp of Ipswich Museum. A fine portrait of the famous Scottish botanist, who first observed "Brownian" motion Robert Brown (1773-1858) was born in Montrose, Scotland. He attended University of Edinburgh for several years, studying medicine, but left before graduating to pursue his interest in botany. Before leaving, he attended lectures by John Walker, the great Scottish polymath and naturalist, and made botanical expeditions in the Highlands with David Don. He joined the army in 1794 and was surgeon's mate to a regiment stationed in Ireland. While in Ireland, he continued his botanical studies. Plant collectors at this time formed a network through correspondence and journals, and Brown's research and ambition eventually led to his being selected Naturalist for Flinder's 1801 expedition to what came to be called Australia. When Brown returned to Britain in 1805, he had assembled a collection of more than 3,500 plants, some 2,000 of which were previously unknown. After cataloging and distributing his botanical discoveries, Brown became Sir Joseph Banks' librarian, and when Banks died in 1820, he inherited the library and herbarium. The library went to the British Museum in 1827 with Brown as its Keeper. Brown is credited with having expanded the study of plants in several important directions, mostly through the use of microscopes. He was one of the first to discover the existence of the cell nucleus and cytoplasmic streaming (the movement of organelles through the cytoplasm). He is best known today for his observations of "Brownian Motion", which he saw in grains of pollen suspended in water. In 1905, Einstein determined that the pollen was moved by the constant activity of the water molecules, which caused random motion. Thomas Herbert Maguire (1821-1895) was a British artist, who studied lithography with Richard James Lane. He is best known for the portraits of scientists, primarily naturalists, for which he was commissioned by George Ransome, F. L. S. in connection with the founding of the Ipswich Museum. Ransome gave the portraits as gifts to subscribing members and gave the entire portfolio, which ultimately ran to 60 portraits, to especially important figures, most notably Prince Albert when he visited the museum in 1851. Maguire brought to portrait making an unusual capacity to capture a person's type and character. His portraits did not try glorify their subject but rather showed their individuality. The subject's renown depended on their accomplishments, which would have been well-known to the observers.

$2500.00

[Two Pencil Sketches by William Daniell, after Architect George Dance, showing the artists William Hodges and Samuel Pepys Cockerell]
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[Two Pencil Sketches by William Daniell, after Architect George Dance, showing the artists William Hodges and Samuel Pepys Cockerell]

By [DANIELL, William]

1809. Each pencil sketch on a sheet 10 x 8 inches. Matted to 15½ x 13½ inches. Minor toning and soiling. Very good. One great landscape artist portrays another. Two pencil drawings by landscape painter and engraver William Daniell, after drawings by George Dance, possibly executed around the time of Daniell's engraving of the portraits for the work A Collection of Portraits Sketched from the Life since the year 1793 by George Dance ...(London, 1809-1814). Daniell (1769-1837) was an accomplished landscape artist, etcher and engraver. He traveled with his uncle, renowned landscape painter Thomas Daniell, to India (1786-1793), where he assisted his uncle and developed his own skills. He later produced many magnificent views of locales around the globe, particularly of India. In addition to his well-known landscape works, he also engraved and published a series of portraits drawn by architect George Dance (1741-1825), some of which were published in a two volume work in 1809-1814. Late in his career, Dance turned his hand to other art forms, including music and chalk profile portraits of friends and acquaintances. The two subjects depicted here are fellow artists - Samuel Pepys Cockerell was a fellow architect, and William Hodges was a painter, particularly noted for being the artist on Captain James Cook's second voyage. Each volume of the work published thirty-six portraits with descriptive text about the subject. William Hodges is depicted in the second volume. The engraved portrait faces right, while this sketch faces left, making it a mirror image for printing. The Yale Center for British Art holds not only the published work but also a volume of proof prints, each labeled in manuscript, with the manuscript title "A Series of Portraits drawn by George Dance Esq. and Engraved by Wm. Daniell." This proof volume is comprised only of portraits, with no text, and includes a further eighty-five engravings beyond the seventy-two published by Daniell in 1809-1814. This is particularly interesting in light of the fact that while the portrait of William Hodges appears in the published work, Samuel Pepys Cockerell does not - though he is among the proof prints. Since Dance's original drawings were done in chalk, which is a much looser medium than line-engraving, it is possible that Daniell created these drawings to provide himself with a more defined and delineated image from which to create his engraving. These drawings therefore provided an interesting and important step in the engraving process.

$12000.00

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