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The Twig Benders
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The Twig Benders

By CHASE, Wilda

New York: The Feminists, n.d., ca. 1969. First Edition. Paperback. Quarto (28cm.); self-wrappers staplebound at top left-hand corner; 6pp.; printed from typescript on green stock. Light wear to extremities else Very Good or better. The Feminists organization rubberstamp to top edge of p. 1 as issued. Described in The Feminists publication catalog as "a pornographic study of pornography." Dystopic tale set at the fictional Eastgate Finishing School for Boys where the pupils must go around naked at all times while the instructors, all female, "are expected to use the boys sexually as such experience counts as part of the boy's training for the Masculine Role" (p. 1). This story was reprinted in the June 19th, 1970, issue of Everywoman. OCLC locates 3 copies of this edition as of April, 2019, at Central Connecticut, Kansas, and UVA.

$125.00

The Twig Benders

By CHASE, Wilda

New York: The Feminists, n.d., ca. 1969. First Edition. Paperback. Quarto (28cm.); self-wrappers staplebound at top left-hand corner; 6pp.; printed from typescript on tan stock. Fine condition. Described in The Feminists publication catalog as "a pornographic study of pornography." Dystopic tale set at the fictional Eastgate Finishing School for Boys where the pupils must go around naked at all times while the instructors, all female, "are expected to use the boys sexually as such experience counts as part of the boy's training for the Masculine Role" (p. 1). This story was reprinted in the June 19th, 1970, issue of Everywoman. OCLC locates 3 copies of this edition as of April, 2019, at Central Connecticut, Kansas, and UVA.

$125.00

The East Village Other - Vol. 4, no. 20, April 23, 1969

By KATZMAN, Allan (editor)

New York: The East Village Other, Inc, 1969. Paperback. Upper cover adorned with a small reproduction, surrounded in black, of Eddie Adams's photograph of the execution of Viet Cong leader Nguyen Van Lem. Contributors include Eli Enzer, Jaakov Kohn, and Harry Smith. Tabloid (43.5cm); illustrated newsprint wrappers; 40pp; illus. Horizontal mail fold, textblock a bit toned and a few leaves slightly chipped at fore-edge, closed tear a top edge of pp. 27/8 without loss of sense, else Very Good overall.

$75.00

Other Scenes - Vol.3, No.14 (September 30, 1969)

By [NEW LEFT / COUNTERCULTURE] DAVID, C.B. (editor); HOFFMAN, Abbie, John Bryan, Tuli Kupferberg, et al. (contributors)

New York: John Wilcock, [1969]. First Edition. Paperback. Though never as popular or widely-circulated as its brethren like The East Village Other and The Berkeley Barb, nor as political as such radical-left undergrounds as The Black Panther and New Left Notes, John Wilcock's Other Scenes probably deserves pride of place as the most daring, creative, and experimental of the alternative press papers of the late Sixties. It was also - probably a function of Wilcock's comparative maturity (he was already in his late thirties in 1967) - far less reliant on the sort of psychedelic mish-mosh that defined the aesthetic of most other underground papers of the period. Described in the masthead as "a revolutionary newsletter concerned with art, politics, sociology, sex and the creation of a more equitable society," Other Scenes was heavily influenced by both the Fluxus and mail-art movements as well as Andy Warhol's avant-pop aesthetic (Wilcock was a regular Factory denizen). The paper operated as much as a virtual underground club for its subscribers as it did a vehicle for news distribution; according to the masthead of an early issue, Wilcock distributed the paper "twenty times a year from wherever its editor happens to be," and his mailings often included "surprises" including "newsletters, newspapers, letters, brochures and discoveries that I make in all parts of the world." Contents include contributions by Abbie Hoffman, Tuli Kupferberg, Claes Oldenburg, John Bryan, and others. Tabloid (43cm); photo-illustrated newsprint wrappers; [24]pp; illus. Light wear and toning to extremities, a few faint stains to margin at lower right corner, else a Very Good+ unfolded example, without postal markings.

$150.00

John Wilcock's Other Scenes: The International Newspaper - Vol.2, No.3 (June, 1968)

By [NEW LEFT / COUNTERCULTURE] WILCOCK, John (editor)

New York: John Wilcock, 1968. First Edition. Paperback. Though never as popular or widely-circulated as its brethren like The East Village Other and The Berkeley Barb, nor as political as such radical-left undergrounds as The Black Panther and New Left Notes, John Wilcock's Other Scenes probably deserves pride of place as the most daring, creative, and experimental of the alternative press papers of the late Sixties. It was also - probably a function of Wilcock's comparative maturity (he was already in his late thirties in 1967) - far less reliant on the sort of psychedelic mish-mosh that defined the aesthetic of most other underground papers of the period. Described in the masthead as "a revolutionary newsletter concerned with art, politics, sociology, sex and the creation of a more equitable society," Other Scenes was heavily influenced by both the Fluxus and mail-art movements as well as Andy Warhol's avant-pop aesthetic (Wilcock was a regular Factory denizen). The paper operated as much as a virtual underground club for its subscribers as it did a vehicle for news distribution; according to the masthead of an early issue, Wilcock distributed the paper "twenty times a year from wherever its editor happens to be," and his mailings often included "surprises" including "newsletters, newspapers, letters, brochures and discoveries that I make in all parts of the world." Contents include an interview with Bill Graham of the Fillmore, and contributions by Marlene Charyn, C. Clayton Clark, Sheila Krynski and Bruce Hoffman, Bob Garcia, Kerry Thornley, and others. Tabloid (43cm); photo-illustrated newsprint wrappers; [24]pp; illus. Some dustiness and mild toning to wrappers, else a Near Fine, unfolded example, without postal markings.

$150.00

John Wilcock's Other Scenes: The International Newspaper - Third Year, No.6 (June 1-14, 1969)

By [NEW LEFT / COUNTERCULTURE] BRAINARD, Joe, Brigid Polk, and Robert Cordier, et al. (contributors)

New York: John Wilcock, 1969. First Edition. Paperback. Though never as popular or widely-circulated as its brethren like The East Village Other and The Berkeley Barb, nor as political as such radical-left undergrounds as The Black Panther and New Left Notes, John Wilcock's Other Scenes probably deserves pride of place as the most daring, creative, and experimental of the alternative press papers of the late Sixties. It was also - probably a function of Wilcock's comparative maturity (he was already in his late thirties in 1967) - far less reliant on the sort of psychedelic mish-mosh that defined the aesthetic of most other underground papers of the period. Described in the masthead as "a revolutionary newsletter concerned with art, politics, sociology, sex and the creation of a more equitable society," Other Scenes was heavily influenced by both the Fluxus and mail-art movements as well as Andy Warhol's avant-pop aesthetic (Wilcock was a regular Factory denizen). The paper operated as much as a virtual underground club for its subscribers as it did a vehicle for news distribution; according to the masthead of an early issue, Wilcock distributed the paper "twenty times a year from wherever its editor happens to be," and his mailings often included "surprises" including "newsletters, newspapers, letters, brochures and discoveries that I make in all parts of the world." Contents include contributions by David Bourdon, Brigid Polk, Sheila Golden, Chacho Guemes, David Ramsay Steele, Karry and Cara Thornley, John Webster, Joe Brainard, Robert Cordier, Robert Zimmerman, and others. Tabloid (43cm); photo-illustrated newsprint wrappers; [24]pp; illus. Light wear along spine-fold, else a very Near Fine, unfolded copy, without postal markings.

$150.00

Other Scenes: The International Newspaper - Vol.3, No.11 (August 15, 1969)

By [NEW LEFT / COUNTERCULTURE] JOHNSON, Oliver (editor); HOFFMAN, Abbie, Tuli Kupferberg, and John Sinclair, et al. (contributors)

New York: Other Scenes, Inc, [1969]. First Edition. Paperback. Though never as popular or widely-circulated as its brethren like The East Village Other and The Berkeley Barb, nor as political as such radical-left undergrounds as The Black Panther and New Left Notes, John Wilcock's Other Scenes probably deserves pride of place as the most daring, creative, and experimental of the alternative press papers of the late Sixties. It was also - probably a function of Wilcock's comparative maturity (he was already in his late thirties in 1967) - far less reliant on the sort of psychedelic mish-mosh that defined the aesthetic of most other underground papers of the period. Described in the masthead as "a revolutionary newsletter concerned with art, politics, sociology, sex and the creation of a more equitable society," Other Scenes was heavily influenced by both the Fluxus and mail-art movements as well as Andy Warhol's avant-pop aesthetic (Wilcock was a regular Factory denizen). The paper operated as much as a virtual underground club for its subscribers as it did a vehicle for news distribution; according to the masthead of an early issue, Wilcock distributed the paper "twenty times a year from wherever its editor happens to be," and his mailings often included "surprises" including "newsletters, newspapers, letters, brochures and discoveries that I make in all parts of the world." Contents include contributions by John Sinclair, Paul Krassner, Tuli Kupferberg, George Streeton, John Walker, John Wilcock, Thomas Forcade, Abbie Hoffman, and others. Tabloid (43cm); photo-illustrated newsprint wrappers; [24]pp; illus. Some trivial wear and toning to extremities, a short tear to upper right corner of front wrapper, else a Near Fine, unfolded example, without postal markings.

$150.00

Other Scenes: The International Newspaper - Vol.3, No.12 (September 1, 1969)

By [NEW LEFT / COUNTERCULTURE] JOHNSON, Oliver (editor); FEIN, John M., Ira Haber, and Claude Pelieu, et al. (contributors)

New York: John Wilcock, [1969]. First Edition. Paperback. Though never as popular or widely-circulated as its brethren like The East Village Other and The Berkeley Barb, nor as political as such radical-left undergrounds as The Black Panther and New Left Notes, John Wilcock's Other Scenes probably deserves pride of place as the most daring, creative, and experimental of the alternative press papers of the late Sixties. It was also - probably a function of Wilcock's comparative maturity (he was already in his late thirties in 1967) - far less reliant on the sort of psychedelic mish-mosh that defined the aesthetic of most other underground papers of the period. Described in the masthead as "a revolutionary newsletter concerned with art, politics, sociology, sex and the creation of a more equitable society," Other Scenes was heavily influenced by both the Fluxus and mail-art movements as well as Andy Warhol's avant-pop aesthetic (Wilcock was a regular Factory denizen). The paper operated as much as a virtual underground club for its subscribers as it did a vehicle for news distribution; according to the masthead of an early issue, Wilcock distributed the paper "twenty times a year from wherever its editor happens to be," and his mailings often included "surprises" including "newsletters, newspapers, letters, brochures and discoveries that I make in all parts of the world." Contents include contributions by John M. Fein, Ira Haber, Lynne Gurewitz, Claude Pelieu, Arthur S. Harris, Jr., Gabriele Bennett, and others. Tabloid (43cm); photo-illustrated newsprint wrappers; [24]pp; illus. Subtle toning along spine-fold, else a Near Fine, unfolded example, without postal markings.

$150.00

John Wilcock's Other Scenes: The International Newspaper - Vol.3, No.5 (May, 1969)

By [NEW LEFT / COUNTERCULTURE] MALANGA, Gerard, Angus Maclise, and Stan Brakhage, et al. (contributors)

New York: John Wilcock, 1969. First Edition. Paperback. Though never as popular or widely-circulated as its brethren like The East Village Other and The Berkeley Barb, nor as political as such radical-left undergrounds as The Black Panther and New Left Notes, John Wilcock's Other Scenes probably deserves pride of place as the most daring, creative, and experimental of the alternative press papers of the late Sixties. It was also - probably a function of Wilcock's comparative maturity (he was already in his late thirties in 1967) - far less reliant on the sort of psychedelic mish-mosh that defined the aesthetic of most other underground papers of the period. Described in the masthead as "a revolutionary newsletter concerned with art, politics, sociology, sex and the creation of a more equitable society," Other Scenes was heavily influenced by both the Fluxus and mail-art movements as well as Andy Warhol's avant-pop aesthetic (Wilcock was a regular Factory denizen). The paper operated as much as a virtual underground club for its subscribers as it did a vehicle for news distribution; according to the masthead of an early issue, Wilcock distributed the paper "twenty times a year from wherever its editor happens to be," and his mailings often included "surprises" including "newsletters, newspapers, letters, brochures and discoveries that I make in all parts of the world." Contents include an interview with Andy Stapp, and contributions by Liza Williams, Gerard Malanga, Angus Maclise, Jane Jacobs, Stan Brakhage, Sam and Janet Evening, John Peck, Jay Gaulding, and others. Tabloid (43cm); photo-illustrated newsprint wrappers; [24]pp; illus. A Fine, unfolded issue, without postal markings.

$150.00

Other Scenes - Vol.1, No.6 (September, 1968)

By [NEW LEFT / COUNTERCULTURE] BRYAN, John, Tuli Kupferberg, and Israel Young, et al. (contributors)

New York: John Wilcock, 1968. First Edition. Paperback. Though never as popular or widely-circulated as its brethren like The East Village Other and The Berkeley Barb, nor as political as such radical-left undergrounds as The Black Panther and New Left Notes, John Wilcock's Other Scenes probably deserves pride of place as the most daring, creative, and experimental of the alternative press papers of the late Sixties. It was also - probably a function of Wilcock's comparative maturity (he was already in his late thirties in 1967) - far less reliant on the sort of psychedelic mish-mosh that defined the aesthetic of most other underground papers of the period. Described in the masthead as "a revolutionary newsletter concerned with art, politics, sociology, sex and the creation of a more equitable society," Other Scenes was heavily influenced by both the Fluxus and mail-art movements as well as Andy Warhol's avant-pop aesthetic (Wilcock was a regular Factory denizen). The paper operated as much as a virtual underground club for its subscribers as it did a vehicle for news distribution; according to the masthead of an early issue, Wilcock distributed the paper "twenty times a year from wherever its editor happens to be," and his mailings often included "surprises" including "newsletters, newspapers, letters, brochures and discoveries that I make in all parts of the world." Contents include contributions by John Bryan, Clem Gorman, Lee Harris, Israel Young, Tuli Kupferberg, Alex Apostolides, Gary Snyder, LeRoi Jones, and others. Tabloid (43cm); photo-illustrated newsprint wrappers; [24]pp; illus. Mild toning and dustiness to wrappers, else a Near Fine, unfolded example, without postal markings.

$150.00

Other Scenes: The International Newspaper - Third Year, No.2 (February, 1969)

By [NEW LEFT / COUNTERCULTURE] WILCOCK, John, et al. (contributors)

New York: John Wilcock, 1969. First Edition. Paperback. Though never as popular or widely-circulated as its brethren like The East Village Other and The Berkeley Barb, nor as political as such radical-left undergrounds as The Black Panther and New Left Notes, John Wilcock's Other Scenes probably deserves pride of place as the most daring, creative, and experimental of the alternative press papers of the late Sixties. It was also - probably a function of Wilcock's comparative maturity (he was already in his late thirties in 1967) - far less reliant on the sort of psychedelic mish-mosh that defined the aesthetic of most other underground papers of the period. Described in the masthead as "a revolutionary newsletter concerned with art, politics, sociology, sex and the creation of a more equitable society," Other Scenes was heavily influenced by both the Fluxus and mail-art movements as well as Andy Warhol's avant-pop aesthetic (Wilcock was a regular Factory denizen). The paper operated as much as a virtual underground club for its subscribers as it did a vehicle for news distribution; according to the masthead of an early issue, Wilcock distributed the paper "twenty times a year from wherever its editor happens to be," and his mailings often included "surprises" including "newsletters, newspapers, letters, brochures and discoveries that I make in all parts of the world." Contents include contributions by Thomas De Baggio, Kerry and Cara Thornley, Paul Steiner, Jim Fouratt, Don and Barbie Stephens, K.L. Gauba, John Wilcock, and others. Cover features an F.B.I. Wanted poster of Eldridge Cleaver. Tabloid (43cm); photo-illustrated newsprint wrappers; [24]pp; illus. Mild toning along spine-fold, else a Near Fine, unfolded copy, without postal markings.

$150.00

John Wilcock's Other Scenes: The International Newspaper - Vol.2, No.4 (July, 1968)

By [NEW LEFT / COUNTERCULTURE] BUKOWSKI, Charles, Julius Lester, and Alan Solomon, et al. (contributors)

New York: John Wilcock, 1968. First Edition. Paperback. Though never as popular or widely-circulated as its brethren like The East Village Other and The Berkeley Barb, nor as political as such radical-left undergrounds as The Black Panther and New Left Notes, John Wilcock's Other Scenes probably deserves pride of place as the most daring, creative, and experimental of the alternative press papers of the late Sixties. It was also - probably a function of Wilcock's comparative maturity (he was already in his late thirties in 1967) - far less reliant on the sort of psychedelic mish-mosh that defined the aesthetic of most other underground papers of the period. Described in the masthead as "a revolutionary newsletter concerned with art, politics, sociology, sex and the creation of a more equitable society," Other Scenes was heavily influenced by both the Fluxus and mail-art movements as well as Andy Warhol's avant-pop aesthetic (Wilcock was a regular Factory denizen). The paper operated as much as a virtual underground club for its subscribers as it did a vehicle for news distribution; according to the masthead of an early issue, Wilcock distributed the paper "twenty times a year from wherever its editor happens to be," and his mailings often included "surprises" including "newsletters, newspapers, letters, brochures and discoveries that I make in all parts of the world." Contents include contributions by Alan Solomon, Julius Lester, Ronald Willis, Brenda Mull, Don Peterson, Jacques Zavrian, and others, with comix by R. Crumb, and a "Notes of a Dirty Old Man" column by Charles Bukowski. Tabloid (43cm); photo-illustrated newsprint wrappers; [24]pp; illus. Mild toning along spine-fold, else a very Near Fine, unfolded copy, without postal markings.

$150.00

John Wilcock's Other Scenes: The International Newspaper - Vol.3, No.9 (July 15-30, 1969)

By [NEW LEFT / COUNTERCULTURE] BRYAN, John, John Wilcock, et al. (contributors)

New York: Other Scenes, Inc, 1969. First Edition. Paperback. Though never as popular or widely-circulated as its brethren like The East Village Other and The Berkeley Barb, nor as political as such radical-left undergrounds as The Black Panther and New Left Notes, John Wilcock's Other Scenes probably deserves pride of place as the most daring, creative, and experimental of the alternative press papers of the late Sixties. It was also - probably a function of Wilcock's comparative maturity (he was already in his late thirties in 1967) - far less reliant on the sort of psychedelic mish-mosh that defined the aesthetic of most other underground papers of the period. Described in the masthead as "a revolutionary newsletter concerned with art, politics, sociology, sex and the creation of a more equitable society," Other Scenes was heavily influenced by both the Fluxus and mail-art movements as well as Andy Warhol's avant-pop aesthetic (Wilcock was a regular Factory denizen). The paper operated as much as a virtual underground club for its subscribers as it did a vehicle for news distribution; according to the masthead of an early issue, Wilcock distributed the paper "twenty times a year from wherever its editor happens to be," and his mailings often included "surprises" including "newsletters, newspapers, letters, brochures and discoveries that I make in all parts of the world." Contents include contributions by John Wilcock, Bradford Angier, Louise Crowley, Lawrence Lipton, John Bryan, Daniel Spoerri, and others. Tabloid (43cm); photo-illustrated newsprint wrappers; [24]pp; illus. Mild wear and toning to extremities, else a Near Fine, unfolded copy, without postal markings.

$150.00

John Wilcock's Other Scenes: The International Newspaper - Vol.3, No.8 (July 1-14, 1969)

By [NEW LEFT / COUNTERCULTURE] JOHNSON, Oliver (editor); BERCOWITZ, Larry, Anne Waldman, and John Wilcock, et al. (contributors)

New York: Other Scenes, Inc, 1969. First Edition. Paperback. Though never as popular or widely-circulated as its brethren like The East Village Other and The Berkeley Barb, nor as political as such radical-left undergrounds as The Black Panther and New Left Notes, John Wilcock's Other Scenes probably deserves pride of place as the most daring, creative, and experimental of the alternative press papers of the late Sixties. It was also - probably a function of Wilcock's comparative maturity (he was already in his late thirties in 1967) - far less reliant on the sort of psychedelic mish-mosh that defined the aesthetic of most other underground papers of the period. Described in the masthead as "a revolutionary newsletter concerned with art, politics, sociology, sex and the creation of a more equitable society," Other Scenes was heavily influenced by both the Fluxus and mail-art movements as well as Andy Warhol's avant-pop aesthetic (Wilcock was a regular Factory denizen). The paper operated as much as a virtual underground club for its subscribers as it did a vehicle for news distribution; according to the masthead of an early issue, Wilcock distributed the paper "twenty times a year from wherever its editor happens to be," and his mailings often included "surprises" including "newsletters, newspapers, letters, brochures and discoveries that I make in all parts of the world." Contents include contributions by Alan Howard, John Wilcock, Larry Bercowitz, Les Levine, Anne Waldman and others. Tabloid (43cm); photo-illustrated newsprint wrappers; [24]pp; illus. Some trivial wear and toning to extremities, else a Near Fine, unfolded example, without postal markings.

$150.00

John Wilcock's Other Scenes: The International Newspaper - Vol.1, No.8 (November, 1968)

By [NEW LEFT / COUNTERCULTURE] GREGORY, Dick, Ted Joans, and Ray Johnson (contributors)

New York: John Wilcock, 1968. First Edition. Paperback. Though never as popular or widely-circulated as its brethren like The East Village Other and The Berkeley Barb, nor as political as such radical-left undergrounds as The Black Panther and New Left Notes, John Wilcock's Other Scenes probably deserves pride of place as the most daring, creative, and experimental of the alternative press papers of the late Sixties. It was also - probably a function of Wilcock's comparative maturity (he was already in his late thirties in 1967) - far less reliant on the sort of psychedelic mish-mosh that defined the aesthetic of most other underground papers of the period. Described in the masthead as "a revolutionary newsletter concerned with art, politics, sociology, sex and the creation of a more equitable society," Other Scenes was heavily influenced by both the Fluxus and mail-art movements as well as Andy Warhol's avant-pop aesthetic (Wilcock was a regular Factory denizen). The paper operated as much as a virtual underground club for its subscribers as it did a vehicle for news distribution; according to the masthead of an early issue, Wilcock distributed the paper "twenty times a year from wherever its editor happens to be," and his mailings often included "surprises" including "newsletters, newspapers, letters, brochures and discoveries that I make in all parts of the world." Contents include contributions by Ted Joans, Dick Gregory, Paul Johnson, Claes Oldenburg, Burt Prelutsky, Allen Young, John Wilcock, Hamid Naficy, and others, with a superb centerfold designed by artist Ray Johnson. Tabloid (43cm); photo-illustrated newsprint wrappers; [24]pp; illus. Some trivial dustiness and toning to wrappers, else a Near Fine, unfolded example, without postal markings.

$150.00

The Genius of Huey P. Newton, Minister of Defense Black Panther Party

By [BLACK PANTHERS] NEWTON, Huey P.; CLEAVER, Eldridge

San Francisco: Ministry of Information, Black Panther Party, 1970. First Edition. Paperback. Staple-bound pamphlet; pictorial wrappers; 31pp. Fine, unworn copy. Collects seven early Newton speeches and essays, with an introduction by Eldridge Cleaver. Photomontage wrappers and a portrait of Huey by Emory Douglas on p.21.

$75.00

Poster: Youth International Party Manifesto!
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Poster: Youth International Party Manifesto!

By [NEW LEFT] [YIPPIES]

New York: Youth International Party, [1968]. Manifesto of the Youth International Party, founded by Abbie and Anita Hoffman, Jerry Rubin, Paul Krassner, and Nancy Kurshan in the Hoffman's New York apartment on December 31, 1967. The poster is largely comprised of the Yippie flag - a pot leaf superimposed on a red star in a sea of black - with text printed in red and white. The "New Nation" statement in the manifesto was meant to embody the group's ethos for an entire generation. OCLC notes a single holding (UC Davis); we note one other held at OMCA. Original illustrated poster, offset printed in black, red, and green on white stock, measuring 89.5cm x 58cm (35.25" x 22.75"). Two old folds, with some trivial dustiness and a few scattered black, red, and green ink spots along the margins; unbacked; Near Fine / A.

$750.00

Group of Materials Related to the Yippies' Festival of Life
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Group of Materials Related to the Yippies' Festival of Life

By [NEW LEFT] [YIPPIES]

New York: Youth International Party, 1968. First Edition. Paperback. A small collection of materials promoting one of the key events that helped disrupt the 1968 Democratic convention, and one of the most celebrated acts of civil disobedience in the history of Chicago. Intended as a response to "the Convention of Death," the YIP-sponsored Festival was to be held in Chicago's Lincoln Park from August 25-30, where the Yippies envisioned 500,000 young people dancing in the streets, making love in the park, doing drugs, and listening to rock bands. In the end, only MC5 ended up playing for a relatively staid number of attendants, and disorganization regarding sound set-up ultimately moved from skirmishes with police to full-scale rioting. 1. [PRESS PACKET] Festival of Life. Aug.25-30. New York: Youth International Party, [1968]. Quarto (28cm); illustrated leaves, printed in colors on variously-colored stock, and stapled once at upper left edge; [10]pp; illus. Subtle toning along upper edge of preliminary leaf; small patch of light brown paper adhesed to upper right corner of terminal leaf; Very Good+ to Near Fine. Not found in OCLC. 2. [PRESS RELEASE] Yippie Announcement! Yippie! New York: Youth International Party, [1968]. Quarto (28cm); two sheets of yellow stock, with mimeographed text in black, stapled at upper left corner; 3pp. Mild wear and subtle toning to extremities, edges of p.3 reinforced with clear tape, with two patches of light brown paper adhesed to verso; Very Good. Not found in OCLC. 3. [FLYER] Yippie! Chicago - Aug.25-30. New York: Youth International Party, [1968]. Single sheet of 8.5" x 11" white stock, with text printed on recto in blue and red. Subtle toning to extremities, verso showing adhesive residue; Very Good. OCLC notes 3 holdings (Brown, Northwestern, U.Virginia). 4. [HANDBILL] Bags Yippies Can Get Into Your Hometown. New York: Y.I.P., [1968]. ca.8.5" x 10.75" sheet of white stock, with text mimeographed in black on recto and verso. Subtle toning to extremities, with a thin strip of tape removed from upper margin; Very Good+. Not found in OCLC.

$1500.00

Democrats Have the Garden - The People Have the Diplomat Hotel. Counter-convention '76
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Democrats Have the Garden - The People Have the Diplomat Hotel. Counter-convention '76

By [NEW LEFT - GRAPHICS] COUNTERCONVENTION '76

N.p. [New York?]: Counterconvention '76, 1976. Ephemera. Poster advertising this clearly Yippie-inspired event, which may or may not have taken place, opposing the 1976 Democratic Party Convention. If the event did come off, we find no reference to it in the standard literature of the period, nor any evidence of institutional or other holdings for this rare promotional poster. Given that Paul Krassner was billed as the keynote speaker and that other guests included such counterculture luminaries as Margo St. James (prominent lobbyist for the rights of sex workers), Peter Stampfel (whose legendary Sixties psychedelic-folk ensemble The Holy Modal Rounders was reincarnated about this time as the Unholy Modal Rounders), Keith Stroup, and David Peel, we would expect the event to have left some mark on history - but it appears to have left no trace. In any case, a compelling graphic promoting what must have been (and may have been) a fantasy event. Offset lithographed poster, 28cm x 44cm; printed in blue and red inks on uncoated white stock. Vertical fold at center; single tack-hole and slightl toning to extremities; Very Good or better.

$250.00

Resist the Draft - Nov.14
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Resist the Draft - Nov.14

By [NEW LEFT]

San Francisco: Resistance / Liberation Press, [1968]. First Edition. Paperback. An uncommon pair of materials heralding an event promoted by the San Francisco chapter of Resistance, to be held at the San Francisco Federal building on 14 November, 1968. "On Thursday, November 14, hundreds of young men across the country will return their draft cards to the government through the new president. In the Bay Area, the Resistance will sponsor rallies and draft card turn-ins on most campuses at noon...Joan Baez will help us gather the cards and post them to the new president." Pamphlet held by a single OCLC institution (UC Davis); flyer unlocated as of July 2018. Bifolium (21.5cm); single sheet of 8.5" x 14" white stock, folded once vertically to create a 4pp pamphlet; offset printed. A few faint creases and mild signs of handling; Very Good+. Accompanied by an 8.5" x 11" flyer from the same event, similarly printed; old horizontal fold at center, else Near Fine.

$275.00

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