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Wild Turkey Shooting
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Wild Turkey Shooting

By CURRIER & IVES [pub.]

New York: Currier & Ives, 125 Nassau Street, 1873. Hand-colored lithograph. Small folio. Framed. Classic small folio Currier & Ives shooting print Wild Turkey Shooting, probably drawn and lithographed by Fanny Palmer, was on the original "Currier & Ives Best Fifty Small Folio" list of 1933. It was # 14. It is a wonderful moment, prior to the actual shooting, when the two hunters very quietly and cautiously prepare. Wild turkeys are notoriously hard to shoot. Fanny Palmer (1812-1876) was the first woman in the United States to work as a professional artist, and to make a living with her art. She produced more Currier and Ives' prints than any other artist, and she was the only female in a business that was dominated by men. Painting was not considered a suitable occupation for a woman, nor was lithography. She is responsible for many of the popular shooting scenes, though there was no artist's attribution on small folio prints. Gale 7219.

$1500.00

[CURRIER & IVES pub] Quail Shooting. Setters Property of S. Palmer, Esq. Brooklyn, L. I.
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[CURRIER & IVES pub] Quail Shooting. Setters Property of S. Palmer, Esq. Brooklyn, L. I.

By PALMER, F. F. (1812-1876)

New York: N. Currier, 1852. Hand-colored lithograph by Frances Palmer after her own painting. Provenance: Donaldson, Lufkin &Jenrette Americana Collection Classic Nathaniel Currier hunting print by Fanny Palmer The location of this scene is thought to be the Meadow Park in Queens, N. Y. The dogs belonged to Fanny Palmer's husband, Samuel, and were her source for portraits of pointers and retrievers in many hunting scenes. Fanny Palmer (1812-1876) was the first woman in the United States to work as a professional artist, and to make a living with her art. She produced more Currier and Ives' prints than any other artist, and she was the only female in a business dominated by men. Painting was not considered a suitable occupation for a woman, nor, of course, was lithography. Hers was a story common for many Victorian wives, who were expected to keep house and be supported by their husbands. She however pursued a career in printmaking in England and eventually in America, virtually supporting her family as her husband sank deeper into alcoholism and then supporting it in fact when he fell to his death on a hotel stairway in 1857. Her shooting prints show a fine understanding of the appeal the sport had for men with their dogs, shotguns and hunting attire, walking through untamed country with a friend on a summer afternoon. Gale 5414.

$4500.00

Woodcock Shooting
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Woodcock Shooting

By [CURRIER & IVES pub.] PALMER, F. F. (1812-1876)

New York: N. Currier, 1852. Hand-colored lithograph by Frances Palmer after her own painting. Provenance: Donaldson, Lufkin &Jenrette Americana Collection Classic Currier hunting print by Fanny Palmer Fanny Palmer (1812-1876) was the first woman in the United States to work as a professional artist, and to make a living with her art. She produced more Currier and Ives' prints than any other artist, and she was the only female in a business that was dominated by men. Painting was not considered a suitable occupation for a woman, nor was lithography. Hers was a story common to Victorian wives who were expected to keep house and be supported by their husbands. She however pursued a career in England in printmaking and eventually in America, virtually supporting her family as her husband sank deeper into alcoholism and then supporting it in fact when he fell to his death on a hotel stairway in 1857. Her shooting prints show a fine understanding of the appeal the sport had for men with their dogs, shotguns and hunting attire, walking through untamed country with a friend on an autumn afternoon. Mrs. Palmer's husband was fond of shooting and kept dogs. These served as models in her images of fowl shooting. Gale 7320.

$4500.00

Wild Duck Shooting
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Wild Duck Shooting

By [CURIER & IVES pub.] PALMER, F. F. (1812-1876)

New York: N. Currier, 1852. Hand-colored lithograph by Frances Palmer after her own painting. Provenance: Donaldson, Lufkin &Jenrette Americana Collection Classic Currier & Ives hunting print by Fanny Palmer Fanny Palmer (1812-1876) was the first woman in the United States to work as a professional artist, and to make a living with her art. She produced more Currier and Ives' prints than any other artist, and she was the only female in a business dominated by men. Painting was not considered a suitable occupation for a woman, nor, of course, was lithography. Hers was a story common for Victorian wives who were expected to keep house and be supported by their husbands. She however pursued a career in printmaking in England and later in America, virtually supporting her family as her husband sank deeper into alcoholism and then supporting it in fact when he fell to his death on a hotel stairway in 1857. Her shooting prints show a fine understanding of the appeal the sport had for men: with their dogs, shotguns and hunting attire, wading among the reeds in a swamp with a companion. Mrs. Palmer's husband, Samuel, was fond of shooting and kept dogs, and these served as models for her hunting scenes. Gale 7208.

$4500.00

Wild Duck Shooting - A Good Day's Sport
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Wild Duck Shooting - A Good Day's Sport

By [CURRIER & IVES pub.] TAIT, A. F. (1819-1905)

New York: N. Currier, 1854. Hand-colored lithgraph. Some titles in facsimile due to abrasion. Provenance: Donaldson, Lufkin &Jenrette Americana Collection Classic Currier & Ives hunting print by Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait This large folio hunting print by Arthur Tait is on the Currier & Ives New Best Fifty list, # 46. It is a quintessential duck hunting scene. The man standing in the boat is thought to be Nathaniel Currier, who enjoyed hunting, and the seated man, Arthur Tait. It is in any event a marvellous scene depicting the happiness of sportsmen with their retrievers and shotguns pulled up on the shore of a lake at the end of a day of sport. Gale 7320.

$4750.00

Partridge Shooting
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Partridge Shooting

By [CURRIER & IVES pub.] PALMER, F. F. (1812-1876)

New York: Currier & Ives, 1865. Hand-colored lithograph. Large folio. Provenance: Donaldson, Lufkin &Jenrette Americana Collection Classic Currier & Ives hunting print by Fanny Palmer Fanny Palmer (1812-1876) was the first woman in the United States to work as a professional artist, and to make a living with her art. She produced more Currier and Ives' prints than any other artist, and she was the only female in a business dominated by men. Painting was not considered a suitable occupation for a woman, nor, of course, was lithography. Hers was a story common for Victorian wives, who were expected to keep house and be supported by their husbands. She however pursued a career in England and eventually in America, virtually supporting her family as her husband sank deeper into alcoholism and then supporting it in fact when he fell to his death on a hotel stairway in 1857. Her shooting prints show a fine understanding of the appeal the sport had for men: with their dogs, shotguns and hunting attire, walking through untamed country with a friend on autumn afternoons. Mrs. Palmer's husband enjoyed shooting fowl, as did Nathaniel Currier, and Palmer's dogs may have modelled for this image. Gale 5114, Peters 108.

$4500.00

Youth Rescued from a Shark, This Representation is founded on the following Fact: a Youth bathing in the Harbour of Havannah, was twice seized by a Shark from which , (though with the Loss of the Flesh & Foot, torn from the Right Leg), He disentangled himself & was, by the assistance of a Boat's Crew, sav'd from the Jaws of the voracious Animal: for in the Moment it was attempting to seize its Prey (a third Time) a Sailor with a Boat Hook drove it from its pursuit. / Jeune Homme sauvé de l'attaque d'un Requien...[text repeated in French]
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Youth Rescued from a Shark, This Representation is founded on the following Fact: a Youth bathing in the Harbour of Havannah, was twice seized by a Shark from which , (though with the Loss of the Flesh & Foot, torn from the Right Leg), He disentangled himself & was, by the assistance of a Boat's Crew, sav'd from the Jaws of the voracious Animal: for in the Moment it was attempting to seize its Prey (a third Time) a Sailor with a Boat Hook drove it from its pursuit. / Jeune Homme sauvé de l'attaque d'un Requien...[text repeated in French]

By GREEN, Valentine after John Singleton COPLEY

London: Published by V. Green, Newman Street, Oxford Street, and at No. 52, Strand, 1779. Mezzotint. Printed on heavy laid paper. Several expertly repaired tears in top and bottom margins. Image size: 18 1/4 x 23 3/4 inches. Considered one of the most important eighteenth century mezzotints, "Youth Rescued from a Shark" made the fortunes of both Valentine Green and the expatriate American painter John Singleton Copley Brook Watson, a London merchant, commissioned his friend John Singleton Copley to paint a scene from his youth depicting the fateful night when he was attacked by a shark while swimming in Havana Harbor. Although Watson survived the attack, after being rescued by his fellow shipmen, he lost his leg during the encounter. "Watson and the Shark" launched Copley's career in London, making him one of the most celebrated American painters on the Continent. The painting became a metaphor for salvation and the triumph over adversity and was widely heralded as the most important painting of the age. Based on Copley's masterpiece, Green's large mezzotint became one of the most sought after prints on the market. It sold so well in fact, that Green was forced to scrape a second and a third plate of the image to satisfy public demand. The wide appeal of Green's mezzotint heightened Copley's fame and catapulted both engraver and painter to the top of the English art world. In the history of engraving, no printmaker has achieved such depth and precision as Valentine Green. He is considered the father of the English mezzotint because through his example we can see the pinnacle of mezzotint engraving. During his career, Green produced some of the most beautiful and sought after 18th century mezzotints. At an early age Green apprenticed himself to Robert Hancock of Worcester, where he produced his first published work 'A Survey of the City of Worcester'. In 1765 Green moved to London where his excellent scraping soon earned him a much-celebrated reputation. He soon became mezzotint engraver to George III, and a member of the Royal Academy. Throughout his industrious career, Green scratched over 400 plates working from works by Copley, Reynolds and West. Whitman, Valentine Green 152; Chaloner Smith, British Mezzotinto Portraits 209; Clayton, The English Print , p. 243, no. 38.

$9500.00

La Maison de monsignieur Le maquis apellée Bolsouer en la Province de Darby. Monsignieur le marquis a Cheval Le Capitainne a pie
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La Maison de monsignieur Le maquis apellée Bolsouer en la Province de Darby. Monsignieur le marquis a Cheval Le Capitainne a pie

By NEWCASTLE, William Cavendish, Duke of (1592-1676) and Gaspard de SAUNIER

London: J. Brindley, 1743. Copper engraving after Abraham van Diepenbeeck. In excellent condition with the exception of a few expertly mended tears on the top edge of sheet. A fine plate from 'A General System of Horsemanship in All Its Branches', Cavendish's extraordinary didactic work on equestrian dressage. An affluent politician, soldier, and devoted Royalist, William Cavendish fought for Charles I during the English Civil War. He established a riding school in Antwerp with several Barbary horses obtained in Paris, and in 1657, published his revolutionary and influential work on equestrian training techniques, 'La Methode et Invention nouvelle de Dresser les Chevaux'. An English edition was published in 1743 as 'A General System Of Horsemanship In All Its Branches', with beautiful illustrations of Cavendish skillfully training and riding his horses at his Antwerp ménage and his various English estates like Bolsover Castle and Welbeck Abbey. Cf. Brunet I.1700; cf. Mellon Books on the Horse and Horsemanship p. 49; cf. Mennessier de la Lance II, p. 250; cf. Nissen ZBI 849.

$325.00

La rénes de la Bride Separées dans les deux mains, pour saire sentir la Bride, tant a main Droite qu à Gauche
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La rénes de la Bride Separées dans les deux mains, pour saire sentir la Bride, tant a main Droite qu à Gauche

By NEWCASTLE, William Cavendish, Duke of (1592-1676) and Gaspard de SAUNIER

London: J. Brindley, 1743. Copper engraving after Abraham van Diepenbeeck. In excellent condition with the exception of a small skillfully mended tear on bottom edge of sheet. A fine plate from 'A General System of Horsemanship in All Its Branches', Cavendish's extraordinary didactic work on equestrian dressage. An affluent politician, soldier, and devoted Royalist, William Cavendish fought for Charles I during the English Civil War. He established a riding school in Antwerp with several Barbary horses obtained in Paris, and in 1657, published his revolutionary and influential work on equestrian training techniques, 'La Methode et Invention nouvelle de Dresser les Chevaux'. An English edition was published in 1743 as 'A General System Of Horsemanship In All Its Branches', with beautiful illustrations of Cavendish skillfully training and riding his horses at his Antwerp ménage and his various English estates like Bolsover Castle and Welbeck Abbey. Cf. Brunet I.1700; cf. Mellon Books on the Horse and Horsemanship p. 49; cf. Mennessier de la Lance II, p. 250; cf. Nissen ZBI 849.

$325.00

Passades au Petit Galop, la Demÿ-volte à Main Gauche. Passades à toute Bride, la demy-volte à Main Gauche
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Passades au Petit Galop, la Demÿ-volte à Main Gauche. Passades à toute Bride, la demy-volte à Main Gauche

By NEWCASTLE, William Cavendish, Duke of (1592-1676) and Gaspard de SAUNIER

London: J. Brindley, 1743. Copper engraving after Abraham van Diepenbeeck. In excellent condition. A fine plate from 'A General System of Horsemanship in All Its Branches', Cavendish's extraordinary didactic work on equestrian dressage. An affluent politician, soldier, and devoted Royalist, William Cavendish fought for Charles I during the English Civil War. He established a riding school in Antwerp with several Barbary horses obtained in Paris, and in 1657, published his revolutionary and influential work on equestrian training techniques, 'La Methode et Invention nouvelle de Dresser les Chevaux'. An English edition was published in 1743 as 'A General System Of Horsemanship In All Its Branches', with beautiful illustrations of Cavendish skillfully training and riding his horses at his Antwerp ménage and his various English estates like Bolsover Castle and Welbeck Abbey. Cf. Brunet I.1700; cf. Mellon Books on the Horse and Horsemanship p. 49; cf. Mennessier de la Lance II, p. 250; cf. Nissen ZBI 849.

$325.00

His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales
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His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales

By BARTOLOZZI, Francesco after J. RUSSELL

London: Published by John Jeffryes, Ludgate Hill, 1795. Stipple engraving. Faint collectors stamp on verso of sheet. In pristine condition. This portrait of George IV, is one of the most celebrated eighteenth century archery prints. The latter half of the eighteenth century witnessed the emergence of numerous clubs and societies, which the English gentry were keen to join. The Society of Royal Kentish Bowmen, under the patronage of the Prince of Wales, later King George IV, is a perfect example of this burgeoning 18th century trend for exclusive sporting clubs. The Prince of Wales insisted that every member of the Society should wear a 'dandyish' uniform comprising of a grass green coat with a white waistcoat and breeches. In Russell's charming portrait, the Prince Regent is shown in the Bowman's uniform, in the background are the other members of the society participating in a shooting match. Russell's portrait not only identifies the Prince as an avid archer, but cleverly connects his person with the exclusive archery society. At the time of production this work was extremely popular both for its flattering depiction of the Regent, and for the publicity garnered by the Bowmen. This is a lovely impression from the collection of F. W. Hope (1797-1862). Vesme & Calabi, Francesco Bartolozzi 820, iv/iv; O'Donoghue, Catalogue of Engraved British Portraits... in the British Museum 50.

$850.00

Yellow Perch
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Yellow Perch

By KILBOURNE, S.A. (1836-1881)

New York: Scribners, 1879. Colour printed lithograph on original mount. Among the finest 19th century images of American sporting fish Samuel A. Kilbourne, a native of Bridgetown, Maine, was an accomplished painter of natural history subjects when he decided, in 1858, to specialize in painting fish. He was extremely successful and, as the plates in this work testify, very proficient in his work. The Game Fishes... was his greatest accomplishment, and has been described as having 'the most beautiful fish plates published in this country' (Bennett). A reviewer writing in The Century magazine in 1882 wrote of Kilbourne's depictions: "Mr. Kilbourne has succeeded in a difficult task. He has succeeded in uniting in his delineation the accuracy in details of form and coloring required by the naturalist, with that freedom of style, delicacy of handling, and naturalness of surroundings demanded by the artist." The images are portraits in natural habitats mounted on card and suitable for framing, and they both accurate and aesthetically appealing. Bennett, p.65; McGrath, p.196; Litchfield 52; Brun G94; Nissen ZBI 1630; Howell 53-325; BMNH, p.973; Gee, p.91; Westwood & Satchell, Bibliotheca Piscatoria , p.107.

$850.00

Edwardian Golf
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Edwardian Golf

By CERI, Marco

Italy, 1990. Oil on copper. Marco Ceri lives in Northern Italy where he paints in oil on copper pictures in a very specific genre all his own. They are paintings of English people engaged at polo, golf or tennis during the Edwardian era. A great deal of research provides a high degree of accuracy to every aspect of these scenes including, of course, the attire and sports equipment, but even the postures and demeanors of the participants. The accuracy of the elements however does not intrude on the overall delight expressed in these tableaux. The artist keeps a low profile, enjoying his virtual anonymity. He considers himself a craftsman, who by limiting his sphere of activity, brings that craft closer and closer to perfection.

$1400.00

A Famous Newfoundland Dog
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A Famous Newfoundland Dog

By HODGES, Charles Howard (1764-1837) after H. B. Chalon

Amsterdam: F. Buffa & Sons, 1810. Mezzotint printed in colors. Several expertly repaired tears in the left margin, repaired split at bottom platemark. Charles Hodges was born in London and was a pupil of John Raphael Smith. He worked from 1788 as a print dealer between the London and Amsterdam markets, settling permanently in Amsterdam in 1794. Henry Chalon, coincidentally, was born in London to Dutch parents - his father, Jan Chalon, was an etcher. In 1793, Chalon was given the honorary title of Animal Painter to the Dutchess of York. He specialized in horses and dogs, and exhibited regularly at the Royal Academy from 1792 until shortly before his death. Judy Egerton, The Paul Mellon Collection: British Sporting & Animal Paintings, 1655-1867 , London, 1978, page 223; Henry Siltzer, The Story of British Sporting Prints , London, 1925, pages 85-93.

$5500.00

Almont
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Almont

By STULL, After Henry (1851-1913)

Boston: Published by S. F. Cassino, 1881. Colour-printed lithograph mounted on card as issued. Printed by Armstrong and Company after Stull. Very good condition. A charming image from "American Racing Horses," a collection of prints depicting some of the most eminent race horses in America during the late 19th century. Primarily renowned for his distinctive images of racehorses, Henry Stull was one of the most prominent equestrian artists in late 19th- and early 20th-century America. As a youth, he migrated from his native Canada to the United States, where he settled in New Rochelle, New York. In addition to his paintings of horses and animals, many of which were issued as lithographs, Stull produced numerous illustrations for Leslie's Weekly Magazine . His works can be found in many important collections such as the New York Jockey Club, the National Museum of Racing Hall Fame, and the Kentucky Derby Museum. Cf. Benezit, Dictionnaire des Peintres, Sculpteurs, Dessinateurs, et Graveurs , vol. 13, p. 332.

$350.00

Study Fen Shooting
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Study Fen Shooting

By HIMELY, Sigismond (engraver) - After Newton FIELDING (1797-1856)

Paris: Tessari et Cie., 1822. Original copper printing plate, engraved and aquatinted by Himely, after Fielding, impressed plate manufacturer's name "Juery / R. St.Jacques No. 43 / à Paris" on verso of plate. Plate size: 11 5/16 x 15 3/8 inches; image: 8 3/8 x 11 3/4 inches. WIth impression of print on paper. A very rare original printing plate: a hunting scene from the early 19th century. An evocative view of a duck-hunt on the Lincolnshire fens: two hunters shoot at a small flock of duck that have foresaken the relative safety of the reeds. Three gun dogs prepare to swim after any birds that are brought down. Pollarded willows line the walkway that leads off into the mist of the autumn morning. The plate is signed in the plate "Himely d'apres Fielding, 22," titled (in English and French) "Étude Chasse aux Marais" and "Study Fen Shooting" and includes the imprint "Fielding del. Himely sculp.," "No. 3," "De l'Imprimerie de Finot," "A Paris chez Tessari et Cie. rue du Cloûre Notre Dame No. 4," "Déposé." This appears to one of the original printing plates from an untitled series of between 20 and 25 plates published in about 1840. All the plates in this series of hunting and fishing views are by Himely after Fielding. Himely was an engraver of the highest order, best known for plates he did for Karl Bodmer and Antoine Garneray. "The youngest of the Fielding brothers, Newton divided his life between London and Paris, marrying a French woman in 1833. He arrived in Paris in late 1821 or early 1822 and worked with his brother Thales for the publisher J. F. d'Ostervald. He acquired a considerable reputation for small-scale, brightly coloured and delicately worked watercolours of animals and birds in landscape. While this genre was very much his own invention, it owed much to the sporting tradition of the Alken family (much admired in France), to natural history in the manner of Thomas Bewick and to the literary tradition of Aesop and La Fontaine...His work became well known through his lithographed albums...He enjoyed the friendship of Delacroix and the dealer Charles Schroth and in 1827 was employed as drawing-master to the family of King Louis-Philippe". Cf. Siltzer p.331; cf. Schwerdt I, p.173.

$485.00

Study Partridge Shooting
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Study Partridge Shooting

By HIMELY, Sigismond (engraver) - After Newton FIELDING (1797-1856)

Paris: Tessari et Cie., 1834. Original copper printing plate, engraved and aquatinted by Himely, after Fielding, impressed plate manufacturer's name "Juery / R. St.Jacques No. 43 / à Paris" on verso of plate. Plate size: 11 1/4 x 15 5/8 inches; image: 8 1/4 x 11 7/8 inches. With sepia impression of print on paper. A very rare original printing plate: a hunting scene from the early 19th century. A well-executed and lively view: the hunter shoots at a small covey of partridge put up by one of his two gun dogs. The second dog in the foreground tries to draw his master's attention to the hare that he has discovered at the edge of the cornfield. The plate is signed in the plate "Himely d'apres Fielding, 34," titled (in English and French) "Étude Chasse aux Perdrix" and "Study Partridge Shooting" and includes the imprint "Fielding del. Himely sculp.," "No.10," "De l'Imprimerie de Finot," "A Paris chez Tessari et Cie. rue du Cloûre Notre Dame No. 4," "Déposé." This appears to one of the original printing plates from an untitled series of between 20 and 25 plates published in about 1840. All the plates in this series of hunting and fishing views are by Himely after Fielding. "The youngest of the Fielding brothers, Newton divided his life between London and Paris, marrying a French woman in 1833. He arrived in Paris in late 1821 or early 1822 and worked with his brother Thales for the publisher J. F. d'Ostervald. He acquired a considerable reputation for small-scale, brightly coloured and delicately worked watercolours of animals and birds in landscape. While this genre was very much his own invention, it owed much to the sporting tradition of the Alken family (much admired in France), to natural history in the manner of Thomas Bewick and to the literary tradition of Aesop and La Fontaine...His work became well known through his lithographed albums...He enjoyed the friendship of Delacroix and the dealer Charles Schroth and in 1827 was employed as drawing-master to the family of King Louis-Philippe". Cf. Siltzer p.331; cf. Schwerdt I, p.173.

$485.00

Billingsgate
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Billingsgate

By WHISTLER, J. A. M. (1834-1903)

[London]: Philip Gilbert Hamerton, 1878. Etching and dry point, signature in image: "Whistler. 1859", black ink on laid paper. State ix of IX. One of Whistler's views of London life Billingsgate was a fish market near London Bridge, an old wharf on the Thames. Whistler captures the place and moment with a cool objectivity that includes bustling crowds, fishermen chatting, bobbing boats, the rolling river and clouds in the sky. Kennedy 43.

$1800.00

THE WATERLOO COURSING MEETING
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THE WATERLOO COURSING MEETING

By REYNOLDS, Samuel William after RICHARD ANSDELL (1815 - 1885)

Manchester & London: Thomas Agnew & Messrs. Ackermann, 1842. Engraved on heavy wove paper, sheet: 24 3/4 x 43 1/4 inches with publisher's blind stamp. A grand group portrait of a aristocratic coursing party near Liverpool The event was known as the Waterloo Cup Coursing Meeting, and it took place on the Sefton Estate at Altcar near Liverpool. Depicted among the participants are the Earl and Countess of Sefton, Lord Douglas and Lord Eglinton. A reviewer commented on the fine drawing of the greyhounds, and in fact the whole ensemble of sportsmen and women, horses and dogs are beautifully rendered by Ansdell. Richard Ansdell (1815-1885) was a native of Liverpool. He established himself as one of the best painters of country life and sport and soon had a national reputation. This led him to move to London in 1847 where he enjoyed continued success adding portraiture to his repertoire. Samuel William Reynolds, Jr. (1794-1872) was the son of and successor to S. W. Reynolds. They were both engravers of the highest order.

$1200.00

THE WILTSHIRE GREAT COURSING MEETING HELD AT AMESBURY, 16th - 20th MARCH 1847, with STONEHENGE BEYOND
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THE WILTSHIRE GREAT COURSING MEETING HELD AT AMESBURY, 16th - 20th MARCH 1847, with STONEHENGE BEYOND

By [BARRAUD, William (1810 - 1850), engraved by G. T. Payne

1849. Engraved by G. T. Payne, image: 18 5/8 x 36 3/8 inches; sheet: 25 1/2 x 40 1/4 inches. Backed on board. A grand group portrait of a coursing party with Stonehenge in the background. Proof before titles. A panoramic view of a gathering of British sportsmen in the rolling hills near Stonehenge at a specific event in 1847, which epitomises a significant aspect of British cultural life. The vast outdoors, the handsome and well-cared for dogs and horses and the hardy sportsmen form a unique ensemble, here beautifully depicted by William Barraud, perhaps the best animal artist of the period.

$1200.00

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