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Manuscript indenture of Lawrence Sendey, knight of Southampton
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Manuscript indenture of Lawrence Sendey, knight of Southampton

By Sendey, Lawrence

Southampton, England, 1565. 478 x 305 mm. Ink on parchment, old folds. Wax seal affixed on parchment hanging tab at bottom, paper label on verso reads B 1260. Very slight water damage in places. 478 x 305 mm. Lawrence is here described as a "knight" of Southampton.

$600.00

Manuscript indenture between Henry Reade, Mary Reade and Alice Winghame
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Manuscript indenture between Henry Reade, Mary Reade and Alice Winghame

By Reade, Henry, Mary Reade, Alice Winghame

Southampton, England, 1599. 615 x 305 mm. Ink on parchment, old folds, two wax seals affixed on parchment hang tabs at bottom. 615 x 305 mm. Yeoman lease. Signatures and marks (in place of signatures) on verso along with paragraph in a contemporary hand describing the document. Later 1cm paper label on verso reads "88" Lighter note on verso rather puzzlingly reads "William Kinge his lease 3 May 14 Eliz" This is a comparatively early reference to yeomen, a term that describes the wealthy peasant farmers who are sometimes considered the beginnings of the "middle class" in early modern England.

$750.00

Manuscript indenture from the reign of Queen Elizabeth I of England between John Bert and Thomas Ruther
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Manuscript indenture from the reign of Queen Elizabeth I of England between John Bert and Thomas Ruther

By Bert, John and Thomas Ruther

Boughton under Bleane, 1598. 690 x 345 mm. Ink on parchment, old folds, with wax seal of a shield with a coat of arms on a parchment tag at bottom. Docketed and signed on verso in a contemporary hand. 690 x 345 mm. Sixteenth-Century Kentish History. This indenture from 1598, the 40th year of the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, is between John Bert, a gentleman of Boughton Bleane (now Boughton under Blean, between Faversham and Cantebury) in Kent and Thomas Ruther of Bishopsborne in Kent. The two locations are approximately ten miles apart today. On the verso, visible when folded, is the note: "Sealed and delivered in the presence of" followed by five signatures including Eswarde Radcliffe, Edwarde Lambe, and three that are more ideosyncratically written and hard to decipher. Another note on the verso in a later hand reads "Gulles Pound in Eastbridge Parish" and is near an affixed paper label with the note "El 198" in a blue printed frame.

$750.00

Manuscript indenture of demise from John Fetyplace, gentleman of Beselslight to Henry Towpott of Appleton
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Manuscript indenture of demise from John Fetyplace, gentleman of Beselslight to Henry Towpott of Appleton

By Fetyplace, John and Henry Towpott

Appleton, England, 1572. 585 x 325 mm. Ink on parchment, old folds, parchment hang tag lacking wax seal. 585 x 325 mm. Berkshire 300 year indenture. Signed by John Fetyplace on bottom right edge. Annotated in brown ink and pencil on verso, with paper label reading C 319. This manuscript is on a distinctively fuzzy English parchment and would be a wonderful teaching sample.

$500.00

Manuscript leaf in Latin from c. 1400  Italian Dominican Missal
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Manuscript leaf in Latin from c. 1400 Italian Dominican Missal

Italy, 1400. KL initial at top of each page rubricated in red and blue, rubricated in red ink throughout. 12-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches. VG. KL initial at top of each page rubricated in red and blue, rubricated in red ink throughout. 12-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches. This calendar leaf from the months of November and December from an Italian manuscript of Dominican origin has been dated to c.1400. The calendar's columns include the golden numbers (the roman numerals in the left-most column) and Dominical letters, which together allowed for the calculation of when Easter would fall in any given year. It also includes columns counting down to the ides and nones of the month, an echo of the ancient Roman calendar. The rubricated feast days (those written in red, the origin of the term "red-letter days") include the nativity, the Apostle Andrew, and Saint Catherine of Alexandria, recorded as "Katerine virgi" on November 25.

$375.00

Mannuscript leaf in latin small hand two columns from Book of Ezekiel ending 16:37
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Mannuscript leaf in latin small hand two columns from Book of Ezekiel ending 16:37

1 page, written recto and verso one rubricated initial in blue. 6-1/4 x 4-1/4 inches. Fine. 1 page, written recto and verso one rubricated initial in blue. 6-1/4 x 4-1/4 inches. Neat and Tiny Paris Bible Leaf. A fine example of what is commonly called a "Paris Bible" this leaf from the Book of Ezekiel, lined in graphite or pale grey ink, is written in a tiny, tidy gothic hand with neat and precise ascenders, descenders, and abbreviation marks. A wonderful teaching example for teaching about manuscript layout, history, or medieval manuscript culture.

$350.00

Manuscript indenture from the reign of Queen Elizabeth between David Arrey (?) and Richard Godfrey

By Arrey, David and Richard Godfrey

Isle of Wight, 1588. 560 x 300 mm with fold at bottom and hanging parchment tab with wax seal. Ink on parchment, old folds. Docketed in a contemporary hand on verso. Wax seal on a hanging parchment tab. 560 x 300 mm with fold at bottom and hanging parchment tab with wax seal. Sixteenth-century Isle of Wight. This indenture, between David Arrey (?) of Aston in the Isle of Wight and Richard Godfrey of the same isle records the transfer of property. A slightly spidery hand in fading ink renders the top half of this document slightly challenging, but the scribe is consistent in abbreviation and letterform. An interesting look at the late sixteenth-century history of the Isle of Wight.

$750.00

Manuscript indenture from the reign of Queen Elizabeth I of England

By Cheyney, Thomas and John Partridge

Luton, England, 1578. 450 x 320 mm. Ink on parchment. Old folds, wax seal partially intact on parchment hang tag. Contemporary annotations on verso. 450 x 320 mm. Bedfordshire history. An indenture between Thomas Cheyney of Bramanyer, in the parish of Luton in the Countie of Bedford and John Partridge, who is described as a yeoman -- which is a comparatively wealthy non-titled farmer. It is compartively unusual to see a seal survive on such a document. The hand is distinct, uses several common (and some less common) abbreviations derived from Latin documentary hands, and the document uses gothic lettering for emphasis in places.

$550.00

Manuscript indenture from the reign of Queen Elizabeth I between William Frankland and Hugh Frankland

By Frankland, William and Hugo

London, 1568. 590 x 405 mm. Ink on parchment, old folds, signed in a contemporary hand on lower fold, docketed in a contemporary hand on verso, slightly effaced, verso slightly darkened. 590 x 405 mm. Sixteenth century London. This document would be an excellent paleographical example of English secretary hand with interspersed Gothic lettering used for emphasis. The legal terminology is straigthforward and usual for contemporary documents. Numerous locations within London are named, though the hand is sometimes unclear enough to make the place names uncertain Both signatures -- of William and of Hugo Frankland -- survive clearly on the bottom fold, above the vellum tags where wax seals would have originally hung, the names above the corresponding seals. The extensive list of witnesses on the verso is of particular interest to any historian of early modern London. Names include: Richard Farmer, Thomas Burton, Henry Walker, John Hellom, and others In addition to its textual and historical interest, this document would be excellent for teaching the material aspects manuscript history: it has the characteristically and distinctively "fuzzy" feel of English parchment, which is unforgettable once encountered in person.

$600.00

Manuscript indenture from the reign of Queen Elizabeth I of England between Thomas Knight and John Holwaye of Southwark

By Knight, Thomas and John Holwaye

1590. 560 x 225 mm with fold at bottom edge. Ink on parchment, old folds, with wax seal of a hound or wolf on a hanging parchment tag, cracking at back. Docketed on verso in a contemporary hand. 560 x 225 mm with fold at bottom edge. Sixteenth-century Hampshire History. This document recording a property transfer is made out between Thomas Knight of Hartley Mauditt, husbandman, and John Holwaye of Selborne, yeoman, both given as residing in the county of Southampton. The legal formulations are traditional and repetitive and an excellent example of the terminology of the time. Representative phrases include: "the sayd Thomas Knight for certeyne good causes and resonabull consideracyons ... by theis prosent doth frelye absolutlye and without condition geve graunt bargayne and sell unto the sayd John Holwaye his heires and assign forever and to the onlye sole and behous of the sayd John, his heires and assign forever all that the tenement ...." Hartley Mauditt is today an abandoned village, but Selborne is occupied. Both are in Hampshire and this is a fascinating look at local English history, signed by several local and contemporary witnesses, including one Matthew Larch.

$750.00

Two manuscript indentures on vellum; one will and testament of Gilberte Lookar; an attached smaller document in Latin
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Two manuscript indentures on vellum; one will and testament of Gilberte Lookar; an attached smaller document in Latin

By Lookar, Gilberte

Basingstoke, England, 1591. Ink on parchment;. Two manuscript leaves, folded and creased. Top of larger leaf slightly frayed, some minor fading of ink. Smaller charter is attached to the larger with a parchment tie at bottom. Parchment hanging tag appended to larger leaf may have had a seal appended, but none remains. Else good. Ink on parchment;. A late sixteenth-century will with an earlier family charter. Two attached manuscripts: the larger is the last will and testament of one Gilberte Lookar, of Basingstoke, England, dated 1591, and is in English; the smaller is a tenure document of John Lookar. It is in a slightly crabbed, possibly earlier hand and is in Latin.

$750.00

Indenture in English between Thomas Taworth of Mappleton, Anne his wife and Lady Judith Corbett of Langley
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Indenture in English between Thomas Taworth of Mappleton, Anne his wife and Lady Judith Corbett of Langley

By Taworth, Thomas

1600. Pen and ink on one parchment membrane, docketed and annotated heavily in several hands on the verso. 1 vols. 14 x 10 1/2 inches. Vellum. Some creasing and folds, incomplete: trimming on (recto) left hand side resulting in loss of text. Minor worming on bottom right corner. Else very good. Pen and ink on one parchment membrane, docketed and annotated heavily in several hands on the verso. 1 vols. 14 x 10 1/2 inches. Dated to the reign of King James, this indenture includes the unusual feature of two and a third lines of "x" marks and several inexpert signatures. Perhaps indicative of a break in the document, a reuse of parchment, or the marks of those who were not fully literate, this document provides a window into late medieval English documentary culture.

$400.00

Manuscript quadrupartite indenture on parchment related to a marriage settlement
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Manuscript quadrupartite indenture on parchment related to a marriage settlement

By Hyatt, Richard

Warwickshire, England, 1743. Ink on parchment with surviving small wax seals at bottom edge. 1 vols. Single parchment membrane, pricked and ruled in ink with a large penwork initial, annotations in a contemporary hand, and four surviving wax seals. Paper ticket on verso along with contemporary annotation. Significant loss of text due to vertical division of the manuscript. Ink on parchment with surviving small wax seals at bottom edge. 1 vols. Eighteenth-century Marriage Contract. This marriage settlement concerns a marriage between Richard Hyatt, son of Humphrey Hyatt and Mary Hyatt, to an Elizabeth Bushell. The four seals name four sigantories: Humphrey Hyatt, Richard Hyatt, Mary Hyatt and one whose name is lacking. Undertaken under the reign of George the Second of England in the County of Warwick, this document might be a good teaching item due to its subject matter, clear hand, and the fact that it is written in English.

$400.00

Manuscript indenture from the reign of Philip and Mary

By Cowper, Thomas

England, 1557. 275x480 mm. Old folds, parchment hanging tab with no remnant of wax seal. Two stickers on verso, one reading "585" and one "395" and contemporary annotations. Some darkening on recto, no visible loss of text. 275x480 mm. Early Modern Marriage. This indenture between Anne Stanhopp of Etherlforde (a widow) and Thomas Cowper provides interesting insight into marriage contracts of the time. A tight, crabbed hand renders this an excellent paleographical example, as does the fact that it is in English.

$550.00

Manuscript indenture from the reign of Queen Elizabeth relating to London property
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Manuscript indenture from the reign of Queen Elizabeth relating to London property

England, 1575. Ink on parchment, 330x525cm. Old folds, parchment hanging tab with partial wax seal. Verso stained and darkened from folded storage, with legible contemporary annotations. Ink on parchment, 330x525cm. This indenture, between Richard Briton of Woodford and Henrie or William Berton late of London, Thomas Christie, and John Entes of London relates to property in the capital messuage or mansion house of Richard Breton, just outside "steplegate," London. An excellent example of a transfer laid out in a fairly clear hand on lined parchment with all the usual legal formulae represented.

$600.00

Manuscript indenture between Richard Stiles and Richard Davis related to land tenure
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Manuscript indenture between Richard Stiles and Richard Davis related to land tenure

By Stiles, Richard

1760. Ink on parchment with two wax seals. 12 x 23 inches. One parchment membrane, cut in half vertically resulting in significant loss of text. Two wax seals next to two signatures remain at bottom; one ink stamp on left margin, one paper stamp on verso and one on recto. Ink on parchment with two wax seals. 12 x 23 inches. Indenture in English naming several figures and giving details about land tenure. Two wax seals and signatures are an uncommon survival. Of potential teaching interest due to the clear hand and the fact that it's in English.

$400.00

Manuscript indenture of John and Thomas Dixon to Miss Young
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Manuscript indenture of John and Thomas Dixon to Miss Young

By (Manuscript)

Kent, England, 1700. Pen and in on one parchment membrane (308 x 610 mm), parchment tag with wax seal and signature of John Dixon on recto, signed by four witnesses on the dorse. Cut vertically in half, with significant loss of text, folded with some soiling on dorse not affecting signatures. Pen and in on one parchment membrane (308 x 610 mm), parchment tag with wax seal and signature of John Dixon on recto, signed by four witnesses on the dorse. Property transfer in Kent, England. Deed transferring pastureland, barn, stable buildings and other property in the parish of Folkestone, in Kent, England during the reign of King George I Incomplete due to the contemporary practice of cutting such documents in half vertically, this would be an excellent paleographical example for teaching, the more so because it is in English, and the hand is a clear one.

$400.00

Indenture of lease between George Cryppes and Roberte Smythe
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Indenture of lease between George Cryppes and Roberte Smythe

By (Manuscript)

Hampshire, England, 1565. Pen and ink on one parchment membrane (415 x 235 mm) parchment tag lacking wax seal hanging from bottom. Signed by Roberte Smythe on dorse. Folded and creased but no loss of text; sticker reading B1233 on dorse, illegible signatures and marks on bottom fold. Pen and ink on one parchment membrane (415 x 235 mm) parchment tag lacking wax seal hanging from bottom. Signed by Roberte Smythe on dorse. Lease agreement from the reign of Queen Elizabeth I of England. Written in English in a clear, spiky hand.

$400.00

"Random Rhymes in Manuscript and Reprint"
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"Random Rhymes in Manuscript and Reprint"

By (Printers-Scottish American) Mackenzie, Colin Grant

[Brooklyn, 1912. Approximately 180 pages, comprising: 143 manuscript pages; 17 typescript pages; 18 pages of printed poems, mounted; a 5 pp printed booklet "Lines of an Octogenarian..."; a 7 pp printed booklet, "The Ship of State," by Charles S. Mackenzie; a 16 pp printed booklet "Leisure Rhymes ... by Mrs. C.G. Mackenzie"; 7 mounted photographs of the Mackenzie family, and 6 mounted postcards of sites around Scotland. 4to. Quarter-leather ruled accounting ledger. Spine chipped, boards moderately worn. Approximately 180 pages, comprising: 143 manuscript pages; 17 typescript pages; 18 pages of printed poems, mounted; a 5 pp printed booklet "Lines of an Octogenarian..."; a 7 pp printed booklet, "The Ship of State," by Charles S. Mackenzie; a 16 pp printed booklet "Leisure Rhymes ... by Mrs. C.G. Mackenzie"; 7 mounted photographs of the Mackenzie family, and 6 mounted postcards of sites around Scotland. 4to. "Hail Brothers of the printing ink!" An unpublished manuscript of poems by the nineteenth century Scottish-American printer and poet, Colin Grant Mackenzie (1832-1913), whose long career as a journeyman pressman brought him into association with Harper Brothers, J.F. Trow, Houghton, the University Press, and other important 19th century American publishers and printers, as well as with many leading American literary men of the day. The album of poems, mostly in manuscript, comprise an unpublished Fourth Series of "Random Rhymes," and was made for his son, Charles S. Mackenzie. Born in Banff, Aberdeenshire, Mackenzie learned hand-press printing at the offices of the Banffshire Journal before moving on to an apprenticeship at the London Art Journal. When "he arrived in New York in 1850 [he] was a fullfledged journeyman pressman. His first work in this country was with John F. Trow, the book-printer, who at that time printed all of D. Appleton & Co.'s books. In 1854 he accepted a position with Harper Brothers and made the woodcut overlays for their illustrated work. [Mackenzie was the first printer in America to make such overlays.] He was next connected with C. A. Alvord, who was at that time considered the best woodcut printer in New York. Later on Mr. Mackenzie joined the University Press of Cambridge, Massachusetts, which was then known as Welsh, Bigelow & Co., and was a partner for seventeen years. During this time he printed the writings of Longfellow, Whittier, Lowell, Holmes, Bryant and other literary men of the day" (Inland Printer, vol 51, 1913, p 120). Mackenzie spent the last thirty years of his life in New York, and died in Brooklyn at age 80; obituaries described him as the oldest journeyman pressman in New York. The upper cover of the commercial ledger which contains the manuscript bears the handwritten title-inscription: "This Book is the Fourth Series of Random Rhymes in Manuscript and Reprint, and is for my Son Charles S. Mackenzie." The first three series had been published in 1867 (Cambridge: the author), 1883 (New York: the author), and 1903 (Brooklyn: J.J. Bowles). Mackenzie also published a volume of Temperance Rhymes (Boston: 1862), broadsides, and a number of poems in journals and newspapers of the day. The manuscript includes approximately 50 poems, all of which appear to have been composed after publication of the "Third Series" in 1903. Of special interest is the 200 line paean to the printing press, "Lines for the Old Time Printing Pressman's Association," which in addition to exalting the medium of print and the operators of presses, mentions by name several American pressman. Excerpts: "Hail Brothers of the printing ink! ... Ye are the faithful, loyal crew, You hold within your faithful hands, Power, mightier than Archmedian screw- The Printing Press rules all the lands ... Chicago sends her choicest men, And with the native boys competes; Dittman, with tints from two to ten, Makes rainbow daubs upon his sheets To Claim on more, Chicago means; 'Tis now some thirty years I think, Stevens was in his callow teens And now he's peddling printer's ink Mark Cormack, see his pleasant smile, Which all his happy thoughts express; With five point talk he'll you beguile And sell you then an Auto Press" Also of note is a printing on silk of "Lines Addressed to the Scotchmen in the United States," written and presumably printed by Mackenzie himself; and the manuscript "Ballad of the Games played and won by the Crescent Hockey Club; ending with a clean sweep and winning the Championship for 1908," as well as another ballad about the Crescent Hockey Club clipped from a magazine printing. There are also several poems about Mackenzie's hometown of Banff, evidently inspired by a journey there; poems dedicated to friends and neighbors; verse letters to family members; a poem on a steamship journey from New York to New Orleans; on a trip to Bermuda; on the Republican victory of 1904; etc. The manuscript also includes a 7 page typescript of a poem by his Mackenzie's son Charles S. Mackenzie, titled "Impromptu Lines for the Reception to President Roosevelt," with manuscript corrections; a 7 pp printed booklet also by Charles; a 16 page booklet of "Leisure Rhymes" by Mrs. C.G. Mackenzie; and a 5 page printed booklet "Lines of an Octogenarian" by Mackenzie in honor of his 80th birthday celebration--these latter three booklets presumably printed by Mackenzie himself.

$1500.00

Sailor's commonplace book with entries comprising original drawings, stories and poems, written in the West Indies and the Mediterranean
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Sailor's commonplace book with entries comprising original drawings, stories and poems, written in the West Indies and the Mediterranean

By (Commonplace Book, Cuba, Florida, Pirates) Fatio, Luis C.F.

V.p. at sea, and Cuba, Florida, Greece, Italy, 1822. 15 watercolor drawings, 63 pp. pen and ink manuscript on pink and white paper album leaves, comprising poems, songs and prose, some signed "L.C.F.F." or "Luis C.F.F.". 1 vols. 8vo (7-3/4 x 5 inches). Green embossed roan, titled "Album" in gilt on spine, a.e.g. Covers detached and worn, a few pages loose and rough at fore-edge. Black morocco-backed slipcase and cloth chemise. 15 watercolor drawings, 63 pp. pen and ink manuscript on pink and white paper album leaves, comprising poems, songs and prose, some signed "L.C.F.F." or "Luis C.F.F.". 1 vols. 8vo (7-3/4 x 5 inches). Commonplace book kept by a sailor in the West Indies and Mediterranean, largely consisting of original compositions - poems, songs, prose, drama, including the account of a pirate attack in the Florida Straits - and embellished with 15 watercolor drawings. The sailor, tentatively identified as Luis (or Lewis) C.F. Fatio, signs his compisitions as "L.C.F.F." or "Luis C.F.F." Fatio was born in Pennsylvania and entered the U.S. Navy as a midshipman in 1822. According to the Naval Registers, he served on the sloop Peacock in 1823, in the West India Squadron in 1824 and 1825, was on a leave of absence in 1826 and 1827 and resigned as a midshipman in 1829. He later served in the U.S. Revenue Marine. One of the entries for 1826, during Fatio's leave, is signed aboard the "U.S. Constitution" when that ship was stationed in the Mediterranean. Pieces of particular interest include the following: "On a messmate who died, and was buried off Cape Otranto in the Mediterranean in 1826," signed "U.S. Ship Constitution - L.C.F.F." "Dialogue between the Author and an Old Spanish Hospital when he was obliged one stormy night to seek shelter in St. Augustine East Florida 1830." "Lines on the loss of the U.S. State Sloop of War Hornet ... some of her officers having been old messmates of the Author's," signed "L.C.F.F. 1830." "On viewing a battlefield strewn with Skeletons in Greece, Misolongi [sic], 1826," perhaps the result of the Third Siege of Missolonghi (1825-6) "Shipwreck," original 1-p. poem signed "L.C.F.F." "The Cross of the Murdered: An American Story," a 10 pp. account with watercolor illustration of the funeral procession in Cuba of Lieutenant William H. Allen, captain of the schooner Alligator. Allen was assigned to the West Indies Squadron to fight piracy in the Florida Straits. He was killed by pirates while attempting to recapture the Anna Maria, a cargo ship loaded with molasses. The watercolors depict items evidently in the author's possession (a Spanish guitar with Italian song lyrics, calligraphy brush and Chinese lacquered box, a bone-handled paring knife), while the rest show scenes from the author's voyages (Morro Castle on the Havana coast, an angling scene, miscellaneous nautical scenes and unnamed coastlines).

$5500.00

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