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Portraits of Our Past : The Sephardis Communities of Grece and the Holocaust
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Portraits of Our Past : The Sephardis Communities of Grece and the Holocaust

By Bedford, Robert

Brooklyn, NY: Foundation for the Advancement of Sephardic Studies & Culture, 1998. 22p. illus. 1st US Edition.. Softcover. New.

$65.00

He Israelitike Koinoteta Volou

By Phrezes, Raphael [Frizis, Rafail]

Volos (Greece): Ekdoseis Ores, 1994. Many records of the community were destroyed in 1943 during the Nazi occupation - so this is a valuable reconstrution of the history. 327p. Illus. index of names Bibliography. 1st Greek Edition.. Softcover. As New.

$85.00

The House of Nasi : The Duke of Naxos

By Roth Cecil

Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society Of America, 1948. Dom Joseph Nasi 1524-1579 (or Nassi; also known as João Miques/Micas and Dom João Migas Mendes in a Portuguese variant, Giuseppe Nasi in Italian, and as Yasef Nassi in Ottoman Turkish) , was a Jewish diplomat and administrator, member of the House of Mendes/Benveniste, and a nephew of Dona Gracia Mendes Nasi, and influential figure in the Ottoman Empire during the rules of both Sultan Suleiman I and his son Selim II. He was a great benefactor of the Jewish people.A Court Jew, he was appointed the Lord of Tiberias with the expressed aim of resettling Jews in Ottoman Syria and encouraging industry there; the attempt failed, and, later, he was appointed to the Duke of Naxos.Nasi also brought about war with the Republic of Venice, at the end of which Venice lost the island of Cyprus to the Ottomans. After the death of Selim, he lost influence in the Ottoman Court, but was allowed to keep his titles and pension for the remainder of his life. 250p. illus. index maps on endpapers [See also the companion volume by this author about his aunt, Dona Gracia ]. 1st US Ed... Hardcover. Near Fiine/Very Good, Slightly Scuffed.

$40.00

Diaspora: Jews amidst Greeks and Romans

By Gruen, Erich S.

Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2004. What was life like for Jews settled throughout the Mediterranean world of Classical antiquity--and what place did Jewish communities have in the diverse civilization dominated by Greeks and Romans? In a probing account of the Jewish diaspora in the four centuries from Alexander the Great's conquest of the Near East to the Roman destruction of the Jewish Temple in 70 C.E., Erich Gruen reaches often surprising conclusions. By the first century of our era, Jews living abroad far outnumbered those living in Palestine and had done so for generations. Substantial Jewish communities were found throughout the Greek mainland and Aegean islands, Asia Minor, the Tigris-Euphrates valley, Egypt, and Italy. Focusing especially on Alexandria, Greek cities in Asia Minor, and Rome, Gruen explores the lives of these Jews: the obstacles they encountered, the institutions they established, and their strategies for adjustment. He also delves into Jewish writing in this period, teasing out how Jews in the diaspora saw themselves. There emerges a picture of a Jewish minority that was at home in Greco-Roman cities: subject to only sporadic harassment; its intellectuals immersed in Greco-Roman culture while refashioning it for their own purposes; exhibiting little sign of insecurity in an alien society; and demonstrating both a respect for the Holy Land and a commitment to the local community and Gentile government. Gruen's innovative analysis of the historical and literary record alters our understanding of the way this vibrant minority culture engaged with the dominant Classical civilization. 386p. bibliography. index. Softcover. Near Fine.

$25.00

Cookbook of the Jews of Greece

By Stavroulakis, Nikos (Nicholas)

Athens: Lycabettus Press, 2005. (New - will be sent to you direct from the publisher in Greece) The Cookbook of the Jews of Greece is more than a cookbook for, in addition to the 287 recipes, some unique and others unusual variations on familiar Persian, Arab, Turkish, and Greek dishes, it is lavishly illustrated by the author with over 60 drawings of Jewish life throughout Greece and documented with descriptions of local customs and traditions that were the settings for a rich and varied cuisine.Greek Jewish cooking is the product of Jewish life in four great empires. The Jews have lived in Greece for over 2,000 years as one succeeded another: the Alexandrine, the Roman, the Byzantine, and the Ottoman. From each they took something and made it their own. Beginning in the 15th century, Jewish exiles from the expulsions of Spain and Portugal and, later, from the violence of eastern Europe, came to Ottoman ruled Greece and created one of the greatest Jewish cities in history. Salonika reigned as "Queen of Israel" for over four hundred years, until it fell victim to the Nazi Holocaust. What remains today in Greece are the memories of survivors from the last generation of Salonika's reign and of 2,000 years of Greek Jewish life. The recipes for the Cookbook of the Jews of Greece were painstakingly gathered from these survivors in retirement homes and family homes throughout Greece by Nicholas Stavroulakis, formerly director of the Jewish Museum of Greece. He has brought his own varied background to bear on the cookbook's creation. His family is of mixed Cretan, Jewish, and Turkish origins. He is an artist and a cook. He has exhibited widely in Europe and the United States and has illustrated numerous books. After being educated in Great Britain and the United States, he taught at Tel Aviv University before returning to Greece to become the director of the Jewish museum in Athens. 267 pages, illustrated, with bibliography and index, hardback. Reissue. Hard Cover. New Book from Greece/New.

$75.00

The Jews in the Greek Age

By Bickerman, Elias J.

Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 1988. Softcover. Very Good.

$17.50

Jewish Sites in Thessaloniki, Brief History and Guide

By Molho, Rena & Hastaoglou-Martinidi, Vilma

Athens: Lycabettus Press, 2009. (New - will be sent to you direct from the publisher in Greece) "Thessaloniki has long been considered Greece's foremost multi-cultural city because for many centuries its history has been marked by the peaceful co-existence of Christians, Muslims, and Jews. Between 1492, in fact, and 1912 the Jewish community was the largest of all ethnic communities living here. This thriving community set the tone of Ottoman Thessaloniki, making it known as the most famous Jewish city in the world, widely referred to as the Jerusalem of the Balkans. Visitors now coming for the first time to Thessaloniki encounter a basically Byzantine city because historical events, such as the devastating fire that destroyed most of the Jewish monuments in 1917 and the annihilation of the Jewish community during the German occupation, erased the city's Jewish character. Reconstruction after the end of World War II, which reached its peak in the 1960s, made the few remaining traces of the two thousand year Jewish presence in the Macedonian capital even less evident. This informative, small book provides a clear image of the community's long, vibrant history; has short biographies of a few of the community's leading members; and describes (with pictures) the major remaining buildings members of the community constructed. It enables foreign and local visitors to discover, even in part, the surviving traces of the Jewish and multi-cultural nature of Thessaloniki." Paperback, 90 pages, 3 maps, 35 color photographs, bibliography, index. 1st Greek Ed... Softcover. New Book from Greece.

$30.00

Jewish Sites in Thessaloniki, Brief History and Guide

By Molho, Rena & Hastaoglou-Martinidi, Vilma

Athens: Lycabettus Press, 2009. (New - will be sent to you direct from the publisher in Greece) "Thessaloniki has long been considered Greece's foremost multi-cultural city because for many centuries its history has been marked by the peaceful co-existence of Christians, Muslims, and Jews. Between 1492, in fact, and 1912 the Jewish community was the largest of all ethnic communities living here. This thriving community set the tone of Ottoman Thessaloniki, making it known as the most famous Jewish city in the world, widely referred to as the Jerusalem of the Balkans. Visitors now coming for the first time to Thessaloniki encounter a basically Byzantine city because historical events, such as the devastating fire that destroyed most of the Jewish monuments in 1917 and the annihilation of the Jewish community during the German occupation, erased the city's Jewish character. Reconstruction after the end of World War II, which reached its peak in the 1960s, made the few remaining traces of the two thousand year Jewish presence in the Macedonian capital even less evident. This informative, small book provides a clear image of the community's long, vibrant history; has short biographies of a few of the community's leading members; and describes (with pictures) the major remaining buildings members of the community constructed. It enables foreign and local visitors to discover, even in part, the surviving traces of the Jewish and multi-cultural nature of Thessaloniki." Paperback, 90 pages, 3 maps, 35 color photographs, bibliography, index . 1st Greek Ed.. Softcover. New Book from Greece.

$30.00

Jüdische Orte in Thessaloniki, Ein historischer Rundgang, / Jewish Sites in Thessaloniki, Brief History and Guide [IN GERMAN]

By Molho, Rena & Hastaoglou-Martinidi, Vilma

Athens: Lycabettus Press, 2009. (New - This is the German language editoin of this book and it will be will be sent to you direct from the publisher in Greece) "Thessaloniki has long been considered Greece's foremost multi-cultural city because for many centuries its history has been marked by the peaceful co-existence of Christians, Muslims, and Jews. Between 1492, in fact, and 1912 the Jewish community was the largest of all ethnic communities living here. This thriving community set the tone of Ottoman Thessaloniki, making it known as the most famous Jewish city in the world, widely referred to as the Jerusalem of the Balkans. Visitors now coming for the first time to Thessaloniki encounter a basically Byzantine city because historical events, such as the devastating fire that destroyed most of the Jewish monuments in 1917 and the annihilation of the Jewish community during the German occupation, erased the city's Jewish character. Reconstruction after the end of World War II, which reached its peak in the 1960s, made the few remaining traces of the two thousand year Jewish presence in the Macedonian capital even less evident. This informative, small book provides a clear image of the community's long, vibrant history; has short biographies of a few of the community's leading members; and describes (with pictures) the major remaining buildings members of the community constructed. It enables foreign and local visitors to discover, even in part, the surviving traces of the Jewish and multi-cultural nature of Thessaloniki." Paperback, 90 pages, 3 maps, 35 color photographs, bibliography, index. 1st Greek Ed... Softcover. New Book from Greece.

$30.00

Jüdische Orte in Thessaloniki, Ein historischer Rundgang, / Jewish Sites in Thessaloniki, Brief History and Guide [IN GERMAN]

By Molho, Rena & Hastaoglou-Martinidi, Vilma

Athens: Lycabettus Press, 2009. (New - This is the German language editoin of this book and it will be will be sent to you direct from the publisher in Greece) "Thessaloniki has long been considered Greece's foremost multi-cultural city because for many centuries its history has been marked by the peaceful co-existence of Christians, Muslims, and Jews. Between 1492, in fact, and 1912 the Jewish community was the largest of all ethnic communities living here. This thriving community set the tone of Ottoman Thessaloniki, making it known as the most famous Jewish city in the world, widely referred to as the Jerusalem of the Balkans. Visitors now coming for the first time to Thessaloniki encounter a basically Byzantine city because historical events, such as the devastating fire that destroyed most of the Jewish monuments in 1917 and the annihilation of the Jewish community during the German occupation, erased the city's Jewish character. Reconstruction after the end of World War II, which reached its peak in the 1960s, made the few remaining traces of the two thousand year Jewish presence in the Macedonian capital even less evident. This informative, small book provides a clear image of the community's long, vibrant history; has short biographies of a few of the community's leading members; and describes (with pictures) the major remaining buildings members of the community constructed. It enables foreign and local visitors to discover, even in part, the surviving traces of the Jewish and multi-cultural nature of Thessaloniki." Paperback, 90 pages, 3 maps, 35 color photographs, bibliography, index . 1st Greek Ed.. Softcover. New Book from Greece.

$30.00

The Jews of Byzantium 1204-1453

By Bowman, Steven B.

Jacksonville FL: Bloch Publishing Co., 2001. Foreword by Zvi Ankori. "Bowman presents the sources with a critical historical introduction for the rediscovery of Balkan and Aegean Jewry from the Fourth Crusade to the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople. The book traces the fortunes of Greek Jews, their contact with co-religionists from Spain, Italy, the Crimea and their interaction with the variegated local populations and endemic conquerors of the region. From the beginning of the 13th century to the 16th century with special chapters on intellectual life, rabbinic interests, mysticism, Greek culture and the social and economic dimension." Covers :Part I Political, Social, Economic and Intellectual Life, Byzantium and the Jews, Jewish Settlements, Communal Organization and Social Life, Language and Literature, The Ottoman Conquest and Its Aftermath Part II Documents and Excursuses. xviii, 380p. Bibliography. index. First Pbk.Ed... Soft Cover. Fine.

$45.00

Athens - Auschwitz (Trans. Nikis Stavroulakis)

By Sevillias, Errikos (Trans. Nikis Stavroulakis

Athens: Lycabettus Press, 1983. (New - will be sent to you direct from the publisher in Greece) Moving personal testimony of the way the Jews were deported from Greece to concentration camps during the Nazi occupation. Errikos Sevillias was born in Athens in 1901 into a Sephardic family. He learned how to work in leather as a child and opened his own leather workshop when he was 16. From 1919 until 1923 he served in the Greek army, for three years fighting in Asia Minor. After the war he reopened his workshop, married, and had a daughter. Life, as he writes, "went along well" until he experienced "an inexplicable and unexpected great adventure," meaning Auschwitz. Errikos Sevillias was killed in Athens by a motorcycle in 1974, when he was 73 years old. The manuscript of this book was found among his papers after he died. He describes the appalling events at Auschwitz with extraordinary calm, saying merely that he couldn't understand "what they wanted in doing such an unjust and evil thing." His simple statements of events give the clearest possible image of the indescribable. The manuscript was translated by Nikos Stavroulakis, who also has provided an extremely useful historical outline of the Jewish presence in Greece with a description of the occupation and final solution. 125 pages, black and white photographs, hardback.. 1st Greek Ed.. Hard Cover. Very Good/Very Good, Slight Chips. Illus. by Tr. Nikos Stavroulakis.

$25.00

Cookbook of the Jews of Greece

By Stavroulakis, Nikos (Nicholas)

Athens: Lycabettus Press, 2005. (New - will be sent to you direct from the publisher in Greece) The Cookbook of the Jews of Greece is more than a cookbook for, in addition to the 287 recipes, some unique and others unusual variations on familiar Persian, Arab, Turkish, and Greek dishes, it is lavishly illustrated by the author with over 60 drawings of Jewish life throughout Greece and documented with descriptions of local customs and traditions that were the settings for a rich and varied cuisine. Greek Jewish cooking is the product of Jewish life in four great empires. The Jews have lived in Greece for over 2,000 years as one succeeded another: the Alexandrine, the Roman, the Byzantine, and the Ottoman. From each they took something and made it their own. Beginning in the 15th century, Jewish exiles from the expulsions of Spain and Portugal and, later, from the violence of eastern Europe, came to Ottoman ruled Greece and created one of the greatest Jewish cities in history. Salonika reigned as "Queen of Israel" for over four hundred years, until it fell victim to the Nazi Holocaust. What remains today in Greece are the memories of survivors from the last generation of Salonika's reign and of 2,000 years of Greek Jewish life. The recipes for the Cookbook of the Jews of Greece were painstakingly gathered from these survivors in retirement homes and family homes throughout Greece by Nicholas Stavroulakis, formerly director of the Jewish Museum of Greece. He has brought his own varied background to bear on the cookbook's creation. His family is of mixed Cretan, Jewish, and Turkish origins. He is an artist and a cook. He has exhibited widely in Europe and the United States and has illustrated numerous books. After being educated in Great Britain and the United States, he taught at Tel Aviv University before returning to Greece to become the director of the Jewish museum in Athens. 267 pages, illustrated, with bibliography and index, hardback. Reissue. Hard Cover. New Book from Greece/New.

$75.00

Historia kai Axiotheata ton Hebraion sti Thessaloniki / Jewish Sites in Thessaloniki, Brief History and Guide [IN GREEK]

By Molho, Rena & Hastaoglou-Martinidi, Vilma

Athens: Lycabettus Press, 2009. (New - This is the Greek language editoin of this book and it will be will be sent to you direct from the publisher in Greece) "Thessaloniki has long been considered Greece's foremost multi-cultural city because for many centuries its history has been marked by the peaceful co-existence of Christians, Muslims, and Jews. Between 1492, in fact, and 1912 the Jewish community was the largest of all ethnic communities living here. This thriving community set the tone of Ottoman Thessaloniki, making it known as the most famous Jewish city in the world, widely referred to as the Jerusalem of the Balkans. Visitors now coming for the first time to Thessaloniki encounter a basically Byzantine city because historical events, such as the devastating fire that destroyed most of the Jewish monuments in 1917 and the annihilation of the Jewish community during the German occupation, erased the city's Jewish character. Reconstruction after the end of World War II, which reached its peak in the 1960s, made the few remaining traces of the two thousand year Jewish presence in the Macedonian capital even less evident. This informative, small book provides a clear image of the community's long, vibrant history; has short biographies of a few of the community's leading members; and describes (with pictures) the major remaining buildings members of the community constructed. It enables foreign and local visitors to discover, even in part, the surviving traces of the Jewish and multi-cultural nature of Thessaloniki." Paperback, 90 pages, 3 maps, 35 color photographs, bibliography, index . 1st Greek Ed.. Softcover. New Book from Greece.

$30.00

Historia kai Axiotheata ton Hebraion sti Thessaloniki / Jewish Sites in Thessaloniki, Brief History and Guide [IN GREEK]

By Molho, Rena & Hastaoglou-Martinidi, Vilma

Athens: Lycabettus Press, 2009. (New - This is the Greek language editoin of this book and it will be will be sent to you direct from the publisher in Greece) "Thessaloniki has long been considered Greece's foremost multi-cultural city because for many centuries its history has been marked by the peaceful co-existence of Christians, Muslims, and Jews. Between 1492, in fact, and 1912 the Jewish community was the largest of all ethnic communities living here. This thriving community set the tone of Ottoman Thessaloniki, making it known as the most famous Jewish city in the world, widely referred to as the Jerusalem of the Balkans. Visitors now coming for the first time to Thessaloniki encounter a basically Byzantine city because historical events, such as the devastating fire that destroyed most of the Jewish monuments in 1917 and the annihilation of the Jewish community during the German occupation, erased the city's Jewish character. Reconstruction after the end of World War II, which reached its peak in the 1960s, made the few remaining traces of the two thousand year Jewish presence in the Macedonian capital even less evident. This informative, small book provides a clear image of the community's long, vibrant history; has short biographies of a few of the community's leading members; and describes (with pictures) the major remaining buildings members of the community constructed. It enables foreign and local visitors to discover, even in part, the surviving traces of the Jewish and multi-cultural nature of Thessaloniki." Paperback, 90 pages, 3 maps, 35 color photographs, bibliography, index. 1st Greek Ed... Softcover. New Book from Greece.

$30.00

A Liter of Soup and Sixty Grams of Bread: The Diary of Prisoner Number 109565

By Kounio, Heinz Salvator [ Chaints Salvator] & Ikonnomopoulos, Marcia Haddad (ed)

Jacksonville, FL: Bloch Pub Co, 2003. On March 15, 1943 the first Greek transport left from Salonika and arrived at Auschwitz on March 20th. It was the beginning of the end of Greek Jewery. Among the 2,800 deported Jews was the 15-year old Heinz Kouinio. Wrenched abruptly from a comfortable upper-middle class home, Heinz found himself immersed in the horrors of the Nazi concentration camps. Heinz, along with his mother, father and sister, would ultimately survive. What kept him going was his fervent wish that his murdered brethren would be remembered and that their killers would be punished. Heinz kept a diary in which he recorded his experiences. That diary is the basis of this book.. 1st US Ed... Soft Cover. New Book from Publisher.

$25.00

Cookbook of the Jews of Greece

By Stavroulakis, Nikos (Nicholas)

Athens: Lycabettus Press, 2005. (New - will be sent to you direct from the publisher in Greece) The Cookbook of the Jews of Greece is more than a cookbook for, in addition to the 287 recipes, some unique and others unusual variations on familiar Persian, Arab, Turkish, and Greek dishes, it is lavishly illustrated by the author with over 60 drawings of Jewish life throughout Greece and documented with descriptions of local customs and traditions that were the settings for a rich and varied cuisine. Greek Jewish cooking is the product of Jewish life in four great empires. The Jews have lived in Greece for over 2,000 years as one succeeded another: the Alexandrine, the Roman, the Byzantine, and the Ottoman. From each they took something and made it their own. Beginning in the 15th century, Jewish exiles from the expulsions of Spain and Portugal and, later, from the violence of eastern Europe, came to Ottoman ruled Greece and created one of the greatest Jewish cities in history. Salonika reigned as "Queen of Israel" for over four hundred years, until it fell victim to the Nazi Holocaust. What remains today in Greece are the memories of survivors from the last generation of Salonika's reign and of 2,000 years of Greek Jewish life. The recipes for the Cookbook of the Jews of Greece were painstakingly gathered from these survivors in retirement homes and family homes throughout Greece by Nicholas Stavroulakis, formerly director of the Jewish Museum of Greece. He has brought his own varied background to bear on the cookbook's creation. His family is of mixed Cretan, Jewish, and Turkish origins. He is an artist and a cook. He has exhibited widely in Europe and the United States and has illustrated numerous books. After being educated in Great Britain and the United States, he taught at Tel Aviv University before returning to Greece to become the director of the Jewish museum in Athens. 267 pages, illustrated, with bibliography and index, hardback. Reissue. Hard Cover. New Book from Greece/New.

$75.00

Cookbook of the Jews of Greece

By Stavroulakis, Nikos (Nicholas)

Athens: Lycabettus Press, 2005. (New - will be sent to you direct from the publisher in Greece) The Cookbook of the Jews of Greece is more than a cookbook for, in addition to the 287 recipes, some unique and others unusual variations on familiar Persian, Arab, Turkish, and Greek dishes, it is lavishly illustrated by the author with over 60 drawings of Jewish life throughout Greece and documented with descriptions of local customs and traditions that were the settings for a rich and varied cuisine. Greek Jewish cooking is the product of Jewish life in four great empires. The Jews have lived in Greece for over 2,000 years as one succeeded another: the Alexandrine, the Roman, the Byzantine, and the Ottoman. From each they took something and made it their own. Beginning in the 15th century, Jewish exiles from the expulsions of Spain and Portugal and, later, from the violence of eastern Europe, came to Ottoman ruled Greece and created one of the greatest Jewish cities in history. Salonika reigned as "Queen of Israel" for over four hundred years, until it fell victim to the Nazi Holocaust. What remains today in Greece are the memories of survivors from the last generation of Salonika's reign and of 2,000 years of Greek Jewish life. The recipes for the Cookbook of the Jews of Greece were painstakingly gathered from these survivors in retirement homes and family homes throughout Greece by Nicholas Stavroulakis, formerly director of the Jewish Museum of Greece. He has brought his own varied background to bear on the cookbook's creation. His family is of mixed Cretan, Jewish, and Turkish origins. He is an artist and a cook. He has exhibited widely in Europe and the United States and has illustrated numerous books. After being educated in Great Britain and the United States, he taught at Tel Aviv University before returning to Greece to become the director of the Jewish museum in Athens. 267 pages, illustrated, with bibliography and index, hardback. Reissue. Hard Cover. New Book from Greece/New.

$75.00

Athens - Auschwitz (Trans. Nikis Stavroulakis)

By Sevillias, Errikos (Trans. Nikis Stavroulakis

Athens: Lycabettus Press, 1983. (New - will be sent to you direct from the publisher in Greece) Moving personal testimony of the way the Jews were deported from Greece to concentration camps during the Nazi occupation. Errikos Sevillias was born in Athens in 1901 into a Sephardic family. He learned how to work in leather as a child and opened his own leather workshop when he was 16. From 1919 until 1923 he served in the Greek army, for three years fighting in Asia Minor. After the war he reopened his workshop, married, and had a daughter. Life, as he writes, "went along well" until he experienced "an inexplicable and unexpected great adventure," meaning Auschwitz. Errikos Sevillias was killed in Athens by a motorcycle in 1974, when he was 73 years old. The manuscript of this book was found among his papers after he died. He describes the appalling events at Auschwitz with extraordinary calm, saying merely that he couldn't understand "what they wanted in doing such an unjust and evil thing." His simple statements of events give the clearest possible image of the indescribable. The manuscript was translated by Nikos Stavroulakis, who also has provided an extremely useful historical outline of the Jewish presence in Greece with a description of the occupation and final solution. 125 pages, black and white photographs, hardback.. Hard Cover. New Book from Greece/New. Illus. by Tr. Nikos Stavroulakis.

$35.00

The Jews of Ioannina

By Dalven,Rae

Athens: Cadmus Press, 1990. (New - will be sent to you direct from the publisher in Greece) "These chronicles of the various communities of Jews in Ioannina covers not merely their history but their religious customs and social life. In focusing upon the Romaniote (Greek-speaking Jews), the author throws light upon an ancient community generally neglected by the historians of the Jewish diaspora." 227 pages, with contemporary black and white photographs, an appendix on three traditional Judeo-Greek hymns, bibliography, and index, hardback.. Hardcover. New Book from Greece.

$50.00

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