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A New and Correct Map of the World, Laid Down According to the Newest Discoveries, and From the Most Exact Observations
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A New and Correct Map of the World, Laid Down According to the Newest Discoveries, and From the Most Exact Observations

By MOLL, Herman (1654-1732)

London: H. Moll, D. Midwinter, T. Bowles, P. Overton, 1730. Copper-engraved map, on four joined sheets, with original outline colour. Marginal foxing, re-margined left and right margins, reinforced center fold, repaired tear bottom margin, toning at center fold. A magnificent and monumental World map, showing the globe in the early days of the Age of Enlightenment and European Imperialism This fascinating global perspective, featured in double-hemispheres, depicts the latest state of knowledge of the world in the first quarter of the eighteenth-century. The delineation of Europe, South America, and southern Asia is quite sophisticated, while the depiction of regions further beyond suggests only fleeting exploration or outright speculation. Most of the Arctic is labelled "Parts Unknown," and the American West is largely conjectural, featuring California as an island, the most beloved of cartographic misconceptions. Lands depicted to the east of the Spice Islands are scarcely contemplated, "Iesso," or Hokkaido, is shown to be part of Siberia, and eastern Australia is left as a complete enigma, decades before the voyages of James Cook. This map was intended to satiate the intense English interest in maritime exploration and commerce. The oceans within the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn feature highly detailed hydrological information, most notably the direction of the ocean currents, that Moll gleaned from his esteemed contemporary Sir Edmond Halley. Evincing the scientific curiosity of the Enlightenment, each corner of the map features very detailed and elegant astronomical diagrams, including; the planetary systems according to both Ptolemy (geo-centric) and Copernicus (helio-centric) (with the addition of the path of a comet), the appearance of the Sun according to the Jesuit intellectual Athanasius Kircher; and the Appearance of the Moon according to Jean-Dominique Cassini. The five known planets are depicted as well, Saturn with its ring and Jupiter with four moons. The magnificent title cartouche, dedicated to George I, features classical sea gods, prefiguring the power of the Royal Navy that would allow the British to build a global empire later in the century. The present map was part of Herman Moll's magnificent folio work, a New and Compleat Atlas. Moll was the most important cartographer working in London during his era, a career that spanned over fifty years. His origins have been a source of great scholarly debate; however, the prevailing opinion suggests that he hailed from the Hanseatic port city of Bremen, Germany. Joining a number of his countrymen, he fled the turmoil of the Scanian Wars for London, and in 1678 is first recorded as working there as an engraver for Moses Pitt on the production of the English Atlas. It was not long before Moll found himself as a charter member of London's most interesting social circle, which congregated at Jonathan's Coffee House at Number 20 Exchange Alley, Cornhill. It was at this establishment that speculators met to trade equities (most notoriously South Sea Company shares). Moll's coffeehouse circle included the scientist Robert Hooke, the archaeologist William Stuckley, the authors Jonathan Swift and Daniel Defoe, and the intellectually-gifted pirates William Dampier, Woodes Rogers and William Hacke. From these friends, Moll gained a great deal of privileged information that was later conveyed in his cartographic works, some appearing in the works of these same figures. Moll was highly astute, both politically and commercially, and he was consistently able to craft maps and atlases that appealed to the particular fancy of wealthy individual patrons, as well as the popular trends of the day. In many cases, his works are amongst the very finest maps of their subjects ever created with toponymy in the English language. Shirley, Maps in the Atlases of the British Library I , T.Moll-4b, 2; Cf. Reinhartz, The Cartographer and the Literati: Herman Moll and his Intellectual Circle.

$9500.00

Hemisphere Septentrional pour voir plus distinctement les Terres Arctiques
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Hemisphere Septentrional pour voir plus distinctement les Terres Arctiques

By DE L'ISLE, Guillaume (1675-1726)

Paris, 1714. Engraved double-page map, period hand colouring in outline. Sheet size: 19 1/4 x 23 3/4 inches. Top margin trimmed close to plate mark, others wide; small abrasion in the Atlantic, mild soiling in margins. Handsome early 18th century polar projection map of the northern hemisphere. First edition of this polar projection of the Northern Hemisphere, drawn with scientific accuracy. De L'Isle is most highly regarded for his meticulous research and for leaving blank any area for which no knowledge was available; earlier cartographers were wont to insert guesswork coastlines and topographical features. This map is the first to correctly place the west coast of North America by moving it substantially eastward from previous mappings. California is correctly shown as a peninsula (at a time when it was often still shown as an island). Much of the northwest of North America is left blank. Polar projections distort increasingly as you approach the equatorial parts, but are accurate at the poles and arctic latitudes; the Mercator projection has just the opposite effect - giving northern latitudes disproportionate volume. This map corrects that impression. Guillaume de l'Isle (1675-1726) was the son of a cartographer and a pupil of Jean Dominique Cassini, who, among other important contributions, aligned the study of astronomy to the study of geography. Under Cassini's direction, observations were made from locations all over the world that enabled longitudinal calculations to be made with much greater accuracy. De l'Isle carried on this exacting work with remarkable dedication and integrity, constantly revising and improving his maps.

$700.00

Diversa Orbis Terræ. visu incedente per coluros tropicorum, ambos ejus polos, et particularis sphæræ zenith, in planum orthographica projectio... Plat Ontwerp van verscheyde Aert-klooten
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Diversa Orbis Terræ. visu incedente per coluros tropicorum, ambos ejus polos, et particularis sphæræ zenith, in planum orthographica projectio... Plat Ontwerp van verscheyde Aert-klooten

By SCHENK, Peter (1645-1715)

Amsterdam: Peter Schenk, 1706. Copper-engraved map, with full original colour, in very good condition apart from one small expertly repaired tear to the old central fold, and two small repaired tears to coastlines. A significant milestone in the history of cartography between the highly decorated 17th century Dutch style and the more `rational' style of cartography of the mid-18th century Peter Schenk was a very prolific Amsterdam mapmaker working in the great Dutch cartographical tradition. Schenk's spectacular map is based on Carel Allard's map of 1696 (Shirley, 578). Shirley's description of the Allard image is equally relevant to the present example: 'The traditional decorative border of many seventeenth-century world maps has disappeared, and ... [the] twin central hemispheres are surrounded by eight smaller projections depicting the world from various angles, and four smaller circular diagrams. The dark cross-hatched background provides a striking contrast.' This map represents a radical departure from what had become a traditional format in Dutch 17th-century maps where the margins would be full of classical mythological figures and references. Here we have a more strictly scientific approach with only a handful of cherubs parceled in between the two largest hemispheres. Cf. Koeman, Atlantes Neerlandici III, p. 119 no. 6; cf. Shirley, The Mapping of the World, 578.

$4800.00

[The World and Continents - Five Maps]
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[The World and Continents - Five Maps]

By ALLARD, Carel (1648-1709)

Amsterdam, 1705. Copper-engraved maps, with original outline colour, in very good condition. A superb set of maps the World and Continents by the eminent Dutch cartographer Allard's World map, Planisphærium Terrestre, sive Terrarum Orbis , represents a dramatic departure from the classical Dutch tradition and prefigures and influences the great age of Enlightenment cartography that flourished in Germany and the Netherlands. In the place of the conventional allegorical personifications, he surrounds his double hemispheres with twelve additional spheres, each depicting an aspect of the Earth purely as an object of scientific inquiry. Recentissima Novi Orbis Sive Americae Septentrionalis et Meridionalis Tabula is Allard's very handsome map of North and South America. Benefiting from late 17th century French maps of the two continents, it shows all five Great Lakes and a well-delineated Mississippi River. An inset in the lower-left corner depicts what was then known of New Zealand. The cartouche is especially attractive, inhabited by exotic animals and scenes relating to mankind's eternal search for gold. Accuratissima Europae Tabula, Multis locis correcta, et Nuperimè edita is Allard's highly detailed map of Europe. The map of Africa, Novissima et Perfectissima Africae Tabula, is beautifully coloured and features a black cherub riding a lion, while a regal woman, personifying Africa, beholds the scene. Exactissima Asiae Delineatio is partially based on the large-scale maps of northeastern Europe prepared by D. Nicolai Witsen (1641-1717), the Burgomaster of Amsterdam. It is thought that he was privy to maps of Siberia, which were the result of surveys commissioned by Peter the Great. Koeman, Atlantes Neelandici, Al.1, Al.4, Al.10, Al.30, & Al.73.

$29000.00

[The World and Continents - Five Maps]
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[The World and Continents - Five Maps]

By SEUTTER, Matthäus (1678-1757)

Augsburg, 1730. Copper-engraved maps, with full original colour, Worlld map with losses to bottom margin, and with re-enforcements to the top and bottom margins. Americas map has been re-backed along bottom margin and part of the right margin, trimmed close to or within platemark on right and left sides. Asia map water-stained near bottom of centerfold, and mild discoloration along centrefold, bottom margin is re-backed with repaired losses. Africa map has a water stain on the left sideborder and into the image of the map around the Cape Verde Islands, and at the bottom margin. Bottom margin is re-backed, with repaired minor losses and tears. Europe map expertly re-backed, repaired tears and minor losses to centerfold and on either side of the centerfold. Discoloration and fading in places. Superb maps of the World and the Continents by one of the great eighteenth-century German cartographers. George Matthäus Seutter learned the map publishing business as an apprentice to J. B. Homann of Nuremberg. In 1707, he moved to Augsburg where he established himself as Homann's main rival, becoming Geographer to the Imperial Court in 1715. Seutter copied many geographical details from his former protégé's maps, and the rival houses duelled with each other in order to see which one could best epitomise the southern German Baroque ethic, with its lavish decorative embellishments and iconography of Roman Catholic piety. The World Map entitled Diversi Globi Terr-Aquei Statione Variante... exemplifies the new world view of the eighteenth-century. Although the familiar twenty-four Classical windheads still adorn the image, in place of the traditional allegorical scenes, the map is really a collection of "scientific" perspectives of Earth. Around the large hemispheres of the Old and New Worlds, there are polar views, "oblique" views, and perspectives illustrating the sphericality of the Earth. The Earth is no longer a mysterious object, but is now quantifiable, progressively subject to the empirical gaze of mankind. The map of North and South America, Novus Orbis sive America Meridionalis et Septentrionalis... , features resplendent examples of Seutter's cartouches. The title cartouche is inhabited by specimens of exotic birds, flying fish, and a native chief shaded by an umbrella. Surrounding a descriptive note about the New World, in the upper left, Europeans are seated at a table while natives kneel and deposit riches before a crucifix surmounted by the Virgin Mary with the cross, a chalice and a book. The map shows California as an island, at the same time featuring many coastal sites including San Clemente and Santa Barbara. Asia cum omnibus Imperiis, Provinciis, Statibus et Insulis. .. shows the continent during the zenith of both the Mughal and Chinese Empire, the latter prominently featuring The Great Wall. The cartouches feature Asian princes, a Chinese scholar with a cup of tea, an elephant, a lion and a pair of warriors. The note to the Reader in the upper right, is a homily on the ultimate importance of eternal and spiritual values over the evanescent values of temporal riches. Africa iuxta navigationes et observationes recentissimas aucta et in sua Regna et Status divisa.. . is beautifully decorated with a large, ornate cartouche by Gottfried Rogg that features natives, pyramids, and indigenous animals such as a leopard, a lion and a crocodile. Faithful to the period, the map is full of interesting geographical speculations, revealing that Europeans actually knew very little about the regions of Africa not immediately on the coasts or the banks of major rivers. Seutter allows the Ptolemaic myth that the Nile is fed by two large lakes to persist. Europa Religionis Christianæ, Morum et Pacis ac Belli Artium Cultu Omnium Terrarum Orbis Partium Præstantiss... is the title of the Europe map. The cartouche avows the claims of the title: "[Christian Europe in all the World the most Accomplished in the Ways of Peace and War and Cultivation of the Arts]", as a chain of cherubs descend from the Godhead along with the symbols of Catholicism. A queen at the left of the title represents good government, and below Athena and Apollo represent war and the arts. Tooley & Bricker, Landmarks of Mapmaking, p. 167-170.

$18000.00

[World map] Das ander alter der werlt
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[World map] Das ander alter der werlt

By SCHEDEL, Hartmann (1440-1514)

Nuremberg, 1493. Wood engraved world map, original hand colouring recto and verso. German text. Sheet size: 16 3/4 x 23 1/4 inches. Schedel's map of the world, from the German edition of the Nuremberg Chronicle: one of the earliest obtainable world maps, here with very fine original hand colouring. Schedel's map is one of the earliest obtainable world maps, and, visually, one of the most evocative of its period. Published just 40 years after the invention of printing, Schedel's map presents the world as seen just prior to Columbus' voyage. The engraving also reflects medieval attitudes toward peoples of distant lands, with grotesque creatures to the left of the map recto, and additional images on verso. Schedel's World map is based upon Ptolemy, omitting Scandinavia, southern Africa and the Far East, and depicting the Indian Ocean as landlocked. The depiction of the World is surrounded by the figures of Shem, Japhet and Ham, and the sons of Noah, who re-populated the Earth after the Flood. On the left, printed from a separate block, are pictures of various mythical creatures, based upon classical and early mediaeval travellers' accounts, including "a six-armed man, possibly based on a file of Hindu dancers so aligned that the front figure appears to have multiple arms; a six-fingered man, a centaur, a four-eyed man from a coastal tribe in Ethiopia; a dog-headed man from the Simien Mountains, a cyclops, one of those men whose heads grow beneath their shoulders, one of the crook-legged men who live in the desert and slide along instead of walking; a strange hermaphrodite, a man with one giant foot only (stated by Solinus to be used a parasol but more likely an unfortunate sufferer from elephantisis), a man with a huge underlip (doubtless seen in Africa), a man with waist-length hanging ears, and other frightening and fanciful creatures of a world beyond." The World map also includes a large island off the west coast of Africa, which may relate to the account of Martin Behaim's voyage to the region, which is referenced by Schedel in the text. Schedel's Liber Chronicarum: Das Buch der Croniken und Geschichten (loosely translated as World Chronicle, but popularly referred to as the Nuremberg Chronicle, based upon the city of its publication), was the first secular book to include the style of lavish illustrations previously reserved for Bibles and other liturgical works. The work was intended as a history of the World, from Creation to 1493, with a final section devoted to the anticipated Last Days of the World. It is without question the most important illustrated secular work of the 15th Century and its importance rivals the early printed editions of Ptolemy's Geographia and Bernard von Breydenbach's Perengrinatio in Terram Sanctam in terms of its importance in the development and dissemination of illustrated books in the 15th Century. Published in Nuremberg by Anton Koberger, the book was printed in Latin and 5 months later in German (translated by George Alt), and enjoyed immense commercial success. However, copies of either the Latin or German editions with original hand colouring are of the utmost rarity. Nordenskiold, Facsimile Atlas, p. 38; Brown, The World Encompassed, # 44, plate XLL; Wilson's The Making of the Nuremberg Chronicle; Shirley, Mapping of the World, No. 19, pl. 25.

$24000.00

A New Map of the World from the Latest Observations
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A New Map of the World from the Latest Observations

By SENEX, John (1678-1740)

London, 1721. Copper-engraved double hemispheric world map, period hand-colouring in outline. Decorative 18th century English world map. This decorative world map includes lovely allegorical representations of the four continents flanking the cartouche. At the corners are circular insets projection maps and at the bottom center is an armillary sphere flanked by two figures. Cartographically, the map includes a depiction of California as an island and much of the northwest coast of America and the eastern coast of Australia are unmapped.

$3000.00

Chart of the World on Mercator's Projection Exhibiting all the New Discoveries to the present Time: with the Tracks of the most distinguished Navigators since the Year 1700, carefully collected from the best Charts, Maps, Voyages &c. Extant ... And regulated from the accurate Astronomical Observations, made in three Voyages Perform'd under the Command of Capt. James Cook
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Chart of the World on Mercator's Projection Exhibiting all the New Discoveries to the present Time: with the Tracks of the most distinguished Navigators since the Year 1700, carefully collected from the best Charts, Maps, Voyages &c. Extant ... And regulated from the accurate Astronomical Observations, made in three Voyages Perform'd under the Command of Capt. James Cook

By ARROWSMITH, Aaron (1750-1823)

London: A. Arrowsmith, No. 24 Rathbone Place, 1799. Engraved map, period hand-colouring in outline, printed on six full sheets and two half sheets, joined to form a pair of large folding sheets. The best world map published at the end of the 18th century, incorporating all of the discoveries made on Cook's great voyages, exhibiting new discoveries in the Pacific, as well as in the Arctic and along the northwest coast of America. Arrowsmith's first map and a major cartographic rarity. Aaron Arrowsmith was the founder of one of the leading London map publishing houses in the early part of the nineteenth century. He came to London about 1770 from Durham, his birthplace, and worked as an assistant to William Faden and as a surveyor for John Cary for whom he carried out some of the road surveys which subsequently appeared in Cary's Travellers' Companion . In 1790, Arrowsmith set up his own business in Long Acre and soon established an international reputation. "Aaron Arrowsmith, Hydrographer to the King of England and Geographer to the Prince of Wales, was the most influential and respected map publisher of the first quarter of the nineteenth century ... His role in cartographic production was to gather the best information available from a wide variety of sources, weigh the relative merits of conflicting data, and compile from this the most accurate depiction possible of an area. Arrowsmith accomplished this synthesis better than any other commercial map maker of his day and, as a result, his maps were the most sought after and highly prized on three continents" (Martin & Martin, p. 113.) Arrowsmith specialized in monumental multi-sheet maps. These were generally separately issued and are now very scarce. "We find [Arrowsmith] in 1790 established in Castle Street, Long Acre, where at great cost and labour, he brought out his first effort in map-making, A Chart of the World upon Mercator's Projection ... This chart, now rare, was published 1 April 1790" (DNB). It is stated elsewhere that "he made himself famous by his large chart of the world on Mercator's projection" (Encyclopedia Britannica). When published in 1790, this map was not only Arrowsmith's first map, but also the first separately-issued English world map to show Cook's discoveries from all three of his voyages. While a seminal piece for any Cook collection, the map incorporates many other Pacific voyages. Indeed, nearly 30 tracks of explorers are marked, dating from 1492 to 1787, including the voyages of Furneaux, Surville, Tasman, Chirikof, Bering and others. "Clarity and accuracy were [Arrowsmith's] aims - and he achieved them as no English cartographer was able to before him. His maps are still essential to historians who want to delve into the history of the 18th-century exploration of the Pacific" (Bricker, Landmarks of Mapmaking , p. 98.) Arrowsmith did a remarkable job, as the title suggests, synthesizing information from the most recent explorations. This included the most up to date information from voyages to the Northwest coast of America, as well as the Arctic. Regarding the former, Arrowsmith consulted the works of Meares, Portlock, Dixon and Duncan. Early issues of the map show the northwest coast as per those discoveries. However, on the present issue, Arrowsmith has corrected the mapping of the region around Queen Charlotte Islands to conform to Vancouver's discoveries and removed the references to Duncan. The present circa 1799 issue is the first issue to incorporate those important discoveries. In the Arctic, Arrowsmith further displays his use of the most recent discoveries, incorporating information from Alexander MacKenzie's 1787-89 expedition. This information, as a 4-line note on the map attests, was derived from Mackenzie's own manuscript journal and pre-dates the 1801 publication of Mackenzie's Voyage. The present example of the map appears to be an unrecorded state. Stevens and Tree cite 7 issues of the map published between 1790 and 1808, largely dated based on Arrowsmith's address in the imprint. Arrowsmith's move to Rathbone Place has not been firmly dated, with some sources suggesting it to be as early as 1796 and others as late as 1802 (this latter date clearly being incorrect as contemporary ads by Arrowsmith and reviews of his maps show his address as Rathbone Place by 1801). The present map is on wove paper watermarked 1799, suggesting the year of publication for this issue. The present copy conforms cartographically with Stevens's and Tree's fourth issue (i.e. with a 1794 dated note concerning the discovery of Wake Island in the Pacific, a 4-line note concerning McKenzie's discoveries in the Arctic and with Van Dieman's Land connected to the mainland), but with the imprint of their sixth issue. (It would appear that what Stevens and Tree cite as the fifth issue is actually a unique copy of the fourth issue, with additions as per the sixth issue comprised of an overlay showing Van Dieman's land). All issues of this separately-issued map are rare. Wagner, Cartography of the Northwest Coast 744; Beddie 506; Stevens & Tree, "Comparative Cartography" 90, in Tooley, The Mapping of America.

$40000.00

[Map of the World on a Globular Projection, Exhibiting Particularly the Nautical Researches of Capn. James Cook, F.R.S. with all the Recent Discoveries to the Present Time, ... This Map Is Respectfully Dedicated To Alexander Dalrymple Esqr. F.R.S. In Testimony of his many New and Valuable Geographical Communications To His most Obedient and very Humble Servant A. Arrowsmith]
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[Map of the World on a Globular Projection, Exhibiting Particularly the Nautical Researches of Capn. James Cook, F.R.S. with all the Recent Discoveries to the Present Time, ... This Map Is Respectfully Dedicated To Alexander Dalrymple Esqr. F.R.S. In Testimony of his many New and Valuable Geographical Communications To His most Obedient and very Humble Servant A. Arrowsmith]

By ARROWSMITH, Aaron (1750-1823)

[London: Compiled and Published by Aaron Arrowsmith, 1799. Engraved double-hemispheric world map, printed on four sheets and joined to form a pair of large folding sheets (one of each hemisphere), period hand-colouring in outline. On wove paper watermarked J. Ruse. (Expert restoration along the folds). A fine large-scale world map incorporating the discoveries made on Captain Cook's voyages, compiled and published by one of the greatest English cartographers. This map was first issued in 1794 and was one of the maps which made Arrowsmith's reputation. The map shows both hemispheres on a large scale and with impressive detail. Notably, the chart shows the tracks of all three of Cook's voyages, as well as information gleaned from other world travellers (for example, discoveries by Mackenzie and Hearne in the Canadian Arctic). The map was corrected and re-issued in 1799 (as here), 1808 and 1814. The present example is from the 1799 plates, but without the title and dedication which were printed on separate sheets and are sometimes are found trimmed and mounted onto the map when when joined as a single wall map. Stevens and Tree identify the above four issues based on the imprints; this copy without that information, but can be dated to the 1799 issue cartographically, i.e. with Bass Strait present and named between Australia and Tasmania, and with no indication of the Louisiana Purchase. Aaron Arrowsmith was the founder of one of the leading London map publishing houses in the early part of the nineteenth century. He came to London about 1770 from Durham, his birthplace, and worked as a surveyor for John Cary for whom he carried out some of the road surveys which subsequently appeared in Cary's Travellers' Companion in 1790. In that year he set up his own business in Long Acre and soon established an international reputation. "Aaron Arrowsmith, Hydrographer to the King of England and Geographer to the Prince of Wales, was the most influential and respected map publishers of the first quarter of the nineteenth century ... His role in cartographic production was to gather the best information available from a wide variety of sources, weigh the relative merits of conflicting data, and compile from this the most accurate depiction possible of an area. Arrowsmith accomplished this synthesis better than any other commercial map maker of his day and, as a result, his maps were the most sought after and highly prized on three continents" (Martin & Martin, p. 113). Arrowsmith specialized in monumental multi-sheet maps. These were generally separately issued and are now very scarce. Stevens & Tree, "Comparative Cartography" 91b, in Tooley, The Mapping of America ; cf. Rumsey 30; cf. Beddie 514.

$25000.00

[FOUR CONTINENTS] Europa delineata et recens edita; Asiæ nova delineata; Africæ accurata tabula; Nova et accuratissima totius Americæ descriptio
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[FOUR CONTINENTS] Europa delineata et recens edita; Asiæ nova delineata; Africæ accurata tabula; Nova et accuratissima totius Americæ descriptio

By VISSCHER, Nicolaes (1649-1702)

[Amsterdam: Visscher, 1658. Four hand-coloured copper engraved maps. A set of the four continental maps from the Golden Age of Dutch cartography The Dutch were especially well equipped for the role they played in the European discovery and colonization of the wider world. Unencumbered by any desire to impose their religious or political beliefs, they simply wanted to trade commodities and profit thereby. The ascendancy of the Dutch in global trade lasted only as long as they could withstand the English and French, who, with much larger populations, ultimately overwhelmed them, but for a considerable portion of the 17th century, the Dutch were supreme. The outlines of the world the Dutch merchantmen discovered was conveyed to the rest of Europe (as Spain and Portugal did not) in beautifully engraved and coloured maps that resonated with authority. In these four maps by Visscher, with only a few exceptions (Hokkaido, Australia, New Zealand and the mythical Anian), the continents are delineated and defined in a remarkably accurate way. This was the accumulation of the day to day observations of sea captain / tradesmen, who at this time gave the world the first comprehensive sea charts. The Dutch were tradesmen and seafarers, not conquerors or settlers, so the fundamental advancement in geographical knowledge was in coastlines and rivers, as if in preparation for the great movements of peoples to come. The interiors derive from other, less reliable sources, some of them ancient as the Ptolemaic interior of Africa. The four maps form a balanced composition and an aesthetically appealing portrait of the newly discovered World. Visscher's cartouches are light, optimistic and exuberant, happily implying a bright future. Each of the four maps bears a dedicatory cartouche to a prominent Dutch statesman and illustrates his coat of arms, usually surrounded by gods, goddesses and angels. Betz, 87; Norwich 55; Burden, 332.

$15000.00

[Double Hemisphere World Map] Die Erde in Zwey Halbkugeln
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[Double Hemisphere World Map] Die Erde in Zwey Halbkugeln

By MANNERT, Conrad von (1756-1834)

Nuremberg: Christoph Fembo, 1839. Copper-engraved map, with original outline colour. Good condition, trimmed within platemark on the top and sides, neat line intact. A very attractive and finely colored twin-hemisphere map of the world This very finely engraved map portrays the world on a bi-hemispheric projection. It evinces the great cartographic tradItion of Nuremberg, where it was devised by Professor Conrad Mannert. It depicts the globe during the height of European imperial expansion. Various possessions of the colonial hegemons are labelled, especially with regards to the British domains in the Americas. Geographically, the world has a form quite familiar to the modern eye, save the curious exception of the Canadian Arctic, which is largely shown to be an enigma.

$600.00

Le Globe Terrestre Representé En Deux Plans-Hemispheres Et En Diverses Autres Figures
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Le Globe Terrestre Representé En Deux Plans-Hemispheres Et En Diverses Autres Figures

By CORONELLI, Vincenzo Maria (1650-1718) and Jean-Nicolas de TRALAGE (c.1640-1699)

Paris: Jean-Baptiste Nolin, 1690. Copper-engraved map, with original outline colour. A very beautiful and finely engraved world map, principally devised by one of the period's greatest cartographers This very fine map is the result of the synergy of the talents of Coronelli and his French colleague Tralage, popularly known as the Sieur de Tillemont. It principally depicts the world in a bi-hemispheric projection, and largely follows the geography represented on Coronelli's celebrated globe of 1688. California is shown to be an island, and in the enigmatic void that lies to the northwest is the 'Strait of Anian' that supposedly forms the western terminus of a Northwest Passage. Beyond the Strait, just to the northeast of Japan is the mysterious "Terre de Jessu," representing, perhaps, Hokkaido. Much further south, the loosely-defined area that is now known as New Guinea is labelled as the "Terre de Quir," noting on the map that it was discovered in 1606 by the Spanish explorer Ferdinand de Quir. The only major addition here to Coronelli's established geography is the appearance of the Solomon Islands. Surrounding the principal hemispheres are eight diverse hemispheric projections of the world, evincing a playful fascination with mathematics and perspective that anticipated the Enlightenment of the next century. Adorning the two upper corners of the map are a pair of hemispheres capturing the world from an oblique perspective, one centered on Paris, and the other from its diametrically opposite position in the antipodes. Also, in the upper portion of the map, is a pair of hemispheres capturing the world in an ovoid projection, and resting in the spaces in between the two main hemispheres are a pair of projections depicting the world from a perspective centered at the poles. In the lower left corner, the entire world is captured on a projection centered at the North Pole. Most strikingly, in the lower right corner the world is captured in a cordiform, or heart-shaped projection, which since it was first devised during the Renaissance was considered an iconological symbol of various humanist values. Vincenzo Maria Coronelli, a Venetian scholar and Minorite Friar, became one of the most celebrated map and globe makers of his era. Throughout his industrious life he produced more than one-hundred terrestrial and celestial globes, several hundred maps, and a wealth of cartographic publications. In 1683, he completed the Marly Globes for Louis XIV, the largest and most magnificent globes ever made. In 1684 he founded the Academia Cosmografica degli Argonauti , the first geographical society, and was appointed Cosmographer of the Republic of Venice. The present map is the result of the lucrative partnership Coronelli formed in the late 1680s with the prominent Paris cartographer Jean-Baptiste Nolin, who printed editions of Coronelli's maps that flourished on the French market. Coronelli published two atlases, the Atlante Veneto (Venice, 1691) and the Isolario (1696-98), and compiled the first encyclopedia to be arranged alphabetically. This map was first printed in 1690, and the present map is in the second state, as indicated by its dedication which honors Louis Philippeaux de Ponchartrain, the French minister of Finance. Shirley, The Mapping of the World, 546.

$8500.00

3e Mappe-Monde
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3e Mappe-Monde

By PALAIRET, Jean (1697-1774)

London: Nourse, Vaillant, Millar, Rocque & Sayer, 1755. Copper-engraved map, with full original colour, repaired area in blank space in lower left of image, lower centerfold strengthened, otherwise in very good condition. A highly decorative map, depicting the World shortly before the great era of Pacific voyages This fascinating and attractive map showcases the world in twin hemispheres. While the general outlines of most regions are familiar to the modern observer, one will notice that vast realms of the Pacific still remained a mystery to the European consciousness. This is especially evident with reference to eastern Australia, which is shown to be connected to New Guinea and the "Terre du S. Esprit" by the "Côtes conjecturées." New Zealand is only partially delineated, having not been visited since Abel Tasman's landing in 1642. The Pacific coast of North America remains a complete enigma north of "Nle. Albion" (California). The Pacific Ocean is traversed with the normal routes of the Spanish galleons that ran between Acapulco and Manila. The map also features the track of Admiral Anson's epic circumnavigation of the world in 1740. The tropics in the Western Hemisphere are divided in the climatic zones, while the northern temperate regions are similarly divided in the Eastern Hemisphere. The map is gracefully adorned with a magnificent title cartouche of a rococo style that rests between the twin hemispheres. Jean Palairet was born in Montauban, France, but emigrated to England where he became a French tutor to the children of George II. He later wrote several informative books on arithmetic, language, arts and sciences, and geography. The present map is from the second edition of Palairet's greatest work, the Atlas méthodique , a magnificent cartographical demonstration, in which landmasses are shown in various stages of political definition. Phillips, Atlases in the Library of Congress , 3503, map 3.

$800.00

A New and Correct Map of the Whole World, Shewing ye Situation of Its Principal Parts..
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A New and Correct Map of the Whole World, Shewing ye Situation of Its Principal Parts..

By MOLL, Herman (1654-1732)

London: H. Moll, T. & J. Bowles, P. Overton & J. King, 1730. Copper-engraved map, on four joined sheets, with original outline colour, in excellent condition. A fine copy of Herman Moll's monumental and highly engaging world map, charted on Mercator's Projection This fascinating global perspective depicts the latest state of knowledge of the world in the first quarter of the eighteenth-century. The delineation of Europe, South America, and southern Asia is quite sophisticated, while the depiction of regions further beyond suggests only fleeting exploration or outright speculation. The map features the sailing tracks of various explorers including Henry Hudson, Thomas James, Willem Barents and the circumnavigation of Woodes Rogers. Most of the Arctic is labelled "Parts Unknown," and the American West is largely conjectural, featuring California as an island, the most beloved of cartographic misconceptions. Lands as depicted to the east of the Spice Islands are scarcely contemplated, "Iesso," or Hokkaido, is shown to be part of Siberia, and eastern Australia is left as a complete enigma, decades before the voyages of James Cook. This map was intended to satiate the intense English interest in maritime exploration and commerce. The oceans within the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn feature highly detailed hydrological information, most notably the direction of ocean currents, gleaned from Moll's esteemed contemporary Sir Edmond Halley. The inset to the upper left of the map features a diminutive world map depicting numerous lines of the degrees of compass variation. These calculations are, in part, based on measurements taken by Woodes Rogers during his transit across the Pacific, his individual readings being noted on the general map. An elegant circular inset in the lower left of the map depicts the Arctic regions as seen from directly above the Pole. This magnificent composition is further accentuated by the large title cartouche, which features personifications of the Old and New Worlds, enlivened by the most virtuous engraving. The present map was part of Herman Moll's magnificent folio work, a New and Compleat Atlas . Moll was the most important cartographer working in London during his era, a career that spanned over fifty years. His origins have been a source of great scholarly debate; however, the prevailing opinion suggests that he hailed from the Hanseatic port city of Bremen, Germany. Joining a number of his countrymen, he fled the turmoil of the Scanian Wars for London, and in 1678 is first recorded as working there as an engraver for Moses Pitt on the production of the English Atlas . It was not long before Moll found himself as a charter member of London's most interesting social circle, which congregated at Jonathan's Coffee House at Number 20 Exchange Alley, Cornhill. It was at this establishment that speculators met to trade equities (most notoriously South Sea Company shares). Moll's coffeehouse circle included the scientist Robert Hooke, the archaeologist William Stuckley, the authors Jonathan Swift and Daniel Defoe, and the intellectually-gifted pirates William Dampier, Woodes Rogers and William Hacke. From these friends, Moll gained a great deal of privileged information that was later conveyed in his cartographic works, some appearing in the works of these same figures. Moll was highly astute, both politically and commercially, and he was consistently able to craft maps and atlases that appealed to the particular fancy of wealthy individual patrons, as well as the popular trends of the day. In many cases, his works are amongst the very finest maps of their subjects ever created with toponymy in the English language. Shirley, Maps in the Atlases of the British Library I , T.Moll-4b, 2; Cf. Reinhartz, The Cartographer and the Literati: Herman Moll and his Intellectual Circle.

$15000.00

[The World and Continents - Five Maps]
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[The World and Continents - Five Maps]

By HONDIUS, Henricus (1597 - 1651) and Jan JANSSON (1588-1664)

Amsterdam: Jan Jansson, 1649. Copper-engraved maps, from the "Novus Atlas," German text edition, in excellent condition. An excellent set of the World and Continents, by Hondius and Jansson, two of the Netherlands' greatest cartographers This handsome set of the World and Continents comes from the 1649 German edition of Jan Jansson and Henricus Hondius' Novus Atlas, Das Ist: Welt-Beschreibung mit allerhand schönen newen auszführ lichen Taffeln Inhaltende Die Königreiche und Länder des gantzen Erdtreichs . This monumental work was the inheritor of the legacy of the great atlas first published in 1595 by Rumold Mercator, and later re-issued and revised by Jodocus Hondius and family. In 1630, Willem Blaeu dramatically entered the land atlas market, compelling Jansson and Hondius to mount this powerful reprise. The World map, Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica ac Hydrographica Tabula, originally dates from 1630, and is present here in the second state, dated '1641', but printed in 1649 using the same plate. It is richly decorated in Baroque style, and is most memorable for the four portraits that adorn it: Julius Caesar and Claudius Ptolemy, at the top; and Gerard Mercator and Jodocus Hondius Sr., at the bottom. Also featured are the four elements of Classical science, illustrated in accordance with Greek and Roman mythology. At the bottom of the composition, between the two hemispheres, are personifications of the four continents. Europe is shown as an enthroned queen with a scepter and a book, symbolising power and knowledge. Alluding to the colonial aspirations of the European powers, Europe accepts gifts offered in outstretched hands by Native Americans, Africans and Asians. In the map, California is shown as an island, a fairly recent innovation, curiously not depicted on the accompanying map of the Americas. The map of Europe, Europa Exactissime Descripta , originally dated 1631, is present here in the second state. Many details regarding the configuration and political boundaries derive from Mercator's map of Europe. The dedication to Louis XIII of France alludes to the alliance forged between France and the United Provinces in 1630, a pact engineered by Cardinal Richelieu which helped guarantee Holland's independence from Spain. (Spain's continued effort to re-invest Holland was one of the ongoing causes of the Thirty Years' War). Africae nova Tabula, first printed in 1631, and present here in the third state, is a fascinating map that reveals the extent to which the interior of the continent largely remained an enigma to Europeans, with the ancient myth that the Nile was fed by two large lakes taking precedence. The coasts, portrayed with relative accuracy, were what really interested the Dutch, who by virtue of their recent seizure of the fortress of Elmina on the Gold Coast had become major protagonists in the African slave trade. The map is embellished with numerous African animals, including ostriches, crocodiles, lions and a griffin. The sea is inhabited by ships, flying fish, sea monsters and the god Neptune. The map of Asia, Asia recens summa cura delineata , was originally printed in 1631, and is present here in the second state, distinguished from the former by the addition of 'Janssonius' as the named publisher. It is dedicated to Eilhard Lubbin, a cartographer and mathematician of Rostock. The image of the Far East is significantly improved from Mercator's example, reflecting information derived from Dutch traders and Jesuit priests. America noviter delineata was first issued by Jodocus Hondius Jr. in 1618, and is present here in the fourth state. Geographically, the map predates the 'California as an Island' phenomenon, and does not include LeMaire's discovery of Cape Horn. The map is elegantly embellished with merchant ships and sea monsters. Burden, The Mapping of North America I, 192; Koeman, Atlantes Neerlandici I (1997 ed.) , 1:424/27; Norwich, Maps of Africa, 34; Shirley, The Mapping of the World , 336.

$28500.00

The World on Mercator's Projection
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The World on Mercator's Projection

By TANNER, H.[enry] S.[chenck] (1786-1858)

Philadelphia: H. S. Tanner, 1823. Copper-engraved map, with full original color, n very good condition. A World map by one of America's first great cartographers The objective of depicting a three dimensional sphere on a two dimensional sheet of paper has challenged mapmakers since Classical times. Mercator's solution was to straighten all of the longitudinal meridians, making them perpendicular to the lines of latitude. The consequence of this projection was that while lands close to the Equator assumed a relatively realistic form, lands closer to the poles attained a progressively attenuated and exaggeratedly large appearance. The map reflects the great improvements in geographical understanding in the wake of the epic sea voyages of the late eighteenth-century, most notably those by Cook, La Perouse and Vancouver.

$1200.00