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The Student's Tale of the Patient Grizelda

By Dulac, Edmund

1942. Watercolor on board, signed "Edmund Dulac" (lower right), titled and docketed in margin under mat. 12 x 13-1/2 in. Removed from frame and mat. Watercolor on board, signed "Edmund Dulac" (lower right), titled and docketed in margin under mat. 12 x 13-1/2 in. Beginning in 1924, celebrated Orientalist illustrator Dulac was commissioned by the Hearst magazine American Weekly to produce an annual series of cover illustrations on a literary or historical theme. This piece is the first of 8 covers illustrating scenes from the Canterbury Tales, and depicts a pivotal scene from "The Clerk's Tale," in which Griselda, exiled from her noble husband's home, returns to her father's house in rags. The Patient Griselda was a popular figure in medieval folklore, appearing in both Boccaccio's Decameron and Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, as well as subseuqent works by Petrarch and others. An impossibly virtuous common woman who marries (in Chaucer's version) a king, her virtue is tested when her husband torments her to prove her obedience and love. When he sends her back to her father, she voluntarily gives up her clothes, a sacrifice symbolically conveyed by her Christ-like posture in Dulac's illustration. Though Griselda's story most directly evokes the sufferings of Job, in Dulac's rendering of the scene, she is presented as a female Christ figure in the classical Western tradition. Although this moment in Griselda's is nominally one of defeat, this illustration conveys her religious sense of purpose and surrounds her with an incredulous father and weeping followers. Later in the story, Griselda's dedication is rewarded: her husband takes her back, and they live a long and happy life together. Literature: American Weekly, 9 August 1942, cover illustration; White, Edmund Dulac, p. 205

$22500.00

"Sandra, my happiness is in your hands."
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"Sandra, my happiness is in your hands."

By Steig, William

[New York: published in New Yorker Magazine, Inc, 1958. Wash drawing on paper, signed "Steig" lower left. 10 x 10 inches (paper); 4-3/4 x 6-3/4 inches (image). Stamps of the New Yorker Magazine Inc on back, docketed in pencil with notes for re-sizing. Wash drawing on paper, signed "Steig" lower left. 10 x 10 inches (paper); 4-3/4 x 6-3/4 inches (image).

$1000.00

The Black Sheep
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The Black Sheep

By Parrish, Maxfield

1901. Lithographic print, signed at lower right by the artist in pencil, with a flourish to the final h. 10 x 8 1/4 in. Matted. Fine. Lithographic print, signed at lower right by the artist in pencil, with a flourish to the final h. 10 x 8 1/4 in. From the book Mother Goose in Prose.

$2500.00

Recueil de Planches sur les Science, Les Arts Liberaux et Les Arts Mécaniques, avec Leur Explications...Troisieme Livraison 298 Planches (not all present)

By Diderot, Denis

Paris: Chez Briasson, David, Le Breton, 1765. Includes Ébenisteries-Marqueterie (11 plates); Emailleur a la Lampe, et Peinture en email (5 plates); Eperonnier (Spur maker, 16 plates); Epinglier (3 plates, 2 double page, Pin making); Escime, (15 pp. of text, 15 plates); Eventailliste, (4 plates, fanmaker); Fayencerie, 5 pages of text, 12 plates), etc. Folio. Disbound, plates clean. Includes Ébenisteries-Marqueterie (11 plates); Emailleur a la Lampe, et Peinture en email (5 plates); Eperonnier (Spur maker, 16 plates); Epinglier (3 plates, 2 double page, Pin making); Escime, (15 pp. of text, 15 plates); Eventailliste, (4 plates, fanmaker); Fayencerie, 5 pages of text, 12 plates), etc. Folio. 66 PLATES.

$1250.00

Portrait of Arnold Bennet, half-length, in evening dress
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Portrait of Arnold Bennet, half-length, in evening dress

By Simpson, Joseph

[London, 1935. Chalk on paper. 10.50 x 7.75 inches. Framed and glazed. Fine. Chalk on paper. 10.50 x 7.75 inches.

$1250.00

Isn't it Wonderful
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Isn't it Wonderful

By Robinson, William Heath

1910. Watercolor on paper, signed "W. Heath Robinson" (lower right). 14-1/4 x 10-1/4 in. Matted and framed. Watercolor on paper, signed "W. Heath Robinson" (lower right). 14-1/4 x 10-1/4 in. The Graphic, Mid-Summer Number, June 25, 1910, page XX. Exhibited: Chris Beetles, The Brothers Robinson (1992), no 376. Literature: The Graphic, Mid-Summer Number (25 June 1910), p. xx; Christian, The Last Romantics (1989)

$55000.00

Bill the Minder
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Bill the Minder

By Robinson, William Heath

1912. Watercolor on paper, signed "W. Heath Robinson" (lower left). 14-3/4 x 11-1/8 in. Matted and framed. Watercolor on paper, signed "W. Heath Robinson" (lower left). 14-3/4 x 11-1/8 in. A fine example of Robinson's work. "In Bill the Minder Heath Robinson really found himself. The story is a simple tale or a series of tales about the wanderings of the King of Troy and a boot-cleaner called Bill, who became the Minder (today he would be called a baby-sitter) to the bad-tempered family of a bad-tempered mushroom-gatherer named Crispin. Like most of Heath Robinson's characters, Bill was a solemn little person who took his minding very seriously, even to the extent of studying at the British Museum and in the Minding Room of the Patents Museum at South Kensington. Soon he fame as a Minder spread and he found himself minding a large flock of children. One day they were out in the fields, being minded by Bill, they found an eccentric old man in a haystack. It was the King of Troy, who had been banished from his country. With Bill's assistance, the children set out on a journey, and through a series of adventures they restore this unworldly old gentleman to his throne. In the process they meet some very droll characters. These are the substance of some of Heath Robinson's wittiest drawings" (Lewis, p. 102). Literature: Robinson, Bill the Minder (Constable & Co., 1912), frontispiece; Larkin, Fantastic Paintings of Charles & WIlliam Heath Robinson, plate 6; Lewis, Heath Robinson Artist and Comic Genuis (Constable, 1973)

$55000.00

"At last she reached the cellar, and there she found an old, old woman with a shaking head", illustration from The Robber Bridegroom, Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm
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"At last she reached the cellar, and there she found an old, old woman with a shaking head", illustration from The Robber Bridegroom, Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm

By Rackham, Arthur (British, 1867-1939)

Watercolor and ink on illustration board, signed lower right "A. Rackham" within rectangle,in script verso "Board of Education S.K./Exhitn. Of Illustr/Illustr. To Grimm. (Freemouth...)". 9-3/8 x 7-9/16 inches. Matted and framed. Fine. Watercolor and ink on illustration board, signed lower right "A. Rackham" within rectangle,in script verso "Board of Education S.K./Exhitn. Of Illustr/Illustr. To Grimm. (Freemouth...)". 9-3/8 x 7-9/16 inches. Exhibition label verso "Exhibition of Works by Arthur Rackham/Held at the Leicester Galleries/Leicester Square, London,/Dec 1909/No. 33./Purchaser Z. Merton Esq.", "Rec. July 16 3 col...not exceed 7 x 5"

$52000.00

Katrina van Tassel and Brom Bones
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Katrina van Tassel and Brom Bones

By Rackham, Arthur

1928. Watercolor and pen and black ink and on paper, signed "Arthur Rackham" (lower left). 10-1/2 x 9-1/2 in. Matted and framed. Watercolor and pen and black ink and on paper, signed "Arthur Rackham" (lower left). 10-1/2 x 9-1/2 in. An original watercolor by Arthur Rackham for Irving's The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, showing the courting couple, Katrina van Tassel and Ichabod Crane's hated rival, Brom Bones. Literature: Irving, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow (George G. Harrap & Co, 1928); Latimore & Haskell, pp. 63-4; Riall, pp. 164-5

$50000.00

The Buried Moon ("In her frantic struggles the hood of her cloak fell back from her dazzling golden hair, and immediately the whole place was flooded with light")
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The Buried Moon ("In her frantic struggles the hood of her cloak fell back from her dazzling golden hair, and immediately the whole place was flooded with light")

By Dulac, Edmund

1916. Watercolor, pencil and ink, signed "Edmund Dulac 16" (lower right) and titled in his hand beneath. 12-5/8 x 11 in. Matted and framed. Watercolor, pencil and ink, signed "Edmund Dulac 16" (lower right) and titled in his hand beneath. 12-5/8 x 11 in. Superb and striking original illustration for "The Buried Moon" from Edmund Dulac's Fairy-Book: Fairy Tales of the Allied Nations, his 1916 collection of fairy stories from the different Allied lands, published by Hodder & Stoughton as their widely publicized Christmas gift book. "This book received even more attention in New York than in England. The 15 illustrations formed the centerpiece of Dulac's first American exhibition, when 70 of his works were shown during December 1916 at Scott and Fowles Gallery ... On December 3, The New York Times Magazine published a reproduction of 'The Friar and the Boy' and announced the opening of the exhibit with a detailed critique ... During this period of his work, Dulac had immersed himself in the artistic traditions of folklore. He was partly stimulated by his friendship with Yeats (whose interest in Celtic folklore was legendary)" (Hughey). Exhibited: Scott & Fowles, 1916 catalogue, no. 46 ("Lent by James G. Heaslet"). Literature: Edmund Dulac's Fairy-Book (Hodder & Stoughton, 1916), p. 8; Hughey, Edmund Dulac: His Book Illustrations, no. 47

$50000.00

The Snow Queen ("The old woman went right into the water")
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The Snow Queen ("The old woman went right into the water")

By Rackham, Arthur

1932. Watercolor and pen and black ink on illustration board, signed "A. Rackham" (lower right). 14 x 11-1/2 in. Matted and framed. Watercolor and pen and black ink on illustration board, signed "A. Rackham" (lower right). 14 x 11-1/2 in. Original watercolor illustrating an episode from "The Snow Queen," from Hans Christian Andersen's Fairy Tales, published by Harrap in 1932, for which Rackham executed 8 color and 19 black-and-white illustrations. The present illustration is reproduced in black-and-white on page 55. Gerda called out still louder, and then there came out fo the house an old, old woman leaning on a crutch: she had on a big sun-hat, painted with the most lovely flowers. 'You poor little child!' said the old woman. 'How did you manage to come on the great strong river, and to float so far out into the wide world?' And then the old woman went right into the water, hooked the boat with her crutch, drew it to land, and lifted little Gerda out" (Fairy Tales, p. 54). Literature: Andersen, Fairy Tales (George G. Harrap & Co., 1932), p. 55; Latimore & Haskell, p. 68; Riall, p. 177

$47500.00

The Tempest, Act I, Scene 2 (Caliban: "Wouldst give me Water with berries in't")
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The Tempest, Act I, Scene 2 (Caliban: "Wouldst give me Water with berries in't")

By Dulac, Edmund

1908. Watercolor, pencil and ink on paper, signed "Edmund Dulac 08" (lower left), additionally inscribed on verso: "Caliban. Wouldst give me water with berries in it ... Act I Sc. II" and numbered 39. 15 x 9-7/8 in. Matted and framed. Watercolor, pencil and ink on paper, signed "Edmund Dulac 08" (lower left), additionally inscribed on verso: "Caliban. Wouldst give me water with berries in it ... Act I Sc. II" and numbered 39. 15 x 9-7/8 in. A beautiful watercolor from Dulac's second major gift book commission for Hodder & Stoughton. The Dulac Tempest was issued as part of a projected series of Shakespeare illustrated by contemporary artists that was never completed. "Dulac can be considered a perfect illustrator for Shakespeare because of his tendency always to mix in with serious pictures some humorous ones, just as Shakespeare inserted scenes of comic relief between his serious ones ... Dulac shows sensitivity to the nuances of the sea with his beautiful greens and blues and patterns of surf and rocks" (Hughey). Dulac "showed greater human understanding as the illustrations moved beyond stage scenes and became mood pictures or tone poems ... Dulac's greater assurance in The Tempest was manifested in many beautifully observed scenes ... Caliban looks like a benevolent Neanderthal man, not very frightening, as befits an edition for children ... The publication of The Tempest in November 1908 was again timed to coincide with the Leicester Galleries' exhibition of the original watercolours, and both the art and book critics acclaimed his work, particularly his treatment of the sea" (White, Edmund Dulac, p. 36). Exhibited: Leicester Galleries. Literature: Shakespeare's Comedy of the Tempest (Hodder & Stoughton, 1908), p. 26; Hughey, Edmund Dulac: His Book Illustrations, no. 19

$40000.00

The Friar and the Boy ("The Friar, bound fast to the post, squirmed and wriggled, showing plainly that he would foot it if he could")
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The Friar and the Boy ("The Friar, bound fast to the post, squirmed and wriggled, showing plainly that he would foot it if he could")

By Dulac, Edmund

1916. Watercolor, pencil and ink on paper, signed "Edmund Dulac 16" (lower left) and titled in his hand beneath. 12-5/8 x 11 in. Matted and framed. Watercolor, pencil and ink on paper, signed "Edmund Dulac 16" (lower left) and titled in his hand beneath. 12-5/8 x 11 in. Superb and striking original illustration for "The Friar and the Boy" from Edmund Dulac's Fairy-Book: Fairy Tales of the Allied Nations, his 1916 collection of fairy stories from the different Allied lands, published by Hodder & Stoughton as their widely publicized Christmas gift book. "This book received even more attention in New York than in England. The 15 illustrations formed the centerpiece of Dulac's first American exhibition, when 70 of his works were shown during December 1916 at Scott and Fowles Gallery ... On December 3, The New York Times Magazine published a reproduction of 'The Friar and the Boy' and announced the opening of the exhibit with a detailed critique ... During this period of his work, Dulac had immersed himself in the artistic traditions of folklore. He was partly stimulated by his friendship with Yeats (whose interest in Celtic folklore was legendary)" (Hughey). Several of the drawings show the influences of Dulac's tour of the eastern Mediterranean and his interest in Asian art. "By contrast, in the English fairy tale, The Friar and the Boy, a traditional technique is used, the eye being drawn inwards by the perspective of the flagstones, receding pillars, and roof beams. By careful use of clean bright colour, Dulac prevented his dancing figures from looking like cut-outs, and although the picture at first seems to be a return to an earlier style, a comparison with 'Madame s'est piqué le doigt' shows how much Dulac's work had altered in ten years" (White, p. 77). Exhibited: Scott & Fowles, 1916 catalogue, no. 43 ("Lent by James G. Heaslet") Literature: Edmund Dulac's Fairy-Book (Hodder & Stoughton, 1916), p. 128; White, Edmund Dulac, p. 79; Hughey, Edmund Dulac: His Book Illustrations, no. 47

$40000.00

The Tempest, Act III, Scene 3 (Caliban: "Sounds and sweet airs that give delight & hurt not")
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The Tempest, Act III, Scene 3 (Caliban: "Sounds and sweet airs that give delight & hurt not")

By Dulac, Edmund

1908. Watercolor, pencil and ink on paper, signed "Edmund Dulac 08" (lower left), additionally inscribed on verso: "Sounds and sweet airs that give delight & hurt not. Act III Sc. III" and numbered 31. 15 x 9-7/8 in. Matted and framed. Watercolor, pencil and ink on paper, signed "Edmund Dulac 08" (lower left), additionally inscribed on verso: "Sounds and sweet airs that give delight & hurt not. Act III Sc. III" and numbered 31. 15 x 9-7/8 in. A beautiful Dulac watercolor, an idyllic waterside scene for Caliban's "Sounds and sweet airs that give delight and hurt not," from Dulac's second major gift book commission. The Dulac Tempest was issued as part of a projected series of Shakespeare illustrated by contemporary artists that was never completed. "Dulac can be considered a perfect illustrator for Shakespeare because of his tendency always to mix in with serious pictures some humorous ones, just as Shakespeare inserted scenes of comic relief between his serious ones ... Dulac shows sensitivity to the nuances of the sea with his beautiful greens and blues and patterns of surf and rocks" (Hughey). Dulac "showed greater human understanding as the illustrations moved beyond stage scenes and became mood pictures or tone poems ... Dulac's greater assurance in The Tempest was manifested in many beautifully observed scenes ... The publication of The Tempest in November 1908 was again timed to coincide with the Leicester Galleries' exhibition of the original watercolours, and both the art and book critics acclaimed his work, particularly his treatment of the sea" (White, Edmund Dulac, p. 36). Provenance: Countess of Lytton. Exhibited: London, Leicester Galleries, 1908. Literature: Shakespeare's Comedy of the Tempest (Hodder & Stoughton, 1908), p. 58; Hughey, Edmund Dulac: His Book Illustrations, no. 19

$40000.00

The Witching Hour, Issue 20 Page 1
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The Witching Hour, Issue 20 Page 1

By (Comic Art) Cardy, Nick

DC Comics Inc, 1972. 16 x 10 inches. Fine. 16 x 10 inches. The Witching Hour was an American comic book anthology focusing on stories of horror and the supernatural. The stories were hosted and introduced by three witches, based on Macbeth's Weird Sisters and the archetypal Maiden/Mother/Crone characterization. This first page shows the three witches, Morded, Mildred, and Cynthia, getting settled in their new apartment in which they attempt to figure out how to find food, and share a residence with a vulture. These pages are a rarity because of their small inclusion in The Witching Hour.

$500.00

The Witching Hour Vol 1 17, page 1 "The Little Witch Went to College"
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The Witching Hour Vol 1 17, page 1 "The Little Witch Went to College"

By (Comic Art) Heck, Don

DC Comics Inc, 1971. 16 x 10 inches. Fine. 16 x 10 inches. The Witching Hour was published for 85 issues from February-March 1969 to October 1978. The beginning of each of the comics featured three witches 'hosting' the tales in a similar fashion to Macbeth's Weird Sisters. The three witches, based on the archetypes of Maiden/Mother/Crone, Cynthia, Mildred, and Morded, guide the readers along with their humorous tendencies as in this issue when they go house hunting and prefer the smog and stagnant. Their characteristics are reminiscent of the Addams Family.

$500.00

Green Lantern Volume 2 168, page 8 "A Ring of Endless Might!"
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Green Lantern Volume 2 168, page 8 "A Ring of Endless Might!"

By (Comic Art) George, Tuska

DC Comics Inc, 1983. 16 x 10 inches. Fine. 16 x 10 inches. Comic Synopsis: Green Lantern must fight Kaylark, who has made herself empress of her home-world with her improved power ring. "Green Lantern Vol 2 168." DC Database. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Apr. 2015. Page Synopsis: Kaylark has become mad with power as new empress of her world. She claims all the riches in the land, and expresses no fear. The pirates appear who claim she has broken their deal since Kaylark never turned over the Oan Power ring for them to copy.

$350.00

Ichabod Crane
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Ichabod Crane

By Rackham, Arthur

1928. Watercolor and pen and black ink on paper, signed "Arthur Rackham" (lower right). 8-1/2 x 6-3/4 in. Matted and framed. Watercolor and pen and black ink on paper, signed "Arthur Rackham" (lower right). 8-1/2 x 6-3/4 in. Rackham's superb illustration of the hapless schoolmaster of Sleepy Hollow, Ichabod Crane. Rackham has captured the essence of Irving's description: "He was tall, but exceedingly lank, with narrow shoulders, long arms and legs, hands that dangled a mile out of his sleeves, feet that might have served for shovels, and his whole frame most loosely hung together. His head was small, and flat at top, with huge ears, large green glassy eyes, and a long snipe nose, so that it looked like a weather-cock, perched upon his spindle neck, to tell which way the wind blew. To see him striding along the profile of a hill on a windy day, with his clothes bagging and fluttering about him one might have mistaken him for the genius of famine descending upon the earth, or some scarecrow eloped from a cornfield" Provenance: Estate of Connecticut artist Rachel Breck. Literature: Irving, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow (George G. Harrap & Co, 1928); Latimore & Haskell, pp. 63-4; Riall, pp. 164-5

$32500.00

The Patchwork Girl of Oz-Page 126
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The Patchwork Girl of Oz-Page 126

By Neill, John R.

Reilly & Britton, 1913. 7 x 5 in. zinc plate. Fine. 7 x 5 in. zinc plate.

$1600.00

The Patchwork Girl of Oz-Page 14
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The Patchwork Girl of Oz-Page 14

By Neill, John R.

Reilly & Britton, 1913. 7 1/4 x 5 1/4 in. zinc plate. Fine. 7 1/4 x 5 1/4 in. zinc plate.

$1500.00

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