Sign In | Register


RECENT ARRIVALS


Next >

[Geoff Lewis]

By ORGAN, Bryan

London: Arthur Ackermann and Son, Ltd, 1974. Hand-coloured lithograph printed on fine wove paper. Number 25 from an edition of 150. Signed in pencil by Lewis along the lower right side of the image and by Organ in the right corner of the bottom margin. Very good condition. Includes a separate biography sheet. "A fine print from 'Six British Jockeys,'" an impressive portfolio of limited edition lithographs depicting several of England's most prestigious jockeys, each of whom has "an established world-wide reputation and has made a valuable and lasting contribution to the sport they serve." (Foreword to "Six British Jockeys") Drawn to jockeying because the advantage his small size would afford him in such a profession, Geoff Lewis trained with Epsom trainer Ron Smyth beginning in 1952. His initial victory at Eastern Imp was followed by several notable Classic successes. He was appointed first jockey to Newmarket trainer Noel Murless in 1971, after which time he exclusively raced on Mr. Paul Mellon's Mill Reef and won the Queen Elizabeth Stakes at Ascot, the King George VI, and the Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe at Longchamp. In his accompanying biographical notes to the portfolio, David Hedges describes Lewis as "a cheerful character who walks with a confident, rolling gait. He is popular with his fellow jockeys, and with starting stalls handlers, for his consideration of his own and other riders' mounts at the beginning of a race. At the finish, there are few with more driving force" ( Six British Jockeys ).

$300.00

[Willie Carson]

By ORGAN, Bryan

London: Arthur Ackermann and Son, Ltd, 1974. Hand-coloured lithograph printed on fine wove paper. Number 25 from an edition of 150. Signed in pencil by Carson along the lower right side of the image and by Organ in the bottom right margin. Very good condition. "A fine print from 'Six British Jockeys,'" an impressive portfolio of limited edition lithographs depicting several of England's most prestigious jockeys, each of whom has "an established world-wide reputation and has made a valuable and lasting contribution to the sport they serve.." (Foreword to "Six British Jockeys"). Born in Scotland in 1942, Willie Carson, pictured here in the colours of Mr. Roderick More O'Ferrall, was an apprentice to Gerald Armstrong in Yorkshire and later to Sam Armstrong in Newmarket. In 1966, he became first jockey to Lord Derby, and his initial 1962 victory at Catterick was followed by a number of glorious successes at classic races including the 2,000 Guineas of 1972. In his accompanying biographical notes to the portfolio, David Hedges explains that "Carson, with his weight advantage, is able to take many more rides than other heavier jockeys vying for the championship title. But this cheerful, bright-eyed Scot works hard for everything he achieves, and he can be often seen in a race driving for all he is worth a furlong from home on something, which most jockeys would have written off as a lost cause" ( Six British Jockeys ).

$300.00

[Set of Four] Coursing. Plate I. Going out.; Plate II. Finding; Plate III. The Hare's Last Effort; Plate IV. The Death
seller photo

[Set of Four] Coursing. Plate I. Going out.; Plate II. Finding; Plate III. The Hare's Last Effort; Plate IV. The Death

By WOLSTENHOLME, After Dean, Senior (1757-1837)

London: R. Ackermann, 1823. Aquatint engraving, printed in colours and finished by hand, by Thomas Sutherland, except plate III which was engraved by J. Stewart. (All skillfully restored, mostly marginal repairs). Images:9 7/8 x 12 3/4 inches approx.; sheets: 11 7/8 x 13 3/4 inches. A very fine series from one of the greatest British sporting artists of his time "Dean Wolstenholme Snr became an artist in middle life after losing his then not inconsiderable wealth in a property deal which went wrong. Before moving to London in about 1800 he had lived in Herfordshire and Essex, pursuing a happy life devoted to foxhunting and coursing, painting a little for his own pleasure. In London he had to paint in earnest, bringing to the city memories of his earlier years. He exhibited a painting of coursing at the Royal Academy in 1803; fox hunting in 1804... and so on until shortly before his death in 1837. A large number of his hunting, coursing and shooting pictures were engraved... [His son, Charles Dean Wolstenholme Jnr. (1793-1883) also became an animal painter of note.] Both father and son populated their landscapes with horses and horsemen rather than painting commissioned equestrian portraits; and the pleasure of their work is their skill in depicting the English (Home Counties) countryside." (Chales Lane British Racing Prints p.184) This series was published at the same time as a matching set of four prints after Wolstenholme called "Hunting". The sport of coursing involves greyhounds and hares, rather than hounds and foxes. The greyhounds follow their prey by sight rather than by scent.

$2000.00

Kingcraft. Winner of the Derby Stakes at Epsom 1870... By King Tom out of Woodcraft. The Property of Lord Falmouth - Trained by Matthew Dawson - Ridden by T. French
seller photo

Kingcraft. Winner of the Derby Stakes at Epsom 1870... By King Tom out of Woodcraft. The Property of Lord Falmouth - Trained by Matthew Dawson - Ridden by T. French

By MASON, After

London: L. Braill & Sons, 1870. Aquatint engraving, printed in colours and finished by hand, after a photograph by Mason. A fine quality aquatint by an unidentified engraver. Braill and Sons here continue a tradition, established by the Fullers and Ackermann in the 1820s, of providing a top quality aquatint portrait of the winner of Britain's greatest classic race over the flat. A sign of the times, however is that the image from which the print was made was provided by a photographer, rather than a painter.

$2900.00

The High Jump, National Horse Show Association, New York, 1892. Transport tying Maud at 6 feet 1 inch
seller photo

The High Jump, National Horse Show Association, New York, 1892. Transport tying Maud at 6 feet 1 inch

By ALLEN, W.S. Vanderbilt

New York: Henry T. Thomas, 1893. Heliotype after Allen's painting by the Heliotype Printing Co. Well repaired tear in upper left and losses along bottom edge. Image: 14 1/4 x 19 1/2' sheet size: 17 1/4 x 22 1/2 inches. A fine plate showing a magnificent high jump, from the nineteenth-century publication 'Sporting Incidents'. The National Horse Show is an annual event, which began in 1883 in the original Madison Square Garden. It continues to this day. This 1892 scene occured in the second Madison Square Garden, which opened in 1891. Published during America's Gilded Age, 'Sporting Incidents' is a portfolio of elaborate illustrations depicting equine sporting events and accompanied by H. Milford Steele's eloquent descriptions of the history and status of these activities. It was primarily intended to glorify the increasingly fashionable sports of coaching, hunting, polo and steeple chasing. In its introduction, Colonel William Jay, a founding member of the Coaching Club, extolled the beneficial effect such activities had on the health, behaviour, and moral character of both participants and spectators and explained that the "aim of the artist in this book has been to reproduce such horses and carriages with such details of their equipment as may be useful as hints to those who need them, at the same time furnishing a standard of correctness in such matters."

$300.00

The Meadow Brook Hunt, At Westbury, L. I., November, 1892. Mr. Thomas Hitchcock, Jr., Master
seller photo

The Meadow Brook Hunt, At Westbury, L. I., November, 1892. Mr. Thomas Hitchcock, Jr., Master

By ALLEN, W.S. Vanderbilt

New York: Henry T. Thomas, 1893. Heliotype after Allen's painting by the Heliotype Printing Co. Well-made repairs to upper right corner. Image: 14 1/4 x 19 1/2' sheet size: 17 1/4 x 22 1/2 inches. A fine plate showing the Meadow Brook Hunt Club in action in 1892 , from the nineteenth-century publication 'Sporting Incidents'. The Meadow Brook Hunt Club was established in 1881, when fox hunting in Long Island was still possible and not objected to. Published during America's Gilded Age, 'Sporting Incidents' is a portfolio of elaborate illustrations depicting equine sporting events and accompanied by H. Milford Steele's eloquent descriptions of the history and status of these activities. It was primarily intended to glorify the increasingly fashionable sports of coaching, hunting, polo and steeple chasing. In its introduction, Colonel William Jay, a founding member of the Coaching Club, extolled the beneficial effect such activities had on the health, behaviour, and moral character of both participants and spectators and explained that the "aim of the artist in this book has been to reproduce such horses and carriages with such details of their equipment as may be useful as hints to those who need them, at the same time furnishing a standard of correctness in such matters."

$300.00

Steeplechase at Hempstead Farms, October 21, 1893. Glenfallon passing Vanity at the In-and-out Jump
seller photo

Steeplechase at Hempstead Farms, October 21, 1893. Glenfallon passing Vanity at the In-and-out Jump

By ALLEN, W.S. Vanderbilt

New York: Henry T. Thomas, 1893. Heliotype after Allen's painting by the Heliotype Printing Co. Several well repaired tears in upper left quadrant. Image: 14 1/4 x 19 1/4 inches; sheet size: 17 1/4 x 22 3/8 inches. A fine plate showing a steeplechase in Long Island in 1892 , from the nineteenth-century publication 'Sporting Incidents'. The new steeplechase track at the Hempstead Farm Company opened in 1890. Steeplechasing separated itself from flat racing quite early on and has always been the more aristocratic of the two types of horseracing, and the riders are generally wealthy amateurs, rather than professional jockeys. Published during America's Gilded Age, 'Sporting Incidents' is a portfolio of elaborate illustrations depicting equine sporting events and accompanied by H. Milford Steele's eloquent descriptions of the history and status of these activities. It was primarily intended to glorify the increasingly fashionable sports of coaching, hunting, polo and steeple chasing. In its introduction, Colonel William Jay, a founding member of the Coaching Club, extolled the beneficial effect such activities had on the health, behaviour, and moral character of both participants and spectators and explained that the "aim of the artist in this book has been to reproduce such horses and carriages with such details of their equipment as may be useful as hints to those who need them, at the same time furnishing a standard of correctness in such matters."

$300.00

The Road Coach Acquidneck, Horsed and driven by Mr. H. Astor Carey. The start from the Casino, Newport, August, 1892
seller photo

The Road Coach Acquidneck, Horsed and driven by Mr. H. Astor Carey. The start from the Casino, Newport, August, 1892

By ALLEN, W.S. Vanderbilt

New York: Henry T. Thomas, 1893. Heliotype after Allen's painting by the Heliotype Printing Co. Repairs, mostly marginal to right and left margins. Image: 14 1/4 x 19 3/8 inches; sheet size: 17 1/4 x 22 3/8 inches. A fine plate showing Mr. H. Astor Carey with his coach and four, departing from a casino in Newport, from the nineteenth-century publication 'Sporting Incidents'. The Coach Club of New York was founded in 1875, and it established the Newport Coaching Weekend, which still takes place.The driving and maintenance of a road coach was considered both an art and a sport, and a very fashionable pastime. The "Acquidneck" was, according to the text, the first road coach to run out of Newport. Published during America's Gilded Age, 'Sporting Incidents' is a portfolio of elaborate illustrations depicting equine sporting events and accompanied by H. Milford Steele's eloquent descriptions of the history and status of these activities. It was primarily intended to glorify the increasingly fashionable sports of coaching, hunting, polo and steeple chasing. In its introduction, Colonel William Jay, a founding member of the Coaching Club, extolled the beneficial effect such activities had on the health, behaviour, and moral character of both participants and spectators and explained that the "aim of the artist in this book has been to reproduce such horses and carriages with such details of their equipment as may be useful as hints to those who need them, at the same time furnishing a standard of correctness in such matters."

$300.00

Melton. Winner of the Derby Stakes at Epsom 1885... As a two year old he won the New Stakes at Ascot, The Middle Park Plate and the Criterion Stakes at Newmarket. As a three year old he won the Payne Stakes at Newmarket, also the St. Leger Stakes at Doncaster 1885. The Property of Lord Hastings. Got by Master Kildare out of Violet Melrose. Trained by M. Dawson. Ridden by Fred Archer
seller photo

Melton. Winner of the Derby Stakes at Epsom 1885... As a two year old he won the New Stakes at Ascot, The Middle Park Plate and the Criterion Stakes at Newmarket. As a three year old he won the Payne Stakes at Newmarket, also the St. Leger Stakes at Doncaster 1885. The Property of Lord Hastings. Got by Master Kildare out of Violet Melrose. Trained by M. Dawson. Ridden by Fred Archer

By WOMBILL, After Sidney R. (fl. 1885-1890)

London: George Rees, 1885. Aquatint engraving, printed in colours and finished by hand, by E.H. Hunt (corners rounded). Image:18 7/8 x 25 inches ; sheet size:24 1/8 x 30 1/4 inches. A portrait of the most famous British jockey of the 19th century, Fred Archer, up on Melton, winner of the 1885 St Leger and the Epsom Derby. Frederick Archer (1857-1886), " born at St. George's Cottage, Cheltenham, on 11 Jan. 1857, was the second son of William Archer, a jockey of the old school, who took over a stud of English horses to Russia in 1842, who won the Grand National at Liverpool on Little Charlie in 1858, and who eventually became landlord of the King's Arms at Prestbury, near Cheltenham. His mother was Emma, daughter of William Hayward, a former proprietor of the King's Arms. On 10 Jan. 1867 Billy Archer apprenticed his son Fred, a quick, retentive, and exceedingly secretive boy, for five years to Matthew Dawson, the trainer at Newmarket. As Billy Archer's son he was soon given an opportunity of showing his mettle, and on 28 Sept. 1870 at Chesterfield, upon Atholl Daisy, he won his first victory on the turf. Two years later, scaling at that time 5st 7lb, he won the Cesarewitch on Salvanoe, and in 1874, in which year the death of Tom French made a clear vacancy for a jockey of the first order, he won a success upon Lord Falmouth's Atlantic in the Two Thousand Guineas which proved of the greatest value to his career. Thenceforth he became a veritable mascotte of the racing stable with which he was connected. In 1874, with 530 mounts, he scored 147 wins. In 1877 he won his first Derby, and also the St. Leger, upon Lord Falmouth's Silvio. In 1884, with 377 mounts, he secured no less than 241 wins. His most successful year was probably 1885, when he won the Two Thousand Guineas on Paradox, the Oaks on Lonely, the Derby and St. Leger on Melton, and the Grand Prix on Paradox. In his last season he won the Derby and St. Leger on Ormonde. In all he is said to have worn silk 8,084 times, and to have ridden 2,748 winners. His most exciting victory was perhaps the Derby of 1880, when he came up from the rear upon Bend Or with an extraordinary rush, beating Robert the Devil by a head. His nerve was of iron, and he never hesitated to take the inside of the turn and hug the rails at Tattenham Corner. The success which enabled him to remain premier jockey for the unprecedented period of ten years is attributed primarily to his coolness and to his judgment of pace." ( DNB ). Lane British Racing Prints p.184.

$750.00

Squirrel Shooting
seller photo

Squirrel Shooting

By CURRIER & IVES [pub.]

New York: Currier & Ives, 152 Nassau Street, 1860. Hand-colored lithograph. Small folio. Framed. Provenance: Americana Collection Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette Classic small folio Currier & Ives hunting print This nice, small format Currier & Ives was probably drawn by Fanny Palmer, who did the majority of the popular shooting scenes. There was rarely an artist attribution on the small folio issues. "Woodland scene: two hunters to left, three dogs barking up at three squirrels in tree. Nineteenth-century gentlemen often hunted squirrels for sport and food. It was also referred to as barking off squirrels. Hunters had to be careful to kill the rodents so that the bullets from the rifle would not destroy the meat. In order to accomplish this, the rifleman would shoot directly underneath the squirrel and the explosion would kill the animal. Many hunters used their dogs to assist in the pursuit." (Springfield Museums Collection description) Gale 6082.

$750.00

Wild Turkey Shooting
seller photo

Wild Turkey Shooting

By CURRIER & IVES [pub.]

New York: Currier & Ives, 125 Nassau Street, 1873. Hand-colored lithograph. Small folio. Framed. Classic small folio Currier & Ives shooting print Wild Turkey Shooting, probably drawn and lithographed by Fanny Palmer, was on the original "Currier & Ives Best Fifty Small Folio" list of 1933. It was # 14. It is a wonderful moment, prior to the actual shooting, when the two hunters very quietly and cautiously prepare. Wild turkeys are notoriously hard to shoot. Fanny Palmer (1812-1876) was the first woman in the United States to work as a professional artist, and to make a living with her art. She produced more Currier and Ives' prints than any other artist, and she was the only female in a business that was dominated by men. Painting was not considered a suitable occupation for a woman, nor was lithography. She is responsible for many of the popular shooting scenes, though there was no artist's attribution on small folio prints. Gale 7219.

$1500.00

[CURRIER & IVES pub] Quail Shooting. Setters Property of S. Palmer, Esq. Brooklyn, L. I.
seller photo

[CURRIER & IVES pub] Quail Shooting. Setters Property of S. Palmer, Esq. Brooklyn, L. I.

By PALMER, F. F. (1812-1876)

New York: N. Currier, 1852. Hand-colored lithograph by Frances Palmer after her own painting. Provenance: Donaldson, Lufkin &Jenrette Americana Collection Classic Nathaniel Currier hunting print by Fanny Palmer The location of this scene is thought to be the Meadow Park in Queens, N. Y. The dogs belonged to Fanny Palmer's husband, Samuel, and were her source for portraits of pointers and retrievers in many hunting scenes. Fanny Palmer (1812-1876) was the first woman in the United States to work as a professional artist, and to make a living with her art. She produced more Currier and Ives' prints than any other artist, and she was the only female in a business dominated by men. Painting was not considered a suitable occupation for a woman, nor, of course, was lithography. Hers was a story common for many Victorian wives, who were expected to keep house and be supported by their husbands. She however pursued a career in printmaking in England and eventually in America, virtually supporting her family as her husband sank deeper into alcoholism and then supporting it in fact when he fell to his death on a hotel stairway in 1857. Her shooting prints show a fine understanding of the appeal the sport had for men with their dogs, shotguns and hunting attire, walking through untamed country with a friend on a summer afternoon. Gale 5414.

$4500.00

Woodcock Shooting
seller photo

Woodcock Shooting

By [CURRIER & IVES pub.] PALMER, F. F. (1812-1876)

New York: N. Currier, 1852. Hand-colored lithograph by Frances Palmer after her own painting. Provenance: Donaldson, Lufkin &Jenrette Americana Collection Classic Currier hunting print by Fanny Palmer Fanny Palmer (1812-1876) was the first woman in the United States to work as a professional artist, and to make a living with her art. She produced more Currier and Ives' prints than any other artist, and she was the only female in a business that was dominated by men. Painting was not considered a suitable occupation for a woman, nor was lithography. Hers was a story common to Victorian wives who were expected to keep house and be supported by their husbands. She however pursued a career in England in printmaking and eventually in America, virtually supporting her family as her husband sank deeper into alcoholism and then supporting it in fact when he fell to his death on a hotel stairway in 1857. Her shooting prints show a fine understanding of the appeal the sport had for men with their dogs, shotguns and hunting attire, walking through untamed country with a friend on an autumn afternoon. Mrs. Palmer's husband was fond of shooting and kept dogs. These served as models in her images of fowl shooting. Gale 7320.

$4500.00

Wild Duck Shooting
seller photo

Wild Duck Shooting

By [CURIER & IVES pub.] PALMER, F. F. (1812-1876)

New York: N. Currier, 1852. Hand-colored lithograph by Frances Palmer after her own painting. Provenance: Donaldson, Lufkin &Jenrette Americana Collection Classic Currier & Ives hunting print by Fanny Palmer Fanny Palmer (1812-1876) was the first woman in the United States to work as a professional artist, and to make a living with her art. She produced more Currier and Ives' prints than any other artist, and she was the only female in a business dominated by men. Painting was not considered a suitable occupation for a woman, nor, of course, was lithography. Hers was a story common for Victorian wives who were expected to keep house and be supported by their husbands. She however pursued a career in printmaking in England and later in America, virtually supporting her family as her husband sank deeper into alcoholism and then supporting it in fact when he fell to his death on a hotel stairway in 1857. Her shooting prints show a fine understanding of the appeal the sport had for men: with their dogs, shotguns and hunting attire, wading among the reeds in a swamp with a companion. Mrs. Palmer's husband, Samuel, was fond of shooting and kept dogs, and these served as models for her hunting scenes. Gale 7208.

$4500.00

Wild Duck Shooting - A Good Day's Sport
seller photo

Wild Duck Shooting - A Good Day's Sport

By [CURRIER & IVES pub.] TAIT, A. F. (1819-1905)

New York: N. Currier, 1854. Hand-colored lithgraph. Some titles in facsimile due to abrasion. Provenance: Donaldson, Lufkin &Jenrette Americana Collection Classic Currier & Ives hunting print by Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait This large folio hunting print by Arthur Tait is on the Currier & Ives New Best Fifty list, # 46. It is a quintessential duck hunting scene. The man standing in the boat is thought to be Nathaniel Currier, who enjoyed hunting, and the seated man, Arthur Tait. It is in any event a marvellous scene depicting the happiness of sportsmen with their retrievers and shotguns pulled up on the shore of a lake at the end of a day of sport. Gale 7320.

$4750.00

Partridge Shooting
seller photo

Partridge Shooting

By [CURRIER & IVES pub.] PALMER, F. F. (1812-1876)

New York: Currier & Ives, 1865. Hand-colored lithograph. Large folio. Provenance: Donaldson, Lufkin &Jenrette Americana Collection Classic Currier & Ives hunting print by Fanny Palmer Fanny Palmer (1812-1876) was the first woman in the United States to work as a professional artist, and to make a living with her art. She produced more Currier and Ives' prints than any other artist, and she was the only female in a business dominated by men. Painting was not considered a suitable occupation for a woman, nor, of course, was lithography. Hers was a story common for Victorian wives, who were expected to keep house and be supported by their husbands. She however pursued a career in England and eventually in America, virtually supporting her family as her husband sank deeper into alcoholism and then supporting it in fact when he fell to his death on a hotel stairway in 1857. Her shooting prints show a fine understanding of the appeal the sport had for men: with their dogs, shotguns and hunting attire, walking through untamed country with a friend on autumn afternoons. Mrs. Palmer's husband enjoyed shooting fowl, as did Nathaniel Currier, and Palmer's dogs may have modelled for this image. Gale 5114, Peters 108.

$4500.00

Youth Rescued from a Shark, This Representation is founded on the following Fact: a Youth bathing in the Harbour of Havannah, was twice seized by a Shark from which , (though with the Loss of the Flesh & Foot, torn from the Right Leg), He disentangled himself & was, by the assistance of a Boat's Crew, sav'd from the Jaws of the voracious Animal: for in the Moment it was attempting to seize its Prey (a third Time) a Sailor with a Boat Hook drove it from its pursuit. / Jeune Homme sauvé de l'attaque d'un Requien...[text repeated in French]
seller photo

Youth Rescued from a Shark, This Representation is founded on the following Fact: a Youth bathing in the Harbour of Havannah, was twice seized by a Shark from which , (though with the Loss of the Flesh & Foot, torn from the Right Leg), He disentangled himself & was, by the assistance of a Boat's Crew, sav'd from the Jaws of the voracious Animal: for in the Moment it was attempting to seize its Prey (a third Time) a Sailor with a Boat Hook drove it from its pursuit. / Jeune Homme sauvé de l'attaque d'un Requien...[text repeated in French]

By GREEN, Valentine after John Singleton COPLEY

London: Published by V. Green, Newman Street, Oxford Street, and at No. 52, Strand, 1779. Mezzotint. Printed on heavy laid paper. Several expertly repaired tears in top and bottom margins. Image size: 18 1/4 x 23 3/4 inches. Considered one of the most important eighteenth century mezzotints, "Youth Rescued from a Shark" made the fortunes of both Valentine Green and the expatriate American painter John Singleton Copley Brook Watson, a London merchant, commissioned his friend John Singleton Copley to paint a scene from his youth depicting the fateful night when he was attacked by a shark while swimming in Havana Harbor. Although Watson survived the attack, after being rescued by his fellow shipmen, he lost his leg during the encounter. "Watson and the Shark" launched Copley's career in London, making him one of the most celebrated American painters on the Continent. The painting became a metaphor for salvation and the triumph over adversity and was widely heralded as the most important painting of the age. Based on Copley's masterpiece, Green's large mezzotint became one of the most sought after prints on the market. It sold so well in fact, that Green was forced to scrape a second and a third plate of the image to satisfy public demand. The wide appeal of Green's mezzotint heightened Copley's fame and catapulted both engraver and painter to the top of the English art world. In the history of engraving, no printmaker has achieved such depth and precision as Valentine Green. He is considered the father of the English mezzotint because through his example we can see the pinnacle of mezzotint engraving. During his career, Green produced some of the most beautiful and sought after 18th century mezzotints. At an early age Green apprenticed himself to Robert Hancock of Worcester, where he produced his first published work 'A Survey of the City of Worcester'. In 1765 Green moved to London where his excellent scraping soon earned him a much-celebrated reputation. He soon became mezzotint engraver to George III, and a member of the Royal Academy. Throughout his industrious career, Green scratched over 400 plates working from works by Copley, Reynolds and West. Whitman, Valentine Green 152; Chaloner Smith, British Mezzotinto Portraits 209; Clayton, The English Print , p. 243, no. 38.

$9500.00

La Maison de monsignieur Le maquis apellée Bolsouer en la Province de Darby. Monsignieur le marquis a Cheval Le Capitainne a pie
seller photo

La Maison de monsignieur Le maquis apellée Bolsouer en la Province de Darby. Monsignieur le marquis a Cheval Le Capitainne a pie

By NEWCASTLE, William Cavendish, Duke of (1592-1676) and Gaspard de SAUNIER

London: J. Brindley, 1743. Copper engraving after Abraham van Diepenbeeck. In excellent condition with the exception of a few expertly mended tears on the top edge of sheet. A fine plate from 'A General System of Horsemanship in All Its Branches', Cavendish's extraordinary didactic work on equestrian dressage. An affluent politician, soldier, and devoted Royalist, William Cavendish fought for Charles I during the English Civil War. He established a riding school in Antwerp with several Barbary horses obtained in Paris, and in 1657, published his revolutionary and influential work on equestrian training techniques, 'La Methode et Invention nouvelle de Dresser les Chevaux'. An English edition was published in 1743 as 'A General System Of Horsemanship In All Its Branches', with beautiful illustrations of Cavendish skillfully training and riding his horses at his Antwerp ménage and his various English estates like Bolsover Castle and Welbeck Abbey. Cf. Brunet I.1700; cf. Mellon Books on the Horse and Horsemanship p. 49; cf. Mennessier de la Lance II, p. 250; cf. Nissen ZBI 849.

$325.00

La rénes de la Bride Separées dans les deux mains, pour saire sentir la Bride, tant a main Droite qu à Gauche
seller photo

La rénes de la Bride Separées dans les deux mains, pour saire sentir la Bride, tant a main Droite qu à Gauche

By NEWCASTLE, William Cavendish, Duke of (1592-1676) and Gaspard de SAUNIER

London: J. Brindley, 1743. Copper engraving after Abraham van Diepenbeeck. In excellent condition with the exception of a small skillfully mended tear on bottom edge of sheet. A fine plate from 'A General System of Horsemanship in All Its Branches', Cavendish's extraordinary didactic work on equestrian dressage. An affluent politician, soldier, and devoted Royalist, William Cavendish fought for Charles I during the English Civil War. He established a riding school in Antwerp with several Barbary horses obtained in Paris, and in 1657, published his revolutionary and influential work on equestrian training techniques, 'La Methode et Invention nouvelle de Dresser les Chevaux'. An English edition was published in 1743 as 'A General System Of Horsemanship In All Its Branches', with beautiful illustrations of Cavendish skillfully training and riding his horses at his Antwerp ménage and his various English estates like Bolsover Castle and Welbeck Abbey. Cf. Brunet I.1700; cf. Mellon Books on the Horse and Horsemanship p. 49; cf. Mennessier de la Lance II, p. 250; cf. Nissen ZBI 849.

$325.00

Passades au Petit Galop, la Demÿ-volte à Main Gauche. Passades à toute Bride, la demy-volte à Main Gauche
seller photo

Passades au Petit Galop, la Demÿ-volte à Main Gauche. Passades à toute Bride, la demy-volte à Main Gauche

By NEWCASTLE, William Cavendish, Duke of (1592-1676) and Gaspard de SAUNIER

London: J. Brindley, 1743. Copper engraving after Abraham van Diepenbeeck. In excellent condition. A fine plate from 'A General System of Horsemanship in All Its Branches', Cavendish's extraordinary didactic work on equestrian dressage. An affluent politician, soldier, and devoted Royalist, William Cavendish fought for Charles I during the English Civil War. He established a riding school in Antwerp with several Barbary horses obtained in Paris, and in 1657, published his revolutionary and influential work on equestrian training techniques, 'La Methode et Invention nouvelle de Dresser les Chevaux'. An English edition was published in 1743 as 'A General System Of Horsemanship In All Its Branches', with beautiful illustrations of Cavendish skillfully training and riding his horses at his Antwerp ménage and his various English estates like Bolsover Castle and Welbeck Abbey. Cf. Brunet I.1700; cf. Mellon Books on the Horse and Horsemanship p. 49; cf. Mennessier de la Lance II, p. 250; cf. Nissen ZBI 849.

$325.00

Next >