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RECENT ARRIVALS


An Expensive Place to Die

By Deighton, Len

New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1967. First American Edition, 1st Printing. 8vo (8 1/2 x 5 3/4 inches; 215 x 142 mm), 252 pages, in quarter cloth over boards, gold titles to spine. With the dust jacket and the scarce "In Transit Docket." Strange things take place in a Paris brothel, involving not only sex but also....nuclear weapons. The book includes the top secret "In Transit Docket," which lays out a U.S. plot against the Chinese. A typically fast-paced Deighton thriller. CONDITION: Small closed tear in pages 29-30, a couple of small stains on the fore edge, some fading to the titles on the spine. Dust jacket unclipped with slight offsetting from the red end papers onto the front flap, a bit of rubbing to the top of the front and rear panels. "Transit Docket" is Fine, Overall, a Very Good copy, clean and unmarked.

$66.00

Absolute Friends
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Absolute Friends

By Le Carré, John

Boston: Little, Brown & Co., 2003. First Edition, First Printing. Small 4to (9 1/2 x 6 1/4 inches; 240 x 155 mm), 455, [1] pages, in red and black boards, title to spine. Near Fine in a Near Fine dust jacket. Boards rubbed, dust jacket shows light edge wear.Two friends, both spies during the Cold War, get together again to work against the American invasion of Iraq. Or so they're led to believe by a mysterious billionaire.

$26.00

Rotten With Honour
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Rotten With Honour

By Robinson, Derek

New York: The Viking Press, Inc., 1973. First American Edition, 1st Printing. 8vo (8 1/2 x 5 1/2 inches; 215 x 140 mm), 244 pages, in light gray boards, titles in black to spine, silhouette of a spy to upper board, pink topstain. Tiny ink mark near top of fore edge, some fading and spotting to topstain. Internally, clean and bright. A Very Good or better copy in a a Very Good dust jacket. The jacket is bright and unclipped with light edge wear and a tiny chip to the bottom of the rear panel where it meets the spine. *A young British agent is assigned to trail a cold-blooded Russian "diplomat." Then things start to go wrong for both sides. "You're sorry when it's over," The New York Times wrote in a laudatory review published October 28, 1973. Striking cover illustration by Michael Codd.

$42.00

The Lights of Skaro
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The Lights of Skaro

By Dodge, David

New York: Random House, Inc., 1954. First Edition, First Printing. 8vo (8 1/4 x 5 1/2 inches; 208 x 140 mm), 248 pages, in quarter cloth over paper boards, titles to upper board and to spine. Very Good or better in a Very Good dust jacket. Some light toning to spine edges, internally clean and bright. The unclipped dust jacket has some nicks and soiling.*American journalists learn a secret about the head of the dreaded security police in a European people's democracy. They head for the border town of Skaro, with the bad guys on their heels. A Cold War thriller.

$42.00

Déricourt: The Chequered Spy
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Déricourt: The Chequered Spy

By Fuller, Jean Overton

Salisbury, U.K.: Michael Russell (Publishing) Ltd., 1989. First Edition, First Printing. 8vo (9 1/2 inches / 240 mm), viii, 407 pages, in publisher's original blue cloth. Foxing and a bit of soiling to top and fore edges. The dust jacket has some minor edge wear. A Very Good copy. The author, Jean Overton Fuller (1915-2009), was a prolific British author who specialized in writing about real espionage cases. Here, she tries to unravel the mysterious case of Henri Déricourt (1909-1962), a French pilot who was an undercover agent for the British during World War II. Déricourt aided the Resistance in France but was also in touch with the Germans. Indeed, he was accused of having sacrificed Allied agents to the Germans. So the question arises: Was he a double agent, working for the Nazis? Or was he instead under the control of British Intelligence throughout the war? The author, who knew Déricourt well, believes he engaged in "loyal treason," meaning that he ultimately acted under British orders. Laid in to the book is a 1994 typed letter from Fuller to American author Robert S. Greene (this book belonged to Greene) regarding some genealogical questions Greene had posed. There are also two 2009 typed letters from Overton's executor, London bookseller Timothy d'Arch Smith, regarding her last year, illnesses and demise. Altogether, an interesting look at Déricourt by a prolific author of nonfiction espionage books.

$184.00

The Clandestine War in Europe (1942-1945). Remarks of William J. Casey on receipt of the William J. Donovan Awards at Dinner of Veterans of O.S.S., December 5, 1974
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The Clandestine War in Europe (1942-1945). Remarks of William J. Casey on receipt of the William J. Donovan Awards at Dinner of Veterans of O.S.S., December 5, 1974

By Casey, William J.

No place of publication stated: [Veterans of the Office of Strategic Services], 1974. No edition stated. Small 4to (10 1/2 inches / 267 mm), [12 pages] in stapled wrappers. Governmental department stamp and log-in number on front wrapper, two horizontal folds for mailing. A Very Good copy. Transcript of a speech by William J. Casey (1913-1987), accepting the William J. Donovan Award from the Veterans of the Office of Strategic Services. Casey had been chief of secret intelligence for the European theatre of operations during World War II. This award -- from a group of former intelligence officers -- cites him for his organization of radio teams that he parachuted into Germany to send back intelligence on Nazi positions. In his speech, Casey lavishes praise on Donovan and others in the clandestine services and discusses some of his own intelligence work during World War II. A fascinating look at a side of the war that was crucial in securing the Allied victory over the the Axis powers. No other copies found in commerce as of April 26, 2017. OCLC WorldCat shows only a single institutional holding, at the NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies in Amsterdam. Separately, we find copies at the Hoover Institution in Stanford, California. SCARCE.

$210.00

All My Enemies
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All My Enemies

By Baron, Stanley

New York: Ballantine Books, 1952. First Edition, First Printing. Communist agent arrives in the U.S. to persuade a scientist to defect to the Soviet Union. He also gets involved with some American women who suspect he's up to no good. As far as Cold War fiction goes, it's not bad at all. Small 8vo., [8], 247, [5] pages. Near Fine in an unclipped, bright, Near Fine dust jacket that has a bit of rubbing and a couple of nicks. An attractive copy of a Ballantine hardcover. Unfortunately, Ballantine didn't credit the artist who designed the striking photomontage dust jacket. Published during the McCarthy era, this book actually goes easy on the lurid, anti-Red hysteria of so much Cold War fiction.

$75.00

Into the Mirror: The Life of Master Spy Robert P. Hanssen
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Into the Mirror: The Life of Master Spy Robert P. Hanssen

By Schiller, Lawrence [Mailer, Norman]

New York: HarperCollins Publishers Inc., 2002. First Edition, First Printing. SIGNED by Lawrence Schiller on the title page (under which the word "and" has been written and then marked through). Based on research and interviews by Lawrence Schiller and Norman Mailer, the book presents a psychological portrait of FBI agent Robert P. Hanssen, who sold classified information to the KGB and its successor organization over more than 20 years. Hanssen was captured in 2001 and is serving multiple life sentences in a Colorado prison. The book is written as a novel, with imagined dialogue. Schiller and Mailer were unable to interview Hanssen, who was already a guest of U.S. taxpayers. Nonetheless, it's a fascinating attempt to get into the mind of an American traitor, especially through the device of having Hanssen talk to himself while looking at a mirror. 8vo., xv, 317 pages. Near Fine, with a minuscule mark to the upper board's right edge and a bump to its lower right corner, in a Fine dust jacket. SCARCE signed. The backstory to this book is unusual and a bit convoluted. In Schiller's Author's Note, he says he asked Mailer to write a screenplay for a CBS Television miniseries that Schiller would produce and direct. As Mailer was finishing the first draft of the screenplay, Schiller decided to write the present book, using Mailer's draft as the foundation. Schiller says he supplemented Mailer's draft with his own research. The book appeared in 2002, as did the series on CBS. The series starred William Hurt as Hanssen, Mary-Louise Parker as his wife, Peter Boyle as his father, and David Strathairn as his best friend. In addition to this book, Schiller and Mailer also collaborated on "The Executioner's Song" and "Oswald's Tale."

$50.00

Breaking With Moscow
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Breaking With Moscow

By Shevchenko, Arkady N

New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1985. First Edition. A high-level Soviet diplomat working at the United Nations seeks asylum in the U.S. This is his story, along with vivid portraits of Soviet leaders and a look at what takes place in the Politburo and in the world of espionage. Octavo, pp. viii, 378. Near Fine with some minor soiling on the top and bottom edges in a Very Good dust jacket that has some sunning and edge wear.

$15.00

The Climate of Treason: Five Who Spied for Russia
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The Climate of Treason: Five Who Spied for Russia

By Boyle, Andrew

London: Hutchinson & Co. (Publishers) Ltd., 1979. First U.K. Edition, Third Printing. The book that led to the unmasking of Anthony Blunt as the "Fourth Man" in the Cambridge spy ring. Octavo, 504 pages. Corners bumped, especially at top of both front and rear, leading to some creasing of pages. Otherwise, Very Good in a dust jacket that shows some edge wear and creases. The author strongly believed that Queen Elizabeth's art adviser, Anthony Blunt, was the "Fourth Man" in the Cambridge spy ring. But, apparently fearing a libel suit, he referred to Blunt as "Maurice." In a dramatic announcement to Parliament in November 1979, Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher confirmed that "Maurice" was, indeed, Anthony Blunt.

$25.00

The Spy Who Got Away: The Inside Story of Edward Lee Howard, the CIA Agent Who Betrayed His Country's Secrets and Escaped to Moscow
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The Spy Who Got Away: The Inside Story of Edward Lee Howard, the CIA Agent Who Betrayed His Country's Secrets and Escaped to Moscow

By Wise, David

New York: Random House, 1988. Book club edition. A riveting look at the case of Edward Lee Howard, who worked for the CIA and defected to the Soviet Union in 1985. Two years later, Howard secretly met in Budapest with the author, David Wise, to tell his version of events. Octavo, 288 pages. Good only, with foxing of page edges, bumped corners, some rubbing to the boards, and a previous owner's embossed seal on the front end paper. The dust jacket is rubbed on both panels and on the spine. If anyone can unravel a spy case, it's journalist David Wise, who is one of the most authoritative writers about the world of espionage. As for Howard, he died under mysterious circumstances at his Russian dacha in 2002. He was 50 years old.

$10.00

Battleground Berlin: CIA vs. KGB in the Cold War
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Battleground Berlin: CIA vs. KGB in the Cold War

By Murphy, David E.; Kondrashev, Sergei A.; Bailey, George

New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1997. First Edition, First Printing. 8vo, pp. xxv, 530 pages. An insiders' account of the espionage battle in Berlin between the CIA and the KGB from the end of World War II to the building of the Wall in 1961. These authors certainly know their stuff. David Murphy was chief of the CIA's Berlin station; Sergei Kondrashev was a lieutenant general in the KGB; and George Bailey was a director of Radio Liberty. CONDITION: Near Fine in a Fine dust jacket. Small creases to spine ends and slight edge wear.

$50.00