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A New Map of the Whole Continent of America, divided into North and South America and West Indies, with a Descriptive Account of the European Possessions, as Settled by the Definitive Treaty of Peace, Concluded at Paris, Feby. 10th, 1763, Compiled from Mr. D'Anville's Maps of that Continent, and Corrected in the Several Parts belonging to Great Britain, from the Original Materials of Governor Pownall, MP
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A New Map of the Whole Continent of America, divided into North and South America and West Indies, with a Descriptive Account of the European Possessions, as Settled by the Definitive Treaty of Peace, Concluded at Paris, Feby. 10th, 1763, Compiled from Mr. D'Anville's Maps of that Continent, and Corrected in the Several Parts belonging to Great Britain, from the Original Materials of Governor Pownall, MP

By [GIBSON, John] - Robert SAYER, publisher

London: Robert Sayer and John Bennett, 1783. Copper-engraved map, printed on four sheets joined as two, period hand-colouring in outline. Inset of the Arctic regions of North America, and including Greenland and Iceland. Table along the left side. Printing of a portion of the 1763 Treaty of Paris above the cartouche. Inset map of Arctic Circle, Iceland and Greenland. Unrecorded issue of Gibson's fascinating wall map of the Western hemisphere Unrecorded intermediate state: conforms to Stevens and Tree 3c, i.e. title, imprint, printing of Articles from the 1763 Treaty, etc., though the United States is shown with engraved dotted lines and the country has lettered: "United States", as per Stevens and Tree 3d. This post-Revolutionary War wall map of North and South America gathered together geographical material from D'Anville, Jefferys and Thomas Pownall, and incorporated the new political divisions brought about by the establishment of the United States. As per the 1783 Treaty of Paris, the United States is shown with its western border at the Mississippi and northern border extending through the Great Lakes. In the inset titled: "The Continent and Islands of America...", the United States of North America heads the list with its 13 states and "The State of Vermont, and all the Lands between the Lakes, the Apalaches & the Missisippi": the term "State of Vermont" refers to its status as a separate republic. (Vermont joined the United States in 1791). "All the Lands between the Lakes..." etc. would soon be settled, not to say over-run by a flood of white settlers bringing about the multitudinous conflicts with the Native American tribes who are regionally designated on the map. Extremely well supplied with placenames and details, the Gibson map represents the sum of cartographical knowledge of the Americas for the 18th century. Stevens and Tree 3c/3d.

$2800.00

Map of Saratoga Co. New York from Actual Surveys..
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Map of Saratoga Co. New York from Actual Surveys..

By GEIL, Samuel

Philadelphia: E. A. Balch, 1856. Wall map, 37½ x 56½ inches, with extensive contemporary colour. Six engraved pictorial inserts plus sixteen map inserts. Expertly restored, backed with modern linen, trimmed in maroon cloth, on contemporary rollers. colour bright and clean. Very good. A lovely wall map of Saratoga County, the most famous spa in mid-nineteenth century America. Each township is separately coloured, and individual property owners are located and named throughout the county. There are inset maps of several county towns and villages, including a large detailed street plan of Saratoga Springs, plus Glenn Falls, Ballston Spa, Jessup's Landing, Waterford, and Schuylerville. The map is surrounded by fine engravings of illustrious local buildings. Geil, a noted upstate surveyor, published maps of several New York counties between 1852 and 1856. This was a particularly rare and important example; the only map of Saratoga County listed in Phillips' America . Not in Rumsey. OCLC locates only one copy. Phillips, America , p.785. Ristow, American Maps and Mapmakers , pp. 388-92. OCLC 41152794.

$3850.00

Bridgeman's New Rail Road & Township Map of New York...
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Bridgeman's New Rail Road & Township Map of New York...

By BRIDGEMAN, E.

New York: E. C. Bridgeman, 1880. Wall map, 69½ x 64 inches, full period colour. Expertly repaired, backed on linen, contemporary rollers, trimmed in modern blue cloth. Minute creasing. Overall very good. Scarce. An attractive map of New York state, featuring seven insets--a population table, a map of Manhattan, a map of Long Island, a list of principal cities and towns, a breakdown of congressional districts, a map of upper Manhattan and the Bronx, and a map of the United States. All of Lake Ontario is shown, as is the state's northwestern Canadian boundary. A nice view of the state as a whole, with particular focus on the state's most important regions. Not on OCLC. Phillips, America , p.517.

$3750.00

Clark & Tackaburys New Topographical Map of the State of Connecticut. Compiled from New and Accurate Surveys of each County, and the United States Trigonometrical Surveys of Long Island Sound
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Clark & Tackaburys New Topographical Map of the State of Connecticut. Compiled from New and Accurate Surveys of each County, and the United States Trigonometrical Surveys of Long Island Sound

By HOPKINS, G. H.

Philadelphia: Clark & Tackabury, 1860. Copper-engraved wall map, with full original colour, expertly repaired, backed with new linen, trimmed in blue cloth, on contemporary rollers, in very good condition. A very fine wall map of the state of Connecticut, based on the latest surveys During the 1850s, Richard Clark published a large number of wall maps based on actual survey of Connecticut towns and counties. Many of those had been the work of the distinguished Philadelphia surveyor, G. H. Hopkins, who was responsible for this accomplished general map. Each township in the state is individually coloured, and many schools, churches, cemeteries, post offices, stores, mines, mills, factories, iron works, etc., are located throughout rural Connecticut. Nine inset maps give detailed plans of the cities of Middletown, Waterbury, Stamford, Norwalk, New London, Bridgeport, Hartford, Norwich, and New Haven. A table gives population statistics for Connecticut's eight counties, and for the major towns and cities in each county. Grist mills and sawmills are shown, as are railroads and common roads. The mapping of the Connecticut coastline is especially fine, giving depths for the entire stretch of Long Island Sound, and showing several islands lying off the coast. This map is the second edition, the first having been printed in 1859, and is an excellent detailed look at Connecticut on the eve of the Civil War. Not in Phillips' America . Rumsey 141; Thompson 181; Ristow, p.388 (ref).

$2750.00

Mitchell's Reference and Distance Map of the United States
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Mitchell's Reference and Distance Map of the United States

By MITCHELL, S. Augustus (1792-1868), and James H. YOUNG (fl.1817-50)

Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, 1845. Copper-engraved wall map, with full original colour, expertly repaired, backed with modern linen, trimmed in green cloth, on contemporary rollers, with bright colour, overall in very good condition. An impressive wall map of the United States from a crucial year in American history. In 1834 Mitchell republished his A New Map of the United States under the title of Reference and Distance Map . New, updated editions appeared almost yearly. When compared to the 1833 edition of the former, this 1845 edition of the Reference and Distance Map shows many new developments in the upper Midwest. The outline of Lake Michigan has undergone extensive corrections. An oversized Wisconsin Territory (1836) now appears. Two of the small insets of American towns have been removed from the upper left-hand corner so that the new oversized Territory of Iowa (1838) could be added. The large inset General Map of the United States now shows Texas in its last year as an independent Republic. An important American map, showing the country on the eve of its second great national expansion. Rumsey 4223; Phillips, Maps , p. 898.

$6500.00

Map of Rockingham Co.  New Hampshire from Practical Surveys..
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Map of Rockingham Co. New Hampshire from Practical Surveys..

By CHACE, J.

Philadelphia: Smith & Coffin, 1857. Wall map, 56 x 56 inches, in full period hand colour. Expertly repaired, backed with modern linen, trimmed in red cloth, on contemporary rollers. Lightly tanned, faint old stain along upper edge, but in very good condition. A large, attractive, detailed wall map of Rockingham County, New Hampshire. Chace evidently received at least some of his training with R. P. Smith and J. H. French's survey of New York, the most ambitious and advanced mapping project for any American state up to its time. Between 1854 and 1860, Chace conducted surveys of more than twenty counties in seven northeastern states. Rockingham is New Hampshire's only coastal county. Each township is individually coloured. There are two large inset street plans of Portsmouth and Exeter (with accompanying business directories), and seventeen smaller insets for other county towns and villages. The map is ornamented by fifteen finely engraved vignettes that show notable buildings and residences in the county, including the Exeter Court House, Swamscot Machine and South New Market Iron Foundry, and Philips, Kingston, Hampton, and Rockingham academies. There are also tables of distances and statistics. Not in Rumsey who lists only one Chace map, of Cumberland County, Maine. An exemplary New Hampshire county map. Phillips, America , p.751; Ristow, pp. 387-88.

$3500.00

Chapman's Sectional Map of Wisconsin
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Chapman's Sectional Map of Wisconsin

By CHAPMAN, Silas

Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Silas Chapman, 1879. Wall map, 36 x 32 inches, full period hand coloured lithograph. Backed with modern linen, trimmed in maroon cloth, and on contemporary rollers. Three small age spots in western part of state, faint streaking in margin areas. A lovely map, brightly coloured, in very good condition. Rare. An attractive and boldly coloured wall map of early Wisconsin. Each county is individually coloured, with most in the north part of the state still oversized and empty of settlement. Townships and sections are also shown. Several Indian reservations are also laid down, including those of the Menominee and Oneida, and the many railroad lines in the state are identified. Silas Chapman produced several maps of the Midwest from the 1850s through the 1870s, including pocket and wall maps of Minnesota, Iowa, and Wisconsin. This map not in Rumsey; Phillips, America ; Checklist of Printed Maps of the Middle West to 1900: (Wisconsin) ; or OCLC.

$2500.00

Gillette's Map of Oneida Co. New York from actual surveys under the direction of J. H. French
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Gillette's Map of Oneida Co. New York from actual surveys under the direction of J. H. French

By BEERS, S. N., D. J. Lake, and F. W. Beers

Philadelphia: John H. Gillette, 1858. Wall map, 66½ x 64 inches, full period colour. Expertly restored, backed with modern linen, trimmed in green cloth, on contemporary rollers. Chip at left end of upper roller. Evenly toned, some minor staining in upper portion. Very good. Scarce and quite important. This handsome map was the largest and best for Oneida County, New York, in the nineteenth century. Each township is individually coloured, with every rural property owner located and identified by name. The route of the Erie Canal is shown, as are several railroad lines. There is a large inset street plan of Utica (17 x 27½") that shows virtually every existing building in the town. It is accompanied by an extensive business directory. More than thirty smaller insets show the towns of Rome, Knox Corners, Delta, Trenton Falls, Deerfield Corners, Remsen, Waterville, Durhamville, Vernon, Camden, New Hartford, and Clinton, among others. Seven surrounding engravings show prominent homes and buildings in the region, including the Court House in Rome, Utica City Hall, and the residences of Stanton Park in Waterville and Gen. Lyman Curtiss in Camden. Silas N. Beers and Frederick W. Beers were cousins and well-known mapmakers. Along with the young D. Jackson Lake, they had studied under J. H. French at Newtown Academy in Newtown, CT. When French left the Academy in 1855 to become head of the New York State mapping project, French enlisted his former students as associates. This project was the most ambitious and accomplished for any American state to its time. The map of Oneida County is the first joint project on which the Beers and Lake collaborated. Ristow hypothesizes that French used the Oneida project as a "training ground" for the three young talented mapmakers. Not in Rumsey, nor in Phillips's America . Ristow, American Maps & Mapmakers , pp.393-94.

$3850.00

Squire's Map of the State of New York, Containing all the Towns in the State
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Squire's Map of the State of New York, Containing all the Towns in the State

By CHAPIN, William (1802-1888)

New York, 1836. Engraved wall map, full period hand-colouring. Inset maps of Manhattan, New York Bay, and the Vicinity of Niagara. Inset view of Niagara Falls. Inset tables relating to height of mountains, length of rivers and construction of canals. (Linen-backing renewed). Scarce 19th century wall map of New York State at the height of canal fever. Chapin began his career as an apprentice to John Vallance in Philadelphia in 1817. Five years later, he began working for Fielding Lucas. Chapin was the engraver of Greenleaf's atlas of the state of Maine (1829) and Lay's wall map of the United States (1832). First issued in 1834, the present example is the second issue, with the date changed in the cartouche. The map is quite rare, with only one other copy recorded by OCLC. Not in Phillips, A List of Maps of America or Rumsey.

$1500.00

Clark's Map of Fairfield County, Connecticut
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Clark's Map of Fairfield County, Connecticut

By CLARK, Richard

Philadelphia: Richard Clark, 1856. Lithographic wall map, with full period hand-colour. Expertly repaired, backed with modern linen, edged with silk, on contemporary rollers. Very nice condition. An extremely elaborate and detailed wall map of Fairfield County, Connecticut, the only 19th-century map of the county listed in Phillips America. Fairfield is the site of some of New York City's most prestigious suburbs. Each township is separately coloured, with the properties of numerous individual landowners located. The map is flanked by sixteen inset views of important Fairfield sites, including numerous private residences, and the Court House in Bridgeport. The views are separated by ornamental Victorian scrollwork. There are twenty-four inset plans of Fairfield towns and villages, including Greenwich, Stamford, Ridgefield, New Canaan, Westport, Danbury, Bridgeport, Southport, Sharon, Bethel, Fairfield, Norwalk, South Norwalk, Newtown, New Fairfield, Brookfield, and Cos Cob. The map was drawn from a survey by J. Chace, W. J. Barker, and N. Hector, and lithographed by Wagner & McGuigan in Philadelphia. Not in Rumsey; Thompson, Maps of Connecticut , 176; Phillips, America , p. 276.

$3250.00

The State of New York from New and Original Surveys under the direction of J.H. French
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The State of New York from New and Original Surveys under the direction of J.H. French

By FRENCH, John Homer (1824-1888)

Syracuse: Robert Pearsall Smith, 1860. Hand-coloured lithographic wall map, backed with modern linen, full period color, trimmed in red cloth, on contemporary rollers. Two inset maps: "Geological and Land Patent Map of the State of New York" and "Meterological Map of the State of New York." Twelve inset city plans: Buffalo, Troy, Utica, Syracuse, Albany, Oswego, Schenectady, Hudson, Auburn, Poughkeepsie, Rochester, New York City. Twelve pictorial vignettes of New York State towns and scenery, and a decorative border of scrolling vines. In good condition except for occasional expert repairs and old repair evident along right edge. The second edition of the best map of any American state published to its time. Ristow devoted an entire chapter to the construction of this map, and pronounced it of a "higher quality than the maps of other states published prior to the Civil War." 'American Maps and Mapmakers', pp. 355-378. Beginning in 1853, Robert Pearsall Smith contracted with a number of local surveyors to construct maps of New York counties. In 1855 he engaged John Homer French to compile a state map from the various county maps. Although the individual county maps were not all of uniform quality, they were far more consistent and comprehensive than the local surveys conducted for any other American state. French's general map of The State of New York , first published in 1859, supplanted Burr's Atlas of the State of New York (1829), as the definitive reference for the topography of the state. It remained so until two decades later, when the U.S. Geological Survey began publishing maps based on original triangulation. This second edition was published in 1860. Despite the quality of the map, the number of copies sold was insufficient to offset costs, and in 1865 Smith sold his publication rights to H. H. Lloyd, who brought out new editions. Cf. BMC Printed Maps X, col. 558; Journal of the American Geographical and Statistical Society 2 (1860), p. 135; Phillips, America, p. 513; Ristow, American Maps & Mapmakers , pp.355-78; not in Rumsey.

$2000.00

L'Amerique Dressée sur les Relations les plus Recentes rectifiées sur les dernieres observations
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L'Amerique Dressée sur les Relations les plus Recentes rectifiées sur les dernieres observations

By [NOLIN, Jean-Baptiste (1657-1725)] and NOLIN, Jean-Baptiste II (1686-1762)

Paris: Chez l'Auteur Rue St. Jacques au dessus de la Rue des Mathurins a lensgne. de la Place des Victoires, 1740. Copper-engraved wall map, with original outline colour, on four unjoined sheets, each 21 5/8 x 28 inches, if joined would form a map measuring approximately 40 x 49 1/2 inches, in excellent condition. A rare and highly decorative large-scale map of the Americas, and one of the finest masterpieces produced by the Nolin family. Jean-Baptiste Nolin was one of the most accomplished and certainly the most ambitious French cartographer of his era. He founded what ultimately became a family empire in Paris in the 1680s. Exceptionally, he managed to marry superlative decorative ornamentation with the serious objective of producing maps that reflected the most advanced rendering of geographical detail. The artistic élan of his compositions evinced a style that preserved the rhetorical ambitions of the Baroque ethic, while anticipating the playful elegance of the Rococo period. His masterpieces, many like the presented wall map, were monumental in scale and represented Nolin's desire to overwhelm his competition in what was a very challenging market. Highly controversial, Nolin occasionally described himself as "the Engraver to the King," an appointment of which the royal court was curiously never apprised. In his endeavour to include the very latest geographical details on his maps, he seldom hesitated to acquire information from his eminent contemporaries, most notably Guillaume De L'Isle and Vincenzo Maria Coronelli, Jean-Dominique Cassini and the Sieur de Tillemon. While Nolin very successfully collaborated with Coronelli, other cartographers were not appreciative of Nolin's adoption of their intellectual property, as De L'Isle successfully sued Nolin for plagiarism in 1705. However, the larger-than-life Nolin always seemed to transcend these challenges, leaving a thriving enterprise to be taken up by his son. The present map was created in 1740 by Jean-Baptiste Nolin II, largely based on earlier maps produced by his father. This work ambitiously endeavours to depict the Americas in the most up-to-date geographic form, drawing upon the most authoritative sources. Ironically, it was the senior Nolin's desire to acquire the most accurate information that caused him to propagate one of the eighteenth-century's greatest cartographic myths. By this time, South America had been quite thoroughly explored, however, the Pacific northwest and the adjacent interior areas of North America remained largely unseen by European eyes. The only prominent feature present in this terra incognita is the mythical Mer de l'Ouest , that sees the Pacific protrude dramatically into the continental landmass. The senior Nolin was the first cartographer to put this detail into print, his campaign of corporate espionage having uncovered a manuscript map by De L'Isle which depicted the sea. This incident was one of the key pieces of evidence that won De L'Isle's lawsuit against Nolin. Although the Mer de l'Ouest is dramatically smaller here than in its original form (and is unlabelled in this map) it sustains a fascinating myth. The highly detailed and relatively accurate depiction of eastern Canada and the Mississippi basin conveys an advanced knowledge of the best French sources. The large landmass looming in the lower-right of the combined image, Indes Meridionales , approximates the presence of Antarctica, but is predicated on speculation rather than any actual discovery of such a landmass. The map features decorative details that represent a social commentary on contemporary European attitudes towards the indigenous peoples they encountered in the New World. The elegant title cartouche formed by period rocaille decoration is inhabited by scenes of the Jesuits evangelizing Christianity to the native peoples. To the lower-left of the combined composition, amidst an elaborate backdrop of exotic tropical vegetation, Mars, the god of war, is shown capriciously watching over two Europeans who are firing rifles onto a group of native Americans, who themselves are engaging in macabre acts of cannibalism. The oceans that lie on either side of the Americas are inhabited by diverse creatures, including sawfish, sea snakes, and flying fish. Numerous ships, some engaged in active combat, allude to the intense contests between European powers for naval supremacy that raged at the time. The tracks of several of the great sea voyages including those of Columbus, Verazanno, Magellan, Quiros, Medaña, and Schouten and Le Maire, traverse the vast maritime spaces. This presented map is certainly one of finest images of the western hemisphere made in the eighteenth-century. A large-scale work of great artistic merit, the finely engraved details comprise not only an elegant geographical rendering of the Americas and the oceans, but showcase a fascinating vision of contemporary European values with respect to their imperialistic ambitions in the New World. Hale, The Discovery of the World Maps of the Earth and the Cosmos, p.159.

$45000.00

L'Europe Dressée Sur les Nouvelles observations faites en toutes les parties de la Terre Rectifiée
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L'Europe Dressée Sur les Nouvelles observations faites en toutes les parties de la Terre Rectifiée

By [NOLIN, Jean-Baptiste (1657-1725)] and Jean-Baptiste NOLIN II (1686-1762)

Paris: Chez le fils de l'auteur Rue St.Jacques a lenseigne de la Place des Victoires, 1740. Copper-engraved wall map, with original outline colour, backed onto old linen, with contemporary wooden rollers, overall in very good condition. A rare and monumental wall map of Europe by one of the great masters of French cartography. Jean-Baptiste Nolin was one of the most accomplished and certainly the most ambitious French cartographer of his era. He founded what ultimately became a family empire in Paris in the 1680s. Exceptionally, he managed to marry superlative decorative ornamentation with the serious objective of producing maps that reflected the most advanced rendering of geographical detail. The artistic élan of his compositions evinced a style that preserved the rhetorical ambitions of the Baroque ethic, while anticipating the playful elegance of the Rococo period. His masterpieces, many like the present wall map, were monumental in scale and represented Nolin's desire to overwhelm his competition in what was a very challenging market. Highly controversial, Nolin occasionally described himself as "the Engraver to the King," an appointment of which the royal court was curiously never apprised. In his endeavour to include the very latest geographical details on his maps, he seldom hesitated to acquire information from his eminent contemporaries, most notably Guillaume De L'Isle and Vincenzo Maria Coronelli, Jean-Dominique Cassini and the Sieur de Tillemon. At times these rivals were not appreciative of Nolin's adoption of their intellectual property, and De L'Isle successfully sued Nolin for plagiarism in 1705. However, the larger-than-life Nolin always seemed to transcend these challenges, leaving a thriving enterprise to be taken up by his son. The present map was created in 1740 by Jean-Baptiste Nolin II, largely based on earlier maps produced by his father. It is a highly detailed and refined image of Europe, which was then in the process of intensifying its imperialistic grip over the other continents. This map is an artistically virtuous composition on a monumental scale, the image being surrounded by thirty vignettes, each framed in individualised Baroque borders, that depict various events from European history, along with textual narratives. The greatest decorative flourish of the composition is surely the title cartouche, located in the upper-left of the main image. Exquisitely engraved classical gods and allegorical personifications border the construction. Iconologically, they are meant to imbue Europe with the various strengths and virtues that they represent. For instance, Mercury, the messenger god of travel, trade and theft, is present to protect and speed European ships as they sail the seas on global missions of conquest and commerce. This wall map is one of the greatest subjects of the Nolins' legacy, not only being a masterful work of art and a fascinating image that tests the very limits of European geographical knowledge, but a vivid record of a dramatic transitional period in the history of cartography, and of society in general.

$18500.00

L'Amerique Dressée sur les Relations les plus Recentes rectifiées sur les dernieres observations
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L'Amerique Dressée sur les Relations les plus Recentes rectifiées sur les dernieres observations

By [NOLIN, Jean-Baptiste (1657-1725)] and Jean-Baptiste NOLIN II (1686-1762)

Paris: Chez l'Auteur Rue St. Jacques au dessus de la Rue des Mathurins a lensgne. de la Place des Victoires, 1740. Copper-engraved wall map, with original outline colour, composed from four joined sheets, surrounded by text and vignettes printed on separate sheets, backed onto old linen, with contemporary wooden rollers. First state of a rare and monumental wall map of the Americas by a great French master of cartography. Jean-Baptiste Nolin was one of the most accomplished and certainly the most ambitious French cartographer of his era. He founded what ultimately became a family empire in Paris in the 1680s. Exceptionally, he managed to marry superlative decorative ornamentation with the serious objective of producing maps that reflected the most advanced rendering of geographical detail. The artistic élan of his compositions evinced a style that preserved the rhetorical ambitions of the Baroque ethic, while anticipating the playful elegance of the Rococo period. His masterpieces, many like the present wall map, were monumental in scale and represented Nolin's desire to overwhelm his competition in what was a very challenging market. Highly controversial, Nolin occasionally described himself as "the Engraver to the King," an appointment of which the royal court was curiously never apprised. In his endeavour to include the very latest geographical details on his maps, he seldom hesitated to acquire information from his eminent contemporaries, most notably Guillaume De L'Isle and Vincenzo Maria Coronelli, Jean-Dominique Cassini and the Sieur de Tillemon. At times these rivals were not appreciative of Nolin's adoption of their intellectual property, and De L'Isle successfully sued Nolin for plagiarism in 1705. However, the larger-than-life Nolin always seemed to transcend these challenges, leaving a thriving enterprise to be taken up by his son. The present map was created in 1740 by Jean-Baptiste Nolin II, largely based on earlier maps produced by his father. This work ambitiously endeavours to depict the Americas in the most up-to-date geographic form, generally borrowing from the most authoritative sources. Ironically, it was the senior Nolin's desire to acquire the most accurate information that caused him to propagate one of the eighteenth-century's greatest cartographic myths. By this time, South America had been quite thoroughly explored, however, the Pacific northwest and the adjacent interior areas of North America remained largely unseen by European eyes. The only prominent feature present in this terra incognita is the mythical Mer de l'Ouest, that sees the Pacific protrude dramatically into the continental landmass. The senior Nolin was the first cartographer to put this detail into print, his campaign of corporate espionage having uncovered a manuscript map by De L'Isle which depicted the sea. This incident was one of the key pieces of evidence that won De L'Isle's suit against Nolin. Although the Mer de l'Ouest is dramatically smaller here than in its original form (and is unlabelled in this map) it sustains a fascinating myth. The map is an artistically virtuous composition on a monumental scale, the image being surrounded by thirty vignettes that depict the dramatic historical events that shaped the founding of the French and Spanish empires in the Americas. Each vignette is set within an elaborate baroque frame of a unique design, accompanied by descriptive text. The extensive text along the lower margin entitled "Description Géographique de l'Amérique" places this important map into its greater social and historical context. The map is further enhanced by a large decorative title cartouche, magnificently framed by period rocaille motifs, that depicts French Jesuits ministering to the Indians. A small vignette below the cartouche shows beavers at work, a popular motif on eighteenth-century maps of America The map also features a decorative detail that represents a social commentary on contemporary European attitudes towards the indigenous peoples they encountered in the New World. The scene occupying the lower-left of the main image depicts Mars, the god of war, capriciously watching over two Europeans who are firing rifles onto a group of native Americans, who themselves are engaging in macabre acts of cannibalism. This wall map is one of the greatest subjects of the Nolins' legacy, not only being a masterful work of art and a fascinating image that tests the very limits of European geographical knowledge, but a vivid record of a dramatic transitional period in the history of cartography, and of society in general. Hale, The Discovery of the World Maps of the Earth and the Cosmos, p. 159.

$65000.00

Africa, with All Its States, Kingdomes, Republics, Regions, Island &c. Improved and inlarged from D'Anville's map to which have been added a particular chart of the Gold Coast [on an inset larger scale map] wherein are distinguished all the european forts and factories by S. Boulton and also a summary description relative to the trade and natural produce, manners and customs of the African continent and islands
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Africa, with All Its States, Kingdomes, Republics, Regions, Island &c. Improved and inlarged from D'Anville's map to which have been added a particular chart of the Gold Coast [on an inset larger scale map] wherein are distinguished all the european forts and factories by S. Boulton and also a summary description relative to the trade and natural produce, manners and customs of the African continent and islands

By D'ANVILLE, Jean Baptiste Bourguignon (1697-1782)

London: Robert Laurie & James Whittle, 1794. Copper-engraved map, on four joined sheets, with original outline colour, some splits to old folds, small tears at margins, one with slight loss, overall in good condition. A fascinating late eighteenth-century wall map of Africa, after one of France's greatest cartographers Jean Baptiste Bourguignon d'Anville was the spiritual successor to Guillaume De L'Isle in the sense that he maintained the rigorous standard for accuracy that De L'Isle had established. D'Anville was the last French mapmaker to establish an international reputation superior to all his contemporaries, as witnessed by the respect shown by English cartographers and publishers during an era when the two countries were often at war and always hostile to one another. This excellent map of Africa, an English edition with revisions of D'Anville by Laurie & Whittle, was issued when the European appetite for exploration and colonization of the continent was just getting underway. By this time there were well over fifty fort/trading posts on the western and southeastern coasts representing various European nations, but there had been almost no penetration of the interior (these European `forts & factories' on the Gold Coast are shown in close up on Boulton's inset map). With the gradual outlawing of the slave trade by most civilized nations, interest in the vast interior regions greatly increased as whites sought other profitable resources, and Catholic and Protestant missionaries bravely evangelised. The peoples of Africa proved much more diverse and intriguing than ever imagined, and some of the discoveries in this regard are included in the extensive texts that are interspersed amongst the geographic features shown on the map.

$2500.00

L'Afrique Dressée Sur les Relationes les Plus Recentes et rectifiées sur les dernieres observations
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L'Afrique Dressée Sur les Relationes les Plus Recentes et rectifiées sur les dernieres observations

By [NOLIN, Jean-Baptiste (1657-1725)] and Jean-Baptiste NOLIN II (1686-1762)

Paris: Chez l'auteur rue s.Jacques au dessous de la rue Mathurins a l'Enseigne de la Place des Victoires, 1740. Copper-engraved wall map, with original outline colour, of four joined sheets, surrounded by text and vignettes printed on separate sheets, backed onto old linen, with contemporary wooden rollers, overall in very good condition. A rare and monumental wall map of Africa by a great French master of cartography. Jean-Baptiste Nolin was one of the most accomplished and certainly the most ambitious French cartographer of his era. He founded what ultimately became a family empire in Paris in the 1680s. Exceptionally, he managed to marry superlative decorative ornamentation with the serious objective of producing maps that reflected the most advanced rendering of geographical detail. The artistic élan of his compositions evinced a style that preserved the rhetorical ambitions of the Baroque ethic, while anticipating the playful elegance of the Rococo period. His masterpieces, many like the present wall map, were monumental in scale and represented Nolin's desire to overwhelm his competition in what was a very challenging market. Highly controversial, Nolin occasionally described himself as "the Engraver to the King", an appointment of which the royal court was curiously never apprised. In his endeavour to include the very latest geographical details on his maps, he seldom hesitated to acquire information from his eminent contemporaries, most notably Guillaume De L'Isle and Vincenzo Maria Coronelli, Jean-Dominique Cassini and the Sieur de Tillemon. At times these rivals were not appreciative of Nolin's adoption of their intellectual property, as De L'Isle successfully sued Nolin for plagiarism in 1705. However, the larger-than-life Nolin always seemed to transcend these challenges, leaving a thriving enterprise to be taken up by his son. The present map was created in 1740 by Jean-Baptiste Nolin II, largely based on earlier maps produced by his father. Geographically, the map is relatively progressive, however it showcases some rather curious speculations. The coastlines are well defined, having been explored for over two-hundred and fifty years, however, the heart of Africa remains an enigma. In the absence of direct observation, the European imagination was given free reign. In this light, Nolin adopts the seventeenth-century conceptions popularized by De L'Isle and Coronelli that the Nile was somehow connected to the Niger River, even though both rivers flow in different directions to terminate at points thousands of miles apart. Furthermore, the written descriptions of the continent's inhabitants are replete with archaic legends of bizarre and monstrous races. The presented map is an artistically virtuous composition on a monumental scale, the image being surrounded by thirty vignettes that depict events from African history. The focus of the vignettes is on the better known North African regions, however, there is also a great deal of attention paid to French commercial activities in Guinea. Each vignette is set within an elaborate baroque frame of a unique design, and is accompanied by textual narratives. The detailed description at the bottom is entitled "Description Geographique de L'Afrique." The large title cartouche is framed by period rocaille swirls, and is inhabited by an optimistic scene depicting the amicable commerce between Africans and Europeans, as well as a dedication to Louis XV. This wall map is one of the greatest subjects of the Nolins' legacy, not only being a masterful work of art and a fascinating image that tests the very limits of European geographical knowledge, but also a vivid record of a dramatic transitional period in the history of cartography, and of society in general. Tooley, Maps of Africa , p.86, plate 67.

$25000.00

L'Asie Dressée sur les Nouvelles Observations Faites en toutes les Parties de la Terre et Rectifieés
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L'Asie Dressée sur les Nouvelles Observations Faites en toutes les Parties de la Terre et Rectifieés

By [NOLIN, Jean-Baptiste (1657-1725)] and Jean-Baptiste NOLIN II (1686-1762)

Paris: Chez J.B. Nolin le Fils Geografe sur le Quay de l'Horloge du Palais a l'Enseigne de la Place des Victoires entre le Rue de Harlay et le Pont Neuf, 1740. Copper-engraved wall map, with original outline colour, of four joined sheets, surrounded by text and vignettes printed on separate sheets, backed onto old linen, with contemporary wooden rollers, overall in very good condition. A rare and monumental wall map of Asia by one of the great French masters of cartography. Jean-Baptiste Nolin was one of the most accomplished and certainly the most ambitious French cartographer of his era. He founded what ultimately became a family empire in Paris in the 1680s. Exceptionally, he managed to marry superlative decorative ornamentation with the serious objective of producing maps that reflected the most advanced rendering of geographical detail. The artistic élan of his compositions evinced a style that preserved the rhetorical ambitions of the Baroque ethic, while anticipating the playful elegance of the Rococo period. His masterpieces, many like the present wall map, were monumental in scale and represented Nolin's desire to overwhelm his competition in what was a very challenging market. Highly controversial, Nolin occasionally described himself as "the Engraver to the King," an appointment of which the royal court was curiously never apprised. In his endeavour to include the very latest geographical details on his maps, he seldom hesitated to acquire information from his eminent contemporaries, most notably Guillaume De L'Isle and Vincenzo Maria Coronelli, Jean-Dominique Cassini and the Sieur de Tillemon. At times these rivals were not appreciative of Nolin's adoption of their intellectual property, and De L'Isle successfully sued Nolin for plagiarism in 1705. However, the larger-than-life Nolin always seemed to transcend these challenges, leaving a thriving enterprise to be taken up by his son. The present map was created in 1740 by Jean-Baptiste Nolin II, largely based on an earlier maps produced by his father. While the geographical depiction of most of the continent is quite assured for the time, this map is one of the eighteenth-century's most fascinating experiments in cartographic speculation. Published on the very eve of Vitus Bering's voyage to Alaska and eastern Siberia, this map shows that contemporary Europeans had no real concept of what lands might have occupied these regions. North America is thus shown as reaching down to a point just north of Japan. On the other side of the continent, an absurdly large Greenland looms closely over the northern coast of Siberia to a point past Nova Zemlya. On the main map the Mariana Islands, or Nouvelle Phillipines, adorn the Pacific in a configuration consistent with the account of the Jesuit explorer Paul Clain. Curiously, the inset in the upper right corner depicts a different rendering of the same islands as suggested in a Jesuit report of 1697. Nolin's work is an artistically virtuous composition on a monumental scale, the image being surrounded by thirty vignettes that depict various events from Greek, Roman, Jewish, Christian, and Islamic history. In turn, each vignette is set within an elaborate baroque frame of a unique design, accompanied by textual narratives. The extensive text along the lower margin is entitled "Description Géographique de l'Asie." The upper left of the main image is adorned with an especially resplendent cartouche, featuring Jesuit priests evangelizing to the diverse peoples of the continent. This wall map is one of the greatest subjects of the Nolins' legacy, not only being a masterful work of art and a fascinating image that tests the very limits of European geographical knowledge, but a vivid record of a dramatic transitional period in the history of cartography, and of society in general.

$45000.00