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America sive India Nova ad magnae Gerardi Mercatoris avi Universalis imitationem in compendium redacta
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America sive India Nova ad magnae Gerardi Mercatoris avi Universalis imitationem in compendium redacta

By MERCATOR, Michael (1565/70-1614)

[Amsterdam: Hondius, 1628. Copper-engraved map, early hand-colouring. French text on verso. Roundels at each corner with inset maps of the Gulf of Mexico, Cuba and Hispaniola, the remaining containing the cartouche. (Expert restoration at sheet edges). A fine example of one of the most celebrated maps of the Americas, the only printed map by Gerard Mercator's grandson Michael. Made by Gerard's grandson Michael to complete the atlas begun by Gerard in 1584 ( Atlantis Pars Altera ), this map is noted for its outstanding design and beauty, particularly its symmetrical configuration of circular insets and Mannerist flow of vines, flowers and leaves surrounding the circular map. Largely based on Rumold Mercator's world map of 1587, this map aptly reflects 16th-century knowledge, theories and suppositions regarding the New World. Naturally, most of this new knowledge was coastal, and configurations of any large areas were greatly hampered by the lack of a sound means of determining longitude. Nevertheless, the collective accomplishment of explorers and mapmakers represented in this map is astounding, showing in a generally correct way the vast extent of the New World. "A few of the most famous theories are still present: a large inland lake in Canada, two of the four islands of the North Pole, a bulge to the west coast of South America and the large southern continent" (Burden). The map appeared in 1595 and 1606 editions of the Atlantis Pars Altera , after which the plate was sold to Jodocus Hondius, who reissued the maps in varying editions through 1639. The present example includes French text on verso (confirming it to be a Hondius issue), with signature mark "S" on verso, suggesting it to be from a 1628 edition of the atlas (see Koeman Me 28a). Burden, The Mapping of North America I, 87; Koeman, Atlantes Neerlandici, Me 28a; Goss, The Mapping of North America, 19; America Emergent 12.

$4750.00

A New Map of the Whole Continent of America, divided into North and South America and West Indies, with a Descriptive Account of the European Possessions, as Settled by the Definitive Treaty of Peace, Concluded at Paris, Feby. 10th, 1763, Compiled from Mr. D'Anville's Maps of that Continent, and Corrected in the Several Parts belonging to Great Britain, from the Original Materials of Governor Pownall, MP
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A New Map of the Whole Continent of America, divided into North and South America and West Indies, with a Descriptive Account of the European Possessions, as Settled by the Definitive Treaty of Peace, Concluded at Paris, Feby. 10th, 1763, Compiled from Mr. D'Anville's Maps of that Continent, and Corrected in the Several Parts belonging to Great Britain, from the Original Materials of Governor Pownall, MP

By [GIBSON, John] - Robert SAYER, publisher

London: Robert Sayer and John Bennett, 1783. Copper-engraved map, printed on four sheets joined as two, period hand-colouring in outline. Inset of the Arctic regions of North America, and including Greenland and Iceland. Table along the left side. Printing of a portion of the 1763 Treaty of Paris above the cartouche. Inset map of Arctic Circle, Iceland and Greenland. Unrecorded issue of Gibson's fascinating wall map of the Western hemisphere Unrecorded intermediate state: conforms to Stevens and Tree 3c, i.e. title, imprint, printing of Articles from the 1763 Treaty, etc., though the United States is shown with engraved dotted lines and the country has lettered: "United States", as per Stevens and Tree 3d. This post-Revolutionary War wall map of North and South America gathered together geographical material from D'Anville, Jefferys and Thomas Pownall, and incorporated the new political divisions brought about by the establishment of the United States. As per the 1783 Treaty of Paris, the United States is shown with its western border at the Mississippi and northern border extending through the Great Lakes. In the inset titled: "The Continent and Islands of America...", the United States of North America heads the list with its 13 states and "The State of Vermont, and all the Lands between the Lakes, the Apalaches & the Missisippi": the term "State of Vermont" refers to its status as a separate republic. (Vermont joined the United States in 1791). "All the Lands between the Lakes..." etc. would soon be settled, not to say over-run by a flood of white settlers bringing about the multitudinous conflicts with the Native American tribes who are regionally designated on the map. Extremely well supplied with placenames and details, the Gibson map represents the sum of cartographical knowledge of the Americas for the 18th century. Stevens and Tree 3c/3d.

$2800.00

America Noviter Delineata
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America Noviter Delineata

By HONDIUS, Jodocus, Jr. (1594-1629) and Henricus (1597-1651)

Amsterdam: Henrico Hondius, 1633. Copper-engraved map, with original outline colour, German text on verso (centerfold reinforced, in very good condition). The celebrated Hondius map of the Americas, in the third state. Originally issued by Jodicus Hondius Jr. in 1618, this map of the Americas was modified by Henricus Hondius following his brother's death. The original map was based on Jodicus Hondius the elder's map of 1606, along with the Willem Blaeu maps of 1608 and 1617. The map would form Europe's geographical understanding of North and South America for the first half of the 17th century. Several major corrections have been made compared to the 1606 Hondius map. The St. Lawrence Bay and River are much improved, and at the opposite end, Tierra del Fuego has been separated, however nebulously, from the great Terra Incognita, thought (correctly) to exist since ancient times. The rather assertive outgrowth of Virginia in the 1606 map has been modified to reflect more accurately the eastward swelling at North Carolina. Interestingly, Henricus Hondius' next map of North America (1636) adopted the increasingly popular notion that California was an island, and greatly advanced that belief. The map includes inset maps of the North and South Poles. The nicely drawn ships and sea monsters add to the pleasant aesthetic effect of the map. Burden, The Mapping of North America I , 192.

$3250.00

Venezuela, cum parte Australi Nova Andalusiae
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Venezuela, cum parte Australi Nova Andalusiae

By BLAEU, Willem (1571-1638) and Jan BLAEU (1596-1673)

Amsterdam, 1640. Engraved map, period hand-colouring in outline. French text on verso. Sheet size: 19 5/8 x 23 1/4 inches. A fine 17th century map of Venezuela and the Lesser Antilles. In the seventeenth century, the Dutch hegemony in ship building and navigation engendered their dominance in mapmaking. At the lead of this field was the Blaeu family. Willem Janszoon Blaeu first studied mathematics and navigation under the famous astronomer Tycho Brahe in 1594, opening his own instrument and globe making shop in Amsterdam in 1599. Shortly thereafter, Willem Blaeu would open a printing house, specializing in works on navigation. The Blaeu family's first world atlas, modestly titled the Atlantis Appendix as it was considered a continuation of the atlases by Ortelius, Mercator and Hondius, was first published in 1630 by Willem Blaeu with his son Joan Blaeu, the official cartographers of the Dutch East India Company. The acclaim that Blaeu's atlases have always received is based primarily upon the extremely high production standards found within. The quality of the engraving and the paper are of the highest order, placing them in the first rank among seventeenth century illustrated books. Blaeu's maps and town plans are embellished in the Baroque style, and many rank among the most beautiful ever made. Van der Krogt, (Atlantes) 9830:2.2; Koeman, Bl17.87.

$850.00

L'Amerique ou Le Nouveau Continent dressee sur les Memoires les plus nouveaux et sur les Relations les plus recentes, rectifiez sur les dernieres observations. Dediée et Presentée a Monseigneur Law
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L'Amerique ou Le Nouveau Continent dressee sur les Memoires les plus nouveaux et sur les Relations les plus recentes, rectifiez sur les dernieres observations. Dediée et Presentée a Monseigneur Law

By NOLIN II, Jean-Baptiste (1686-1762)

Paris: "chés l'Auteur rue St. Jacques à l'Enseigne de la Place des Victoires, 1742. Copper-engraved map, period hand colouring in outline. A rare depiction of the mythical Sea of the West. This unusual mapping of North and South America, dedicated to John Law of Mississippi Bubble infamy, includes several mythical elements, including the Sea of the West, Florida as an archipelago and the Riviere Longue. Also of interest is the mapping of islands in the South Pacific, including a much enlarged depiction of New Zealand after Tasman.

$2250.00

America Noviter Delineata
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America Noviter Delineata

By HONDIUS, Jodocus, Jr. (1594-1629) and Henricus (1597-1651)

Amsterdam: Jansson, 1652. Copper-engraved map, with period hand-colouring in outline. Insets of each polar region, both oceans embellished with ships and sea monsters. French text on verso. The celebrated Hondius map of the Americas. Originally issued by Jodocus Hondius Jr. in 1618, this map of the Americas was modified by Henricus Hondius following his brother's death. The original map was based on Jodocus Hondius the elder's map of 1606, along with the Willem Blaeu maps of 1608 and 1617. The map would form Europe's geographical understanding of North and South America for the first half of the 17th century. Several major corrections have been made compared to the 1606 Hondius map. The St. Lawrence Bay and River are much improved, and at the opposite end, Tierra del Fuego has been separated, however nebulously, from the great Terra Incognita, thought (correctly) to exist since ancient times. The rather assertive outgrowth of Virginia in the 1606 map has been modified to reflect more accurately the eastward swelling at North Carolina. Interestingly, Henricus Hondius' next map of North America (1636) adopted the increasingly popular notion that California was an island, and greatly advanced that belief. The present copy an example of Burden's fifth state, without the border found only on the first state of 1618, with Jansson's imprint at the lower right, and with the date and Hondius imprint removed from the cartouche. Burden, The Mapping of North America I: 192.

$2750.00

Carte de l'Amerique corrigee et augmentee dessus Toutes les aultres cy devant faictes par P. Bertius
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Carte de l'Amerique corrigee et augmentee dessus Toutes les aultres cy devant faictes par P. Bertius

By TAVERNIER, Melchior (1564-1641)

[Paris, 1627. Copper-engraved map, insets of polar regions. Scarce first state of Tavernier's separately-issued map of North America, including insets of the Arctic and Antarctic regions. In 1627, Tavernier, the most important mapseller and publisher in France, published a set of the four continents after Bertius, though possibly without his permission. Although crediting Bertius, the map more closely follows the Hondius mapping of 1618, with the completed northwest coast line, similar mapping of the Great Lakes and similar decorative ships and sea monsters (though without the decorative surround). However, unlike the Hondius map, here the southern coast of Tierra del Fuego is completed, as per the Bertius map of 1624. The map was first issued separately, and then issued in Tavernier's Theatre Geographique . The present example is the rare, separately-issued first state; the subsequent issue published after 1640 included additional toponyms, such as "Neuf Amsterdam" (i.e. New York), "Pleymouth", "Accadie" and others. Burden, The Mapping of North America 218; Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 335.

$2500.00

Novissima et Accuratissima Totius Americae Descriptio
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Novissima et Accuratissima Totius Americae Descriptio

By DANCKERTS, Justus (1635-1701)

Amsterdam, 1680. Copper-engraved map. The first state of Danckert's first map of North and South America. Danckerts here issues a version of De Witt's circa 1675 map of the same title (i.e., Burden 465, between state 3 and state 4 of that issue). Cartographically, the two are very similiar, and thus Burden's notes on the earlier apply. Of that map, Burden writes: "The map is cartographically drawn directly from De Wit's own wall map version published in 1672. The most notable improvement is the depiction of the five Great Lakes, this for the first time on a Dutch map. There is also an altered west coast depiction of the Hudson Bay region. Both features appear to have been taken from Guillaume Sanson's Amerique Septentrionale, published in 1669" (Burden 465). As in the De Wit map, the decorative cartouche on the present map by Danckerts draws from an earlier Visscher map of the western hemisphere. The present map is Burden's first state, with the additional cartouche at the top left, without the mapping of New Guinea and neighboring islands in the South Pacific, and without Terra Esonis in the north. In circa 1696, Danckerts would re-issue this map from a new plate, the present plate apparently having worn out or been damaged (see Burden 725). This earlier version, however, is considerably more scarce, particularly in its first state, with Burden noting that only "a handful of examples" of Danckert's atlas from this early period are extant. Burden, The Mapping of North America 527 (state 1); McLaughlin, Mapping of California as an Island 75.

$1400.00

L'Amerique suivant le R. P. Charlevoix J.te, Mr. De La Condamine, et plusiers autres nouv.le observations
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L'Amerique suivant le R. P. Charlevoix J.te, Mr. De La Condamine, et plusiers autres nouv.le observations

By LE ROUGE, Georges Louis (1712-90)

Paris, 1746. Copper-engraved map, period hand-colouring in outline. Table at the bottom left. Mid-18th century French map of North and South America showing the latest Russian and English discoveries in the Arctic: one of the earliest depictions of the discoveries of Bering's second expedition. This decorative map by Le Rouge shows North and South America, with the discoveries of Charlevoix and Condamine added in Canada and the Amazon, respectively. Interestingly, it also shows Aleksei Chirikov's discoveries on the northwest coast during Bering's second expedition, as well as Middleton's Repulse Bay in the Arctic. Concerning the former, Wroth writes: "In 1746 the royal geographer, George Louis Le Rouge, brought out a map entitled L'Amerique, in the northwest corner of which is shown a portion of the 1741 routes of Chirikov and De L'Isle de la Croyere to and from the American coast, the earliest cartographical record, it seems from present knowledge, of the American discoveries of the second Bering expedition. This map antedates by six years the publication of the De L'Isle -Buache map ... There is ground for belief that during his stay in Russia of twenty-one years J.N. Delisle sent to France through the French embassy copies of maps which passed through his hands as an employee and associate of the Academy of Science. Doubtless intended for the information of the French government, these would have become available to Le Rouge as royal geographer" (Wroth, Early Cartographer of the Pacific, p. 222). Since Wroth's essay, copies of the Le Rouge map have been found without the discoveries of Bering's second expedition, suggesting two issues of the map, with the second issue possibly issued at a date later than 1746 but retaining the original date in the cartouche. Wroth, Cartography of the Pacific , 92.

$1800.00

America with those known parts in that unknowne worlde, both people and manner of buildings Described and inlarged..
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America with those known parts in that unknowne worlde, both people and manner of buildings Described and inlarged..

By SPEED, John (c.1552-1629)

London: Thomas Bassett and Richard Chiswell, 1676. Copper engraved map, engraved by Abraham Goos. Inset of Greenland and the Arctic. Side borders composed of ten figures in native costume, upper border comprised of eight city views. Speed's famous map of North and South America, among the most decorative maps of the seventeenth century. This famous map by Speed, first issued in 1626, was when issued among the most accurate depictions of the east coast of North America. The large depiction of California as an island is after the rare map by Briggs and was the first such depiction to appear in an atlas. Numerous ships and sea monsters appear in both the Atlantic and Pacific. "Decorating the whole are three attractive borders. The two sides illustrate the natives of the continent, the left bears those of the north and the right those of the south" (Burden). The city views along the top depict Havana, St. Domingo, Cartagena, Mexico, Cusco, Moca, Rio de Janiero and Oldina. "Despite the map's obvious attention to the English presence in North America, none of the eight towns represented ... are from that part. This is owing to the relative lack of any contemporary views to draw upon" (Burden). The present copy is an example of the fourth state, published in 1676, with Bassett and Chiswell's imprint in the lower left. Tooley notes that while the copperplate is unchanged from the previous state (save for the addition of the aforementioned imprint) that "the text on the reverse is not only reset but rewritten. There is no fleuron heading, New York and Maryland are mentioned for the first time in the text to Virginia ... and Hochelaga, Quebec and Tadusac added to the description of Canada" (Tooley). Burden, The Mapping of North America I: 217 (state 4); Tooley, "California as an Island," 5 in Tooley, The Mapping of America ; McLaughlin, The Mapping of California as an Island 3.

$5500.00

America Aurea Pars Alter Mundi Auctoribus
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America Aurea Pars Alter Mundi Auctoribus

By VALK, Gerard (c.1650-1726) & Leonard VALK (1675-1755)

Amsterdam, 1700. Copper-engraved map, full period hand-colouring. Highly decorative map of North and South America showing California as an island and here with full period hand colouring. This decorative map by the Valk brothers is after a similar map by Carol Allard, first published circa 1696. Cartographically, both Allard and the Valks borrow heavily from the De Wit map of 1675, naming the Great Lakes, showing California as an island and with a Terra Esonis and Fretum Anian in the northwest. Interestingly, the Valks here re-issue the first state of Allard's map, i.e. before the re-engraving of the western Great Lakes and the Mississippi River (based on Hennepin's mapping). In addition, the lower left corner of the cartouche is left blank, whereas in subsequent issues of the Allard map, an inset of New Zealand appears. In the present issue, there are no toponyms on Terra Esonis and the South Pacific is without New Guinea. Cf. Burden, The Mapping of North America II: 724 (discussing the map under the entry for Allard); Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast, 496; Tooley, "California as an Island," 68 in Tooley, The Mapping of America ; McLaughlin, The Mapping of California as an Island , 176.

$2750.00

Recentissima Novi Orbis, Sive Americae Septentrionalis et Meridionalis Tabula
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Recentissima Novi Orbis, Sive Americae Septentrionalis et Meridionalis Tabula

By ALLARD, Carol (1648-1709)

Amsterdam, 1697. Copper-engraved map. Small inset of New Zealand within the cartouche. Rare issue of Allard's map of North and South America, the first to show important corrections to the mapping of the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River Valley. "The map of America by Allard is derived from that of Frederick de Wit, c. 1675" (Burden). Significantly, however, Allard corrects the mapping of the Great Lakes and Mississippi Valley. "The former are entirely re-engraved as are the nearby waterways off the St. Lawrence River including Lake Champlain, which is moved south-west. Lake Superior is now enclosed to the west as is Lac des Puans, which is renamed Lac Illinois, placing the previous toponym correctly in Green Bay. To the west an entirely new and more recent depiction of the Mississippi valley is inserted. This is derived from that of Louis Hennepin ... published in 1697" (Burden). This is Burden's second state, with a ruled border surrounding the New Zealand inset but without the textual descriptions of climates between the neat line and gradients. It is the first state to show the important corrections noted above. Beyond the cartographic importance, the cartouche is especially attractive, with an allegorical figure of America seated within a sugar cane field inhabited by exotic animals and scenes relating to mankind's eternal search for gold. Burden, The Mapping of North America II: 724; McLaughlin, The Mapping of California as an Island , 132; Tooley, "California as an Island," in The Mapping of America 65.

$2000.00

America sive India Nova ad magnae Gerardi Mercatoris aui Vniversalis imitationem in compendium redacta
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America sive India Nova ad magnae Gerardi Mercatoris aui Vniversalis imitationem in compendium redacta

By MERCATOR, Michael (1565/70-1614)

[Amsterdam: Hondius, 1639. Copper-engraved map, French text on verso. Roundels at each corner with inset maps of the Gulf of Mexico, Cuba and Hispaniola, the remaining containing the cartouche. A fine example of one of the most celebrated maps of the Americas, the only printed map by Gerard Mercator's grandson Michael. Made by Gerard's grandson Michael to complete the atlas ( Atlantis Pars Altera ) begun by Gerard in 1584, this map is noted for its outstanding design and beauty, particularly its symmetrical configuration of circular insets and Mannerist flow of vines, flowers and leaves surrounding the circular map. Largely based on Rumold Mercator's world map of 1587, this map aptly reflects 16th-century knowledge, theories and suppositions regarding the New World. Naturally, most of this new knowledge was coastal, and configurations of any large areas were greatly hampered by the lack of a sound means of determining longitude. Nevertheless, the collective accomplishment of explorers and mapmakers represented in this map is astounding, showing in a generally correct way the vast extent of the New World. "A few of the most famous theories are still present: a large inland lake in Canada, two of the four islands of the North Pole, a bulge to the west coast of South America and the large southern continent" (Burden). The map appeared in 1595 and 1606 editions of the Atlantis Pars Altera , after which the plate was sold to Jodocus Hondius, who reissued the maps in varying editions through 1639. The present example includes French text on verso (confirming it to be a Hondius issue), but is apparently an unrecorded variant without a signature mark on verso. Burden, The Mapping of North America I, 87; Koeman, Atlantes Neerlandici, Me 22; Goss, The Mapping of North America, 19; America Emergent 12.

$4500.00

Amérique Septentrionale et Meridionale divisée en ses principales parties par les S[ieu]rs Sanson ... rectifiée suivant les nouvelles découvertes ... par le S[ieu]r. Robert
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Amérique Septentrionale et Meridionale divisée en ses principales parties par les S[ieu]rs Sanson ... rectifiée suivant les nouvelles découvertes ... par le S[ieu]r. Robert

By ROBERT DE VAUGONDY, Gilles (1686-1766)

Paris: Vaugondy, 1749. Copper-engraved map, with original outline colour. In good condition, with two small repairs to lower blank margin. The rare first issue of this very fine eighteenth-century map depicting both North and South America, by one of France's greatest cartographers This highly attractive map depicts the American continent at a time when the European powers were jockeying for power and possessions in the the New World: the period immediately before the Seven Years' War. It is one of Gilles Robert's earlier original maps, and concurrently he also issued a world map and maps of the three other continents. Its rarity can be explained by the fact that it was not apparently usually issued in any of the Robert atlases. The political realities of the time are spelt out in the interesting engraved panel on the right hand side which lists the holdings of Britain, France, Portugal, Holland, Denmark and Spain in the Americas. Also included in this panel is a list of the dominant religions in the region. The map includes two insets: one of Martinique and the other of Santo Domingo, two immensely profitable French colonies (they shared Santo Domingo with the Spanish). The elegant title cartouche is by Gobin and features a Native American reclining beside a spilled pot of gold, her arms raised in exultation as she accepts Christianity, as personified by the Blessed Virgin holding a Cross. The scene also includes flora and fauna indigenous to the Americas: an alligator, a parrot, a goat, a small, rather unusual quadruped with a long tail and two tropical trees. This map was re-issued in 1771, 1776 and 1778 with a new cartouche incorporating a new title "Amérique ou Indes Occidentales". Pedley Bel et Utile , 19 (1st state) & see pp.34/35 (double-page plate).

$2250.00

Carte Générale de L'Amérique
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Carte Générale de L'Amérique

By PALAIRET, Jean (1697-1774)

London: Nourse, Vaillant, Millar, Rocque & Sayer, 1754. Copper-engraved map, with full original colour, in very good condition. A highly decorative map of the Americas, evincing Palairet's uniquely elegant aesthetic style This artistically virtuous map embraces the entirety of North and South America, and also takes in the western extremities of Europe and Africa. South America is very well defined, and is divided into the various Spanish domains and Portuguese Brazil. North America is depicted on the eve of the Seven Years War. The English colonies running from Georgia up to Nova Scotia hug the Atlantic seaboard, while the massive French empire consisting of Canada and Louisiana extends through the heart of the continent. Quebec City, the capital of New France, is noted on the map. In the west, California is correctly shown to be a peninsula, while the Pacific Northwest is shown to be an enigma. Mexico and the numerous islands of the Caribbean are also portrayed. The map is adorned with a elegant, rococo style cartouche. Jean Palairet was born in Montauban, France, but emigrated to England where he became a French tutor to the children of George II. He later wrote several informative books on arithmetic, language, arts and sciences, and geography. The present map is from the second edition of Palairet's greatest work, the Atlas méthodique , a magnificent cartographical demonstration, in which landmasses are shown in various stages of political definition. Phillips, Atlases in the Library of Congress , 3503, map 12.

$600.00

Carte D'Amerique Dressée pour l'Usage du Roy...1739. America Accurate in Imperia, Regna, Status & Populos Divisa, ad Usum Ludovici XV, Galliarum Regis
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Carte D'Amerique Dressée pour l'Usage du Roy...1739. America Accurate in Imperia, Regna, Status & Populos Divisa, ad Usum Ludovici XV, Galliarum Regis

By De L'ISLE, Guillaume and Covens & Mortier

Amsterdam: Covens & Mortier, 1742. Engraving with period outline colour. Some mild soiling. Discolouration at centerfold. An elegant map of North and South America, the most accurate to date, produced for the "usage du Roy," Louis XV. Guillaume de l'Isle (1675-1726) was the son of a cartographer and pupil of Jean Dominique Cassini, who, among other important contributions, aligned the study of astronomy to the study of geography. Under Cassini's direction, observations were made from locations all over the world that enabled longitudinal calculations to be made with much greater accuracy. De l'Isle carried on this exacting work with remarkable dedication and integrity, constantly revising and improving his maps. While precision was his primary goal, his maps are invariably elegant and attractive. Jean (Johannes) Covens and Corneille (Cornelius) Mortier were brothers-in-law, who carried on the book publishing business established by Pierre Mortier in Amsterdam in 1685. Pierre Mortier's company owed much of its success to his access to French publishers, whose publications he re-issued in handsome editions.The elder Mortier died in 1711; his wife continued the firm until she died in 1719. In 1721, Covens and Mortier formed a partnership, Covens having married Agatha Mortier in the same year. They continued the business by publishing enlarged editions of Sanson, Jaillot, and De L'Isle, as well as some of the later Dutch cartographical masters such as De Wit and Allard, and of course Pierre Mortier. This map is from an edition of De L'Isle entitled, Atlas Nouveau, Contenant Toutes Les Parties Du Monde, Ou sont exactement Remarquées les Empires, Monarchies, Royaumes, Etats, Republiques &c. Par Guillaume de l'Isle. Premier Géographe de sa Majesté. It is his map of North and South America shown on a large enough scale that western Europe and Africa are included. The map includes the rectification of South America's eastern coast line, correcting a map of South America whose Chilean-Argentinian peninsula swung to the west. The map also includes a Prime Meridian declared by Louis XIII, but not adopted and Pope Alexander VI's Line of Demarcation that divided the world (outside of Europe) between Portugal and Spain. Finally, it should be noted that De l'Isle resisted the temptation to depict California as an island, which was being done by many mapmakers of the period. Koeman, C&M 7, #98.

$800.00

L'Amerique Dressée sur les Relations les plus Recentes rectifiées sur les dernieres observations
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L'Amerique Dressée sur les Relations les plus Recentes rectifiées sur les dernieres observations

By [NOLIN, Jean-Baptiste (1657-1725)] and NOLIN, Jean-Baptiste II (1686-1762)

Paris: Chez l'Auteur Rue St. Jacques au dessus de la Rue des Mathurins a lensgne. de la Place des Victoires, 1740. Copper-engraved wall map, with original outline colour, on four unjoined sheets, each 21 5/8 x 28 inches, if joined would form a map measuring approximately 40 x 49 1/2 inches, in excellent condition. A rare and highly decorative large-scale map of the Americas, and one of the finest masterpieces produced by the Nolin family. Jean-Baptiste Nolin was one of the most accomplished and certainly the most ambitious French cartographer of his era. He founded what ultimately became a family empire in Paris in the 1680s. Exceptionally, he managed to marry superlative decorative ornamentation with the serious objective of producing maps that reflected the most advanced rendering of geographical detail. The artistic élan of his compositions evinced a style that preserved the rhetorical ambitions of the Baroque ethic, while anticipating the playful elegance of the Rococo period. His masterpieces, many like the presented wall map, were monumental in scale and represented Nolin's desire to overwhelm his competition in what was a very challenging market. Highly controversial, Nolin occasionally described himself as "the Engraver to the King," an appointment of which the royal court was curiously never apprised. In his endeavour to include the very latest geographical details on his maps, he seldom hesitated to acquire information from his eminent contemporaries, most notably Guillaume De L'Isle and Vincenzo Maria Coronelli, Jean-Dominique Cassini and the Sieur de Tillemon. While Nolin very successfully collaborated with Coronelli, other cartographers were not appreciative of Nolin's adoption of their intellectual property, as De L'Isle successfully sued Nolin for plagiarism in 1705. However, the larger-than-life Nolin always seemed to transcend these challenges, leaving a thriving enterprise to be taken up by his son. The present map was created in 1740 by Jean-Baptiste Nolin II, largely based on earlier maps produced by his father. This work ambitiously endeavours to depict the Americas in the most up-to-date geographic form, drawing upon the most authoritative sources. Ironically, it was the senior Nolin's desire to acquire the most accurate information that caused him to propagate one of the eighteenth-century's greatest cartographic myths. By this time, South America had been quite thoroughly explored, however, the Pacific northwest and the adjacent interior areas of North America remained largely unseen by European eyes. The only prominent feature present in this terra incognita is the mythical Mer de l'Ouest , that sees the Pacific protrude dramatically into the continental landmass. The senior Nolin was the first cartographer to put this detail into print, his campaign of corporate espionage having uncovered a manuscript map by De L'Isle which depicted the sea. This incident was one of the key pieces of evidence that won De L'Isle's lawsuit against Nolin. Although the Mer de l'Ouest is dramatically smaller here than in its original form (and is unlabelled in this map) it sustains a fascinating myth. The highly detailed and relatively accurate depiction of eastern Canada and the Mississippi basin conveys an advanced knowledge of the best French sources. The large landmass looming in the lower-right of the combined image, Indes Meridionales , approximates the presence of Antarctica, but is predicated on speculation rather than any actual discovery of such a landmass. The map features decorative details that represent a social commentary on contemporary European attitudes towards the indigenous peoples they encountered in the New World. The elegant title cartouche formed by period rocaille decoration is inhabited by scenes of the Jesuits evangelizing Christianity to the native peoples. To the lower-left of the combined composition, amidst an elaborate backdrop of exotic tropical vegetation, Mars, the god of war, is shown capriciously watching over two Europeans who are firing rifles onto a group of native Americans, who themselves are engaging in macabre acts of cannibalism. The oceans that lie on either side of the Americas are inhabited by diverse creatures, including sawfish, sea snakes, and flying fish. Numerous ships, some engaged in active combat, allude to the intense contests between European powers for naval supremacy that raged at the time. The tracks of several of the great sea voyages including those of Columbus, Verazanno, Magellan, Quiros, Medaña, and Schouten and Le Maire, traverse the vast maritime spaces. This presented map is certainly one of finest images of the western hemisphere made in the eighteenth-century. A large-scale work of great artistic merit, the finely engraved details comprise not only an elegant geographical rendering of the Americas and the oceans, but showcase a fascinating vision of contemporary European values with respect to their imperialistic ambitions in the New World. Hale, The Discovery of the World Maps of the Earth and the Cosmos, p.159.

$45000.00

L'Amerique Dressée sur les Relations les plus Recentes rectifiées sur les dernieres observations
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L'Amerique Dressée sur les Relations les plus Recentes rectifiées sur les dernieres observations

By [NOLIN, Jean-Baptiste (1657-1725)] and Jean-Baptiste NOLIN II (1686-1762)

Paris: Chez l'Auteur Rue St. Jacques au dessus de la Rue des Mathurins a lensgne. de la Place des Victoires, 1740. Copper-engraved wall map, with original outline colour, composed from four joined sheets, surrounded by text and vignettes printed on separate sheets, backed onto old linen, with contemporary wooden rollers. First state of a rare and monumental wall map of the Americas by a great French master of cartography. Jean-Baptiste Nolin was one of the most accomplished and certainly the most ambitious French cartographer of his era. He founded what ultimately became a family empire in Paris in the 1680s. Exceptionally, he managed to marry superlative decorative ornamentation with the serious objective of producing maps that reflected the most advanced rendering of geographical detail. The artistic élan of his compositions evinced a style that preserved the rhetorical ambitions of the Baroque ethic, while anticipating the playful elegance of the Rococo period. His masterpieces, many like the present wall map, were monumental in scale and represented Nolin's desire to overwhelm his competition in what was a very challenging market. Highly controversial, Nolin occasionally described himself as "the Engraver to the King," an appointment of which the royal court was curiously never apprised. In his endeavour to include the very latest geographical details on his maps, he seldom hesitated to acquire information from his eminent contemporaries, most notably Guillaume De L'Isle and Vincenzo Maria Coronelli, Jean-Dominique Cassini and the Sieur de Tillemon. At times these rivals were not appreciative of Nolin's adoption of their intellectual property, and De L'Isle successfully sued Nolin for plagiarism in 1705. However, the larger-than-life Nolin always seemed to transcend these challenges, leaving a thriving enterprise to be taken up by his son. The present map was created in 1740 by Jean-Baptiste Nolin II, largely based on earlier maps produced by his father. This work ambitiously endeavours to depict the Americas in the most up-to-date geographic form, generally borrowing from the most authoritative sources. Ironically, it was the senior Nolin's desire to acquire the most accurate information that caused him to propagate one of the eighteenth-century's greatest cartographic myths. By this time, South America had been quite thoroughly explored, however, the Pacific northwest and the adjacent interior areas of North America remained largely unseen by European eyes. The only prominent feature present in this terra incognita is the mythical Mer de l'Ouest, that sees the Pacific protrude dramatically into the continental landmass. The senior Nolin was the first cartographer to put this detail into print, his campaign of corporate espionage having uncovered a manuscript map by De L'Isle which depicted the sea. This incident was one of the key pieces of evidence that won De L'Isle's suit against Nolin. Although the Mer de l'Ouest is dramatically smaller here than in its original form (and is unlabelled in this map) it sustains a fascinating myth. The map is an artistically virtuous composition on a monumental scale, the image being surrounded by thirty vignettes that depict the dramatic historical events that shaped the founding of the French and Spanish empires in the Americas. Each vignette is set within an elaborate baroque frame of a unique design, accompanied by descriptive text. The extensive text along the lower margin entitled "Description Géographique de l'Amérique" places this important map into its greater social and historical context. The map is further enhanced by a large decorative title cartouche, magnificently framed by period rocaille motifs, that depicts French Jesuits ministering to the Indians. A small vignette below the cartouche shows beavers at work, a popular motif on eighteenth-century maps of America The map also features a decorative detail that represents a social commentary on contemporary European attitudes towards the indigenous peoples they encountered in the New World. The scene occupying the lower-left of the main image depicts Mars, the god of war, capriciously watching over two Europeans who are firing rifles onto a group of native Americans, who themselves are engaging in macabre acts of cannibalism. This wall map is one of the greatest subjects of the Nolins' legacy, not only being a masterful work of art and a fascinating image that tests the very limits of European geographical knowledge, but a vivid record of a dramatic transitional period in the history of cartography, and of society in general. Hale, The Discovery of the World Maps of the Earth and the Cosmos, p. 159.

$65000.00