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A Chart of the Straits of Magellan. Inlarged from the chart published at Madrid in 1769. by Don Juan de la Cruz Cano y Olmedilla ... and improved from the observations and surveys of Captns. Byron, Wallis, and Cartaret compared with those of Monsr. de Bougainville
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A Chart of the Straits of Magellan. Inlarged from the chart published at Madrid in 1769. by Don Juan de la Cruz Cano y Olmedilla ... and improved from the observations and surveys of Captns. Byron, Wallis, and Cartaret compared with those of Monsr. de Bougainville

By JEFFERYS, Thomas (d.1771) - Juan de la CRUZ CANO y Olmedilla and others

London: R. Sayer & J. Bennett, 1775. Engraving, with original hand-colour in outline, with inset 'A Chart of the Magellania with Falkland Islands'. Numerous expert small repairs. Some restoration to centerfold, losses to publication line, soiling at base around centerfold and margins. A splendid chart of the diabolical Straits of Magellan from the American Atlas As a collection, the American Atlas stands as the most comprehensive, detailed and accurate survey of the Americas at the beginning of the Revolution. Jefferys was the leading English cartographer of the 18th century. From about 1750, he published a series of maps of the English American colonies, that were among the most significant produced in the period. As Geographer to the Prince of Wales, and after 1761, Geographer to the King, Jefferys was well placed to have access to the best surveys conducted in America, and many of his maps held the status of "official work". Jefferys died on 20th November 1771, and in 1775, his sucessors, Robert Sayer and John Bennett, gathered the separately-issued maps together (including the present example) and republished them in book form as The American Atlas . This superb chart of the turbulent meeting place of Atlantic and Pacific depicts the fascinating labyrinth that Magellan and his crew famously threaded their way through and where many a ship has been lost. It was and remains even now a most treacherous passage, the sailor's dread. Cf. Howes J-81; cf. Phillips Atlases 1165 and 1166; cf. Sabin 35953; cf. Streeter Sale I, 72 (1775 edition); cf. Walter Ristow (editor) Thomas Jefferys The American Atlas London 1776, facsimile edition, Amsterdam 1974.

$450.00

[Buzzards Bay and Vineyard Sound.]
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[Buzzards Bay and Vineyard Sound.]

By DES BARRES, JOSEPH FREDERICK WALLET (1721-1824) and SAMUEL HOLLAND

London: J. F. W. Des Barres for The Atlantic Neptune, 1776. Large engraved chart from Des Barres' Atlantic Neptune on two sheets of laid paper, joined, each bearing "J Bates" watermark. 43x31 inches sheet size, nice margins; contemporary hand-color in outline; slightest offsetting, a superior copy. State 4 of 7. Fine chart depicting the waters between New Bedford and Martha's Vineyard. Buzzards Bay and the Vineyard Sound including the Elizabeth Islands and the western half of Martha's Vineyard. Showing much more on-shore information than is typical for a Des Barres chart, there are details of property boundaries, structures, even a road from Menemshaw Pond to Tisbury. Native names throughout remain largely unchanged today. Joseph Des Barres was born in Switzerland in 1721 and educated in Basel before emigrating to England and entering the Royal Military College where he learned engineering and the art of surveying. In 1756, Des Barres was commissioned a Lieutenant in the Royal American Regiment and dispatched to North America. He served in America during the Seven Years War under Colonel Bouquet, Lord Howe and General Amherst, and participated in the Quebec campaign as General Wolfe's engineer. Though Des Barres was responsible for the surveys done of Nova Scotia and the Isle of Sable, the surveying of the coastline of what became the United States was undertaken by Major Samuel Holland, a Dutchman, who joined the British army during the French and Indian War as an engineer, and became ultimately Surveyor General for North America. Holland was in charge of a rather large staff, that included Charles Blaskowitz and George Gauld. They ultimately provided greatly improved charts for the entire coastline and the Gulf of Mexico. All this work was done prior to the Revolution, which necessarily brought the surveys to an end. The publishing supervised by Des Barres continued throughout the war years. Des Barres compiled and edited the atlas, maintaining a high standard throughout. His primary motive seems to have been the navigational usefulness of the charts. He clearly envisioned a navigator's needs in approaching a shoreline. The Atlantic Neptune was the first new survey of American coastlines in a century, and the need was very great. The charts were plagiarized for the next thirty or forty years. Des Barres also had a flare for making charts aesthetically appealing, so that they are invariably handsome as well as unfailingly interesting. Stevens 88D; John Carter Brown Library Charting the East Coast of North America, The Atlantic Neptune (Providence: 1972); Robert Lingel 'The Atlantic Neptune' in the Bulletin of the New York Public Library, July 1936, pp.571-603; Augustus P. Loring 'The Atlantic Neptune' in American Maritime Prints (New Bedford: 1985).

$28500.00

Mississipi River from Iberville to Yazous
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Mississipi River from Iberville to Yazous

By DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824)

London: J.F.W. Des Barres in the 'The Atlantic Neptune', 1779. Copper-engraved map, on two joined sheets, with original wash colour. A very rare and highly important chart of the Mississippi River, from 'The Atlantic Neptune,' the celebrated first British sea atlas of the American colonies. This map is one of the scarcest and most fascinating charts from Des Barres' Atlantic Neptune', and is the finest map of the region to be produced in the eighteenth-century. This chart was often missing from editions of the Neptune , and today very rarely appears on the market. This very elegant map charts the Mississippi River, as it forms curves around the numerous oxbows, from the site of modern-day Vicksburg, Mississippi in the north, down past Baton Rouge, Louisiana in the south. The quality of the wash colour and the aquatint shading used on the map creates a most elegant aesthetic, distinguishing Des Barres work for all contemporary cartographers. The present example is the second of two variants of this map that were produced. This chart was drafted during an especially fascinating and tumultuous time in the region's history. Most of the east bank of the river was under the auspices of Great Britain, having been ceded by Spain during the Treaty of Paris in 1763. In the same treaty, Spain was given control of New Orleans and the territory to the west of the river. In 1779, the year this map was printed, Spain actively sided with the Americans in the Revolutionary War. That year, the British outpost of Fort New Richmond, located on the site of Baton Rouge, was seized by the Spanish governor of Louisiana, Don Bernardo de Galvez. At the conclusion of the war, in 1783, the territory east of the Mississippi was awarded to the United States. While Des Barres' plan is far more detailed, and in a larger scale, his primary source for his work was the Course of the Mississipi , by Lt. John Ross, printed in London by Sayer & Bennett in 1776. In 1765, Ross was sent on an expedition up the river as far as Illinois, and after his return he created a manuscript map that added observations gleaned on his own surveys to the most recent French geographical information, especially that contained on the D'Anville map. One will notice that the east bank features far more detail than the opposing side, as Ross and other British surveyors were technically only permitted to explore the British side of the river. In the centre of the map is "Natches," currently celebrated for its great mansions, and for being one of the most beautiful towns in the south. Further down the river, the French settlement of Pointe Coupée, with its church and fort is depicted on the map. Further down, a series of buildings marks the sight of Fort New Richmond, where the river meets a bayou named after the founder of New Orleans, the Sieur d'Iberville. This east bank features the outlines of numerous British land grants, that in most cases, were not settled upon the outbreak of the Revolution. Joseph Frederick Wallet Des Barres was born in Switzerland, where his Huguenot ancestors had fled following the repeal of the Edict of Nantes. He studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before immigrating to Britain where he trained at the Royal Military College, Woolwich. Upon the outbreak of hostilities with France in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to join his personal detail. During this period he also worked with the legendary future explorer James Cook on a monumental chart of the St. Lawrence River. Upon the conclusion of the Seven Years War, Britain's empire in North America was greatly expanded, and this required the creation of a master atlas featuring new and accurate sea charts for use by the Royal Navy. Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence. With these extremely accurate surveys in hand, Des Barres returned to London in 1774, where the Royal Navy charged him with the Herculean task of producing the atlas. He was gradually forwarded the manuscripts of numerous advanced surveys conducted by British cartographers in the American Colonies, Jamaica and Cuba, of which the present map is based on the work of Samuel Holland, conducted in the 1760s. The result was The Atlantic Neptune , which became the most celebrated sea atlas of its era, containing the first systematic survey of the east coast of North America. Des Barres's synergy of great empirical accuracy with the peerless artistic virtue of his aquatint views, created a work that "has been described as the most splendid collection of charts, plates and views ever published" ( National Maritime Museum Catalogue ). The Neptune eventually consisted of four volumes and Des Barres's dedication to the project was so strong that often at his own expense he continually updated and added new charts and views to various editions up until 1784, producing over 250 charts and views, many appearing in several variations. All of these charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information, such that in many cases they remained the most authoritative maps of the regions covered for several decades. Following the completion of the Neptune , Des Barres returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, living to the advanced age of 103. National Maritime Museum, Catalogue III, 143, p.384; National Maritime Museum, Henry Newton Stevens Collection, 172B ; Sellers & Van Ee, Maps & Charts of North America & West Indies, 791.

$25000.00

A Plan of Port Royal in South Carolina. Survey'd by Capn. John Gascoigne
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A Plan of Port Royal in South Carolina. Survey'd by Capn. John Gascoigne

By GASCOIGNE, John & William FADEN (1750-1836)

London: Jefferys & Faden, 1776. Copper-engraved sea chart, in excellent condition, on a full untrimmed sheet. A very rare and highly detailed sea chart, the most important map of South Carolina's Port Royal Sound and Hilton Head made in the early days of the Revolutionary War, in the first state This very finely engraved and immensely detailed chart was superior to all other maps printed of the region, and the most important portrayal of the Port Royal Sound available in the early days of the Revolutionary War. The map embraces today's Beaufort County, with the Sound's excellent natural harbour, formed by the numerous Sea Islands, which are separated from each other by an elaborate web of tidal channels. The Broad River enters from the north, and the sound is bordered by Port Royal, Parris, and Trench's (Hilton Head) Island, and Lady's and Saint Helena Islands. In the upper-centre of the image is the town of Beaufort, and numerous plantations are individually labeled. This sea chart was one of the most detailed and accurate of any such map of the American coastline. The immense detail of the hydrography was the result of surveys conducted by Captain John Gascoigne, assisted by his brother James. In 1728, aboard the HMS Alborough, he employed the most sophisticated and modern techniques with exacting attention to detail to produce a manuscript chart. The next year, this chart was altered by Francis Swaine, and it would appear that Swaine's manuscript, or a close copy of it, found its way to the London workshop of William Faden. Faden, the successor to the great Thomas Jefferys, was already one of Britain's leading cartographers and this map, present here in the first state, although undated, was printed in 1776. The Port Royal Sound region has one of the most diverse and fascinating histories of any part of the American South. The region was originally the domain of the Yamasee native tribe, and was known to Europeans since 1521, when it was encountered by a Spanish expedition led by Francisco Cordillo. In 1562, Jean Ribaut led a party of Huguenot colonists to found Charlesfort on Parris Island. The French presence soon proved too close for comfort for the Spanish, who had established a base at St. Augustine in 1565. The Spanish commander, Pedro Ménendez de Avilés succeeded in crushing the French colony, establishing his own outpost of Santa Elena nearby in 1566. Santa Elena became the capital of Spanish Florida and an important Jesuit mission that sought to convert the natives to Christianity. It was finally abandoned in 1587. For a brief period in the 1680s, the area was also home to a Stuart Town, the first Scottish settlement in the Americas. In 1663, Captain William Hilton, sailing from the Barbados in the Adventure, conducted a reconnaissance of the region, newly claimed by England. It was on this trip that he named "Hilton Head" after himself. In the 1670s, the first governor of Carolina, William Sayle led a party of Bermudian colonists to found the town of Port Royal. The English settlement of the region proved to be successful and enduring, and what was to become the most important town in the region, Beaufort, was founded in 1710. This chart was the finest and most detailed map available in the early days of the Revolutionary War, and would most certainly have been used by commanders in formulating their battle plans. This is significant, as Port Royal Sound was one of the South's finest harbours, both sides in the conflict believed that possession of the area was of great strategic importance. Early in the war, the region had fallen under the control of the American patriots, however, in December, 1778 the British seized control of nearby Savannah, Georgia. As the new year of 1779 dawned, the British commander there, General Augustin Prevost was determined to further his gains. Taking advantage of Britain's naval superiority, Prevost dispatched the HMS George Germaine with 200 marines aboard, commanded by Major Valentine Gardiner. On February 1st, they first engaged American forces at Hilton Head, who then decided to strategically withdraw up the Broad River, with the British in close pursuit. A fierce battle occurred at Bull's Plantation, forcing the Americans to retreat to the shelter of the surrounding forested swamps. Emboldened by his success, on February 2nd, Gardiner decided to attack Beaufort, which was defended by General William Moultrie. A pitched battle ensued, in which Moultrie managed to disable some of the British guns, which neutralized the British advantage. The next day, Gardiner was forced to retreat with heavy losses. On September 24th of the same year, in what was to become known the Battle of Hilton Head, three British ships were set upon by a trio of French ships, allied to the American cause. After a dramatic chase and intense exchange of cannon fire, the principal British ship, the HMS Experiment, was forced to surrender. The area remained an important base for the American cause, and although the British conducted isolated raids along the coast, it remained in the possession the American forces until the end of the war. Sellers & Van Ee, Maps & Charts of North America & the West Indies, 1529; Steven & Tree, "Comparative Cartography," in Tooley, The Mapping of America, 71(a). Cf. Cumming, British Maps of Colonial America, pp.47-49 and The Southeast in Early Maps, 204.

$5500.00

Egmont Harbour [modern Jeddore Harbour, Nova Scotia]
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Egmont Harbour [modern Jeddore Harbour, Nova Scotia]

By DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824)

London: Published by J.F.W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', 1779. Sea chart, etched with roulette-work, with original colour, with aquatint view. Printed on laid paper with `J Bates' watermark and `JB' countermark. A very fine sea chart and view of Egmont, now called Jeddore Harbour, from 'The Atlantic Neptune', the first British sea atlas of her North American colonies This is a finely presented and highly detailed chart of what is now known as Jeddore Harbour, near Halifax. The bay, seven miles long and three miles wide, is captured in a cartographic composition of great topographical and hydrographical detail, and is further embellished by a roundel containing a mariner's view of the area. This chart is the fifth and final state produced, and is identical to the Henry Stevens Collection , variant 49G, in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich. Des Barres studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. On the outbreak of the Seven Years war in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to be his aide-de-camp. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St.Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on the Neptune . His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The Atlantic Neptune was the first British sea atlas of her North American colonies, and one of the most important achievements of eighteenth century cartography. With an official commission from the Royal Navy, Des Barres published the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by further volumes. Des Barres' monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and aquatint views, many being found in several states. All of the charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information. Des Barres' plates were used to print further editions up into the first decade of the nineteenth-century. The Neptune met with the highest acclaim from the beginning, and is today widely regarded as superior to all other atlases produced during its time. National Maritime Museum: Henry Stevens Collection: K0124 HNS 49G & Catalogue , no.38, p.382; Cf. Spendlove, The Face of Early Canada , Chapter 4: "J.F.W. Des Barres and The Atlantic Neptune"; pp. 18-22; Debard, "The Family Origins of Joseph Frederick Wallet Des Barres: A Riddle Finally Solved", Nova Scotia Historical Review, Vol 14, No. 2 (1994), p.15.

$2500.00

Annapolis Royal... St. Mary's Bay
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Annapolis Royal... St. Mary's Bay

By DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824)

London: Published by J.F.W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', 1781. Etching with added hand-colour. On laid paper with `J Bates' watermark and `JB' countermark. A fine print from 'The Atlantic Neptune' which charts the Annapolis Royal, with a coastal view of Gulliver's Hole and a descriptive text. 'The Atlantic Neptune' was the first great marine atlas, and one of the greatest achievements of eighteenth century cartography. Published in England in 1774, it contained over 250 charts and views of the North American and Canadian coasts. The charts were intensely detailed and contained both hydrographical and topographical details. The Neptune was compiled and published for the Royal Navy by Joseph F. W. Des Barres, a Swiss cartographer who joined the Royal American Regiment as a surveyor. Des Barres fought in the French and Indian wars and was enlisted to survey the Canadian coastline. While his fellow surveyor, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast, Des Barres mapped the shoreline of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and the St. Lawrence River regions. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he compiled and published his monumental atlas; his dedication to the project was so strong that he published an updated version of the work every year until 1784. Des Barres' work was so superior to any other contemporary atlas, that the maps were used as the standard charts of the East coast for over 50 years. The Neptune remains one of the most important atlases ever printed, its views and maps chart the history of North America and allow us to glimpse a forgotten land long changed by the passage of time. This chart is an excellent eighteenth century record of the first settlement in Canada. In 1605, two years before the first permanent English settlement at Jamestown, three years before the founding of Quebec, and fifteen years before the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth, a small party of French explorers, led by Sieur de Monts, established Port Royal as the first settlement in Canada. The settlement was later renamed Annapolis Royal which is the name asigned to it in Des Barres chart. Spendlove, The Face of Early Canada, Chapter 4: "J.F.W. Des Barres and The Atlantic Neptune"; pp. 18-22; Debard, "The Family Origins of Joseph Fredericks Wallet DesBarres: A Riddle Finally Solved", Nova Scotia Historical Review, Vol 14, No. 2 (1994), p.15.

$3500.00

Pascaert Vande Caribes Eylanden
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Pascaert Vande Caribes Eylanden

By GOOS, Pieter (1616-1675)

Amsterdam, 1666. Engraved sea chart, period hand-colouring in outline. Sheet size: 21 1/2 x 25 inches. Minor age toning. Fine seventeenth century sea chart of the islands of the Caribbean, including Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and the Lesser Antilles. The seventeenth century was the Golden Age of Dutch mapmaking. As the world's greatest trading nation, marine cartography was a particular specialty, and no one produced more lavish sea charts than Pieter Goos. Famed for its beauty, Koeman notes that "Goos' sea-atlas was more intended for the booklover than for the seaman." Finely drawn and engraved, printed on top quality paper, and beautifully coloured, they were intended more for the merchant collector than the practical mariner. Goos' Zee-Atlas was the companion marine atlas of choice for Blaeu's famous terrestrial atlas, the Atlas Maior. "Pieter Goos was one of Amsterdams most prominent publishers of nautical charts. The reputation of his firm was matched only by that of the publishing houses of Blaeu and van Keulen" (Putnam). This fine chart depicts the islands of the Antilles and the northern coast of South America. It is oriented with west to the top of the map. The map is decorated with a compass rose, as well as a pair of galleons and a decorative cartouche. Koeman, Atlantes Neerlandici, Volume IV, pp. 193, 197 and 199; Putnam, Early Sea Charts, pp. 99-100; Tooley, Dictionary of Mapmakers, p. 253.

$1750.00

[Chart of the Coast of Georgia]
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[Chart of the Coast of Georgia]

By DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824)

[London, 1780. Aquatint and line engraving, period hand colouring. Very rare first state of Des Barres's chart of the coast of Georgia. This fine chart is from "The Atlantic Neptune," one of the finest large scale sea atlases of the United States and Canadian Atlantic coastline ever produced. The maps in the atlas were produce over a seven-year period (1775-82), and are well known for their accurate portrayal of various sounds, bays, bars, harbors as well as navigational hazards. This atlas was used extensively by the Royal Navy during the American Revolution. This is a detailed chart of the Georgia and upper Florida coastlines, covering an area between the mouth of the River May to John's Island. The towns of Savannah, Beaufort, Hardwick and Sunbury are shown and the coastal Parishes in Georgia are names. To the west is noted "Indian Boundary Line." This very rare first state is larger than the subsequent two states, without any detail added to the South Carolina coast and without the inset in the lower right corner added in or after 1780. Stevens 168a.

$22500.00

Pas-kaart van de Golff van Mexico
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Pas-kaart van de Golff van Mexico

By KEULEN, Johannes van (1654-1715) and Claes Janszoon VOOGHT (d. 1696)

Amsterdam: Johannes Van Keulen, 1687. Copper-engraved map, period hand-colouring. Inset of the waters near Vera Cruz. (Expert restoration at sheet edges). Van Keulen's scarce 17th century chart of the western Gulf of Mexico, oriented with west toward the top of the page. Van Keulen's rare chart of the western portion of the Gulf of Mexico "covers the coastline from the panhandle of present day Florida around to the Yucatan peninsula. The main feature of this map is its originality of form. It is the first sea chart of the western portion of the Gulf of Mexico detailing the coastal waters of present-day Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas. The geography is largely derived from the exceedingly rare Hessel Gerritz chart of c. 1631" (Burden). As expected, most of the toponyms are Spanish and the mouth of the Mississippi is labelled Baja de Spirito Sancto. Oriented to the west, "it represented the most sophisticated rendering of the coast then available" (Martin & Martin). The Texas portion of the coastline, along the top of the map, begins at "Rio Bravo" (Rio Grande) gives an indication of the many rivers that flow from Texas into the Gulf, though of course the names have been changed. The Van Keulen family were chart and instrument makers, and publishers of nautical textbooks, books on sea law, shipbuilding, almanacs and more. Founded by Joannes van Keulen (c.1654-1715), the firm remained in business for over 200 years. For the publication of his Zee-Fakkel, Keulen retained geographer and mathematician Claes Janszoon Vooght. Burden's second state, with the page number "14" added to the lower left corner, but before later additions and re-engravings. Burden, The Mapping of North America II: 592; Martin & Martin, Maps of Texas and the Southwest p. 85, plate 11.

$5750.00

Pas-kaart van de Zuyd kust van Espaniola met de Zee kust van Nuevo Reyne de Granada
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Pas-kaart van de Zuyd kust van Espaniola met de Zee kust van Nuevo Reyne de Granada

By KEULEN, Johannes van (1654-1715)

Amsterdam: Johannes van Keulen, 1687. Copper-engraved map, full contemporary hand-colouring, heightened with gold. A very fine copy of this excellent and very early chart of the island of Aruba, the southern coast of Haiti and the Dominican Republic and part of the northern coast of Colombia. This beautifully-finished map was published by innovative Dutch cartographer and publisher, Johannes van Keulen, in the 1687 second edition of the third volume his Sea-Atlas [or Zee-Fakkel ]. The chart includes a fine decorative title vignette, just above which is the island of Aruba, to the left the north coast of Columbia and as far west as Santa Marta. In the right corner is an enlarged detail of the bay of Tiburon ( Baya de Tiburaon .) on the southwestern-most tip of Haiti. Along the uppermost margin, the south coast of the island of Hispaniola (Haiti and the Dominican Republic) is shown, with the capital city of Santo Domingo, the oldest continuously occupied city in the Americas, marked at the mouth of the Ozama River. Cf. Koeman IV, Keu109B.

$675.00

Chart of the Bay of San Pablo  Straits of Carquines and part of the Bay of San Francisco California by ... Ringgold assisited by Simon F. Blunt ... Projected, constructed & drawn by Fred. D. Stuart ... assisted by A.H. Campbell
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Chart of the Bay of San Pablo Straits of Carquines and part of the Bay of San Francisco California by ... Ringgold assisited by Simon F. Blunt ... Projected, constructed & drawn by Fred. D. Stuart ... assisted by A.H. Campbell

By RINGGOLD, Cadwalader (1802-1867, surveyor)

Washington, D.C., 1850. Lithographic map, by C.B. Graham from Ringgold's survey. Sheet size: 31 1/8 x 21 5/16 inches. In good condition, on later backing paper with a number of small repaired marginal tears. Rare unfolded thick paper issue of this important early chart of San Francisco bay and its environs by the 'Gold Rush Surveyor' (A.F. Houston) This rare separately issued map sheet is one of the results of a series of surveys carried out under Cadwalader Ringgold's leadership between August 1849 and June 1850. The California gold rush had brought home the fact that there was an urgent need for accurate charts of the route from the Golden Gate up river to Sacramento and beyond to the area around Sutter's Fort on the American River. The local government and business community moved quickly: the San Francisco newspaper Alta California (20 June 1849) noted that 'A subscription is on foot among our business men to survey and buoy the Suisun bay and the Sacramento river between the port and Sacramento city. Captain Ringgold, USN, has been employed to make the survey, and there is every prospect that it will be speedily accomplished' The results of the survey were published in Ringgold's A series of charts, with sailing directions, embracing surveys of the Farallones, entrance to the bay of San Francisco, bays of San Francisco and San Pablo, straits of Carquines and Suisun Bay, confluence and deltic branches of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers and the Sacramento River (with the middle fork) to the American River, including the cities of Sacramento and Boston, State of California. (Washington: J.T. Towers, 1851), with the charts, folded and printed on thin paper. The present example is from the rare series of charts printed on thick paper, unfolded and intended for use on board the vessels wishing to make the hazardous journey up river to Sacramento. Cf. Alan Fraser Houston 'Cadwalader Ringgold, U.S. Navy' in California History , vol.79, Winter 2000; cf. Cowan (II), pp. 533-534; cf. Howes-Hartley R-301; cf. Kurutz 536c; cf. Rocq 11146; Rumsey 4658.001; cf. Sabin 71425; cf. Streeter Sale 2679.

$1200.00

Chart of the Coast of America from Cape Hateras [sic] to Cape Roman from the actual surveys of Dl. Dunbibin Esq
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Chart of the Coast of America from Cape Hateras [sic] to Cape Roman from the actual surveys of Dl. Dunbibin Esq

By [NORMAN, John]

[Boston: John Norman, 1794. Copper-engraved sea chart, on two joined sheets. Overall sheet size: 21 1/4 x 33 inches. An early issue of the earliest American chart of the North Carolina coast. Wheat and Brun, and others, speculate that the original version of this map was separately published in 1761, citing an advertisement in the September 14, 1761 Boston Gazette: "The Navigation on the Coast of North and South Carolina being very dangerous on account of the many Bars, Shoals, Sandbanks, Rocks, etc. The late Daniel Dunbibin, Esq. of North Carolina, has, at very great Expence and Labour, draughted the Sea Coast of both the Provinces in a large whole Sheet Chart of 33 inches by 23; together with all the Rivers, Bays, Inlets, Islands, Brooks, Bars, Shoals, Rocks, Soundings, Currents, &c. with necessary Directions to render the Navigation both easy and safe, and are much esteemed by the most expert Pilots..." No copy of this 1761 map is known to exist. It is believed, however, that John Norman re-used the original printing plate for this map, or closely copied a surviving example, when he published the first edition of his The American Pilot in 1791. This example of Norman's chart of the North Carolina coastline is present here in its third state (i.e., preceded by the 1761 first issue, and second issue copies from the 1791 and 1792 editions of Norman's pilot). This state can be discerned by the addition of "New Inlet" just north of Cape Fear. Additional issues were published through 1803. The American Revolution brought to an end Britain's leading role in the mapping of America. The task now fell to the American publishing industry, still in its infancy, but with first-hand access to the new surveys that were documenting the rapid growth of the nation. In particular, there was a need for nautical charts for use by the expanding New England commercial fleets. The first American marine atlas, Mathew Clark's A Complete Set of Charts of the Coast of America, was published in Boston in 1790. Two of Clark's charts had been engraved by John Norman, who was inspired to launch his own enterprise. In January 1790, Norman published a notice in the Boston Gazette stating he was currently engraving charts of all the coast of America on a large scale. These were assembled and published as The American Pilot , Boston, 1791. Norman's Pilot , the second American marine atlas, indeed the second American atlas of any kind, marked an advance over the earlier work of Mathew Clark. New editions of the Pilot appeared in 1792 and 1794, and after John Norman's death, his son, William, brought out editions in 1794, 1798, 1801, and 1803. Despite the seemingly large number of editions, The American Pilot is one of the rarest of all American atlases, and one of the very few published during the eighteenth century. Wheat and Brun (pps. 198-199) locate just ten complete copies for the first five editions: 1791 (Huntington, Harvard); 1792 (LC, Clements); 1794(1) (LC, JCB, Boston Public); 1794(2) (Yale); 1798 (LC, Boston Public). Provenance: de-accessioned by the Museum of the City of New York. Wheat & Brun Maps & Charts Published in America before 1800 580 (third state); Phillips, p. 872 (1798 edition); Printed Maps of the Carolinas 24; cf. Wroth, Some Contributions to Navigation, pp. 32-33.

$52500.00

I. Carte Particuliere des Costes de Normandie Depuis Dieppe jusqu'a la pointe de la Perçée en Bessin. Faite Par Ordre Exprez du Roy de France
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I. Carte Particuliere des Costes de Normandie Depuis Dieppe jusqu'a la pointe de la Perçée en Bessin. Faite Par Ordre Exprez du Roy de France

By MORTIER, Pierre (1661-1711)

Paris [but Amsterdam: Mortier], 1693. Engraved with full, period colour. This large scale, beautifully coloured chart which shows the coast of France from Sainte Mère-Englise to Dieppe, comes from Le Neptune François , a lavish collection of charts produced collaboratively by Hubert Jaillot and Pierre Mortier. As Koeman discovered in his research on this work (see P. Mortier, Atlantes Neerlandici, Maritime Atlases, p. 423-4), Mortier re-engraved the plates after the original French prototype Neptune François by Charles Pène and others in a richly coloured edition and added to the titles the words "Levée et Gravée par ordre du Roy à Paris 1693" though they were in fact engraved, coloured and published in Amsterdam by Mortier. Pierre Mortier's grandparents were French émigrés, who left France in about 1625 to live in Leiden. His parents settled in Amsterdam in 1661 or 1662. Pierre Mortier grew up in Amsterdam but lived in Paris from 1681 to about 1685 where he must have gotten into the book trade. Once he was in Amsterdam again he specialized in French books and maintained his relationships with Parisian publishers. Amsterdam was at this time the international marketplace for books, especially books forbidden by repressive governments. He established himself in the field of cartographical publishing by offering editions of French maps, primarily Sanson's and Jaillot's to a public tired of the superb but dated Dutch offerings. Working on a scale larger than the typical Dutch folio map and providing the new insights of French geography, he was immensely successful. The charts in his version of Le Neptune François are outstanding examples of cartographical art. They are among the most beautiful printed sea charts ever made. This chart gives the soundings and shorelines for this area of French coastline along the English Channel including towns Bayeux and Rouen. Koeman, M. Mor 1, #16.

$1500.00

Baye de Chesapeake en 4 feuilles avec les Bas fonds, Passes, Entrees, Sondes et Routes... Patowmack, Patapsco, et Nord-Est d'apres les Dessins de Navigateurs Experimentes, principal d'apres A. Smith Pilote de St. Marys; Comparees avec les Nouvelles Levees de Virginie et Maryland
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Baye de Chesapeake en 4 feuilles avec les Bas fonds, Passes, Entrees, Sondes et Routes... Patowmack, Patapsco, et Nord-Est d'apres les Dessins de Navigateurs Experimentes, principal d'apres A. Smith Pilote de St. Marys; Comparees avec les Nouvelles Levees de Virginie et Maryland

By SMITH, After Anthony

Paris: George Louis Le Rouge, 1778. Copper-engraved map on 2 sheets, 21 x 55 inches each. Marvelous Chesapeake Bay chart made during the American Revolution The first French edition of Chesapeake pilot Anthony Smith's highly detailed chart of Chesapeake Bay and the rivers that converge in it. As Pritchard points out, pilots were offering themselves for hire to visiting merchant ships from the 1640s onward, so hazardous are sand spits, currents and shoals. Given the critical need, it is surprising how few charts were made in the 18th century. In making his chart, Anthony Smith, of St, Mary's County in Maryland, took the most important cartographical works on the region: Walter Hoxton's 1735 chart and Fry and Jefferson's map of Virginia and added to this information many soundings in the mouths of Western shore rivers, making it the best chart of the Bay. As such, it was published by George Louis Le Rouge in the Pilote Americain Septentrionale in 1778, the year in which the French formally allied with the Americans. The LeRouge is undoubtedly based on the 2nd English edition of 1777. The first two editions of Smith's chart are virtually unobtainable, so the LeRouge edition (the third) in a large, wall map scale, represents an opportunity for collectors to see in detail the places where on sea and land the British endured their final defeat. Three years after it was issued, the French fleet, having driven off the British, blockaded the Bay and surrounded the Yorktown peninsula, which, in concert with Washington's siege, forced the British to surrender. Degrees of Latitude 48; Sellers & Van Ee, 1496.

$45000.00

A Chart of Delawar[e] Bay with Soundings and Nautical Observations taken by Capt. Sir Andrew Snape Hammond of the Navy and others  Composed and Published for The Use of Pilotage...
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A Chart of Delawar[e] Bay with Soundings and Nautical Observations taken by Capt. Sir Andrew Snape Hammond of the Navy and others Composed and Published for The Use of Pilotage...

By DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721?-1824)

London: Published by J. F. W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', 1779. Black and white copper engraving. Large repaired tear (12") from bottom edge, parallel to centerfold. 4" repaired split from bottom in centerfold. Thin, uneven margins. Plate size: 30 1/4 x 22 1/8 inches. This is a fantastic sea chart of the Delaware coast from the 'The Atlantic Neptune' which is universally recognized as one of the most magnificent atlases ever made. This superb sea chart, constructed for the use of the British Navy, shows the major part of the Delaware coast, from Rehobeth to Bombay Hook, as well as the opposing south New Jersey shore. 'The Atlantic Neptune' was the first great marine atlas, and one of the great achievements of eighteenth century cartography. When publication in England began in 1774, it contained over 250 charts and views of the North American and Canadian coasts. The charts were intensely detailed and contained both hydrographical and topographical details. The Neptune was compiled and published for the Royal Navy by Joseph F. W. Des Barres, a Swiss cartographer who joined the Royal American Regiment as a surveyor. Des Barres fought in the French and Indian wars and was enlisted to survey the Canadian coastline. While his fellow surveyor, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast, Des Barres mapped the shoreline of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and the St. Lawrence River regions. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he compiled and published his monumental atlas; his dedication to the project was so strong that he published an updated version of the work every year until 1784. Des Barres' work was so superior to any other contemporary atlas that the maps were used as the standard charts of the East coast for over 50 years. The Neptune remains one of the most important atlases ever printed, its views and maps chart as aspect of the history of North America and now allow us to glimpse this land drastically changed by the passage of time. Snyder, City of Independence , p. 271; Stevens 158.

$10000.00

Pas caerte van Nieu Nederlandt en de Engelsche Virginies van Cabo Cod tot Cabo Canrick
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Pas caerte van Nieu Nederlandt en de Engelsche Virginies van Cabo Cod tot Cabo Canrick

By GOOS, Pieter

Amsterdam, 1666. Copper engraving with period outline colour. One of the finest and most beautiful 17th-century charts of the Northeast of America, from 'De Zee Atlas ofter Water-Weereld' The seventeenth century was the Golden Age of Dutch mapmaking. As the world's greatest trading nation, marine cartography was a particular specialty, and no one produced more lavish sea charts than Pieter Goos. Finely drawn and engraved, printed on top quality paper, and beautifully coloured, they were intended more for the merchant collector than the practical mariner. Goos' Zee-Atlas was the companion marine atlas of choice for Joan Blaeu's famous terrestrial atlas, the Atlas Maior. This is the general chart of New Netherland from the Zee-Atlas. It covers the Atlantic coast of America from Cape Cod to Cape Hatteras. The emphasis is on the Dutch colony of New Netherland. New Amsterdam (the future New York) is shown at the tip of Manhattan Island. Many other place names of Dutch origin appear, including 'Staten Eylandt', 'Lange Eylandt', and 'Vlysingen' (Flushing). Along the Delaware River a number of Dutch settlements are shown, including Fort Casimir, Nassau and Elsenburgh, as well as the Swedish Fort Christina. The Schuylkill River, site of the future metropolis of Philadelphia, is also located. In New England, Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket are shown with their present names, and several early English settlements, such as 'New Plymouth' are located. The delineation of the Chesapeake Bay is also quite good, with Jamestown located. The Potomac River is shown as the 'Patwomeck'. Burden, The Mapping of North America , plate 387; Humphreys, Old Decorative Maps and Charts , plate 63; Deak, Picturing America , 48.

$14000.00

A Chart of the Coast of Guinea from Cape de Verde to Cape Bona Esperança
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A Chart of the Coast of Guinea from Cape de Verde to Cape Bona Esperança

By THORNTON, John (1641-1708) & Samuel (fl.1703-39)

London: William Mount & Thomas Page, 1734. Copper-engraved sea chart, in excellent condition. A very elegant sea chart of all of the west coast of Africa and one of the most important charts of the celebrated Third Book of 'The English Pilot' This very fine sea chart embraces the coast of Africa from Senegal all the way down to Cape Agulhas, past the Cape of Good Hope. The features of the coast are named in great detail, and the seas are elegantly traversed by loxodromes. The map is oriented with the east towards the top of the map, and a very beautiful cartouche surrounded by mermen and seashells adorns the upper left corner. In 1671, the London cartographer John Seller (fl.1664-97) commenced work on The English Pilot, a work that intended to challenge Dutch hegemony in the sea atlas market. Intended to be published in four books covering different regions of the globe, Seller published an uncompleted book on 'Oriental navigation' in 1675. Unable to continue this Herculean endeavour, Seller sold his rights to John Thornton, the official hydrographer to the English East India Company. Thornton took up the project with great fervour, publishing his first editions in 1689. Thornton did not publish his first edition of the Third Book, detailing navigation in the East Indies, until 1703. While Thornton largely based his charts on those of earlier Dutch cartographers, most notably those found in Pieter Goos' Zee-Spiegel and Lucas Janz Waghenaer's Mariner's Mirror , The English Pilot proved to be enormously popular. When John Thornton died in 1708, his brother Samuel took over the business and added to and modified existing charts. All four books were produced in editions until the 1760s, the Third Book ran into twelve editions up to 1761. The project succeeded in giving the English dominance in the sea chart market as the eighteenth-century progressed. Cf. Phillips, Atlases , 4278-10; Verner & Skelton (eds.), John Thornton - The English Pilot: The Third Book (Facsimile 1703 edition).

$650.00

A Large Draught of the South Part of Borneo
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A Large Draught of the South Part of Borneo

By THORNTON, John (1641-1708) & Samuel (fl.1703-39)

London: William Mount & Thomas Page, 1734. Copper-engraved sea chart, in excellent condition apart from a skilfully repaired marginal split at the base of the centerfold and marginal soiling. A very attractive sea chart of southern Borneo, from the celebrated Third Book of the 'English Pilot' This very attractive sea chart depicts Kalimantan, now the Indonesian section of Borneo and the adjacent part of the Java Sea. While the delineation of the coast is geographically well assured, the interior of the island is shown to be virtually unknown. Inhabited by fierce indigenous tribes and exotic animals, agents of the Dutch East Indian Company, who then nominally controlled the coasts, were afraid to venture into the interior. Indeed, parts of Borneo have not even been fully explored to this day. The Java Sea is elegantly adorned with rhumb lines that radiate from a compass rose and from centerpoints placed on an invisible circle. A handsome title cartouche embellishes the lower left corner of the composition. In 1671, the London cartographer John Seller (fl.1664-97) commenced work on The English Pilot, a work that intended to challenge Dutch hegemony in the sea atlas market. Intended to be published in four books covering different regions of the globe, Seller published an uncompleted book on 'Oriental navigation' in 1675. Unable to continue this Herculean endeavour, Seller sold his rights to John Thornton, the official hydrographer to the English East India Company. Thornton took up the project with great fervour, publishing his first editions in 1689. Thornton did not publish his first edition of the Third Book, detailing navigation in the East Indies, until 1703. While Thornton largely based his charts on those of earlier Dutch cartographers, most notably those found in Pieter Goos' Zee-Spiegel and Lucas Janz Waghenaer's Mariner's Mirror, The English Pilot proved to be enormously popular. When John Thornton died in 1708, his brother Samuel took over the business and added to and modified existing charts. All four books were produced in editions until the 1760s, the Third Book ran into twelve editions up to 1761. The project succeeded in giving the English dominance in the sea chart market as the eighteenth-century progressed. National Maritime Museum (Greenwich), chart G258:2/17; Cf. Phillips, Atlases , 4278-38; Verner & Skelton (eds.), John Thornton - The English Pilot: The Third Book (Facsimile 1703 edition).

$450.00

A Large Draught of the Coast of Arabia from Maculla to Dofar
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A Large Draught of the Coast of Arabia from Maculla to Dofar

By THORNTON, John (1641-1708) & Samuel (fl.1703-39)

London: William Mount & Thomas Page, 1734. Copper-engraved sea chart by Sutton Nichols, in excellent condition apart from a small expert repair to the lower right and left corners. A very fine sea chart of the coast of Yemen and Oman from the celebrated Third Book of 'The English Pilot' This very attractive sea chart depicts the coast of the Arabian Peninsula from Al Makullah in Yemen to Dhofar in Oman. The coastal view is bisected into two images, separated by a border formed by the elegant tendrils of a vine. The upper view depicts the southern, while the lower portrays the northern aspect of the coast. Prominent features of the desert coastline are depicted, while compass roses, from which radiate rhumb lines, decorate the seas. In 1671, the London cartographer John Seller (fl.1664-97) commenced work on The English Pilot, a work that intended to challenge Dutch hegemony in the sea atlas market. Intended to be published in four books covering different regions of the globe, Seller published an uncompleted book on 'Oriental navigation' in 1675. Unable to continue this Herculean endeavour, Seller sold his rights to John Thornton, the official hydrographer to the English East India Company. Thornton took up the project with great fervour, publishing his first editions in 1689. Thornton did not publish his first edition of the Third Book, detailing navigation in the East Indies, until 1703. While Thornton largely based his charts on those of earlier Dutch cartographers, most notably those found in Pieter Goos' Zee-Spiegel and Lucas Janz Waghenaer's Mariner's Mirror , The English Pilot proved to be enormously popular. When John Thornton died in 1708, his brother Samuel took over the business and added to and modified existing charts. All four books were produced in editions until the 1760s, the Third Book ran into twelve editions up to 1761. The project succeeded in giving the English dominance in the sea chart market as the eighteenth-century progressed. Tibbetts, Arabia in Early Maps , 177; Cf. Phillips, Atlases , 4278-18; Verner & Skelton (eds.), John Thornton - The English Pilot: The Third Book (Facsimile 1703 edition).

$750.00

A Large Draught of the North Part of China Shewing the Passages and the Chanells into the Harbour of Chusan
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A Large Draught of the North Part of China Shewing the Passages and the Chanells into the Harbour of Chusan

By THORNTON, John (1641-1708) & Samuel (fl.1703-39)

London: William Mount & Thomas Page, 1734. Copper-engraved sea chart, in excellent condition, apart from an expertly repaired centre fold, and mild creases where the map folded. A very fine sea chart of China's Zhejiang Province, from the celebrated Third Book of 'The English Pilot' This elegant and large sea chart captures China's modern day Zhejiang province. Located on the East China sea, just below the Yangtze Delta, this region was of major interest to European traders during the eighteenth-century. It features the major port of Zhousan (Chusan), and was the location of the entrance of the Grand Canal of China. The canal, construction of which began in the 5th-century B.C., was then the oldest and longest man-made waterway in the world, which allowed barges to travel hundreds to Beijing. In 1671, the London cartographer John Seller (fl.1664-97) commenced work on The English Pilot , a work that intended to challenge Dutch hegemony in the sea atlas market. Intended to be published in four books covering different regions of the globe, Seller published an uncompleted book on 'Oriental navigation' in 1675. Unable to continue this Herculean endeavour, Seller sold his rights to John Thornton, the official hydrographer to the English East India Company. Thornton took up the project with great fervour, publishing his first editions in 1689. Thornton did not publish his first edition of the Third Book, detailing navigation in the East Indies, until 1703. While Thornton largely based his charts on those of earlier Dutch cartographers, most notably those found in Pieter Goos' Zee-Spiegel and Lucas Janz Waghenaer's Mariner's Mirror, The English Pilot proved to be enormously popular. When John Thornton died in 1708, his brother Samuel took over the business and added to and modified existing charts. All four books were produced in editions until the 1760s, the Third Book ran into twelve editions up to 1761. The project succeeded in giving the English dominance in the sea chart market as the eighteenth-century progressed. Cf. Phillips, Atlases , 4278-36; Verner & Skelton (eds.), John Thornton - The English Pilot: The Third Book (Facsimile 1703 edition).

$1200.00

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