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[Buzzards Bay and Vineyard Sound.]
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[Buzzards Bay and Vineyard Sound.]

By DES BARRES, JOSEPH FREDERICK WALLET (1721-1824) and SAMUEL HOLLAND

London: J. F. W. Des Barres for The Atlantic Neptune, 1776. Large engraved chart from Des Barres' Atlantic Neptune on two sheets of laid paper, joined, each bearing "J Bates" watermark. 43x31 inches sheet size, nice margins; contemporary hand-color in outline; slightest offsetting, a superior copy. State 4 of 7. Fine chart depicting the waters between New Bedford and Martha's Vineyard. Buzzards Bay and the Vineyard Sound including the Elizabeth Islands and the western half of Martha's Vineyard. Showing much more on-shore information than is typical for a Des Barres chart, there are details of property boundaries, structures, even a road from Menemshaw Pond to Tisbury. Native names throughout remain largely unchanged today. Joseph Des Barres was born in Switzerland in 1721 and educated in Basel before emigrating to England and entering the Royal Military College where he learned engineering and the art of surveying. In 1756, Des Barres was commissioned a Lieutenant in the Royal American Regiment and dispatched to North America. He served in America during the Seven Years War under Colonel Bouquet, Lord Howe and General Amherst, and participated in the Quebec campaign as General Wolfe's engineer. Though Des Barres was responsible for the surveys done of Nova Scotia and the Isle of Sable, the surveying of the coastline of what became the United States was undertaken by Major Samuel Holland, a Dutchman, who joined the British army during the French and Indian War as an engineer, and became ultimately Surveyor General for North America. Holland was in charge of a rather large staff, that included Charles Blaskowitz and George Gauld. They ultimately provided greatly improved charts for the entire coastline and the Gulf of Mexico. All this work was done prior to the Revolution, which necessarily brought the surveys to an end. The publishing supervised by Des Barres continued throughout the war years. Des Barres compiled and edited the atlas, maintaining a high standard throughout. His primary motive seems to have been the navigational usefulness of the charts. He clearly envisioned a navigator's needs in approaching a shoreline. The Atlantic Neptune was the first new survey of American coastlines in a century, and the need was very great. The charts were plagiarized for the next thirty or forty years. Des Barres also had a flare for making charts aesthetically appealing, so that they are invariably handsome as well as unfailingly interesting. Stevens 88D; John Carter Brown Library Charting the East Coast of North America, The Atlantic Neptune (Providence: 1972); Robert Lingel 'The Atlantic Neptune' in the Bulletin of the New York Public Library, July 1936, pp.571-603; Augustus P. Loring 'The Atlantic Neptune' in American Maritime Prints (New Bedford: 1985).

$28500.00

Isthmus of Nova Scotia
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Isthmus of Nova Scotia

By DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824)

London: Published by J.F.W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', 1780. Engraved and etched map with roulette work and aquatint, with original color, 6th state of six. Watermarked "JBates" and countermarked "JB". Some off-setting and soiling. A magnificent large scale map of the isthmus that bridges modern-day Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, featuring superlative detail applied with the greatest artistic virtuousity A monumental map of what is now the Isthmus of Chignecto, which connects Nova Scotia to the mainland. This land bridge had been fiercely contested between the British and French. and many battles were fought there during the 18th century. Fort Beausèjour at the head of the Bay of Fundy had become Fort Cumberland in 1755, at the beginning of the French and Indian War, and Fort Cumberland had repulsed an attack by American sympathisers in 1776. This final state of Des Barres' chart includes a great deal of topographical detail and many settlements in the region, shown as rectangular plots. There are of course many soundings and the title cartouche includes some interesting navigational information: " Chignecto, the North East Branch of the Bay of Fundy is Navigable up to Cumberland, Petcudiac, &c. Tides flow here with great rapidity and rise at Equinoctial Times from 60 to 70 feet perpendicular. By means of these huigh Tides, the Bason of Mines and several fine Rivers which discharge themselves about the Head of the Bay of Fundy are rendered Navigable. The Gulph of St. Lawrence Tides in Bay Verte on the North East of the Isthmus rise only 8 Feet." The charts of Nova Scotia were surveyed under Des Barres' direct supervision in the 1760's. Des Barres, of Swiss-Huguenot extraction, studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. Upon the outbreak of hostilities with France in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to join his personal detail. During this period he also worked with the future legendary explorer James Cook on a monumental chart of the St. Lawrence River. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast. He also managed to gain access to some surveys of the American South, Cuba and Jamaica. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on The Neptune. His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The Atlantic Neptune, the most celebrated sea atlas, contained the first systematic survey of the east coast of North America. Des Barres's synergy of great empirical accuracy with the peerless artistic virtue of his aquatint views, created a work that "has been described as the most splendid collection of charts, plates and views ever published" (National Maritime Museum Catalogue). Upon the conclusion of the Seven Years War, Britain's empire in North America was greatly expanded, and this required the creation of a master atlas featuring new and accurate sea charts for use by the Royal Navy. Des Barres was charged with this Herculean task, publishing the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by three further volumes. Des Barres's monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and views, many being found in several states. Des Barres's charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information, and in many cases remained the most authoritative maps of the regions covered for several decades. National Maritime Museum (Greenwich), Henry Newton Stevens Collection, 15f.

$5000.00

Mississipi River from Iberville to Yazous
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Mississipi River from Iberville to Yazous

By DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824)

London: J.F.W. Des Barres in the 'The Atlantic Neptune', 1779. Copper-engraved map, on two joined sheets, with original wash colour. A very rare and highly important chart of the Mississippi River, from 'The Atlantic Neptune,' the celebrated first British sea atlas of the American colonies. This map is one of the scarcest and most fascinating charts from Des Barres' Atlantic Neptune', and is the finest map of the region to be produced in the eighteenth-century. This chart was often missing from editions of the Neptune , and today very rarely appears on the market. This very elegant map charts the Mississippi River, as it forms curves around the numerous oxbows, from the site of modern-day Vicksburg, Mississippi in the north, down past Baton Rouge, Louisiana in the south. The quality of the wash colour and the aquatint shading used on the map creates a most elegant aesthetic, distinguishing Des Barres work for all contemporary cartographers. The present example is the second of two variants of this map that were produced. This chart was drafted during an especially fascinating and tumultuous time in the region's history. Most of the east bank of the river was under the auspices of Great Britain, having been ceded by Spain during the Treaty of Paris in 1763. In the same treaty, Spain was given control of New Orleans and the territory to the west of the river. In 1779, the year this map was printed, Spain actively sided with the Americans in the Revolutionary War. That year, the British outpost of Fort New Richmond, located on the site of Baton Rouge, was seized by the Spanish governor of Louisiana, Don Bernardo de Galvez. At the conclusion of the war, in 1783, the territory east of the Mississippi was awarded to the United States. While Des Barres' plan is far more detailed, and in a larger scale, his primary source for his work was the Course of the Mississipi , by Lt. John Ross, printed in London by Sayer & Bennett in 1776. In 1765, Ross was sent on an expedition up the river as far as Illinois, and after his return he created a manuscript map that added observations gleaned on his own surveys to the most recent French geographical information, especially that contained on the D'Anville map. One will notice that the east bank features far more detail than the opposing side, as Ross and other British surveyors were technically only permitted to explore the British side of the river. In the centre of the map is "Natches," currently celebrated for its great mansions, and for being one of the most beautiful towns in the south. Further down the river, the French settlement of Pointe Coupée, with its church and fort is depicted on the map. Further down, a series of buildings marks the sight of Fort New Richmond, where the river meets a bayou named after the founder of New Orleans, the Sieur d'Iberville. This east bank features the outlines of numerous British land grants, that in most cases, were not settled upon the outbreak of the Revolution. Joseph Frederick Wallet Des Barres was born in Switzerland, where his Huguenot ancestors had fled following the repeal of the Edict of Nantes. He studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before immigrating to Britain where he trained at the Royal Military College, Woolwich. Upon the outbreak of hostilities with France in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to join his personal detail. During this period he also worked with the legendary future explorer James Cook on a monumental chart of the St. Lawrence River. Upon the conclusion of the Seven Years War, Britain's empire in North America was greatly expanded, and this required the creation of a master atlas featuring new and accurate sea charts for use by the Royal Navy. Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence. With these extremely accurate surveys in hand, Des Barres returned to London in 1774, where the Royal Navy charged him with the Herculean task of producing the atlas. He was gradually forwarded the manuscripts of numerous advanced surveys conducted by British cartographers in the American Colonies, Jamaica and Cuba, of which the present map is based on the work of Samuel Holland, conducted in the 1760s. The result was The Atlantic Neptune , which became the most celebrated sea atlas of its era, containing the first systematic survey of the east coast of North America. Des Barres's synergy of great empirical accuracy with the peerless artistic virtue of his aquatint views, created a work that "has been described as the most splendid collection of charts, plates and views ever published" ( National Maritime Museum Catalogue ). The Neptune eventually consisted of four volumes and Des Barres's dedication to the project was so strong that often at his own expense he continually updated and added new charts and views to various editions up until 1784, producing over 250 charts and views, many appearing in several variations. All of these charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information, such that in many cases they remained the most authoritative maps of the regions covered for several decades. Following the completion of the Neptune , Des Barres returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, living to the advanced age of 103. National Maritime Museum, Catalogue III, 143, p.384; National Maritime Museum, Henry Newton Stevens Collection, 172B ; Sellers & Van Ee, Maps & Charts of North America & West Indies, 791.

$25000.00

A Plan of Port Royal in South Carolina. Survey'd by Capn. John Gascoigne
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A Plan of Port Royal in South Carolina. Survey'd by Capn. John Gascoigne

By GASCOIGNE, John & William FADEN (1750-1836)

London: Jefferys & Faden, 1776. Copper-engraved sea chart, in excellent condition, on a full untrimmed sheet. A very rare and highly detailed sea chart, the most important map of South Carolina's Port Royal Sound and Hilton Head made in the early days of the Revolutionary War, in the first state This very finely engraved and immensely detailed chart was superior to all other maps printed of the region, and the most important portrayal of the Port Royal Sound available in the early days of the Revolutionary War. The map embraces today's Beaufort County, with the Sound's excellent natural harbour, formed by the numerous Sea Islands, which are separated from each other by an elaborate web of tidal channels. The Broad River enters from the north, and the sound is bordered by Port Royal, Parris, and Trench's (Hilton Head) Island, and Lady's and Saint Helena Islands. In the upper-centre of the image is the town of Beaufort, and numerous plantations are individually labeled. This sea chart was one of the most detailed and accurate of any such map of the American coastline. The immense detail of the hydrography was the result of surveys conducted by Captain John Gascoigne, assisted by his brother James. In 1728, aboard the HMS Alborough, he employed the most sophisticated and modern techniques with exacting attention to detail to produce a manuscript chart. The next year, this chart was altered by Francis Swaine, and it would appear that Swaine's manuscript, or a close copy of it, found its way to the London workshop of William Faden. Faden, the successor to the great Thomas Jefferys, was already one of Britain's leading cartographers and this map, present here in the first state, although undated, was printed in 1776. The Port Royal Sound region has one of the most diverse and fascinating histories of any part of the American South. The region was originally the domain of the Yamasee native tribe, and was known to Europeans since 1521, when it was encountered by a Spanish expedition led by Francisco Cordillo. In 1562, Jean Ribaut led a party of Huguenot colonists to found Charlesfort on Parris Island. The French presence soon proved too close for comfort for the Spanish, who had established a base at St. Augustine in 1565. The Spanish commander, Pedro Ménendez de Avilés succeeded in crushing the French colony, establishing his own outpost of Santa Elena nearby in 1566. Santa Elena became the capital of Spanish Florida and an important Jesuit mission that sought to convert the natives to Christianity. It was finally abandoned in 1587. For a brief period in the 1680s, the area was also home to a Stuart Town, the first Scottish settlement in the Americas. In 1663, Captain William Hilton, sailing from the Barbados in the Adventure, conducted a reconnaissance of the region, newly claimed by England. It was on this trip that he named "Hilton Head" after himself. In the 1670s, the first governor of Carolina, William Sayle led a party of Bermudian colonists to found the town of Port Royal. The English settlement of the region proved to be successful and enduring, and what was to become the most important town in the region, Beaufort, was founded in 1710. This chart was the finest and most detailed map available in the early days of the Revolutionary War, and would most certainly have been used by commanders in formulating their battle plans. This is significant, as Port Royal Sound was one of the South's finest harbours, both sides in the conflict believed that possession of the area was of great strategic importance. Early in the war, the region had fallen under the control of the American patriots, however, in December, 1778 the British seized control of nearby Savannah, Georgia. As the new year of 1779 dawned, the British commander there, General Augustin Prevost was determined to further his gains. Taking advantage of Britain's naval superiority, Prevost dispatched the HMS George Germaine with 200 marines aboard, commanded by Major Valentine Gardiner. On February 1st, they first engaged American forces at Hilton Head, who then decided to strategically withdraw up the Broad River, with the British in close pursuit. A fierce battle occurred at Bull's Plantation, forcing the Americans to retreat to the shelter of the surrounding forested swamps. Emboldened by his success, on February 2nd, Gardiner decided to attack Beaufort, which was defended by General William Moultrie. A pitched battle ensued, in which Moultrie managed to disable some of the British guns, which neutralized the British advantage. The next day, Gardiner was forced to retreat with heavy losses. On September 24th of the same year, in what was to become known the Battle of Hilton Head, three British ships were set upon by a trio of French ships, allied to the American cause. After a dramatic chase and intense exchange of cannon fire, the principal British ship, the HMS Experiment, was forced to surrender. The area remained an important base for the American cause, and although the British conducted isolated raids along the coast, it remained in the possession the American forces until the end of the war. Sellers & Van Ee, Maps & Charts of North America & the West Indies, 1529; Steven & Tree, "Comparative Cartography," in Tooley, The Mapping of America, 71(a). Cf. Cumming, British Maps of Colonial America, pp.47-49 and The Southeast in Early Maps, 204.

$5500.00

Egmont Harbour [modern Jeddore Harbour, Nova Scotia]
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Egmont Harbour [modern Jeddore Harbour, Nova Scotia]

By DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824)

London: Published by J.F.W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', 1779. Sea chart, etched with roulette-work, with original colour, with aquatint view. Printed on laid paper with `J Bates' watermark and `JB' countermark. A very fine sea chart and view of Egmont, now called Jeddore Harbour, from 'The Atlantic Neptune', the first British sea atlas of her North American colonies This is a finely presented and highly detailed chart of what is now known as Jeddore Harbour, near Halifax. The bay, seven miles long and three miles wide, is captured in a cartographic composition of great topographical and hydrographical detail, and is further embellished by a roundel containing a mariner's view of the area. This chart is the fifth and final state produced, and is identical to the Henry Stevens Collection , variant 49G, in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich. Des Barres studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. On the outbreak of the Seven Years war in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to be his aide-de-camp. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St.Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on the Neptune . His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The Atlantic Neptune was the first British sea atlas of her North American colonies, and one of the most important achievements of eighteenth century cartography. With an official commission from the Royal Navy, Des Barres published the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by further volumes. Des Barres' monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and aquatint views, many being found in several states. All of the charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information. Des Barres' plates were used to print further editions up into the first decade of the nineteenth-century. The Neptune met with the highest acclaim from the beginning, and is today widely regarded as superior to all other atlases produced during its time. National Maritime Museum: Henry Stevens Collection: K0124 HNS 49G & Catalogue , no.38, p.382; Cf. Spendlove, The Face of Early Canada , Chapter 4: "J.F.W. Des Barres and The Atlantic Neptune"; pp. 18-22; Debard, "The Family Origins of Joseph Frederick Wallet Des Barres: A Riddle Finally Solved", Nova Scotia Historical Review, Vol 14, No. 2 (1994), p.15.

$2500.00

Annapolis Royal... St. Mary's Bay
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Annapolis Royal... St. Mary's Bay

By DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824)

London: Published by J.F.W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', 1781. Etching with added hand-colour. On laid paper with `J Bates' watermark and `JB' countermark. A fine print from 'The Atlantic Neptune' which charts the Annapolis Royal, with a coastal view of Gulliver's Hole and a descriptive text. 'The Atlantic Neptune' was the first great marine atlas, and one of the greatest achievements of eighteenth century cartography. Published in England in 1774, it contained over 250 charts and views of the North American and Canadian coasts. The charts were intensely detailed and contained both hydrographical and topographical details. The Neptune was compiled and published for the Royal Navy by Joseph F. W. Des Barres, a Swiss cartographer who joined the Royal American Regiment as a surveyor. Des Barres fought in the French and Indian wars and was enlisted to survey the Canadian coastline. While his fellow surveyor, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast, Des Barres mapped the shoreline of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and the St. Lawrence River regions. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he compiled and published his monumental atlas; his dedication to the project was so strong that he published an updated version of the work every year until 1784. Des Barres' work was so superior to any other contemporary atlas, that the maps were used as the standard charts of the East coast for over 50 years. The Neptune remains one of the most important atlases ever printed, its views and maps chart the history of North America and allow us to glimpse a forgotten land long changed by the passage of time. This chart is an excellent eighteenth century record of the first settlement in Canada. In 1605, two years before the first permanent English settlement at Jamestown, three years before the founding of Quebec, and fifteen years before the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth, a small party of French explorers, led by Sieur de Monts, established Port Royal as the first settlement in Canada. The settlement was later renamed Annapolis Royal which is the name asigned to it in Des Barres chart. Spendlove, The Face of Early Canada, Chapter 4: "J.F.W. Des Barres and The Atlantic Neptune"; pp. 18-22; Debard, "The Family Origins of Joseph Fredericks Wallet DesBarres: A Riddle Finally Solved", Nova Scotia Historical Review, Vol 14, No. 2 (1994), p.15.

$3500.00

Pascaert Vande Caribes Eylanden
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Pascaert Vande Caribes Eylanden

By GOOS, Pieter (1616-1675)

Amsterdam, 1666. Engraved sea chart, period hand-colouring in outline. Sheet size: 21 1/2 x 25 inches. Minor age toning. Fine seventeenth century sea chart of the islands of the Caribbean, including Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and the Lesser Antilles. The seventeenth century was the Golden Age of Dutch mapmaking. As the world's greatest trading nation, marine cartography was a particular specialty, and no one produced more lavish sea charts than Pieter Goos. Famed for its beauty, Koeman notes that "Goos' sea-atlas was more intended for the booklover than for the seaman." Finely drawn and engraved, printed on top quality paper, and beautifully coloured, they were intended more for the merchant collector than the practical mariner. Goos' Zee-Atlas was the companion marine atlas of choice for Blaeu's famous terrestrial atlas, the Atlas Maior. "Pieter Goos was one of Amsterdams most prominent publishers of nautical charts. The reputation of his firm was matched only by that of the publishing houses of Blaeu and van Keulen" (Putnam). This fine chart depicts the islands of the Antilles and the northern coast of South America. It is oriented with west to the top of the map. The map is decorated with a compass rose, as well as a pair of galleons and a decorative cartouche. Koeman, Atlantes Neerlandici, Volume IV, pp. 193, 197 and 199; Putnam, Early Sea Charts, pp. 99-100; Tooley, Dictionary of Mapmakers, p. 253.

$1750.00

[Chart of the Coast of Georgia]
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[Chart of the Coast of Georgia]

By DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824)

[London, 1780. Aquatint and line engraving, period hand colouring. Very rare first state of Des Barres's chart of the coast of Georgia. This fine chart is from "The Atlantic Neptune," one of the finest large scale sea atlases of the United States and Canadian Atlantic coastline ever produced. The maps in the atlas were produce over a seven-year period (1775-82), and are well known for their accurate portrayal of various sounds, bays, bars, harbors as well as navigational hazards. This atlas was used extensively by the Royal Navy during the American Revolution. This is a detailed chart of the Georgia and upper Florida coastlines, covering an area between the mouth of the River May to John's Island. The towns of Savannah, Beaufort, Hardwick and Sunbury are shown and the coastal Parishes in Georgia are names. To the west is noted "Indian Boundary Line." This very rare first state is larger than the subsequent two states, without any detail added to the South Carolina coast and without the inset in the lower right corner added in or after 1780. Stevens 168a.

$22500.00

A Chart of the Banks of Newfoundland, Drawn from a Great Number of Hydrographical Surveys, Chiefly from those of Chabert, Cook and Fleuieu, Corrected and Ascertained by Astronomical Observations
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A Chart of the Banks of Newfoundland, Drawn from a Great Number of Hydrographical Surveys, Chiefly from those of Chabert, Cook and Fleuieu, Corrected and Ascertained by Astronomical Observations

By COOK, James (1728-1779); Joseph Bernard de CHABERT (1724-1805); and Charles Pierre Claret de FLEURIEU (1738-1810)

London: "Printed for & sold by Robt. Sayer & Jno. Bennett", 1775. Engraved map. Table of astronomical observations. Tracks of Chabert and Fleurieu identified. A fine chart of the Grand Banks, principally after the survey by Captain James Cook. This fine chart of the Grand Banks, most of Newfoundland and the entrance to the Gulf of St. Laurence was published in the first part of the North American Pilot , the most thorough and detailed mapping of the Canadian territory ceded to Great Britain at the end of the French and Indian war. Following the war, surveys of the region were immediately ordered, as the waterways were deemed of vital economic importance to the inland fur trade. Among those selected for the task was James Cook. "On 19 April 1763 James Cook, Master R.N.. was ordered by the Admiralty to proceed to Newfoundland 'in order to your taking a survey of the Parts of the Coasts and Harbours of that Island'" (Tooley & Skelton, p.177). His appointment would have been based, in no small part, on the glowing endorsement of his commanding officer, who had written to the Admiralty in December 1762 "that from my experience of Mr. Cook's genius and capacity, I think him well fitted for the work he has undertaken, and for greater undertakings of the same kind." Cook started by surveying the northwest stretch of coastline in 1763 and 1764, then in 1765 and 1766 the south coast between Cape Ray and the Burin Peninsula, and in 1767 the west coast. Cook's work in the region allowed him to master the art of practical surveying and navigation, bringing his name to the attention of the Admiralty and Royal Society at a crucial moment in his career. Summoned to depart on what would prove to be the first of his three great voyages to the Pacific, the survey of Newfoundland and southern Labrador was finished by Michael Lane between 1768 and 1773. "The charting of Newfoundland and southern Labrador by Cook, in the years 1763-7, and by his successor Michael Lane, in 1768-73, was unequalled, for thoroughness and method, by any previous hydrographic work by Englishmen; and it produced the first charts of this extensive and difficult coastline that could (in the words of a later hydrographer) 'with any degree of safety be trusted by the seaman'" (Skelton & Tooley). For Cook, his accomplishment led directly to his being commissioned to the Endeavor, launching his reputation as the greatest maritime explorer of his age, and perhaps of all time. Cf. Skelton & Tooley, "The Marine Surveys of James Cook in North America" in Tooley, The Mapping of America; not in Kershaw, Early Printed Maps of Canada.

$900.00

A Chart of the South-east Part of Newfoundland, Containing the Bays of Placentia, St. Mary, Trepassy and Conception, from Actual Surveys
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A Chart of the South-east Part of Newfoundland, Containing the Bays of Placentia, St. Mary, Trepassy and Conception, from Actual Surveys

By [GILBERT, Joseph; and Michael LANE]

London: "Printed for R. Sayer and I. Bennet", 1775. Engraved map. A spectacular chart from the survey that launched the career of Captain James Cook. At the conclusion of the French and Indian War, the British needed accurate charts of the territories that had been awarded to them in the Treaty of Paris. The areas that were of particular interest to the Admiralty included Labrador and Newfoundland. "On 19 April 1763 James Cook, Master R.N.. was ordered by the Admiralty to proceed to Newfoundland 'in order to your taking a survey of the Parts of the Coasts and Harbours of that Island'" (Tooley & Skelton, in The Mapping of America p.177). His appointment would have been based, in no small part, on the glowing endorsement of his commanding officer, who had written to the Admiralty in December 1762 "that from my experience of Mr. Cook's genius and capacity, I think him well fitted for the work he has undertaken, and for greater undertakings of the same kind." "The charting of Newfoundland and southern Labrador by Cook ... and by his successor Michael Lane ... was unequalled, for thoroughness and method, by any previous hydrographic work by Englishmen [and also allowed Cook to master the art of practical surveying and navigation, in a way that brought him to the attention of the Admiralty and the Royal Society at a crucial moment. More immediately.] it produced the first charts of this extensive and difficult coastline that could (in the words of a later hydrographer) 'with any degree of safety be trusted by the seaman'" (Tooley & Skelton op. cit.). Cook started by surveying the northwest stretch of coastline in 1763 and 1764, then in 1765 and 1766 the south coast between Cape Ray and the Burin Peninsula, and in 1767 the west coast. His work was interrupted by what was to prove to be the first of his three great voyages to the Pacific, and the work on Newfoundland and southern Labrador was continued by Joseph Gilbert between 1767 and 1769 and Michael Lane between 1768 and 1773" (Tooley & Skelton op,cit.). Gilbert, a surveyor in the Newfoundland squadron and the master of the HMS Guernsey, would survey the coast of Labrador between St. Peter's Bay and Cape Bluff in 1767 and the following year chart the coast of southeast Newfoundland between the Bay of Placentia and Conception Bay. The present chart is based on the latter survey, with additions from Lane's surveys of the area between 1772-73. Cook held Gilbert in high esteem and the surveyor, although about the same age as Cook, would later serve as master of the Resolution on Cook's second voyage. The present chart is an example of the second state of the map, as published in the first edition of the North American Pilot , with Sayer and Bennett's 1770 imprint, "III" in the upper right corner and the magnetic variation for 1773 noted. It is preceded only by a very rare issue of the map published in Jeffery's 1769-1770 The Newfoundland Pilot . Skelton & Tooley, The Marine Surveys of James Cook in North America 13:III; Kershaw, Early Printed Maps of Canada 542; Phillips, A List of Maps of America , p. 1209.

$2250.00

A Chart of the Gulf of St. Laurence, composed from a great number of actual surveys and other materials, regulated and connected by astronomical observations
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A Chart of the Gulf of St. Laurence, composed from a great number of actual surveys and other materials, regulated and connected by astronomical observations

By SAYER, Robert (1725-1794) & John BENNETT (d.1787)

London: "Printed & sold by Robt. Sayer & Jno. Bennett", 1775. Engraved map. Table of astronomical observations. Rare first state of Sayer and Bennett's chart of the Gulf of St. Laurence, based on the surveys by James Cook and Michael Lane. At the conclusion of the French and Indian War, the British needed accurate charts of the territories that had been awarded to them in the Treaty of Paris. The areas that were of particular interest to the Admiralty included Labrador and Newfoundland. "On 19 April 1763 James Cook, Master R.N.. was ordered by the Admiralty to proceed to Newfoundland 'in order to your taking a survey of the Parts of the Coasts and Harbours of that Island'" (Tooley & Skelton, in Tooley's The Mapping of America p.177). His appointment would have been based, in no small part, on the glowing endorsement of his commanding officer, who had written to the Admiralty in December 1762 "that from my experience of Mr. Cook's genius and capacity, I think him well fitted for the work he has undertaken, and for greater undertakings of the same kind". "The charting of Newfoundland and southern Labrador by Cook... and by his successor Michael Lane ... was unequalled, for thoroughness and method, by any previous hydrographic work by Englishmen [and also allowed Cook to master the art of practical surveying and navigation, in a way that brought him to the attention of the Admiralty and Royal Society at a crucial moment. More immediately.] it produced the first charts of this extensive and difficult coastline that could (in the words of a later hydrographer) 'with any degree of safety be trusted by the seaman'" (Tooley & Skelton op. cit.). Cook started by surveying the northwest stretch of coastline in 1763 and 1764, then in 1765 and 1766 the south coast between Cape Ray and the Burin Peninsula, and in 1767 the west coast. His work was interrupted by what was to prove to be the first of his three great voyages to the Pacific, and the work on Newfoundland and southern Labrador was finished by Michael Lane between 1768 and 1773. Thomas Jefferys used the charts by Cook and others to form the "Collection of Charts of 1769-70, a prototype ... for the celebrated North-American Pilot which was to be published in five English editions from 1775 to 1806" (Tooley & Skelton op,cit.). Unlike many of the other charts in the North American Pilot which appeared in other forms in earlier publications, the present chart first appeared in the 1775 edition of that great atlas. As the title suggests, Sayer and Bennett drafted this map by compiling information from other sources, with the charting of southern Labrador and the western and southern coasts of Newfoundland entirely based on the surveys by Cook and Lane. The map would be republished in successive issues of the North American Pilot (with changes to the imprint) as well as copies of The American Atlas (with "Pl. No." added to the upper right corner in advance of "XI"). Kershaw, Early Printed Maps of Canada II:597; Phillips, A List of Maps of America , p. 1209; Skelton & Tooley, The Marine Surveys of James Cook in North America 13.XI.

$675.00

Pas-kaart van de Golff van Mexico
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Pas-kaart van de Golff van Mexico

By KEULEN, Johannes van (1654-1715) and Claes Janszoon VOOGHT (d. 1696)

Amsterdam: Johannes Van Keulen, 1687. Copper-engraved map, period hand-colouring. Inset of the waters near Vera Cruz. (Expert restoration at sheet edges). Van Keulen's scarce 17th century chart of the western Gulf of Mexico, oriented with west toward the top of the page. Van Keulen's rare chart of the western portion of the Gulf of Mexico "covers the coastline from the panhandle of present day Florida around to the Yucatan peninsula. The main feature of this map is its originality of form. It is the first sea chart of the western portion of the Gulf of Mexico detailing the coastal waters of present-day Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas. The geography is largely derived from the exceedingly rare Hessel Gerritz chart of c. 1631" (Burden). As expected, most of the toponyms are Spanish and the mouth of the Mississippi is labelled Baja de Spirito Sancto. Oriented to the west, "it represented the most sophisticated rendering of the coast then available" (Martin & Martin). The Texas portion of the coastline, along the top of the map, begins at "Rio Bravo" (Rio Grande) gives an indication of the many rivers that flow from Texas into the Gulf, though of course the names have been changed. The Van Keulen family were chart and instrument makers, and publishers of nautical textbooks, books on sea law, shipbuilding, almanacs and more. Founded by Joannes van Keulen (c.1654-1715), the firm remained in business for over 200 years. For the publication of his Zee-Fakkel, Keulen retained geographer and mathematician Claes Janszoon Vooght. Burden's second state, with the page number "14" added to the lower left corner, but before later additions and re-engravings. Burden, The Mapping of North America II: 592; Martin & Martin, Maps of Texas and the Southwest p. 85, plate 11.

$5750.00

Pas-kaart vande zee-kusten van Terra Nova, met de byleggende zee-kusten van Francia Nova, Canada en Accadie van c. de Sables tot de mond vande straad davids..
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Pas-kaart vande zee-kusten van Terra Nova, met de byleggende zee-kusten van Francia Nova, Canada en Accadie van c. de Sables tot de mond vande straad davids..

By KEULEN, Johannes van (1654-1715)

Amsterdam: Johannes van Keulen, 1687. Copper-engraved map, period hand-colouring in outline. Van Keulen's 17th century chart of the Maritime Canada, here with period hand-colouring. This map accurately depicts the Grand Banks, though is somewhat more fanciful regarding the coasts of Newfoundland, Labrador and Nova Scotia, indicative of the Dutch charts of the Gulf of St. Lawrence in this early period. This chart appeared in editions of both Van Keulen's Zee-Fakkel and Zee-Atlas . The present copy is an example of Burden's second state (of 4), with the page number in the lower left corner but without a shoal added to the coastline of Nova Scotia. Burden, The Mapping of North America 584; Kershaw, Early Printed Maps of Canada 188.

$1500.00

A Chart of Part of the Coast of Labradore, from Grand Point to Shecatica, surveyed by Michael Lane in 1768, and Engraved by Thomas Jefferys Geographer to the King..
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A Chart of Part of the Coast of Labradore, from Grand Point to Shecatica, surveyed by Michael Lane in 1768, and Engraved by Thomas Jefferys Geographer to the King..

By LANE, Michael. - Thomas JEFFERYS, engraver (1719-1771)

London: "Printed for R. Sayer and I. Bennett", 1775. Engraved map. Insets plans of Mecatina Harbour, St. Augustine and Cumberland Harbour. A chart of the coast of Labrador from the survey that launched the career of Captain James Cook. At the conclusion of the French and Indian War, the British needed accurate charts of the territories that had been awarded to them in the Treaty of Paris. The areas that were of particular interest to the Admiralty included Labrador and Newfoundland. "On 19 April 1763 James Cook, Master R.N.. was ordered by the Admiralty to proceed to Newfoundland 'in order to your taking a survey of the Parts of the Coasts and Harbours of that Island'" (Tooley & Skelton, in The Mapping of America p.177). His appointment would have been based, in no small part, on the glowing endorsement of his commanding officer, who had written to the Admiralty in December 1762 "that from my experience of Mr. Cook's genius and capacity, I think him well fitted for the work he has undertaken, and for greater undertakings of the same kind". "The charting of Newfoundland and southern Labrador by Cook... and by his successor Michael Lane ... was unequalled, for thoroughness and method, by any previous hydrographic work by Englishmen [and also allowed Cook to master the art of practical surveying and navigation, in a way that brought him to the attention of the Admiralty and the Royal Society at a crucial moment. More immediately.] it produced the first charts of this extensive and difficult coastline that could (in the words of a later hydrographer) 'with any degree of safety be trusted by the seaman'" (Tooley & Skelton op. cit.). Cook started by surveying the northwest stretch of coastline in 1763 and 1764, then in 1765 and 1766 the south coast between Cape Ray and the Burin Peninsula, and in 1767 the west coast. His work was interrupted by what was to prove to be the first of his three great voyages to the Pacific, and the work on Newfoundland and southern Labrador was finished by Michael Lane between 1768 and 1773" (Tooley & Skelton). This copy is the second issue of the map as published in the first edition of the North American Pilot (preceded only by the very rare first issue of the map, without Sayer and Bennett's imprint, which appeared in Jeffery's Collection of Charts of the Coasts of Newfoundland and Labradore in 1769). Skelton & Tooley The Marine Surveys of James Cook in North America 13.XIX. Not in Kershaw, Early Printed Maps of Canada.

$2250.00

A Chart of the Harbour of Halifax in Nova Scotia; with Jebucto Bay and Cape Sambro ... Survey'd by order of His Excellency Brigadier General Lawrence, Gouvernor of the Province of Nova Scotia, By Charles Morris, Chief Surveyor
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A Chart of the Harbour of Halifax in Nova Scotia; with Jebucto Bay and Cape Sambro ... Survey'd by order of His Excellency Brigadier General Lawrence, Gouvernor of the Province of Nova Scotia, By Charles Morris, Chief Surveyor

By MORRIS, Charles (1711-1781) - Thomas JEFFERYS (1719-1771)

London: "Printed for & sold by Robt. Sayer and Jno. Bennett", 1775. Engraved map. Three columns of text under the heading "Directions for avoiding the Ledges lying to the Eastward & Westward of Sambro Island..." Dedication by Jefferys to the Earl of Halifax. Rare early maritime chart of the entrance to Halifax harbor, engraved by Jefferys after noted Massachusetts soldier and surveyor Charles Morris, among the founders of Halifax. In 1746, Charles Morris, an American surveyor, received a commission to raise a Massachusetts regiment and proceed to Nova Scotia as part of the British American attempt to protect the region from French encroachment. Morris was present at the bloody Battle of Grand Pre, a disastrous defeat of the Massachusetts force. Morris, one of few survivors, returned to Boston only to be sent back to Nova Scotia in 1748 to ascertain the locations of French forces and scout possible regions for British settlement. The results of this expedition led directly to the founding of the city of Halifax by a British force under the command of Governor Edward Cornwallis. Morris accompanied Cornwallis and was charged with laying out the new town. Following the capture of Louisbourg, and with the region firmly in control of the British, Morris would settle in Halifax, becoming its first Chief Justice, and as evidenced by this map, its Chief Surveyor. At the conclusion of the French and Indian War, the British needed accurate charts of the territories that had been awarded to them in the Treaty of Paris. Jefferys therefore engraved this chart after Morris's surveys, first publishing it in his General Topography (London, 1768). The chart would subsequently be reissued by Sayer and Bennett in their North American Pilot, the present copy being from the 1775 first edition of that great nautical atlas. Kershaw, Early Printed Maps of Canada 281 (incorrectly dating the map 1777).

$3750.00

A General Chart of the Island of Newfoundland with the Rocks and Soundings, Drawn from Surveys taken by Order of the Right Honourable the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, By James Cook and Michael Lane, Surveyors, and Others
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A General Chart of the Island of Newfoundland with the Rocks and Soundings, Drawn from Surveys taken by Order of the Right Honourable the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, By James Cook and Michael Lane, Surveyors, and Others

By COOK, James (1728-1779); Michael LANE; and Joseph GILBERT - Thomas JEFFERYS, engraver (1719-1771)

London: "Printed for Robt. Sayer & Jno. Bennett", 1775. Engraved map. A classic chart published by Jefferys depicting all of Newfoundland, after the monumental surveys of Cook, Lane and Gilbert. This fine chart of Newfoundland, the Gulf of St. Laurence and part of the coast of Labrador was published in the first part of the North American Pilot , the most thorough and detailed mapping of the Canadian territory ceded to Great Britain at the end of the French and Indian war. Following the war, surveys of the region were immediately ordered, as the waterways were deemed of vital economic importance to the inland fur trade. Among those selected for the task was James Cook. "On 19 April 1763 James Cook, Master R.N.. was ordered by the Admiralty to proceed to Newfoundland 'in order to your taking a survey of the Parts of the Coasts and Harbours of that Island'" (Tooley & Skelton, p.177). His appointment would have been based, in no small part, on the glowing endorsement of his commanding officer, who had written to the Admiralty in December 1762 "that from my experience of Mr. Cook's genius and capacity, I think him well fitted for the work he has undertaken, and for greater undertakings of the same kind." Cook started by surveying the northwest stretch of coastline in 1763 and 1764, then in 1765 and 1766 the south coast between Cape Ray and the Burin Peninsula, and in 1767 the west coast. Cook's work in the region allowed him to master the art of practical surveying and navigation, bringing his name to the attention of the Admiralty and the Royal Society at a crucial moment in his career. Summoned to depart on what would prove to be the first of his three great voyages to the Pacific, the survey of Newfoundland and southern Labrador was finished by Michael Lane and James Gilbert between 1768 and 1773. "The charting of Newfoundland and southern Labrador by Cook, in the years 1763-7, and by his successor Michael Lane, in 1768-73, was unequalled, for thoroughness and method, by any previous hydrographic work by Englishmen; and it produced the first charts of this extensive and difficult coastline that could (in the words of a later hydrographer) 'with any degree of safety be trusted by the seaman'" (Skelton & Tooley). For Cook, his accomplishment led directly to his being commissioned to the Endeavor, launching his reputation as the greatest maritime explorer of his age, and perhaps of all time. This general chart of Newfoundland would appear in editions of the North American Pilot , as well as the American Atlas . Kershaw, Early Printed Maps of Canada 539; Phillips, A List of Maps of America 1208; cf. Skelton & Tooley, "The Marine Surveys of James Cook in North America" in Tooley, The Mapping of America.

$1000.00

The Harbour of Trepassey with Mutton and Biscay Bays / The Road and Harbour of Placentia. By James Cook / St. Mary's Harbour. [published in: The North-American Pilot for Newfoundland, Labradore, the Gulf and River St.Laurence: being a collection of sixty accurate charts and plans, drawn from original surveys: taken by James Cook and Michael Lane, Surveyors, and Joseph Gilbert, and other officers in the King's service]
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The Harbour of Trepassey with Mutton and Biscay Bays / The Road and Harbour of Placentia. By James Cook / St. Mary's Harbour. [published in: The North-American Pilot for Newfoundland, Labradore, the Gulf and River St.Laurence: being a collection of sixty accurate charts and plans, drawn from original surveys: taken by James Cook and Michael Lane, Surveyors, and Joseph Gilbert, and other officers in the King's service]

By [COOK, James (1728-1779, surveyor)]. - Robert SAYER & John BENNETT (publishers)

London: Robert Sayer & John Bennett, 1770. Copper engraving with three maps on one single-page sheet (plate area: 14 x 12 inches). A spectacular chart from the survey which laid the foundation upon which Captain Cook's reputation as a surveyor and navigator rested. At the conclusion of the French and Indian War, the British needed accurate charts of the territories that had been awarded to them in the Treaty of Paris. The areas that were of particular interest to the Admiralty included Labrador and Newfoundland. "On 19 April 1763 James Cook, Master R.N.. was ordered by the Admiralty to proceed to Newfoundland 'in order to your taking a survey of the Parts of the Coasts and Harbours of that Island'" (Tooley & Skelton, in Tooley's The Mapping of America p.177). His appointment would have been based, in no small part, on the glowing endorsment of his commanding officer, who had written to the Admiralty in December 1762 "that from my experience of Mr. Cook's genius and capacity, I think him well fitted for the work he has undertaken, and for greater undertakings of the same kind". "The charting of Newfoundland and southern Labrador by Cook... and by his successor Michael Lane ... was unequalled, for thoroughness and method, by any previous hydrographic work by Englishmen [and also allowed Cook to master the art of practical surveying and navigation, in a way that brought him to the attention of the Admiralty and Royal Society at a crucial moment. More immediately.] it produced the first charts of this extensive and difficult coastline that could (in the words of a later hydrographer) 'with any degree of safety be trusted by the seaman'" (Tooley & Skelton op. cit.). Cook started by surveying the northwest stretch of coastline in 1763 and 1764, then in 1765 and 1766 the south coast between Cape Ray and the Burin Peninsula, and in 1767 the west coast. His work was interrupted by what was to prove to be the first of his three great voyages to the Pacific, and the work on Newfoundland and southern Labrador was finished by Michael Lane between 1768 and 1773. Thomas Jefferys used the charts by Cook and others to form the "Collection of Charts of 1769-70, a prototype ... for the celebrated North-American Pilot which was to be published in five English editions from 1775 to 1806" (Tooley & Skelton op,cit.). The present example is from Sayer and Bennett's 1775 edition (Tooley & Skelton's # 13). Skelton & Tooley, "The Marine Surveys of James Cook in North America" 13.V in Tooley, The Mapping of America.

$1500.00

Trinity Harbour / Carboniere and Harbour Grace / St. John's Harbour / Cape Broyle Harbour ...[published in: The North-American Pilot for Newfoundland, Labradore, the Gulf and River St.Laurence: being a collection of sixty accurate charts and plans, drawn from original surveys: taken by James Cook and Michael Lane, Surveyors, and Joseph Gilbert, and other officers in the King's service]
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Trinity Harbour / Carboniere and Harbour Grace / St. John's Harbour / Cape Broyle Harbour ...[published in: The North-American Pilot for Newfoundland, Labradore, the Gulf and River St.Laurence: being a collection of sixty accurate charts and plans, drawn from original surveys: taken by James Cook and Michael Lane, Surveyors, and Joseph Gilbert, and other officers in the King's service]

By [COOK, James (1728-1779)]. - Robert SAYER & John BENNETT (publishers)

London: Robert Sayer & John Bennett, 1770. Copper engraving with four maps on one single-page sheet (plate area: 15 x 11 1/2 inches). Good condition, old horizontal fold. A spectacular chart from the survey which laid the foundation upon which Captain Cook's reputation as a surveyor and navigator rested. At the conclusion of the French and Indian War, the British needed accurate charts of the territories that had been awarded to them in the Treaty of Paris. The areas that were of particular interest to the Admiralty included Labrador and Newfoundland. "On 19 April 1763 James Cook, Master R.N.. was ordered by the Admiralty to proceed to Newfoundland 'in order to your taking a survey of the Parts of the Coasts and Harbours of that Island'" (Tooley & Skelton, in Tooley's The Mapping of America p.177). His appointment would have been based, in no small part, on the glowing endorsment of his commanding officer, who had written to the Admiralty in December 1762 "that from my experience of Mr. Cook's genius and capacity, I think him well fitted for the work he has undertaken, and for greater undertakings of the same kind". "The charting of Newfoundland and southern Labrador by Cook... and by his successor Michael Lane ... was unequalled, for thoroughness and method, by any previous hydrographic work by Englishmen [and also allowed Cook to master the art of practical surveying and navigation, in a way that brought him to the attention of the Admiralty and Royal Society at a crucial moment. More immediately.] it produced the first charts of this extensive and difficult coastline that could (in the words of a later hydrographer) 'with any degree of safety be trusted by the seaman'" (Tooley & Skelton op. cit.). Cook started by surveying the northwest stretch of coastline in 1763 and 1764, then in 1765 and 1766 the south coast between Cape Ray and the Burin Peninsula, and in 1767 the west coast. His work was interrupted by what was to prove to be the first of his three great voyages to the Pacific, and the work on Newfoundland and southern Labrador was finished by Michael Lane between 1768 and 1773. Thomas Jefferys used the charts by Cook and others to form the "Collection of Charts of 1769-70, a prototype ... for the celebrated North-American Pilot which was to be published in five English editions from 1775 to 1806" (Tooley & Skelton op,cit.). The present example is from Sayer and Bennett's 1775 edition (Tooley & Skelton's # 13). Skelton & Tooley, "The Marine Surveys of James Cook in North America" 13.IV in Tooley, The Mapping of America.

$1850.00

A Draught of the Gut of Canso Between Nova Scotia and Cape Breton Island, Surveyed by the King's Ships in 1761. / A Plan of Port Dauphin, on the Eastern Side of Cape Breton Island, Surveyed in 1743. / A plan of Murgain or Cow Bay, on the Eastern Side of Cape Breton Island, Surveyed in August 1760. [published in: The North-American Pilot for Newfoundland, Labradore, the Gulf and River St.Laurence: being a collection of sixty accurate charts and plans, drawn from original surveys: taken by James Cook and Michael Lane, Surveyors, and Joseph Gilbert, and other officers in the King's service]
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A Draught of the Gut of Canso Between Nova Scotia and Cape Breton Island, Surveyed by the King's Ships in 1761. / A Plan of Port Dauphin, on the Eastern Side of Cape Breton Island, Surveyed in 1743. / A plan of Murgain or Cow Bay, on the Eastern Side of Cape Breton Island, Surveyed in August 1760. [published in: The North-American Pilot for Newfoundland, Labradore, the Gulf and River St.Laurence: being a collection of sixty accurate charts and plans, drawn from original surveys: taken by James Cook and Michael Lane, Surveyors, and Joseph Gilbert, and other officers in the King's service]

By [COOK, James (1728-1779)]. - Robert SAYER & John BENNETT (publishers)

London: Robert Sayer & John Bennett, 1775. Copper engraving on a single page (approx. plate area: 14 x 21 inches). Good condition, old vertical fold. A spectacular chart from the survey which laid the foundation upon which Captain Cook's reputation as a surveyor and navigator rested. At the conclusion of the French and Indian War, the British needed accurate charts of the territories that had been awarded to them in the Treaty of Paris. The areas that were of particular interest to the Admiralty included Labrador and Newfoundland. "On 19 April 1763 James Cook, Master R.N.. was ordered by the Admiralty to proceed to Newfoundland 'in order to your taking a survey of the Parts of the Coasts and Harbours of that Island'" (Tooley & Skelton, in Tooley's The Mapping of America p.177). His appointment would have been based, in no small part, on the glowing endorsment of his commanding officer, who had written to the Admiralty in December 1762 "that from my experience of Mr. Cook's genius and capacity, I think him well fitted for the work he has undertaken, and for greater undertakings of the same kind". "The charting of Newfoundland and southern Labrador by Cook... and by his successor Michael Lane ... was unequalled, for thoroughness and method, by any previous hydrographic work by Englishmen [and also allowed Cook to master the art of practical surveying and navigation, in a way that brought him to the attention of the Admiralty and Royal Society at a crucial moment. More immediately.] it produced the first charts of this extensive and difficult coastline that could (in the words of a later hydrographer) 'with any degree of safety be trusted by the seaman'" (Tooley & Skelton op. cit.). Cook started by surveying the northwest stretch of coastline in 1763 and 1764, then in 1765 and 1766 the south coast between Cape Ray and the Burin Peninsula, and in 1767 the west coast. His work was interrupted by what was to prove to be the first of his three great voyages to the Pacific, and the work on Newfoundland and southern Labrador was finished by Michael Lane between 1768 and 1773. Thomas Jefferys used the charts by Cook and others to form the "Collection of Charts of 1769-70, a prototype ... for the celebrated North-American Pilot which was to be published in five English editions from 1775 to 1806" (Tooley & Skelton op,cit.). The present example is from Sayer and Bennett's 1775 edition (Tooley & Skelton's # 13). Cf. Sabin, Dictionary of Books Relating to America 35966; Skelton & Tooley, "The Marine Surveys of James Cook in North America" 13.X in Tooley, The Mapping of America.

$2250.00

Chart of the Bay of San Pablo  Straits of Carquines and part of the Bay of San Francisco California by ... Ringgold assisited by Simon F. Blunt ... Projected, constructed & drawn by Fred. D. Stuart ... assisted by A.H. Campbell
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Chart of the Bay of San Pablo Straits of Carquines and part of the Bay of San Francisco California by ... Ringgold assisited by Simon F. Blunt ... Projected, constructed & drawn by Fred. D. Stuart ... assisted by A.H. Campbell

By RINGGOLD, Cadwalader (1802-1867, surveyor)

Washington, D.C., 1850. Lithographic map, by C.B. Graham from Ringgold's survey. Sheet size: 31 1/8 x 21 5/16 inches. In good condition, on later backing paper with a number of small repaired marginal tears. Rare unfolded thick paper issue of this important early chart of San Francisco bay and its environs by the 'Gold Rush Surveyor' (A.F. Houston) This rare separately issued map sheet is one of the results of a series of surveys carried out under Cadwalader Ringgold's leadership between August 1849 and June 1850. The California gold rush had brought home the fact that there was an urgent need for accurate charts of the route from the Golden Gate up river to Sacramento and beyond to the area around Sutter's Fort on the American River. The local government and business community moved quickly: the San Francisco newspaper Alta California (20 June 1849) noted that 'A subscription is on foot among our business men to survey and buoy the Suisun bay and the Sacramento river between the port and Sacramento city. Captain Ringgold, USN, has been employed to make the survey, and there is every prospect that it will be speedily accomplished' The results of the survey were published in Ringgold's A series of charts, with sailing directions, embracing surveys of the Farallones, entrance to the bay of San Francisco, bays of San Francisco and San Pablo, straits of Carquines and Suisun Bay, confluence and deltic branches of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers and the Sacramento River (with the middle fork) to the American River, including the cities of Sacramento and Boston, State of California. (Washington: J.T. Towers, 1851), with the charts, folded and printed on thin paper. The present example is from the rare series of charts printed on thick paper, unfolded and intended for use on board the vessels wishing to make the hazardous journey up river to Sacramento. Cf. Alan Fraser Houston 'Cadwalader Ringgold, U.S. Navy' in California History , vol.79, Winter 2000; cf. Cowan (II), pp. 533-534; cf. Howes-Hartley R-301; cf. Kurutz 536c; cf. Rocq 11146; Rumsey 4658.001; cf. Sabin 71425; cf. Streeter Sale 2679.

$1200.00

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