Sign In | Register


RECENT ARRIVALS


Next >

Voyages made in the years 1788 and 1789, from China to the north west coast of America. To which are prefixed, an introductory narrative of a voyage performed in 1786, from Bengal, in the Ship Nootka; observations on the probable existence of a north west passage; and some account of the trade between the north west coast of America and China; and the latter country and Great Britain

By MEARES, John (1756-1809)

London: printed at the Logographic Press and sold by J. Walter, 1790. Quarto. (11 3/8 x 9 1/4 inches). 5pp. list of subscribers. 28 engraved, stipple or aquatint plates and maps (1 stipple-engraved portrait frontispiece of Meares by C. Bestland after Sir William Beechey, 10 maps and charts, 17 engraved and aquatint plates. Contemporary half tree calf and marbled paper covered boards, flat spine ruled in gilt, red morocco lettering piece Provenance: J.H. Clarke (early signature on the title); early armorial bookplate on verso of title; Thomas Sneyd Kynnersley (armorial bookplate) A very fine example in a beautiful contemporary binding of the first edition of "one of the fundamental books on the Northwest coast of America in general and on Alaska in particular" (Lada-Mocarski): complete with the rare Views of the Philipine Islands plate. "Meares made two fur trading voyages to the Northwest Coast. The first, sponsored by Bengal merchants, included the ships Nootka and Sea Otter , which sailed from Calcutta on March 2, 1786. On this voyage Meares reached Alaska and visited Kodiak but was continually frustrated by the presence of the Russians. On the northwest coast he met Portlock and Dixon. In June 1787 he sailed to Hawaii and continued on to Canton, taking with him the Hawaiian chief Kiana (whose portrait is included among the plates). On the Nootka , Meares again arrived at Hawaii August 2, 1787 and departed September 2, 1787. Meares returned to Hawaii as master of the Felice , [the renamed Nootka ], October 18 and departed October 26, 1788. Meares' second voyage to the American coast (1787-1788) was to alter the course of history. In 1788 he determined to establish a permanent fur-trading settlement at Nootka and engaged Colnett of the Argonaut and Hudson of the Princess Royal to accompany him. Shortly after arrival in territory claimed by Spain, the ships Iphigenia, Argonaut , and Princess Royal were seized by a Spanish frigate, and the resulting action, known as the Nootka Controversy, nearly precipitated a war between England and Spain. The appendixes to this work contain letters and instructions, Dufferin's journal kept while exploring the Straits of Juan de Fuca in July 1788, and Meares' memorial to the House of Commons, May 13, 1790, claiming exclusive rights to Nootka and the prior raising of the British Flag. Meares' account was central to British claims to the Northwest Territory and led to the convention by which Spain's claim was finally disallowed" (Forbes I, pp.157-158). The work is noted for its fine illustrations, including aquatint views of Macao, Nihoa (Hawaii) and the Northwest coast of America, as well as important maps. This copy includes the plate titled "Views of the Land on the Philippine Islands" which is frequently lacking and likely not issued in all copies. Abbey Travel II 594; Cordier Sinica 2103; Hill (2004) 1126; Howes M469; Howgego M-86; Sabin 47260 (26 plates); Staton & Tremaine 612); Streeter sale VI:3491; Wagner Northwest Coast 758, 758a, 759-766.

$12000.00

A Narrative of the Life, Travels and Sufferings of Thomas W. Smith: comprising an account of his early life, adoption by the gipsys [sic]; his travels during eighteen voyages to various parts of the world, during which he was five times shipwrecked; thrice on a desolate island near the South Pole, once on the coast of England, and once on the coast of Africa

By SMITH, Thomas

Boston, 1844. 8vo. 240pp. Contempory sheep, rebacked retaining a portion of the original spine. Housed in a calf backed box. Provenance: Neva & Guy Littell (morocco booklabel) Rare American account of voyages in the Antarctic and the Pacific. Smith was born of respectable British parents, but after his father died he was sent to work as an errand boy at age seven, and not unlike other young men in his situation, he soon found himself at sea. He participated in seven whaling voyages to the Pacific from 1816 to 1832, as well as numerous other sea adventures all over the world, including the South Pacific, the Atlantic coast of South America, Africa, and the Antarctic regions. Rosove notes that the work has been missed by many bibliographers because it is "so rare and little known." Besides whaling, Smith took part in hunting elephant seals on South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands in 1816-18, and whaling and sealing on the South Shetland Islands in 1820. This visit, only a year after the discovery of the islands, is the earliest account of sealing there, and an important early Antarctic narrative, with harrowing tales of surviving on penguin hearts and livers and contesting territory with other sealers. Smith also describes a voyage from London to Cape Horn, then to Juan Fernandez and the Galapagos, Easter Island, and points in South America including Colombia and Panama. Later, in New Zealand, he describes scrapes with natives, witnessing battles between the Whorowrarians and Kivakivians. He also visited Japan, Guam, and other Pacific islands. He gives details of whaling activities, including advice on "the most expeditious way of killing a whale" (pp.228-229). Smith made further whaling voyages to the Pacific Ocean in the 1820s aboard the British whalers Spring, Grove, and Hibernia. He ended up trying to do good in New Bedford, but debt and a lung ailment prevented him from achieving his dream of becoming a minister. A rare book, not in the Hill Collection. The Brooke-Hitching copy realized approximately $21,000 at his sale in September 2015. Huntress 331C; Forster 86; Spence 1139 (listing an 1840 ed., an error in dating); Rosove 312; Howes S679.

$5500.00

Mecheti Samarkanda ... Les Mosquées de Samarcande. Fascicule I. Gour-Emir [all published]

By RUSSIAN IMPERIAL ARCHAEOLOGICAL COMMISSION - NikolaiI Vanovich VESELOVSKII (1848-1918) and others

St. Petersburg: Expédition pour la Confection des Papiers d'État, 1905. Elephant folio. Illustrated title in Russian and French printed in red and black, dedication to Empress Alexandra Feodorovna printed in red and black, 4pp. text in two columns in Russian and French with illustrations as head-piece and tailpiece, 1p. list of plates, 18 plates (numbered I-XVIII, 12 chromolithographed, 2 double-page, one folding), after A. Shchusev, P. Poryshkin and A. Minenko. Expertly bound to style in half black morocco and period cloth covered boards, spine gilt with raised bands First edition, large paper en plano (i.e. unfolded) issue of an imporant illustrated Imperial Russian work on Islamic architecture. An important, large-scale and ambitious undertaking by the Imperial Russian Archaeological Commission, whose work in the area prepared the ground for subsequent western studies. This fascicle, the only published, is devoted to the Gour-Emire ("Tomb of the King") mosque in Samarkand, Uzbekistan, which to this day remains unparalleled in scale and significance.The delicacy and clarity of the chromolithographs, based on paintings made on site by the three artists, make it one of the most exquisitely printed and desirable Russian books of the Silver Age and an important work on Islamic architecture.

$15000.00

By Authority of Her Majesty's Foreign Office. An Account of the Progress of the Expedition to Central Africa, performed by order of Her Majesty's Office, under Messrs. Richardson, Barth, Overweg & Vogel, In the years 1850, 1851, 1852 and 1853

By PETERMANN, Augustus (1822-1878)

London: For the Author by E. Stanford, 1854. Folio. (23 x 17 inches). 3 lithographed maps, hand-coloured in outline (one folding), including one within pictorial tinted border incorporating portraits of Richardson, Barth, Overweg and Vogel. Expertly bound to style in half red morocco and marbled paper covered boards, spine gilt with raised bands Rare folio account of Barth's famed expedition to the Sudan, illustrated with three important maps of the region. Seeking to open commercial relationships in the sub-Saharan region of North Africa, Great Britain organized an overland expedition under the direction of James Richardson, an abolitionist missionary and traveller who had returned from travels in Northern Africa in 1846. Accompanying him were Heinrich Barth, a German explorer and Adolf Overweg, a German geologist and astronomer. Departing from Tripoli in March 1850, the expedition set out for Ghat, which they reached four months later. En route, Barth became separated from the party after climbing Mount Idinen and in a delerium induced by heat and dehydration, sliced his arms and drank his own blood to quench his thirst. He would be found by nomadic locals and returned safely to his companions. From Ghat, the party headed by caravan to the Aïr mountains. In January 1851, at an oasis north of Zinder, the party separated, agreeing to meet again at Kukawa four month later : Richardson headed for Zinder and Lake Chad, Overweg travelled westward to Gobir, and Barth headed southward to Tassawa. Richardson, however, would contract fever and die before reaching their meeting place. Barth and Overweg continued on and explored the northern shore of Lake Chad, with the latter becoming the first European to circumnavigate its shores by boat. The two separated again, with Overweg heading southeast toward present day Bongor, and Barth exploring the southern shore of Lake Chad. Overweg would succumb to a fever east of Kukawa before his rendezvous with Barth. Now the only survivor of the original expedition, Barth courageously decided to continue on and explore the region between Lake Chad and Timbukto. He would enter that famed city disguised as a Muslim in September 1853, becoming just the third European to do so, staying there for seven months. On his return trip to Kukawa, Barth would be discovered by Edouard Vogel, who had been dispatched to find him. Barth would eventually make his way northward arriving in Tripoli in August 1855, before returning to London. His journey had extended from Tripoli in the north to Adamawa in the south, and from Lake Chad in the east to Timbuktu in the west, covering some 12,000 miles in all. Barth arrived in London with great fanfare. He was awarded the Order of the Bath by Queen Victoria and the present work was commissioned, compiled by German geographer Augustus Petermann, based on Barth's preliminary account, his expedition maps and official dispatches. The maps include a general map of the region (with an elaborate surround comprised of portraits of the four explorers, plus vignettes of peoples, places, flora and fauna from the region), a map of Northern Africa showing the routes of the expedition members between 1850 and 1853, and a more detailed, large folding map of Central Africa showing the routes of the expedition between 1851 and 1852. Howgego B18.

$6800.00

Album Pintoresco de la Isla de Cuba
seller photo

Album Pintoresco de la Isla de Cuba

By [MIALHE, Pierre Toussaint Frederic (1810-1881)]

Berlin: Bernardo May y Co, 1855. Oblong quarto. (9 1/2 x 13 1/4 inches). Chromolithographic title heightened with gold, 27 chromolithographic plates by Storch & Kramer after Mialhe, each within an elaborate border printed in varying shades of blue and incorporating the plate number, the series title and the individual image title in Spanish, all printed recto only on thin card leaves, 2 folding uncoloured maps printed on thin paper. Publisher's brown cloth, covers elaborately blocked in blind, upper cover lettered in gilt, expertly rebacked with the original spine laid down An excellent copy of the finest pictorial record of daily life in Cuba in the 19th century. French-born Pierre Toussaint Frédéric Mialhe lived in Cuba from 1838 to 1854, initially working for the printing firm Real Sociedad Patriótica to compile a pictorial record of the island. He also taught drawing at the Liceo Literario y Artístico in Havana. He had trained as a painter under François-Édouard Picot in Paris, but his greatest artistic legacy is the series of three lithographically-illustrated works that he produced whilst in Cuba: Isla de Cuba, Isla de Cuba Pintoresca and Viaje Pintoresco al Rededor de la Isla de Cuba . There are three editions of this last work. The first, Viaje Pintoresco ... was published by Louis Marquire for Mialhe in 1847-8 in Havana, and is now almost unobtainable: only two copies (one incomplete) are listed as having sold at auction in the past thirty five years. The success of this work prompted Bernardo May to issue the second, Album Pintoresco de la Isla de Cuba which contained 26 tinted plates and was printed in either Berlin or Hamburg, with captions in Spanish, English and German, and a series of vignettes printed around the borders of the two maps: this was the first of the pirated editions. May was subsequently taken to court by Mialhe and the publisher, but they failed to prove their case and the present edition appeared shortly afterwards, with the full complement of 27 plates. This present edition is obviously the more desirable of the two as it is completely printed in colours, and the plates give much more detail than in the earlier pirated edition. The album includes 11 topographical views of Havana, 4 of other ports, 10 views of daily life, street vendors, dancers, cock-fighting, a bull-fight, fishermen, etc, and ending with two views which recall the two main industries of the time: the interior of a casa de calderas on a sugar-cane plantation, and an exterior view of a tobacco plantation. Cf. Emilio Cueto, Mialhe's Colonial Cuba (Miami, 1994), pp. 1-7, 73-77; Palau 5421, and cf.167989; cf. Sabin 17748 (for the other pirated edition with only 26 plates); cf. G. Sánchez. "Federico Mialhe: diseño biográfico y señalamientos para la estimación de su obra" in Revista de la Biblioteca Nacional (La Habana), año 66, nº 2, 1975.

$7500.00

A New Discovery of a Vast Country in America, extending above four thousand miles, between New France and New Mexico; with a description of the Great Lakes...with a continuation, giving an account of the attempts of the sieur de La Salle upon the mines of St. Barbe, &c. the taking of Quebec by the English..

By HENNEPIN, Louis (1640-1705)

London: Printed for M. Bentley, J. Tonson, H. Bonwick, T. Goodwin, and S. Manship, 1698. Two volumes in one, 8vo. (7 3/8 x 4 3/8 inches). [22],243,[32],228pp. Frontispiece, two engraved folding maps and six engraved folding plates. Modern panelled calf, spine in six compartments with raised bands, red morocco lettering piece in the second compartment, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt The desirable Tonson issue of the first edition in English of this important American narrative, including the first eye-witness account of Niagara Falls. The second issue of the English translation, known as the "Tonson issue," with plates and typography improved, after the original French edition published in Utrecht in 1697. No other narratives of French exploration in the interior of North America enjoyed as wide a popularity or stimulated as much controversy and criticism among later scholars as those of Hennepin. A Recollet missionary, Father Hennepin went to New France in 1675, and in 1678 he set out with La Salle to explore the fertile basin of the Mississippi River. While La Salle turned back to raise funds to continue the voyage, Hennepin went on to ascend the river from Fort Crevecoeur (Chicago) and penetrated farther northwest into the interior than any white man to that time. He discovered St. Anthony's Falls near the present site of Minneapolis, and provided the first eyewitness account of Niagara Falls. The engraving of the Falls which appears in his narrative, although an imaginative rendering, was the earliest to be published. Hennepin was subsequently captured by the Sioux, and after several months of wandering, he was rescued by Daniel De Lhut. This edition contains translations of both Hennepin's second and third books, Nouvelle Decouverte ... and Nouveau Voyage .... The first presents a fairly reliable account of Hennepin's actual travels and experiences, but also incorporates his entirely false claim to have descended the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico. This is, in fact, Father Zenobe Membre's account, which Hennepin boldly plagiarized from Le Clercq. In his sequel, Nouveau Voyage ..., Hennepin added new material drawn from contemporary sources on Indian manners and customs and various North American travels. The first eight chapters describe the adventures and murder of La Salle, while the last concern the British treatment of the Recollets after the taking of Quebec in 1629. Despite the fact that Hennepin has been severely and justly criticized for imposture and plagiarism, his works, according to Thwaites, still stand as "invaluable contributions to the sources of American history; they deserve study, and to this day furnish rare entertainment. We can pardon much to our erratic friar, when he leaves to us such monuments as these." The maps are of great importance for the cartography of the Midwest. JCB (2)II:1535; European Americana 698/100; Wing H-1451; Sabin 31370; Church 773; TPL 6354 ("Bon- Issue"); Streit II: 2780; Howes H416, "b;" Cox II, p.84; Bell 266-67; Lande 423; Vail 278; Dionne II:250; ESTC R24981.

$8500.00

A Voyage Round the World; but more particularly to the North-West Coast of America: Performed in 1785, 1786, 1787, and 1788, in the King George and Queen Charlotte, Captains Portlock and Dixon
seller photo

A Voyage Round the World; but more particularly to the North-West Coast of America: Performed in 1785, 1786, 1787, and 1788, in the King George and Queen Charlotte, Captains Portlock and Dixon

By PORTLOCK, Nathaniel (1748-1817)

London: Printed for John Stockdale, and George Goulding, 1789. Quarto. (11 3/4 x 9 1/4 inches). xii, 384, xl pp. 20 engraved plates, charts and maps (6 folding charts or maps, 2 engraved portraits, 12 engraved plates [the 5 ornithological plates with contemporary hand-colouring, as issued]). Bound to style in half calf and marbled paper covered boards, spine with raised bands in six compartments, red morocco lettering piece in the second and fourth, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt Rare deluxe issue with hand coloured plates of the first edition of a classic narrative of the early exploration on the Northwest coast. Portlock, a veteran of Cook's third voyage, and Dixon were sent by the King George's Sound Company to the Northwest coast of North America to investigate the economic possibilities of the fur trade there. En route, they had a long stay in Hawaii, and Portlock's narrative of this visit is of particular interest since Portlock and Dixon were the first captains to visit the Hawaiian islands since the death of Cook. He gives an important account of the situation there, already much altered by European contact. The voyage then proceeded to the Northwest to survey the region. Portlock and Dixon separated, with Portlock exploring northward up the Alaskan coast and Dixon proceeding southward to Nootka Sound. Both Dixon and Portlock published accounts of the voyage, but Portlock is of greater value for his particularly vivid descriptions of the Native Americans and Russians in the region. In addition to the lively narrative, the work is well illustrated with 20 plates and maps: these include a fine large folding general map of the Northwest Coast, and five maps of particular harbours along the coast. In the regular issue, the five bird plates are uncoloured and the text is printed on laid paper. A contemporary advertisement announcing the publication offers "a few copies ... printed on fine paper, hot pressed and plates coloured." These deluxe issues, as here, are considerably more rare than the usual uncoloured examples. Besides the obvious benefit of hand coloured illustrations, the paper used for the text of this deluxe issue is a higher quality paper. Forbes Hawaii 177; Judd Voyages 147; Hill (2004) 1376; Howes P487 "b."; Lada-Mocarski 42; Sabin 64389; Streeter Sale 3485; TPL 599; Wagner Northwest Coast 738-43; Wood p.523.

$17500.00

Voyage Autour du Monde Exécuté, Pendant les années 1830, 1831 et 1832, sur la Corvette La Favorite ... Atlas Hydrographique
seller photo

Voyage Autour du Monde Exécuté, Pendant les années 1830, 1831 et 1832, sur la Corvette La Favorite ... Atlas Hydrographique

By LAPLACE, Cyrille Pierre Theodore (1793-1875)

[Paris]: Dépòt-général de la Marine, 1833. Large folio. (25 7/8 x 19 ½ inches). Engraved throughout: title, contents leaf, 11 maps on 10 sheets (8 double-page). Expertly repaired tears. Bound to style in half dark blue morocco and period blue cloth covered boards, spine with raised bands in eight compartments, lettered in the second and fifth, the others with a repeat decoration in blind The large folio atlas to Laplace's Voyage to Indo-China and the South Pacific. "In December 1829, Laplace was commissioned to take an expedition to India, the East Indies and South East Asia, and then, if he chose to do so, proceed through the South Pacific. His instructions were to provide protection for French merchant vessels and obtain at each port-of-call information which might be of value to French trade" (Howgego). Laplace's voyage marked a shift in emphasis from voyages of discovery to politically-motivated expeditions. The Favorite covered some 56,000 miles on her twenty-eight month voyage. The voyage is perhaps best seen to complement Bougainville's circumnavigation. "The purpose of this voyage was to show the French flag in eastern and other waters, in order to re-establish French influence over Indo-China and the Pacific ... The hydrographic work was thorough and reliable, the work done on the Anamba and Natuna groups of Malayasia was valuable ... Laplace visited Singapore, Manila, Canton, Batavia, Chile, and other ports" (Hill). Published between 1833 and 1839, the complete publications of the voyage comprise five text volumes and two atlases (Album Historique and the present larger folio Atlas Hydrographique). cf. Hill 980; Howgego L-12; cf. Sabin 38985; cf. Ferguson 1669.

$8500.00

[Two-sheet watercolor panorama of Valapariso, accomplished by an American naval officer]
seller photo

[Two-sheet watercolor panorama of Valapariso, accomplished by an American naval officer]

By CHILE - [William M. HUNTER, 1st Lieutenant]

[South America, 1825. Pen-and-ink and gray wash, with white gouache highlights, on wove paper watermarked Hatman W. Balston & Co, sheets measuring approximately 12 1/2 x 18 1/8 inches each. Uniformly matted. South American panoramic watercolour by an American naval officer and talented artist aboard the USS Franklin, the flagship of the first American Pacific squadron. Attribution to Hunter is based on similar views found in the logbook of the USS Franklin located at the Huntington Library. The log book was kept by First Lieutenant William M. Hunter on board the ship, which departed from New York in October 1821, returning in 1824. The 74-gun American war ship, commanded by Charles Stewart, was the principal vessel of the newly designated American Pacific squadron, tasked with protecting American whaling vessels on South American coast amidst the ongoing independence movement.

$4500.00

Regni Davidici et Salomonæi Descriptio Geographica et Historica, una cum Delineatione Syriæ et Ægypti
seller photo

Regni Davidici et Salomonæi Descriptio Geographica et Historica, una cum Delineatione Syriæ et Ægypti

By HAAS, Johann Mattias (1684-1742)

Nuremberg: Officina Hommaniana, 1739. Two parts in one, folio. Title printed in red and black, text in two columns, historiated initials, woodcut head- and tailpieces. 20 hand coloured maps and plates (six folding). Contemporary mottled calf, spine gilt with raised bands, morocco lettering piece, marbled endpapers Provenance: Earls of Macclesfield (North Library bookplate to front pastedown, dated 1860) The Macclesfield copy of an important historical atlas of Egypt and the Holy Land. Haas, a noted German mathematician, astronomer, geographer and cartographer, compiled maps and geographical texts for the Homann firm. The first part of this work is devoted to the Holy Land, Syria and Egypt during the time of Kings David and Solomon. The second part is a comparison and consideration of the greatest cities of the known world, including Rome, Constantinople, Peking, St. Petersburg, Yedo, London, Amsterdam, and Lima, and concludes with a section on the pyramids of Egypt. Röhricht 1403; Tobler 214; Laor 312-317.

$3750.00

Oriental Memoirs: selected and abridged from a series of familiar letters written during seventeen years residence in India: including observations on parts of Africa and South America, and a narrative of occurrences in four India voyages
seller photo

Oriental Memoirs: selected and abridged from a series of familiar letters written during seventeen years residence in India: including observations on parts of Africa and South America, and a narrative of occurrences in four India voyages

By FORBES, James (1749-1819)

London: printed for the author by T. Bensley, published by White, Cochrane, and Co, 1813. 4 volumes, quarto. (11 3/4 x 9 3/4 inches). Half titles, 1p. errata at the end of vol.IV. Uncoloured stipple-engraved portrait frontispiece to vol.I by Bate after Murphy, 93 plates after Forbes (including 20 hand-coloured aquatints, 3 hand-coloured stipple engravings, 5 hand-coloured lithographs, 3 uncoloured lithographs). (Light foxing to the uncoloured engraved plates). Contemporary diced russia, covers bordered in gilt, spines with wide flat bands in six compartments, lettered in the second and third, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt, repairs to joints, marbled endpapers and edges Provenance: Robert Hurst (morocco booklabel) The first edition of this fascinating work: a snapshot of all aspects of life in India at the turn of the 19th century. In 1775, Forbes went to India as private secretary to Col. Keating, and was later appointed to a post in Baroche in Goojerat. In 1780 he became collector and resident of Dubhoy, remaining in India until 1784 when the district in which he lived was ceded to the Mahrattas. In 1810, Forbes was put in charge of his fifteen-month old grandson, the future orator and historian Charles de Montalembert, and thenceforth his life was divided between Charles and the Oriental Memoirs . The work takes the form of a profusely illustrated series of letters describing many aspects of life in India. According to Abbey, the work was drawn from 152 folio volumes (some 152,000 pages) that Forbes filled with notes and sketches. Indeed, Forbes himself describes the Oriental Memoirs in his preface as the "principal recreation of my life" (preface p.xi). The compiling of the notebooks, "beguiled the monotony of four India voyages, cheered a solitary residence at Anjengo and Dhuboy, and softened the long period of absence from my native country: it has since mitigated the rigor of captivity, and alleviated domestic sorrow. Drawing to me had the same charm as music to the soul of harmony. In my secluded situation in Guzerat, I seemed to be blest with another sense. My friends in India were happy to enlarge my collection; the sportsman suspended his career after royal game to procure me a curiosity; the Hindoo often brought a bird or an insect for delineation, knowing it would then again regain its liberty; and the brahmin supplied specimens of fruit and flowers from his sacred enclosures" ( op.cit. p.xi). The work has been noted as a "publication of massive weight and great charm" ( India Observed ) but is largely noted for its illustrations, which include a mixture of natural history images of birds, animals, insects and plants (most hand-coloured and many executed by William Hooker), topographical views of locations in India, and both ethnographic and individual portraits. In addition, the work includes among the earliest examples of lithography - 8 plates drawn on stone by Forbes himself. Abbey, Travel II,436; Anker 148; Nissen ZBI 1409; Wood p.345; Mildred Archer, India Observed , pp. 87-89; Rohatgi and Parlett, Indian Life and Landscape , pp. 191-192.

$9750.00

Ramblings in Cashmere [manuscript title page]
seller photo

Ramblings in Cashmere [manuscript title page]

By CAVE, Lieutenant Colonel George Noble

Kashmir, India, 1870. Large folio. (25 3/4 x 20 inches). Mounted albumen photographic frontispiece portrait of the artist, manuscript title page with mounted original watercolor vignette (9 7/8 x 7 inches), 42 original watercolors, mounted onto 39 larger sheets, captioned in pencil on the mounts, ranging in size from 2 3/4 x 4 7/8 inches to 13 7/8 x 19 15/16 inches (with most being larger in size). Contemporary green cloth, rebacked and retipped with green morocco, flat spine gilt Provenance: G. N. Cave (the artist's son; presentation inscription to his neice); May Procter An extraordinary album of original watercolors of the Himalayas. George Noble Cave was born in Bristol in 1824, and served as an officer in the Bengal Staff Corp from 1849 when he married his first wife, Matilda Chambers, with whom he had five children. He was promoted from Captain to Major in 1861, and then to Lieutenant-Colonel in 1867, around the time he commenced these paintings. He married again to Jane Wheatley in 1871, with whom he had a sixth child. He later reached the rank of Colonel before returning to England where he died in 1908. The images present here skilfully and strikingly depict various scenes in the Kashmir region. The Kashmir region was one much favored by the British in the 19th century, and the sort of wonder its landscape inspired is expertly captured by Cave, who spent decades in the area. The plates comprise: [Title vignette]: Temple at Pendriton near Srinuggur [1] On the Jhelum, Murree route [2] First view of the Valley of Cashmere, near Baramoola [3] The Falls of Hurreebul [4] On the Veshau River, approach to the Konsa Nag [5] The Konsa Nag [6] On the Veshau River [7] Valley of the Lidder River. Village Guneshbul [8] On the Lidder River [9] In the Lidder Valley [10] Near Bunihar, Murree route [11] On the Downs, upper part of Lidder Valley [12] The Sheesh Nag, the source of the Lidder River [13] Pass above Sheesh Nag from the Lidder Valley to Sind Valley [14] Punjtarni or Five Streams, source of Sind River [15] On the Sind River [16] On the Sind River [17] Sona Murg or the Golden Down [18] The Sind Valley fom the Zajla Pass [19] On the Zajla Pass [20] Gungabul on Mr. Horomook [21] Gulmurg [22] Gulmurg [23] Last view of Valley of Cashmere from Babamirishi [24] Baramoolla [25] Narainkol on Mt. Horomook [26] Falls of Hurreebul on the Veshau River [27] On the Sona Murg, Sind River [28] Lake Manusbul, Early Morning [29] Buddhist Tempe at Bunihar [30] On the Mar Canal Srinuggur [31] The Lidder Valley from the Downs, Palgaum in the Distance [32] Buddhist Ruins at Martund [33] [Uncaptioned river scene] [34] The Dhul Lake, Srinuggur [35a] Plane Trees [35b] [Small uncaptioned river scene] [35c] On the Sind River [36a] Gulmurg [36b] On the Jhelum near Sombul [37] Lake Manusbul [38] Approach to the Cave of Ammernauth [39] On the Way to Dhul Lake, Srinuggur The presentation inscription, dated 19 April 1934, by Cave's son reads: "For my niece May Proctor because the pictures were painted by her grandfather in the presence of her mother in 1867-1869-1870."

$35000.00

The war-time, daily manuscript diaries of Captain L. H. Bell, the assistant to Admiral Tom Phillips, Vice Chief of the Naval Staff of the Royal Navy
seller photo

The war-time, daily manuscript diaries of Captain L. H. Bell, the assistant to Admiral Tom Phillips, Vice Chief of the Naval Staff of the Royal Navy

By WORLD WAR II - Capt. L. H. Bell

London, 1941. 6 volumes, large 8vo. Over 1400pp., written recto and verso within ruled diaries, with some entries written on sheets of paper neatly tipped in. Contemporary cloth Extraordinary war-time diaries of an Admiralty insider. Captain Bell served as the assistant to Admiral Tom Phillips, Vice Chief of the Naval Staff, among the most important naval figures of the war. Given his position, Bell was privy to an extraordinary amount of war-time news, intelligence, insight and strategy, which he dutifully records in daily entries. Beginning his diary on 2 September, the day following Germany's invasion of Poland and the day prior to Great Britain's Declaration of War, Bell's diary includes detailed descriptions relating to the Battle of the Atlantic, the evacuation of Dunkirk, the Norwegian Campaign, the Blitz, Nazi movements on the Continent, battles in the Mediterranean and more. A brief selection of quotes: 20 September 1939: "Poles still holding out in Warsaw. Germans mopping up elsewhere & Russians advancing unchecked. More & more opinions being expressed that Russian intervention, though a low down stab in the back for Poland, will not be to Germany's advantage either now or in the future. But no one knows!..." 10 May 1940: "...the Germans have invaded Holland, Belgium, & Luxembourg ... All hell let loose at last & now the war legions to rage in full & utter earnest! ... Chamberlain resigned tonight & Churchill has accepted the job of Prime Minister & will choose his cabinet tomorrow. Not altogether unexpected but I don't trust Churchill's judgment & am very doubtful if the change will be for the good." 27 May 1940: "... God help the BEF! The country has still no conception of the gravity of the situation for in response to French appeals nearly all military news of the past few days has been suppressed. I think it is a mistake - the blow will be the more stunning when it falls." 29 May 1940: "The situation in Flanders & NE France remains grim & grisly ... By 10 pm 56,000 had been recovered but conditions at Dunkerque on the beaches must be indescribable. Practically every boat that floats between Portsmouth & Harwich has been launched to the beach between Dunkerque & Newport ... but the men are proving [?] down into the beach half dead with thirst & famished. There is no water in Dunkerque which has been bombed to bits ..." 10 June 1940: "Roosevelt broadcast at 0015 - the most pro-Ally speech he has yet made & pretty scathing abot the Italian stab in the back. He is certainly out to help us all he can short of sending Americans to fight in Europe..." 15 September 1940: "There was a big air raid on London at about 1130. I watched from our window & one spitfire overhead in a clear patch of the blue sky through the clouds ... a large dark twin engined Dornier came spinning through the clouds. It looked as if it would fall into St. James Park lake but eventuall I think fell in Victoria St. A black cloud of smoke followed its contact with the earth..." 30 December 1940: "... Last night an attack in London took the form of an intense biombing of the city with incendiaries & raging fires were caused all round St. Pauls. Guildhall has been destroyed & 7 Wren churches. Also many offices & old buildings. Little loss of life, but immense damage..." 10 May 1941: "Several uboats attacked a GB convoy & I think sank 5 ships from it but we bagged one certain U110 & probably another. More uboat attacks - convoys are threatened and are getting out a long way West..." Although the final volume ends somewhat abruptly in July 1941, a postscript by Bell dated 1972 explains that the subsequent two volumes (which included his final months at the Admiralty before becoming Captain of the Fleet under Admiral Phillips aboard the HMS Prince of Wales in October 1941), went down with the battleship when it was sunk on 10 December 1941 off the coast of Malaya. Bell was among the few survivors. Thus, the present six volumes represent his complete war-time diaries. Given his position within the Admiralty, Bell's diaries offer extraordinary insight into Great Britain's war-time decision making, offering first-hand knowledge of events as they unfolded.

$3800.00

Narrative of a Second Voyage in search of a North-West Passage, and of a Residence in the Arctic Regions ... [With:] Appendix to the Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-West Passage
seller photo

Narrative of a Second Voyage in search of a North-West Passage, and of a Residence in the Arctic Regions ... [With:] Appendix to the Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-West Passage

By ROSS, Sir John (1777-1856)

London: A.W. Webster, 1835. 2 volumes, large quarto. (12 3/8 x 9 3/4 inches). [Narrative]: 6 maps (1 folding engraved map, 5 lithographic charts and maps), 25 plates (9 hand-coloured, comprised of 6 lithographs, 16 engravings, 3 mezzotints printed in colors). Errata leaf. [Appendix]: 20 plates (4 engravings [1 hand-coloured]; 16 lithographs [11 hand-coloured]). 37pp. list of subscribers, 1p. with errata and additions to subscriber's list. Contemporary half dark blue dyed calf and marbled paper covered boards, flat spines gilt, marbled endpapers and edges Provenance: George P. Shearwood (early signature) First editions of both the Narrative and the separately-issued Appendix to Ross' second Arctic voyage: the large-paper, "royal" issue, with additional hand coloured plates. After his failure to explore Lancaster Sound in his first voyage of 1818, Ross had his 1829-33 second voyage privately financed. Although forced to abandon his steamship Victory in the ice at Felix Harbour (a fact that in the present official account Ross blames largely on the shortcomings of the boilers supplied by Braithwaite), his second expedition achieved a number of milestones. Besides the most thorough exploration of Boothia Peninsula that had been accomplished to date, James Clark Ross (John Ross's nephew) undertook an overland journey across the peninsula and became the first to reach the North Magnetic Pole. Two issues of the Narrative were published, a standard issue containing 3 color plates (i.e. the three colour printed mezzotints) and a "royal" issue, printed on larger paper and with 6 plates additionally hand coloured. Abbey, Travel II, 636; Arctic Bibliography 14866; Chavanne 1450; Sabin 73381; Staton & Tremaine 1808; Lande 1462; TPL 1808.

$3000.00

An Account of an Embassy to the Court of the Teshoo Lama in Tibet, containing a narrative of a journey through Bootan, and part of Tibet ... To which are added, views taken on the spot, by Lieutenant Samuel Davis; and observations botanical, mineralogical, and medical, by Mr. Robert Saunders
seller photo

An Account of an Embassy to the Court of the Teshoo Lama in Tibet, containing a narrative of a journey through Bootan, and part of Tibet ... To which are added, views taken on the spot, by Lieutenant Samuel Davis; and observations botanical, mineralogical, and medical, by Mr. Robert Saunders

By TURNER, Samuel (1749-1802). - Samuel DAVIS (1760-1819, illustrator)

London: printed by W. Bulmer & Co, and sold by G. & W. Nicol, 1800. Imperial quarto. (13 x 9 3/4 inches). Folding engraved map after Samuel Davis, 13 plates (1 aquatint by De la Motte after Stubbs, 1 double-page line engraving of script, 2 engraved views by James Basire after Turner, 1 engraved plan and 8 views by James Basire after Samuel Davis), 1 engraved illustration. Contemporary russia, covers bordered with gilt rules, rebacked, spine with raised bands in six compartments, marbled endpapers and edges Provenance: William Wickham (armorial bookplate) A rare large paper issue of the first edition of the official account of Turner's embassy to Bhutan and Tibet: the first great western account of the region. Acting on Warren Hastings orders, Samuel Turner's expedition was despatched with the aim of improving "trans-Himalayan trade after the Nepal war. Turner's party, including the surgeon and botanist Dr Robert Saunders, set off from Calcutta in January 1783. Davis was to survey the route and record the topographical features of the country ... While in Bhutan during their first audience with the Deb Raja in his palace at Tassisudon, Turner explained to him that 'drawing constituted in England a branch of education; and that we made unequal progress in the art, I could boast but little skill in it, but that my friend Mr. Davis had attained a great degree of perfection' ... After four months in Bhutan waiting for permission to enter Tibet ... the three men were told that only Turner and Saunders could proceed. Turner believed that the authorities were suspicious of Davis's drawing skills ... Leaving Davis behind in Bhutan ... Turner and Saunders departed for Tibet on 8 September 1783. Their travels were to last until March the following year" ( Indian Life & Landscape p.194). The Table of Plates notes that the plates were all engraved from originals in the possession of Warren Hastings - including the image of the Yak. The Yak was one of a pair sent to Hastings, by his kinsman, Turner. Only one survived the journey, and it is this animal that was painted by George Stubbs from life. In the background, Stubbs incorporates Davis's view of Punakha Dzong, the summer palace in Bhutan. Published at 2l. 2s in boards, contemporary advertisements reveal that a smaller number of copies were available in large paper, printed from the same setting of type as the smaller regular issue but in larger size and on better paper stock, at 4l. 4s. Cox I, 346; cf. J. Egerton George Stubbs, painter: catalogue raisonné 284; cf. P. Godrej & P. Rohatgi Scenic Splendours India through the printed image p.34; cf. Indian Life and Landscape p.194; Lennox-Boyd 140; Lowndes IV, p.2724; Lust 208; Yakushi T140.

$6500.00

Costumes of India
seller photo

Costumes of India

By D'OYLY, Sir Charles (1781-1845)

Patna: Behar Lithographic Press, 1830. Oblong 4to. Mounted lithographed title and 12 hand-coloured lithographed plates, on early paper mounts. Later paper wrappers with the original upper titled wrapper trimmed and mounted, unstitched Very rare color plate book of Indian costume from D'Oyly's Behar Lithographic Press. Born in India, Sir Charles D'Oyly was educated in England, before returning to India in the service of the East India Company in 1798. By 1808 he was Collector of Dacca, and in 1818 succeeded to baronet. After serving in a series of posts throughout India, culminating in his appointment as Senior Member of the Board of Customs, Salt and Opium, and of the Marine Board in 1833, he returned to England in 1838, and retired in 1839. He is now best known for his work as an amateur artist, lithographer and publisher in India. D'Oyly became a noted student of George Chinnery, who worked in India between 1802 and 1825. "Chinnery's love of drawing rural India and its people and animals comes through strongly in D'Oyly's work ... [D'Oyly's] work at its best is fresh and charming, and his topographical work has an engaging vividness" (Losty). Lithography came to India in the 1820s and D'Oyly was an early adopter. "In 1824 D'Oyly was the moving spirit in setting up a society of dilettanti called the Behar School of Athens ... for the promotion of the Arts & Sciences, and 'for the circulation of fun and merriment of all descriptions'" (Losty). D'Oyly had ordered a lithographic press from England in 1823, though transporting it to Patna proved difficult, with the first such attempt resulting in the destruction of the press in a squall on the Ganges. A second press was ordered, and was established at Patna named The Behar Amateur Lithographic Press in 1828 (though there is evidence that D'Oyly had access to lithographic stones at an earlier date). "Although [D'Oyly's published works] appear to be regular books in the sense that various copies of them were printed, it is obvious that none of the products of the Behar Lithographic Press was ever published in any commercial sense" (Losty). Abbey concurs, writing: "there seems to be no evidence as to whether D'Oyly sold copies of the Behar Amateur Press Books, or distributed them privately." As a result, all are rare, all vary amongst each other and of those extant, most bear direct association with D'Oyly and his circle. Archer, India Observed , pp. 70-72; Godrej and Rohatgi, Scenic Splendours , pp. 58-60; Jeremiah P. Losty, "Sir Charles D'Oyly's Lithographic Press and his Indian Assistants" in Rohatgi and Godrej, India: A Pageant of Prints , pp. 135-160; Bobins, The Exotic and the Beautiful 235; Not in Abbey.

$12000.00

Through Central Asia, with a map and appendix on the Diplomacy and Delimitation of the Russo-Afghan Frontier
seller photo

Through Central Asia, with a map and appendix on the Diplomacy and Delimitation of the Russo-Afghan Frontier

By LANSDELL, Henry

London: Sampson & Low, 1887. 8vo. xx, 668pp., folding map, 75 illustrations in the text. Publisher's pale blue pictorial cloth, custom slipcase. Provenance: Franklin Brooke-Hitching The very fine Franklin Brooke-Hitching copy of a classic narrative of a journey through Siberia, Turkistan, Samarkand, Bokhara and Khiva. Yakushi (1994) L75a.

$700.00

A Sketch of Assam with some Account of the Hill Tribes
seller photo

A Sketch of Assam with some Account of the Hill Tribes

By [BUTLER, John]

London: Smith, Elder and Co, 1847. 8vo. vi, [2], [v]-viii, 220pp. Folding map, 17 plates (16 hand coloured lithographs, 1 woodcut plate), woodcut illustrations. Repaired tear to folding map. Contemporary smooth tan calf, covers pictorially stamped in gilt, spine gilt with raised bands in six compartments, black morocco lettering piece in the second, marbled endpapers and edges Provenance: Colonel Simpson (inscribed by the author); J. Talbot Clifton (armorial bookplate) Author's presentation copy, complete with the map and hand coloured plates. A rare work, particularly in what is believed to be the publisher's deluxe binding. This example with a presentation inscription by Butler to Colonel Simpson, "with the sincere esteem & regards of his old comrade." The plates include beautifully hand coloured landscape views, plates of native costume, as well as some natural history subjects. Abbey, Travel 471; Yakushi (1994) B650; Bobins I:227.

$3000.00

Souvenir du Caire
seller photo

Souvenir du Caire

By PREZIOSI, Amadeo (1816-1882)

Paris, 1862. Folio. Engraved title, engraved list of plates and 20 chromolithographed plates, printed by Lemercier after Preziosi. Publisher's purple cloth, covers decorated in gilt and blind, expertly rebacked to style with dark purple cloth First edition of lively lithographs by one of the best known of the artists living and working in the Levant in the mid-19th century The son of Count Gio Francois Preziosi of Malta, Amadeo initially studied the law before turning to painting. After studying under Giuseppe Hyzler, Perziosi subsequently completed his art education at the Paris Academy of Fine Arts. He moved to Constantinople in 1842, fell in love with the city, and was able to make a living painting the places and people that surrounded him. It is noted in the Atabey catalogue that "Preziosi was well-known .... His studio is mentioned in Murray's guidebooks for 1854 and 1871. By that time he had become an institution in the city... He produced views of the city, and genre and costume drawings" ( The Ottoman World p.535). His paintings sold well to both the affluent local and the Grand Tourist, and his reputation was such that also served as a court painter to Sultan Abdul Hamid II. Preziosi visited Cairo in 1862 and the colourful views here depict street scenes and local inhabitants in the city and along the Nile. Colas 2425; Blackmer 1352; Hilmy II, 135.

$18500.00

Voyage de la Corvette l'Astrolabe exécuté par ordre du Roi, pendant les années 1826-1827-1828-1829
seller photo

Voyage de la Corvette l'Astrolabe exécuté par ordre du Roi, pendant les années 1826-1827-1828-1829

By DUMONT D'URVILLE, Jules Sébastien César, le Comte, (1790-1842)

Paris: J. Tastu, 1835. Together, 17 volumes, as described below. Contemporary half diced calf and cloth covered boards (text), contemporary cloth expertly rebacked and retipped uniform to the text (Historique, Botanique and Zoologique atlases), contemporary marbled paper covered boards rebacked and retipped uniform to the text (the Hydrographique text and atlas), spines with raised bands, ruled in gilt on either side of each band, lettered in gilt in the second and third compartments, contemporary brown or marbled paper endpapers Provenance: Marinens Bibliotek (gilt stamps on upper covers and other markings to endpapers or titles); deaccessioned by the Garnisions Biblioteket in 2017 A complete set of the official account of the voyage of the Astrolabe: one of the most important French voyages to the South Pacific and a cornerstone work on the early exploration of Australia and New Zealand. This important voyage, one of the great series undertaken by the French government for both colonizing and scientific reasons was led by Jules Dumont d'Urville, it was "his first expedition, which was to gain additional information about the principal groups of islands in the Pacific and to augment the mass of scientific data acquired by Louis Duperrey. The Astrolabe sailed south, around the Cape of Good Hope, and arrived at Port Jackson. Proceeding to New Zealand, its coast, especially the southern part of Cook Strait, was surveyed with great care. Tonga and parts of the Fiji Archipelago were explored, then New Britain, New Guinea, Amboina, Tasmania, Vanikoro, Guam, and Java. The return home was by way of Mauritius and the Cape of Good Hope. Huge amounts of scientific materials were collected and published" (Hill). Noted as one of the most detailed and most lavishly illustrated of the French grande voyage publications, the work includes an impressive amount of data relating to the region's natural history, topography, and anthropology. Besides the wonderful portraits of Maori, the plates include important topographical views of Sydney, Hobart, Melbourne, Western Australia, Victoria, New Zealand, New Guinea, Tonga, Fiji and more. Together, the work contains over five hundred plates, with more than half in color. Comprised as follows: HISTORIQUE Text: Ten parts in five volumes, 8vo. With nine engraved plates and numerous woodcut illustrations. Paris:1830-33. Atlas: One volume, folio. Engraved portrait frontispiece, illustrated title, 8 maps and 239 lithographed plates (89 hand coloured). Paris:1833. BOTANIQUE Text: Two volumes in one, 8vo. Paris: 1832-34 Atlas: Three parts in one volume, folio. With illustrated title and 92 plates as follows: Flore (41 plates); Sertum (39 plates); Lepidoptera (12 plates). Paris: 1834 ZOOLOGIQUE Text: Six parts in four volumes, 8vo. With 8 lithographed plates. Paris 1830-35. Atlas: One volume, folio. With illustrated title and 192 plates as follows: Mammals (28 plates [23 coloured]); Birds (31 coloured plates); Fish (12 coloured plates); Molluscs (95 coloured plates); Zoophytes (26 coloured plates). ENTOMOLOGIE Text: Two parts in one volume, 8vo. Paris: 1832-35. PHILOLOGIE Text: Two parts in one volume, 8vo. Paris: 1833-34 HYDROGRAPHIQUE Text (titled Observations Nautiques, Meteorologiques, Hydrographiques et de Physique ): Four parts in one volume, 4to. With two folding tables. Paris:1833-34. Atlas: One volume, large folio. With illustrated title and 45 engraved maps, charts and coastal profiles (19 double-page, and with the three profiles hand colored), plus a double-page engraved table. Paris:1833. Anker 410; BM (NH) II, p.603; Borba de Moraes p.273; Brunet II, 881; Ellis. Early Prints of New Zealand (1978) pp.43; Ferguson 1341; F ine Bird Books (1990) pp. 92; Hill 504; Nissen BBI 555; Nissen IVB 752; Nissen ZBI 1199; Ronsil 940; Whittell p. 216 ; Wood p.615; Zimmer p. 184; Sabin 21210.

$120000.00

Next >