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The war-time, daily manuscript diaries of Captain L. H. Bell, the assistant to Admiral Tom Phillips, Vice Chief of the Naval Staff of the Royal Navy

By WORLD WAR II - Capt. L. H. Bell

London, 1941. 6 volumes, large 8vo. Over 1400pp., written recto and verso within ruled diaries, with some entries written on sheets of paper neatly tipped in. Contemporary cloth Extraordinary war-time diaries of an Admiralty insider. Captain Bell served as the assistant to Admiral Tom Phillips, Vice Chief of the Naval Staff, among the most important naval figures of the war. Given his position, Bell was privy to an extraordinary amount of war-time news, intelligence, insight and strategy, which he dutifully records in daily entries. Beginning his diary on 2 September, the day following Germany's invasion of Poland and the day prior to Great Britain's Declaration of War, Bell's diary includes detailed descriptions relating to the Battle of the Atlantic, the evacuation of Dunkirk, the Norwegian Campaign, the Blitz, Nazi movements on the Continent, battles in the Mediterranean and more. A brief selection of quotes: 20 September 1939: "Poles still holding out in Warsaw. Germans mopping up elsewhere & Russians advancing unchecked. More & more opinions being expressed that Russian intervention, though a low down stab in the back for Poland, will not be to Germany's advantage either now or in the future. But no one knows!..." 10 May 1940: "...the Germans have invaded Holland, Belgium, & Luxembourg ... All hell let loose at last & now the war legions to rage in full & utter earnest! ... Chamberlain resigned tonight & Churchill has accepted the job of Prime Minister & will choose his cabinet tomorrow. Not altogether unexpected but I don't trust Churchill's judgment & am very doubtful if the change will be for the good." 27 May 1940: "... God help the BEF! The country has still no conception of the gravity of the situation for in response to French appeals nearly all military news of the past few days has been suppressed. I think it is a mistake - the blow will be the more stunning when it falls." 29 May 1940: "The situation in Flanders & NE France remains grim & grisly ... By 10 pm 56,000 had been recovered but conditions at Dunkerque on the beaches must be indescribable. Practically every boat that floats between Portsmouth & Harwich has been launched to the beach between Dunkerque & Newport ... but the men are proving [?] down into the beach half dead with thirst & famished. There is no water in Dunkerque which has been bombed to bits ..." 10 June 1940: "Roosevelt broadcast at 0015 - the most pro-Ally speech he has yet made & pretty scathing abot the Italian stab in the back. He is certainly out to help us all he can short of sending Americans to fight in Europe..." 15 September 1940: "There was a big air raid on London at about 1130. I watched from our window & one spitfire overhead in a clear patch of the blue sky through the clouds ... a large dark twin engined Dornier came spinning through the clouds. It looked as if it would fall into St. James Park lake but eventuall I think fell in Victoria St. A black cloud of smoke followed its contact with the earth..." 30 December 1940: "... Last night an attack in London took the form of an intense biombing of the city with incendiaries & raging fires were caused all round St. Pauls. Guildhall has been destroyed & 7 Wren churches. Also many offices & old buildings. Little loss of life, but immense damage..." 10 May 1941: "Several uboats attacked a GB convoy & I think sank 5 ships from it but we bagged one certain U110 & probably another. More uboat attacks - convoys are threatened and are getting out a long way West..." Although the final volume ends somewhat abruptly in July 1941, a postscript by Bell dated 1972 explains that the subsequent two volumes (which included his final months at the Admiralty before becoming Captain of the Fleet under Admiral Phillips aboard the HMS Prince of Wales in October 1941), went down with the battleship when it was sunk on 10 December 1941 off the coast of Malaya. Bell was among the few survivors. Thus, the present six volumes represent his complete war-time diaries. Given his position within the Admiralty, Bell's diaries offer extraordinary insight into Great Britain's war-time decision making, offering first-hand knowledge of events as they unfolded.

$3800.00

Narrative of a Second Voyage in search of a North-West Passage, and of a Residence in the Arctic Regions ... [With:] Appendix to the Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-West Passage

By ROSS, Sir John (1777-1856)

London: A.W. Webster, 1835. 2 volumes, large quarto. (12 3/8 x 9 3/4 inches). [Narrative]: 6 maps (1 folding engraved map, 5 lithographic charts and maps), 25 plates (9 hand-coloured, comprised of 6 lithographs, 16 engravings, 3 mezzotints printed in colors). Errata leaf. [Appendix]: 20 plates (4 engravings [1 hand-coloured]; 16 lithographs [11 hand-coloured]). 37pp. list of subscribers, 1p. with errata and additions to subscriber's list. Contemporary half dark blue dyed calf and marbled paper covered boards, flat spines gilt, marbled endpapers and edges Provenance: George P. Shearwood (early signature) First editions of both the Narrative and the separately-issued Appendix to Ross' second Arctic voyage: the large-paper, "royal" issue, with additional hand coloured plates. After his failure to explore Lancaster Sound in his first voyage of 1818, Ross had his 1829-33 second voyage privately financed. Although forced to abandon his steamship Victory in the ice at Felix Harbour (a fact that in the present official account Ross blames largely on the shortcomings of the boilers supplied by Braithwaite), his second expedition achieved a number of milestones. Besides the most thorough exploration of Boothia Peninsula that had been accomplished to date, James Clark Ross (John Ross's nephew) undertook an overland journey across the peninsula and became the first to reach the North Magnetic Pole. Two issues of the Narrative were published, a standard issue containing 3 color plates (i.e. the three colour printed mezzotints) and a "royal" issue, printed on larger paper and with 6 plates additionally hand coloured. Abbey, Travel II, 636; Arctic Bibliography 14866; Chavanne 1450; Sabin 73381; Staton & Tremaine 1808; Lande 1462; TPL 1808.

$3000.00

An Account of an Embassy to the Court of the Teshoo Lama in Tibet, containing a narrative of a journey through Bootan, and part of Tibet ... To which are added, views taken on the spot, by Lieutenant Samuel Davis; and observations botanical, mineralogical, and medical, by Mr. Robert Saunders

By TURNER, Samuel (1749-1802). - Samuel DAVIS (1760-1819, illustrator)

London: printed by W. Bulmer & Co, and sold by G. & W. Nicol, 1800. Imperial quarto. (13 x 9 3/4 inches). Folding engraved map after Samuel Davis, 13 plates (1 aquatint by De la Motte after Stubbs, 1 double-page line engraving of script, 2 engraved views by James Basire after Turner, 1 engraved plan and 8 views by James Basire after Samuel Davis), 1 engraved illustration. Contemporary russia, covers bordered with gilt rules, rebacked, spine with raised bands in six compartments, marbled endpapers and edges Provenance: William Wickham (armorial bookplate) A rare large paper issue of the first edition of the official account of Turner's embassy to Bhutan and Tibet: the first great western account of the region. Acting on Warren Hastings orders, Samuel Turner's expedition was despatched with the aim of improving "trans-Himalayan trade after the Nepal war. Turner's party, including the surgeon and botanist Dr Robert Saunders, set off from Calcutta in January 1783. Davis was to survey the route and record the topographical features of the country ... While in Bhutan during their first audience with the Deb Raja in his palace at Tassisudon, Turner explained to him that 'drawing constituted in England a branch of education; and that we made unequal progress in the art, I could boast but little skill in it, but that my friend Mr. Davis had attained a great degree of perfection' ... After four months in Bhutan waiting for permission to enter Tibet ... the three men were told that only Turner and Saunders could proceed. Turner believed that the authorities were suspicious of Davis's drawing skills ... Leaving Davis behind in Bhutan ... Turner and Saunders departed for Tibet on 8 September 1783. Their travels were to last until March the following year" ( Indian Life & Landscape p.194). The Table of Plates notes that the plates were all engraved from originals in the possession of Warren Hastings - including the image of the Yak. The Yak was one of a pair sent to Hastings, by his kinsman, Turner. Only one survived the journey, and it is this animal that was painted by George Stubbs from life. In the background, Stubbs incorporates Davis's view of Punakha Dzong, the summer palace in Bhutan. Published at 2l. 2s in boards, contemporary advertisements reveal that a smaller number of copies were available in large paper, printed from the same setting of type as the smaller regular issue but in larger size and on better paper stock, at 4l. 4s. Cox I, 346; cf. J. Egerton George Stubbs, painter: catalogue raisonné 284; cf. P. Godrej & P. Rohatgi Scenic Splendours India through the printed image p.34; cf. Indian Life and Landscape p.194; Lennox-Boyd 140; Lowndes IV, p.2724; Lust 208; Yakushi T140.

$6500.00

Costumes of India

By D'OYLY, Sir Charles (1781-1845)

Patna: Behar Lithographic Press, 1830. Oblong 4to. Mounted lithographed title and 12 hand-coloured lithographed plates, on early paper mounts. Later paper wrappers with the original upper titled wrapper trimmed and mounted, unstitched Very rare color plate book of Indian costume from D'Oyly's Behar Lithographic Press. Born in India, Sir Charles D'Oyly was educated in England, before returning to India in the service of the East India Company in 1798. By 1808 he was Collector of Dacca, and in 1818 succeeded to baronet. After serving in a series of posts throughout India, culminating in his appointment as Senior Member of the Board of Customs, Salt and Opium, and of the Marine Board in 1833, he returned to England in 1838, and retired in 1839. He is now best known for his work as an amateur artist, lithographer and publisher in India. D'Oyly became a noted student of George Chinnery, who worked in India between 1802 and 1825. "Chinnery's love of drawing rural India and its people and animals comes through strongly in D'Oyly's work ... [D'Oyly's] work at its best is fresh and charming, and his topographical work has an engaging vividness" (Losty). Lithography came to India in the 1820s and D'Oyly was an early adopter. "In 1824 D'Oyly was the moving spirit in setting up a society of dilettanti called the Behar School of Athens ... for the promotion of the Arts & Sciences, and 'for the circulation of fun and merriment of all descriptions'" (Losty). D'Oyly had ordered a lithographic press from England in 1823, though transporting it to Patna proved difficult, with the first such attempt resulting in the destruction of the press in a squall on the Ganges. A second press was ordered, and was established at Patna named The Behar Amateur Lithographic Press in 1828 (though there is evidence that D'Oyly had access to lithographic stones at an earlier date). "Although [D'Oyly's published works] appear to be regular books in the sense that various copies of them were printed, it is obvious that none of the products of the Behar Lithographic Press was ever published in any commercial sense" (Losty). Abbey concurs, writing: "there seems to be no evidence as to whether D'Oyly sold copies of the Behar Amateur Press Books, or distributed them privately." As a result, all are rare, all vary amongst each other and of those extant, most bear direct association with D'Oyly and his circle. Archer, India Observed , pp. 70-72; Godrej and Rohatgi, Scenic Splendours , pp. 58-60; Jeremiah P. Losty, "Sir Charles D'Oyly's Lithographic Press and his Indian Assistants" in Rohatgi and Godrej, India: A Pageant of Prints , pp. 135-160; Bobins, The Exotic and the Beautiful 235; Not in Abbey.

$12000.00

Travels of a Pioneer of Commerce in pigtail and petticoats
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Travels of a Pioneer of Commerce in pigtail and petticoats

By COOPER, T. T.

London, 1871. 8vo. xiv, [ii], 476pp., half-title, wood-engraved frontispiece, folding lithographed map, illustrations in text. Publisher's blue cloth, upper pictorially stamped in gilt, custom slipcase Provenance: Franklin Brooke-Hitching The very fine Franklin Brooke-Hitching copy. Cooper's account contains descriptions of his daring journey from Hoopeh, to Ichang, Chung Ching, Chen Tu, Eastern Tibet, Bathang, Atenze, etc., and of the tribes of Lan-Tsan-Kiang and his imprisonment at Weisee for crossing Tibet to India against the orders of Chinese authorities. Yakushi (1994) C343a.

$1250.00

Through Central Asia, with a map and appendix on the Diplomacy and Delimitation of the Russo-Afghan Frontier
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Through Central Asia, with a map and appendix on the Diplomacy and Delimitation of the Russo-Afghan Frontier

By LANSDELL, Henry

London: Sampson & Low, 1887. 8vo. xx, 668pp., folding map, 75 illustrations in the text. Publisher's pale blue pictorial cloth, custom slipcase. Provenance: Franklin Brooke-Hitching The very fine Franklin Brooke-Hitching copy of a classic narrative of a journey through Siberia, Turkistan, Samarkand, Bokhara and Khiva. Yakushi (1994) L75a.

$700.00

A Sketch of Assam with some Account of the Hill Tribes
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A Sketch of Assam with some Account of the Hill Tribes

By [BUTLER, John]

London: Smith, Elder and Co, 1847. 8vo. vi, [2], [v]-viii, 220pp. Folding map, 17 plates (16 hand coloured lithographs, 1 woodcut plate), woodcut illustrations. Repaired tear to folding map. Contemporary smooth tan calf, covers pictorially stamped in gilt, spine gilt with raised bands in six compartments, black morocco lettering piece in the second, marbled endpapers and edges Provenance: Colonel Simpson (inscribed by the author); J. Talbot Clifton (armorial bookplate) Author's presentation copy, complete with the map and hand coloured plates. A rare work, particularly in what is believed to be the publisher's deluxe binding. This example with a presentation inscription by Butler to Colonel Simpson, "with the sincere esteem & regards of his old comrade." The plates include beautifully hand coloured landscape views, plates of native costume, as well as some natural history subjects. Abbey, Travel 471; Yakushi (1994) B650; Bobins I:227.

$3000.00

Souvenir du Caire
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Souvenir du Caire

By PREZIOSI, Amadeo (1816-1882)

Paris, 1862. Folio. Engraved title, engraved list of plates and 20 chromolithographed plates, printed by Lemercier after Preziosi. Publisher's purple cloth, covers decorated in gilt and blind, expertly rebacked to style with dark purple cloth First edition of lively lithographs by one of the best known of the artists living and working in the Levant in the mid-19th century The son of Count Gio Francois Preziosi of Malta, Amadeo initially studied the law before turning to painting. After studying under Giuseppe Hyzler, Perziosi subsequently completed his art education at the Paris Academy of Fine Arts. He moved to Constantinople in 1842, fell in love with the city, and was able to make a living painting the places and people that surrounded him. It is noted in the Atabey catalogue that "Preziosi was well-known .... His studio is mentioned in Murray's guidebooks for 1854 and 1871. By that time he had become an institution in the city... He produced views of the city, and genre and costume drawings" ( The Ottoman World p.535). His paintings sold well to both the affluent local and the Grand Tourist, and his reputation was such that also served as a court painter to Sultan Abdul Hamid II. Preziosi visited Cairo in 1862 and the colourful views here depict street scenes and local inhabitants in the city and along the Nile. Colas 2425; Blackmer 1352; Hilmy II, 135.

$18500.00

Essai Politique sur la Royaume de la Nouvelle-Espagne ... [With:] Atlas Géographique et Physique du Royaume de la Nouvelle-Espagne
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Essai Politique sur la Royaume de la Nouvelle-Espagne ... [With:] Atlas Géographique et Physique du Royaume de la Nouvelle-Espagne

By HUMBOLDT, Alexander von (1769-1859)

Paris: J.H. Stône for [text] F. Schoell or [atlas] G. Dufour & Cie, 1812. 3 volumes (text: 2 vols., large quarto [13 x 10 inches]; atlas: large folio [21 3/4 x 16 1/2 inches]). Text: 3ll. dedication to King Charles IV of Spain in vol.I, 2pp. of errata in vol.I, 1p. of errata in vol.II. Atlas: letterpress half-title, title page and 4pp. description of the 'Cartes Géographiques et Physiques contenus dans l'Atlas Mexicain'. 19 engraved sheets with maps, cross-sections or plates (9 sheets double-page), consisting of one engraved map on 2 double-page sheets, 1 double-page sheet with three maps on it, 1 single-page with eight maps on it, 1 single page with one map and four graphs on it, 4 single-page maps, 3 double-page maps, 4 double-page geographical cross-section profiles [one printed in brown], 2 single-page views printed in brown, 1 single-page plate of diagrams. Text bound in contemporary red morocco, flat spines gilt, marbled endpapers, gilt edges. Atlas expertly bound to style in half red morocco and marbled paper covered boards, flat spines uniform to the text, marbled endpapers. A fine set of Humboldt's work on New Spain: a founding work in the fields of political economy and economic geography and considered by Howes to be "of superlative California importance." The present set with the rare large paper text, including the very rare dedication to the Spanish King. First French edition, second issue of Humboldt's essay on New Spain. Yale has a copy of the true first edition of the text with a title page dated 1808 and the dedication to Charles IV of Spain. The present copy, with a reprinted title page dated 1811, is otherwise identical to the Yale copy and is actually comrpised from the text printed in 1808, including the suppressed dedication. Humboldt dedicated the work to Charles IV, who had allowed him to travel freely through the Spanish colonies. Almost concurrently with the book's publication, Napoleon invaded Spain and deposed Charles, installing his own brother, Joseph Bonaparte, on the Spanish throne. Already under suspicion as a Prussian spy (his brother was the Prussian Secretary of State) and only allowed to remain in Paris through the intercession of his scientific friends, Humboldt's dedication to the abdicated monarch might have sealed his fate. The dedication leaves were therefore usually removed from this edition when it was published in 1811. The accompanying Atlas... is regarded as one of the seminal cartographic works of Western Americana. The most important map is Humboldt's great "Carte Generale du Royaume de la Nouvelle Espagne," originally executed by Humboldt during his stay in Mexico in 1803-4, and covering two large folio double sheets. It extends from the "comte de Natchitoches" in the Texas country on the east to the head of the Gulf of California in the west, and begins just south of El Paso in the north, extending south to the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. Carl Wheat calls it a 'truly magnificent cartographic achievement,' and notes that, 'for the area of the American West which it included it was undoubtedly the most important and accurate map that had yet appeared' and concludes that, before the explorations of Lewis and Clark, Humboldt's maps were in the first rank of western cartography. Schwartz and Ehrenberg state that it remained 'the standard map of the Great Basin region until Fremont's explorations 35 years later.' Thomas Streeter discusses the map at great length, concluding that "it is without question the best representation of Texas that had thus far appeared." It is certainly one of the foundation maps for Texas and the Southwest. Besides the large map, there is a double-sheet map of the whole North American continent south of 42° latitude which reiterates Humboldt's western cartography on a larger scale, and three important maps for the Santa Fe trade illustrating the route from Mexico to Durango, Durango to Chihuahua, and Chihuahua to Santa Fe. Other maps illustrate the Valley of Mexico, and ports and routes in Mexico and across the Isthmus. The Atlas... concludes with a series of fine geological/physical profiles (one printed in brown), and two excellent views of volcanoes (also in brown). Humboldt was described by Dibdin as the most illustrious traveller of his day. With the support of the Spanish Prime Minister, Humboldt managed to gain permission to enter the Spanish colonies of Central and South America, which were effectively closed at the time. He set off with the French botanist Bonpland from Marseilles in 1799, and spent five years travelling through Central and South America, during which time he covered some 6000 miles. He then returned to Europe and spent the next twenty-three years recording his experiences, observations and collections in a series of spectacular works. The Essai Politique ... is a complete work in itself, but also forms the third part of Humboldt and Bonpland's Voyage... In the present work Humboldt describes northern New Spain, particularly Mexico and the northern provinces, including California and the American Southwest: Becker calls it "detailed and thorough, containing much data that had never before appeared in print." "Nothing seems too vast, too varied, too wonderful, or too minute, for the keen eye, penetrating intellect, and unwearied exertions of this extraordinary man. A botanist, zoologist, statistician and philosopher, the genius of this great writer seems to have been peculiarly fitted for surveying the varieties and immensity of the physical world; and he accordingly takes the foremost rank of all the travellers, dead or living" (Dibdin). Cf. Cowan p.296; cf. Graff 2009; cf. Hill (2004) 843; Howes H786; cf. Mapping the West pp.100-101; Palau 116974; Phillips Atlases I:2682; Plains & Rockies IV:7a:3 & 7a:3a:1; cf. Printing and the Mind of Man 320; cf. Reese & Miles Creating America 23; Sabin 33713; Schwartz & Ehrenberg, p.127, plate 139; cf. Streeter Sale 195; Wagner-Camp 7a:2; Wheat Transmississippi 272-275, 302-305 & pp.132-138.

$57500.00

Voyage de la Corvette l'Astrolabe exécuté par ordre du Roi, pendant les années 1826-1827-1828-1829

By DUMONT D'URVILLE, Jules Sébastien César, le Comte, (1790-1842)

Paris: J. Tastu, 1835. Together, 17 volumes, as described below. Contemporary half diced calf and cloth covered boards (text), contemporary cloth expertly rebacked and retipped uniform to the text (Historique, Botanique and Zoologique atlases), contemporary marbled paper covered boards rebacked and retipped uniform to the text (the Hydrographique text and atlas), spines with raised bands, ruled in gilt on either side of each band, lettered in gilt in the second and third compartments, contemporary brown or marbled paper endpapers Provenance: Marinens Bibliotek (gilt stamps on upper covers and other markings to endpapers or titles); deaccessioned by the Garnisions Biblioteket in 2017 A complete set of the official account of the voyage of the Astrolabe: one of the most important French voyages to the South Pacific and a cornerstone work on the early exploration of Australia and New Zealand. This important voyage, one of the great series undertaken by the French government for both colonizing and scientific reasons was led by Jules Dumont d'Urville, it was "his first expedition, which was to gain additional information about the principal groups of islands in the Pacific and to augment the mass of scientific data acquired by Louis Duperrey. The Astrolabe sailed south, around the Cape of Good Hope, and arrived at Port Jackson. Proceeding to New Zealand, its coast, especially the southern part of Cook Strait, was surveyed with great care. Tonga and parts of the Fiji Archipelago were explored, then New Britain, New Guinea, Amboina, Tasmania, Vanikoro, Guam, and Java. The return home was by way of Mauritius and the Cape of Good Hope. Huge amounts of scientific materials were collected and published" (Hill). Noted as one of the most detailed and most lavishly illustrated of the French grande voyage publications, the work includes an impressive amount of data relating to the region's natural history, topography, and anthropology. Besides the wonderful portraits of Maori, the plates include important topographical views of Sydney, Hobart, Melbourne, Western Australia, Victoria, New Zealand, New Guinea, Tonga, Fiji and more. Together, the work contains over five hundred plates, with more than half in color. Comprised as follows: HISTORIQUE Text: Ten parts in five volumes, 8vo. With nine engraved plates and numerous woodcut illustrations. Paris:1830-33. Atlas: One volume, folio. Engraved portrait frontispiece, illustrated title, 8 maps and 239 lithographed plates (89 hand coloured). Paris:1833. BOTANIQUE Text: Two volumes in one, 8vo. Paris: 1832-34 Atlas: Three parts in one volume, folio. With illustrated title and 92 plates as follows: Flore (41 plates); Sertum (39 plates); Lepidoptera (12 plates). Paris: 1834 ZOOLOGIQUE Text: Six parts in four volumes, 8vo. With 8 lithographed plates. Paris 1830-35. Atlas: One volume, folio. With illustrated title and 192 plates as follows: Mammals (28 plates [23 coloured]); Birds (31 coloured plates); Fish (12 coloured plates); Molluscs (95 coloured plates); Zoophytes (26 coloured plates). ENTOMOLOGIE Text: Two parts in one volume, 8vo. Paris: 1832-35. PHILOLOGIE Text: Two parts in one volume, 8vo. Paris: 1833-34 HYDROGRAPHIQUE Text (titled Observations Nautiques, Meteorologiques, Hydrographiques et de Physique ): Four parts in one volume, 4to. With two folding tables. Paris:1833-34. Atlas: One volume, large folio. With illustrated title and 45 engraved maps, charts and coastal profiles (19 double-page, and with the three profiles hand colored), plus a double-page engraved table. Paris:1833. Anker 410; BM (NH) II, p.603; Borba de Moraes p.273; Brunet II, 881; Ellis. Early Prints of New Zealand (1978) pp.43; Ferguson 1341; F ine Bird Books (1990) pp. 92; Hill 504; Nissen BBI 555; Nissen IVB 752; Nissen ZBI 1199; Ronsil 940; Whittell p. 216 ; Wood p.615; Zimmer p. 184; Sabin 21210.

$120000.00

Archive of 21 field journals and other related material kept by the anthropologist and Margaret Mead desciple, recording his observations during a five-month stay in a Murik village near the Sepik River, Papua New Guinea
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Archive of 21 field journals and other related material kept by the anthropologist and Margaret Mead desciple, recording his observations during a five-month stay in a Murik village near the Sepik River, Papua New Guinea

By LEDOUX, Louis Pierre (1912-2001)

Papua New Guinea, 1936. Over 1400pp. in manuscript, written in pen and pencil in 21 small quarto or octavo journals. With a 29-page autograph manuscript by Ledoux concerning the trade of the Murik, a 50+ page autograph letter signed by Ledoux written in New Guinea on his experiences and giving advice to an incoming anthropologist, a group of approximately ten personal letters written to Ledoux, as well as some printed and other ephemera. All housed in a contemporary 11 1/2 x 20 x 12 1/2 inch wooden box, made by Brooks Brothers, with metal bound edges and with Ledoux's name stencilled on the top. An incredible archive of an American anthropologist in Papua New Guinea, including his field journals, in the year just following Margaret Mead's groundbreaking work on gender consciousness among natives of the same region. During her studies for her groundbreaking work Sex Temperament in Three Primitive Societies , anthropologist Margaret Mead recognized the opportunity and need to research the trade dominant Murik tribes of the Sepik River region of Papua New Guinea. To this task, she recommended a young anthropologist named Pierre Ledoux, who had just completed his studies at Harvard and was looking for field research opportunities. Ledoux was sponsored on his expedition by the American Museum of Natural History, though seems to have financed the journey himself. Ledoux arrived in Australia in December 1935. Included in this archive is a 24 December 1935 autograph letter signed written to Ledoux from Australian anthropologist Ernest Chinnery, advising him on what village in Papua New Guinea to study: "Margaret [Mead] will probably have advised you by this personally. I think you should leave the choice to her. She knows what she is doing. There are several good places but she knows these all and any suggestion from me at this stage would probably only confuse you." He arrives at the village Kaup, Papua New Guinea on February 13. His journals comprise over 700 pages in 6 volumes with daily entries beginning on that day, through the beginning of July. His diaries record everything in great detail but focus especially on the people encountered and their customs, habits, trade, ceremonies, health and food, with careful attention paid to gender. In addition, present are 15 additional diaries with approx. 700pp. of subject specific field notes, in volumes comprised as follows:legends/sing sings (dos-a-dos); medicine/magic (dos-a-dos); puberty ceremonies/searification and tatooing (dos-a-dos); ceremonial house building/outrigger canoes (dos-a-dos); language; reading notes; sex; collection (i.e. artifacts collected); Karau; Murik; Mendam #1 and #2; Sandap; questions to be asked; Das Kirchebuch (listing names of tribe members with birth, marriage and death dates). Included in the archive is a more than 50pp. autograph letter signed by Ledoux, written to another anthropologist, nicknamed "Michigan" -- i.e. Bernard Mishkin. Written from Kaup on 5 June at the request of Mead, Ledoux tells Mishkin, whom he has never met, everything he has learned about living in the village; i.e. what supplies, food, medicine, etc. should be brought, how to hire and pay servants, how to interact with natives, etc. His advice ranges from what brands of specific ointments work best, to how to store film, to how to best obtain data from subject: "Be sure to divorce yourself from other whites as much as possible, though never in loss of dignity. The natives are proud to have you there and quick to resent any loss of dignity on your part ... If they have this feeling that you belong to no group of whites they know, yet that you are white, you will not have to help them settle squabbles by giving them notes to the District Officer ... You are there to study how the natives do things by themselves, not how the whites govern them." Also included is a 27-page contemporary typed transcript of the letter and a covering letter by Ledoux. The archive also includes a 29-page original manuscript by Ledoux on the trade of the tribes of the Murik language group of the Sepik River region; approximately 10 personal letters from friends in the U.S. sent to Ledoux during his time in Papua New Guinea; many shipping-related receipts for the sending of artifacts; and a few printed maps and other ephemera, including two offprints of articles by Mead.

$18500.00

Views in India
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Views in India

By BELLEW, Captain

London: Published for the Author, 1833. Quarto. Lithographed title, 30 lithographed plates after Bellew by Walton, Purser and others, printed by Hullmandel, 78pp. text plus two errata leaves in the rear. Contemporary brown cloth boards, rebacked and retipped with calf, flat spine gilt, green morocco lettering piece in the second compartment Very rare privately printed book of lithographed views of northern and central India. This very rare work was published in six parts, comprised of five plates in each part. Includes views in Oorcha, Bundelkhand, Uttarakhand, Almora, Kamaon, Arracan, Ramree, Ambeer, Rajpootaneh, Harrowty, Gautumpore, Bundelcund, Futtypore, Dooab, and on the Ganges. The work is attributed to Henry Walter Bellew (1803-1842) or his brother Francis John Bellew (1799-1868), both of whom served as officers in the Bengal army. The British Library example includes a list of 87 subscribers not present here. OCLC records only seven copies, including the British Library example as well as incomplete copies, with no complete copy in North America. Only one other complete copy appears in the auction records for the last quarter century. Not in Abbey.

$4000.00

Hunting with the Eskimos: the unique record of a sportsman's year among the northernmost tribe -- the big game hunt, the native life, and the battle for existence through the long Arctic night
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Hunting with the Eskimos: the unique record of a sportsman's year among the northernmost tribe -- the big game hunt, the native life, and the battle for existence through the long Arctic night

By WHITNEY, Harry (1873-1936)

New York: De Vinne Press for the Century Co, 1910. Large 8vo. 68 photographic plates. Signed by the author on the title. Later half green crushed morocco and period orange cloth covered boards, spine with raised bands in six compartments, endpapers renewed. One of 150 numbered large paper copies signed by Whitney: an important account of life in northern Greenland from an eyewitness to Peary's race to the pole. Harry Whitney (1873-1936) was a wealthy American sportsman, a descendant of the Eli Whitney family of New Haven, Connecticut (not to be confused with his contemporary, sportsman and donor of Yale's gymnasium Harry Payne Whitney). Whitney first travelled to the far northern Arctic for sport in 1908-09, on the ship carrying Robert Peary's expedition to the North Pole in the spring of 1908. While Peary and his rival Frederick Cook assaulted the Pole, Whitney hunted musk ox, polar bears, walrus, and other arctic game, and wintered over with the Inuit. In the spring of 1909 he encountered Frederick Cook, who claimed to have reached the Pole, and left some luggage in Whitney's care as he raced south to report his triumph. When Peary arrived later in the summer, he offered Whitney a ride home, but refused to bring Cook's luggage. Whitney thus became embroiled in the controversy over who achieved the Pole first, since Cook claimed his proofs were in the baggage. This deluxe edition, limited to 150 numbered copies on special paper, this being copy number 5, is rare.

$1500.00

Exploration of Mount Kina Balu, North Borneo
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Exploration of Mount Kina Balu, North Borneo

By WHITEHEAD, John (1860-1899)

London: Gurney and Jackson, 1893. Folio. 32 lithographed plates [14 coloured, 17 tinted]. Publisher's green cloth, upper cover pictorially stamped in black blue and gold. First edition recording the author's ornithological expedition to Borneo, Java, Palawan, the Balabac islands and his ascent of Mt. Kina Balu. The primary object of the expedition was ornithological research, though the plates also include natives, views, insects, mammals, etc. Fine Bird Books 155; Nissen ZBI 4394;Wood p.626; Zimmer p.673.

$3500.00

A Voyage towards the South Pole, and Round the World. Performed in His Majesty's Ships the Resolution and Adventure, In the years 1772, 1773, 1774, and 1775. In which is included Captain Furneaux's Narrative of his Proceedings in the Adventure during the Separation of the Ships ...Fourth Edition

By COOK, Capt. James (1728-1779)

London: W. Strahan and T. Cadell, 1777. 2 volumes, 4to. (11 1/8 x 8 3/4 inches). Engraved portrait of Cook by J. Basire after Wm. Hodges, 63 engraved plates, maps and charts, 1 folding letterpress table. Contemporary mottled calf, rebacked. Fourth edition of Cook's second voyage describing his attempt to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible in search for a southern continent. "Cook earned his place in history by opening up the Pacific to western civilization and by the foundation of British Australia. The world was given for the first time an essentially complete knowledge of the Pacific Ocean and Australia, and Cook proved once and for all that there was no great southern continent, as had always been believed. He also suggested the existence of antarctic land in the southern ice ring, a fact which was not proved until the explorations of the nineteenth century" (Printing and the Mind of Man p.135). "The success of Cook's first voyage led the Admiralty to send him on a second expedition, described in the present work, which was to circumnavigate the globe as far south as possible in search of any southern continents ... the men of this expedition became the first to cross the Antarctic Circle. Further visits were made to New Zealand, and on two great sweeps Cook made an astonishing series of discoveries and rediscoveries including Easter Island, the Marquesas, Tahiti and the Society Islands, Niue, the Tonga Islands, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, Norfolk Island, and a number of smaller islands. Rounding Cape Horn, on the last part of the voyage, Cook discovered and charted South Georgia, after which he called at Cape Town, St. Helena and Ascension, and the Azores ... This voyage produced a vast amount of information concerning the Pacific peoples and islands, proved the value of the chronometer as an aid to finding longitude, and improved techniques for preventing scurvy" (Hill p.123) "This, the official account of the second voyage, was written by Cook himself ... In a letter, dated June 22nd, 1776, to his friend Commodore William Wilson, Cook writes: - "The Journal of my late Voyage will be published in the course of the next winter, and I am to have the sole advantage of the sale. It will want those flourishes which Dr. Hawkesworth gave the other, but it will be illustrated and ornamented with about sixty copper plates, which, I am of the opinion, will exceed every thing that has been done in a work of this kind; ... As to the Journal, it must speak for itself. I can only say that it is my own narrative ..."' (Holmes pp.35-36). Beddie 1217; cf. Hill (2004) 358; cf. Holmes 24; cf. Printing and the Mind of Man 223; Rosove 77.A2; cf. Sabin 16245.

$6000.00

An Account of the Voyages undertaken by the order of His Present Majesty for making discoveries in the Southern Hemisphere, and successively performed by Commodore Byron, Captain Wallis, Captain Carteret, and Captain Cook, in the Dolphin, the Swallow, and the Endeavour; Drawn up from the journals which were kept by the several commanders, and from the papers of Joseph Banks
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An Account of the Voyages undertaken by the order of His Present Majesty for making discoveries in the Southern Hemisphere, and successively performed by Commodore Byron, Captain Wallis, Captain Carteret, and Captain Cook, in the Dolphin, the Swallow, and the Endeavour; Drawn up from the journals which were kept by the several commanders, and from the papers of Joseph Banks

By COOK, Capt. James (1728-1779). - John HAWKESWORTH (1715?-1779)

London: for W. Strahan & T. Cadell, 1773. 3 volumes, quarto. 52 plates, maps and charts (18 folding, 24 double-page). Contemporary mottled calf, rebacked First edition of Hawkesworth's account of all the most important mid-18th century English voyages of exploration to the southern hemisphere: including the official account of Cook's first voyage. A fascinating narrative intended to 'embellish England's prestige as a maritime power' (Hill) and describing events that were to be major factors in the shaping of the subsequent history of the region. One of the standard works of Pacific voyages, giving an account of English voyages of the 1760s in the first volume, and of Cook's first voyage in the second and third volumes. The first volume includes an account of John Byron's voyage to the Tuamoto Islands and the Gilberts, as well as Capt. Wallis' voyage of discovery to Tahiti and Moorea. Captain Carteret's discovery of Pitcairn Island is also told. The majority of the book, of course, is devoted to an account of Cook's first Pacific voyage. "The first voyage under Captain Cook's command on the Endeavour was primarily of a scientific nature. The expedition was to sail to Tahiti in order to observe the transit of Venus across the disk of the sun, to determine the earth's distance from the sun, and also to carry on the geographical discovery that John Byron had started. Entering the Pacific around Cape Horn, Cook reached Tahiti in 1769 and carried out the necessary astronomical observations...Leaving Tahiti in July, Cook discovered, named, and charted the Society Islands, and then, heading southwest, explored New Zealand...then headed towards Australia and discovered and charted the eastern coast for 2,000 miles, naming the area New South Wales. Both Australia and New Zealand were annexed by Britain as a result of this voyage which began in 1768 and ended in 1771" (Hill). Beddie 648; cf. Hill (2004) 782; Holmes 5; Sabin 30934.

$6000.00

An Arctic Voyage to Baffin's Bay and Lancaster Sound in search of friends with Sir John Franklin
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An Arctic Voyage to Baffin's Bay and Lancaster Sound in search of friends with Sir John Franklin

By GOODSIR, Robert A. (1823-1895)

London: John Van Voorst, 1850. 8vo. (7 3/4 x 4 3/4 inches). viii, 152pp. Tinted lithographed frontispiece, lithographed folding map with the route hand coloured. Complete with the half title. Publisher's blue cloth, covers bordered in blind, flat spine tooled in blind and lettered in gilt, yellow endpapers, minor fading to spine, small repair at head of spine Provenance: C. Normann (collector's stamp on title); Det Kongelige Danske Søkaart Archiv. (inked stamp on title); deaccessioned by the Garnisions Biblioteket in 2017 First edition of a scarce Arctic narrative: one of the first published accounts of the search for Franklin. The author, whose brother was a surgeon aboard the Erebus, joined Captain William Penny aboard the whaler Advice in 1849 on an eight-month journey in the hopes of finding the missing Franklin expedition in Lancaster Sound. The last survivors of the 1845-48 expedition, however, had perished in the spring of 1848 on Adelaide Peninsula. The work includes tales of Eskimos, polar bears, whaling and descriptions of Arctic scenery. Goodsir's Arctic Voyage is one of the first published accounts of a search for Franklin. Arctic Bibliography 5919; Sabin 27931; TPL 2986; Lande 1192.

$2250.00

Mémoires et observations géographique et critiques sur la situation des pays septentrionaux de l'Asie et l'Amérique
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Mémoires et observations géographique et critiques sur la situation des pays septentrionaux de l'Asie et l'Amérique

By ENGEL, Samuel (1702-1784)

Lausanne: Antoine Chapuis, 1765. Quarto. Title in red and black, engraved vignette on dedication page. 2 engraved folding maps. Contemporary mottled calf, gilt stamp on upper cover, minor repairs to top and tail of spine Provenance: Marinens Bibliothek; deaccessioned by the Garnisions Biblioteket in 2017 The first edition of Engel's important Arctic geography. Engel availed himself of the most up-to-date geographic intelligence on the region by explorers and cartographers such as Kirilov, Buache, Delisle, and Gmelin, evaluating each in order to come to a more accurate picture of the Arctic. He stated definitively that California was not an island but rather a peninsula and rejected the fantastical Sea of the West asserted by Buache and Delisle. On the other hand, his critiques of Müller's map of Siberia were unfounded, and his understanding of the rivers of Western North America was described by Wagner as characterized by remarkable imagination. The maps are by the Swiss cartographer Jacques Antony Chovin. "Contains accounts of the Cabrillo, De Fonte and De Fuca exploring voyages up the Pacific coast and definitively refuted the conception of Californian insularity" (Howes). Lada-Mocarski notes that Engel "examined diligently the maps and writings of Kirilov (the compiler of the first Russian atlas), Buache, Delisle, Muller, Gmelin, and others--and invariably, with some justification, found something wrong with each of them. He examined these works with regard to the northern parts of both Asia and America. Most of the questions he raised were valid and the present-day student of these regions would profit by reading his work with a modern maps before him, to see who was right or wrong--and when wrong, how wrong. A valuable part of Engel's present work is his rejection of the persistent belief held by many of his contemporary geographers and cartographers that California was an island. He unequivocally asserted... that (in translation), 'California is not an island but a peninsula.'" Howes E-149; Lada-Mocarski 18; Sabin 22571; Streeter sale 3460; Wickersham 3542.

$12000.00

Passing the Rubicon, Lieut. S. Bent in Mississippi's First Cutter Forcing His Way Through a Fleet of Japanese Boats While Surveying the Bay of Yedo, Japan, July 11th 1853
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Passing the Rubicon, Lieut. S. Bent in Mississippi's First Cutter Forcing His Way Through a Fleet of Japanese Boats While Surveying the Bay of Yedo, Japan, July 11th 1853

By HEINE, Wilhelm (1827-1885)

New York, 1855. Hand colored, color lithograph after Heine, lithographed by Eliphalet M. Brown Jr. and printed by Sarony. Sheet size: approximately 25 1/2 x 36 inches. A print from the very rare elephant folio suite of lithographs illustrating scenes from Perry's Expedition to Japan. In 1849, Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry led an expedition to Japan which forced the country to enter into trade and diplomatic relations with the West after nearly two hundred years of isolation. Artist William Heine accompanied Perry on the Japan Expedition, as it became known, and was named assistant master's mate and artist to the expedition. His drawings of the expedition were used for this series of six large lithographs printed by Sarony & Co., Boell & Lewis and Boell & Michelin in 1855-6. The lithographer of the suite was Eliphalet M. Brown, Jr., who accompanied the expedition as a daguerreotypist, but had learned lithography while working for Currier & Ives. The complete set is extremely rare. The print titled Passing the Rubicon depicts a scene shortly after Perry had entered Edo Bay on July 8, 1853. Confined to the bay while Perry's request for a treaty was being considered, Perry ordered the launch of several smaller boats to survey the bay. In the scene pictured here, Lieutenant Silas Bent's cutter, the Mississippi, has just passed Point Rubicon and is heading into the bay and comes face to face with a Japanese patrol boat. Some of Bent's crew have dropped their oars and are wielding their muskets in order to intimidate the Japanese crew. In his account of the expedition, Heine writes that this show of force successfully cleared the way for the survey boats.

$6500.00

Le Caire Moeurs et Costumes
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Le Caire Moeurs et Costumes

By PREZIOSI, Amadeo (1816-1882)

Paris: Canson, 1883. Folio. (24 1/2 x 18 inches). [8]pp, plus 20 chromolithographed plates, printed by Lemercier afte Preziosi. Expertly bound to style in half red morocco and period red cloth, spine gilt with raised bands Lively lithographs by one of the best known of the artists living and working in the Levant in the mid-19th century: one of 500 numbered copies. The son of Count Gio Francois Preziosi of Malta, Amadeo initially studied the law before turning to painting. After studying under Giuseppe Hyzler, Perziosi subsequently completed his art education at the Paris Academy of Fine Arts. He moved to Constantinople in 1842, fell in love with the city, and was able to make a living painting the places and people that surrounded him. It is noted in the Atabey catalogue that "Preziosi was well-known .... His studio is mentioned in Murray's guidebooks for 1854 and 1871. By that time he had become an institution in the city... He produced views of the city, and genre and costume drawings" ( The Ottoman World p.535). His paintings sold well to both the affluent local and the Grand Tourist, and his reputation was such that also served as a court painter to Sultan Abdul Hamid II. Preziosi visited Cairo in 1862 and the colourful views here depict street scenes and local inhabitants in the city and along the Nile. First published in 1862, the present re-issue, limited to 500 numbered copies, was published under the direction of the Encyclopédie des Arts Décoratifs de L'Orient. Colas 2425; Blackmer 1352.

$18500.00

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