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Progress & Plenty: Advocates the Single Tax, a Scientific Currency, and a Minimum Wage to Abolish Poverty and Unemployment [Inscribed & Signed to Henry Ford]
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Progress & Plenty: Advocates the Single Tax, a Scientific Currency, and a Minimum Wage to Abolish Poverty and Unemployment [Inscribed & Signed to Henry Ford]

By [SOCIALISTS] PATON, James S.

Boston: Christopher Publishing House, 1918. Second Edition. Hardcover. Uncommon work by a student of George Henry's, whose influence would lead a group of twenty-eight single-tax disciples from Des Moines, Iowa, to found the Fairhope Industrial Association on Mobile Bay in Alabama in 1893. The Association, where Paton resided at the time of publication, still operates as a single-tax community to this day under the name the "Fairhope Single-Tax Corporation." A significant association copy, the industrialist Henry Ford having been in favor of a Single Tax system (see David Lanier Lewis, The Public Image of Henry Ford (1976), p. 76). We find three copies of this edition in OCLC as of August, 2018, at Kansas State, the Minnesota Historical Society, and U. Oregon. Small octavo (19cm.); publisher's green cloth, upper cover stamped in gilt; 136pp.; photographic portrait frontispiece. Light shelf wear to cloth extremities, corners slightly softened, minor offsetting to endpapers, else Very Good or better. Inscribed and signed by the author on front free endpaper: "Presented to Henry Ford by Jas. S. Paton / Fairhope, Ala."

$400.00

Die Macht und Schwäche der Gewerkschaften: Die Ursachen der Arbeitslosigkeit [The Power and Weakness of Trade Unions: The Reasons of the Unemployed]
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Die Macht und Schwäche der Gewerkschaften: Die Ursachen der Arbeitslosigkeit [The Power and Weakness of Trade Unions: The Reasons of the Unemployed]

By [SOCIALISTS] COLLINS, John M.

Chicago: John M. Collins, 1910. First German Language Edition. Paperback. Short and uncommon study of trade unionism by a member of the Machinists Union no. 134 and a leading member and "agitator" of the Socialist Party. Neither the German or the English language edition of this title mentioned in Egbert. Duke only in OCLC as of November, 2018. 12mo (17cm.); publisher's tan staplebound card wrappers printed in red; 32pp.; photographic portrait frontispiece, full-page cartoons throughout. Light wear, faint dampstain to bottom edge of upper cover only just bleeding into textblock, else Very Good or better.

$125.00

Ballad of the American Dreyfus Case
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Ballad of the American Dreyfus Case

By [SOCIALISTS] [MOONEY, Tom] ANONYMOUS

n.d. but 1934. Lengthy unpublished ballad of 86 4- and 5-line stanzas recounting the plight of iron molder and IWW leader Tom Mooney from his birth to the present date (1934, based on the penultimate stanza on p. 6 describing Judge Griffin: "all these eighteen years [since the 1916 trial], / Has fought on Mooney's side"). Though no author is provided, the poet has a detailed knowledge of Mooney's biography and trial, beginning before his birth with his father, "A tall trade-union Irishman, / Choking his lungs out mining coal"; progressing to Mooney's early childhood helping his widowed mother make ends meet as a paperboy; and the first trial against him after dynamite was found (or planted) on a boat in the San Pablo Bay, a crime for which he was exonerated. The poem additionally recounts the first meetings between Mooney and Warren K. Billings, as well as the tireless travel and work his mother and sister shouldered to bring justice after it was revealed that the star witness, Frank Oxman, had perjured himself. The poem ends with the heartbreaking death of Mother Mooney, who was laid in state at the gates of San Quentin, and the mournful plea: "Warren Billings is forty years old. / Tom Mooney's hair grows white. / How soon will California turn / Her long, long wrong to right?" Another five years would pass before liberal Governor Culbert Olson would pardon him, in 1939. Original clean copy typescript poem; 9ll. on onionskin; previous mail folds, ex-Mooney Papers, Bancroft Library, with their small rubberstamps to each leaf, else Very Good and sound.

$250.00

Gouged; or, The National Crisis
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Gouged; or, The National Crisis

By [SOCIALISTS] RUSSELL, Chas. Edward

Newark: Clarion Publishing Co, [ca. 1910]. First Edition. Paperback. Text of a speech delivered at Carnegie Hall, New York, in 1909 or 1910 (publication date deduced from text). Russell was an early member of the Socialist Party of America, on whose ticket he ran for Governor of New York in 1910 and 1912, and a co-founder of the NAACP in 1909. Includes seven text illustrations, unsigned. 12mo (18cm.); publisher's pictorial staplebound self-wrappers; 23pp.; cartoons throughout. Wrappers a bit rubbed at extremities, the whole quite dust-soiled, else Very Good and sound.

$75.00

Socialism
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Socialism

By [SOCIALISM] HITCHCOCK, Roswell D.

New York: Anson D.F. Randolph & Company, 1879. First Edition. Hardcover. Virulently anti-socialist and -communist piece by the Congregationalist clergyman, arguing that "To-day there is not in our language, nor in any language, a more hateful word than Communism...it meant, and still means, wages without work, arson, assassination, anarchy" (p. 24). An anonymously published response, "A Reply to Roswell D. Hitchcock, D.D., on Socialism," would be published the same year. Neither title appears in Egbert. 12mo (19cm.); publisher's light blue-grey decorative cloth embossed in black and gilt, blue floral endpapers; 111pp. Extremities a bit worn with brief loss of cloth at spine ends, corners bumped, light soil, spine a bit cocked, else Good to Very Good overall.

$75.00

What Socialism Will Really Mean to You
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What Socialism Will Really Mean to You

By [SOCIALISTS] BENJAMIN, Lawrence

Chicago: Socialist Party of the United States of America, [1936]. First Edition. Paperback. Official 1936 campaign handbook of the Socialist Party issued at the height of the Great Depression and illustrated with attractive graphics promising that "Under socialism, healthy nourishing foods...will be available in sufficient quantities for all, and all useful producers will have a sufficiency of money, with which they will be able to buy them." Eight physical copies in OCLC as of November, 2018; not mentioned in Egbert. Folio tabloid format (41cm.); publisher's photo-illustrated staplebound wrappers; 15pp.; illus. throughout, including photographs, charts, and cartoons. Extremities rather worn and brittle due to poor paperstock, horizontal mail fold with small loss mid-fold affecting text without loss of sense, some ragged splitting at spine ends, smallish withdrawn rubberstamp of the Mooney Papers, Bancroft Library, to upper cover; an About Very Good copy of a fragile and uncommon piece.

$200.00

Discussion and Documentation in support of the Motion for the removal of the National Secretary [Arnold Petersen] of the Socialist Labor Party [Together With Eleven Pieces of Evidence]
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Discussion and Documentation in support of the Motion for the removal of the National Secretary [Arnold Petersen] of the Socialist Labor Party [Together With Eleven Pieces of Evidence]

By [SOCIALISTS] [SOCIALIST LABOR PARTY] [PETERSEN, Arnold] MIJANOVICH, Nada et al.

Chicago, 1947. 1. "Discussion and Documentation in support of the Motion for the Removal of the National Secretary of the Socialist Labor Party." 16 typescript leaves. In which the author makes the following charges against Petersen: "Incompetence as an administrator"; "Incompetence as a Marxist"; and "Slander of the membership." Many, though not all, of the subsequent documents are touched upon, the complaints ranging from toleration of absenteeism, complacency regarding the decline in party membership, poor management of the party printing plant, and the somewhat petty practice of referring to the late Florence Wills as "Ms. Wills" rather than "Comrade Wills." 2. Typed letter signed in print by Mijanovich, dated March 23, 1947, addressed "To members of Section Cook Co." Regarding the charges made against Mijanovich by Petersen, including "Slandering and vilifying the National Secretary of the Party"; "Introducing disruption in Section Cook County by poisoning the minds of members of the Section"; "Conspiring with members of other sections"; and "Fraternizing with an expelled disrupter." Below these charges are Mijanovich's own against Petersen, formally presented at the business meeting of Section on February 18th of that year. 3. "Statement by Nada Mijanovich Submitted to Grievance Committee of Section Cook Co. / Friday, March 14th, 1947." 8 typescript leaves. Follow-up document to the above-mentioned letter in which Mijanovich responds to Petersen's charges made against her, including that of "Fraternizing with an expelled disrupter" to which Mijanovich points out that "This charge I think proves the complete bankruptcy of the National Secretary. The day I started to work in the National Office I told the National Secretary that [expelled SLP member] M. Chuck was my cousin and that he had secured a room for me in New York. All the time that I was in New York the National Secretary was aware of my association with M. Chuck and never once did he say anything to me regarding same." Other aired grievances include Petersen's three-hour lunches, tardyism, and discourtesy to his staff, as well as the publication of such "display pieces" as his "Theocracy or Democracy," which Mijanovich describes as "Pure ostentatious waste. It's criminally useless as a propaganda work for Socialism..." 4. "Excerpts from Letters from Comrade F[lorence] Wills." 3 & [1] typescript leaves, the last the reproduction of a typescript letter from Petersen announcing the unexpected death of Wills. Florence Wills worked for 16 years at the offices of the SLP's weekly journal the "Weekly People." The excerpts came from private correspondence by Wills addressed to Mijanovich, in which first-hand distrust and splintering from the Petersen ("Papa Pete") leadership are most apparent: "Wouldn't it be glorious if, despite everything, and if not before, he got a thorough shellacking at the next convention? Pete I mean. I'll bet he doesn't get the vote he got in 1944. I know he won't for I know quite a few, don't you, who will administer a resounding 'No.' If only there were another candidate" ... "If he should ever start to crack there's a lot of people here who wouldn't be bothered. The hero worship is not apparent here and I heard some lucious comments on what some of those good, working class members think of his highfalutin language which pleased me." 5. "Document A." 1-p. typed letter signed by the "Weekly People," though attributed by Wills and Mijanovich to Arnold Petersen, addressed to John Gould, "High school student, age 16," dated July 9, 1946. Rather substantial letter in response to Gould's request to cancel his "Weekly People" subscription. Despite the simple request, Petersen's letter in response is approxiately 350 acerbic words, threatening Gould with a spanking but finally agreeing to return his money though most sarcastically: "You can buy quite a few lolly-pops for thirty cents." Mijanovich mentions this letter in her original "Discussion and Documentation" as an example of poor time management and public relations. 6. "Document B." 5ll. typescript letter from Petersen to "Weekly People" editor and SLP Presidential candidate Eric Hass, dated September 20, 1945, in which Petersen belatedly argues against facts stated by Hass for the National Executive Committee's report regarding the work done at the printing press and the editorial offices. 7. "Document C." 4ll. typescript letter from Hass to Petersen in response to the above-mentioned epistle, dated September 26, 1945, in which Hass maintains his original facts and figures regarding the work done by the editorial staff at the "Weekly People." He ends with the reminder that "you say you 'do not wish to make invidious comparisons,' [but] the comparison you do make is, in my opinion, invidious. Inasmuch as I have made no pretensions to invite the comparison, I do not understand why you make it unless it is to show the tremendously greater capacities of De Leon...I would not have the Party membership unaware of my limitations, yet I think it should be realized that, within these limitations, I am working as hard and as zealously as I know how." In her own "Statement," Mijanovich points out "That Comrade Hass... [is] thoroughly disgusted with the actions of the N.S. but hesitate[s] to bring out certain facts for fear of causing a split in the Party." 8. "Document D & E." 14ll. typed letter from Florence Wills to Eric Hass regarding her own response to "Document B," in which she too systematically proves Petersen's corrections as "false." Offered together with a 1-p. letter from Wills to Petersen dated September 30, 1944, in which she points out the inferior quality of the printed pamphlets being distributed to potential SLP members. 9. "Document F." 1-page typed letter from Arnold Petersen to Theodore Weder dated September 13, 1946, in regards to the Party's having or having not "revised its 'attitude toward Soviet Russia'" in "recent years." As Mijanovich pointed out in the "Discussion and Documentation," Petersen had allowed to go to press a number of pamphlets directly contradicting the SLP's stance regarding the Soviet Union (see below). 10. "Document G." "Memorandum Copy on Section New York's Resolution, recommending withdrawal of the Party declarations now published in pamphlet form under the titles 'Soviet Russia: Promise or Menace?' and 'Socialism: Hope of Humanity.'" 12ll. document signed in type on last page by Petersen, arguing against the removal of these two titles from popular sale despite criticisms presented by Section New York. 11. "Document H." 22&2ll. document collecting statements made in the following pamphlets: "Soviet Russia: Promise or Menace?"; "DeLeonism vs. Stalinism"; "Stalinist Corruption of Marxism"; "Workers of the World Unite!"; "What Is Socialism?"; and "Stalinist Imperialism." 12. [Undesignated Document]. 1-p. letter of resignation by SLP bookkeeper Eleanor Greenberg addressed to Arnold Petersen dated July 30, 1945, in which Greenberg states "your actions have caused me to be deeply humiliated and hurt, and I am unaccustomed to being treated in such a manner." According to Greenberg, Petersen had inaccurately accused her of repeated tardyism and had "shouted" at her when she invited friends to the office after lunch ("their visit was particularly meaningful to me since they were nurses recently returned from European duty.") To this is attached Petersen's 4ll. response dated the same day, in which Petersen spends approx. 2000 words denigrating Greenberg while defending himself, only to conclude with "I do ask you, in all fairness and common decency to stay until August 18 in order to enable me to secure another bookkeeper." Original packet delivered to leading members of the Socialist Labor Party calling for the removal of Arnold Petersen as National Secretary. All documents printed from typescript and side-staplebound in original mailing envelope addressed from Nada Mijanovich, a Chicago-based member of the SLP, to Bert Baxter, a Portland, Oregon, member, and SLP write-in candidate for Governor. Some wear and light toning to documents, envelope postally used and rather worn and soiled with some tearing, else a Very Good or better collection. Daniel De Leon named the 29-year-old Arnold Petersen his successor as National Secretary of the Socialist Labor Party shortly before his death in 1914. Like his predecessor, during whose tenure the SLP splintered to form the Socialist Party of the United States, Petersen proved to be a polarizing presence in the Party, and while he saved it from bankruptcy, the present collection delineates the slow but steady decline of the SLP during the later years of World War II. Nada Mijanovich, the compiler of this packet, was a Chicago-based SLP member and former worker in the SLP's New York office where she and Petersen butted heads, Petersen eventually charging Mijanovich with slander and other subversive activities. The present collection of evidence levelled against Petersen appears to have been produced in retaliation. Though these documents does not paint an especially flattering portrait of Petersen as will be shown below, Mijanovich's efforts appear to have been in vain, as Petersen would remain National Secretary of the SLP for the next 22 years, until his retirement in 1969. Contents as follows:.

$750.00

Neumjesne Ženidbe [Imprudent Marriages]
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Neumjesne Ženidbe [Imprudent Marriages]

By [SOCIALISTS] BLATCHFORD, Robert; Geo. C. Kutuzovi , trans

Chicago: Izdala Knjižara Radni ke Straže, 1916. First Croatian Language Edition. Paperback. Croatian-language edition of the British socialist's pamphlet "Imprudent Marriages," first published by Charles Kerr in the 1890s and described in a contemporary review as "a short but spicy little work" ("Progressive Thought" (Olathe, KS), November 1, 1899). This translation, by a Croatian-American student at the University of Chicago, was issued by a small and short-lived Croatian-language socialist workers' publisher. At head of title "No. 8 Nardona Knjižnica." This title apparently unrecorded, we find no copies in OCLC (November, 2018) or the NUC. Small octavo (18cm.); publisher's green decorative staplebound wrappers; 24pp. Light wear to wrapper extremities including tiny gouge at top fore-edge corner of upper cover slightly affecting textblock though not approaching text, minor soil, else Very Good or better.

$125.00

Solidarnost i Borba za Opstanak [Solidarity and Struggle for Survival]
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Solidarnost i Borba za Opstanak [Solidarity and Struggle for Survival]

By [SOCIALISTS] "PRAVDOLJUB," trans

Chicago: Izdala Knjižara Radni ke Straže, 1917. First Croatian-Language Edition. Paperback. 12mo (18cm.); publisher's blue decorative staplebound wrappers; 23pp. Wrappers separated from textblock, some chipping and a few shallow losses to extremities, light toning, else Good or better. Published as "Narodna Knjižnica" (Folk Library), no. 15. Croatian translation (from the original Russian?) of a socialist pamphlet issued by the Croatian-American labor press. Unlocated in OCLC as of December, 2018.

$75.00

[Drop title] Lavoratori!
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[Drop title] Lavoratori!

By [SOCIALISM] [ROSSONI, Edmondo]

[New York: Federazione Socialista Italiana, ca. 1912]. First Edition. Issued during Rossoni's tenure as propagandist for the Federazione Socialista Italiana in New York, with blanks in text to be filled in with the place and date of his talks on the ongoing Italo-Turkish War. Rossoni would eventually be deported back to Italy in 1917 where he joined the Fascist leadership despite expressing open criticism against Mussolini. Rossoni would be sentenced to death in 1943 while exiled in Canada, though his sentence would eventually be commuted in 1952. PERICONI 127, giving the publisher as the Industrial Workers of the World (though we find no listing in Miles). Not separately catalogued in OCLC as of June, 2018. Broadside handbill (27.5cm.); printed in black on green stock. Extremities quite toned with a number of small chips, none approaching text, else Very Good.

$150.00

The Intercollegiate Socialist, Vol 1, no 1 (Feb-March 1913) and Vol. 2, no. 1 (October-November 1913)
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The Intercollegiate Socialist, Vol 1, no 1 (Feb-March 1913) and Vol. 2, no. 1 (October-November 1913)

By [SOCIALISM - PERIODICALS] LAIDLER, Harry W. (ed)

New York: The Intercollegiate Socialist Society, 1913. First Edition. Pamphlet. Official organ of the Intercollegiate Socialist Society, founded by Upton Sinclair in 1905; the ISS was the earliest precursor (through two name-changes) of the Sixties radical organization Students for a Democratic Society. The Society's magazine began publication following the Socialist Party's gains in 1912, a landmark year for American socialists during which many public intellectuals joined the cause and the Party's Presidential candidate, Eugene Debs, received nearly a million popular votes, the best showing ever for a Socialist candidate. Thereafter the Party's recruiting efforts stepped up considerably, with many new publications appearing in 1912 and 1913. The inaugural issue has a cover by radical cartoonist Art Young; contents include a mission statement of the I.S.S. by Upton Sinclair; articles by William English Walling and W.H. Ghent; and proceedings of the Society's fourth annual convention in New York. Second issue includes a recruiting article by the prominent woman socialist and Wellesley professor Vida Scudder, author of the Rideout-listed socialist romance A Listener in Babel (1903). Other contributors include Albert Edwards and Ernest Poole (both also Rideout-listed novelists). The publication continued until 1919, when the name was changed to The Socialist Review. A key Socialist Party periodical; not particularly scarce institutionally, but rather uncommon in the trade, especially in original wrappers. GOLDWATER 106. Staple-bound digest (23cm); printed thick paper wrappers; 28pp. Covers heavily soiled; brief tears into text margins; just Good. Ink "SAMPLE" hand-stamp to front wrapper of second issue.

$150.00

Propaganda Primjerom
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Propaganda Primjerom

By [SOCIALISTS] LAVROVU, Po [alt. spelling Petr Lavrov]

Chicago: Izdala Radni ka Knjižara, 1918. First Croatian Language Edition. Paperback. 12mo (19cm.); publisher's pale yellow staplebound card wrappers; 20pp. Minor wear and toning to wrapper extremities, some finger soil, most heavily to upper cover, contemporary pencil ownership inscription to upper cover, else Very Good and sound. Croatian-language translation of a short work by the Russian socialist philosopher, issued as Narodna Knjižnica (Folk Library) no. 17. One copy located in OCLC as of December, 2018, at the Hoover Institute. Not in the NUC.

$75.00

Jedan od Kraljeva Republike (Interview)
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Jedan od Kraljeva Republike (Interview)

By [SOCIALISTS] GORKI, Maksim [alt. spellings Gorkii, Gorky]

Chicago: Izdala Knjižara Radni ke Straže, 1917. First Croatian Language Edition. Paperback. Croatian translation from the original Russian, the title loosely translated as "One of the Kings of the Republic." Published as Nardona Knjižnica (Folk Literature), no. 16. Presumably excerpted from a larger body of work, the text an attack on the oil industry (the titular "King"). This edition not in OCLC as of December, 2018, nor in the NUC. 12mo (19cm.); publisher's buff staplebound card wrappers; 24pp. Wrappers a bit rubbed and toned at extremities, some soil to textblock including ringstains to p. 5 bleeding into following few leaves, occasional contemporary pencil marginalia, else Near Very Good.

$125.00

Report on the Chicago Strike of June-July, 1894 ... With appendices containing testimony, proceedings, and recommendations
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Report on the Chicago Strike of June-July, 1894 ... With appendices containing testimony, proceedings, and recommendations

By [ORGANIZED LABOR & IWW] UNITED STATES STRIKE COMMISSION

Washington DC: Government Printing Office, 1895. First Edition. Hardcover. A massive and detailed report of the Pullman Strike, which began May 11, 1894, and ended unsuccessfully on July 20. Members of the Eugene V. Debs-led American Railway Union, at the time the largest labor union in the country, and workers at the Pullman Company, who had suffered wage cuts as a result of the 1893 recession, organized a Pullman boycott in which members of the ARU refused to drive trains with Pullman cars, leading to a nation-wide hault in freight and passenger traffic. The strike turned violent when 12,000 American troops arrived in the city, leading to 30 deaths and 57 injuries, all suffered by members of the strike. Debs and the Union would eventually be charged with the obstruction of the United States mail, a sentence from which the ARU never recovered. Thick octavo (22.5cm.); publisher's tan cloth, spine stamped in black and gilt; liv,681pp. Boards rather rubbed along extremities, cloth quite darkened, especially at spine, spine lettering quite flaked, crease to pp. 62/3 with long clean splitting though leaf remains complete, small dampstain at bottom fore-edge corner of preliminaries. A Good or better copy overall, internally near fine.

$150.00

Razvoj Nad ovjeka [Development of Man]
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Razvoj Nad ovjeka [Development of Man]

By [SOCIALISTS] KUTUZOVI , Geo

Chicago: Izdala Knjižara Radni ke Straže, 1917. First Edition. Paperback. Uncommon Croatian-language pamphlet by a little-known author, the only other work attributed to Kutuzovi in OCLC being a preface to a translation of Marx published by this same Croatian-American imprint. This title published as Narodna Knjižnica (Folk Library), no. 12. We find two copies in OCLC of this title as of December, 2018 (title misspelled "Razvoj Nad oveka"), both in Slovenia. 12mo (19.5cm.); publisher's buff staplebound wrappers; 47pp. Wrapper a bit worn with small loss at spine crown, extremities toned and rather soiled, else About Very Good.

$100.00

The Masses - Vol.VI, No.4 (January, 1915)
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The Masses - Vol.VI, No.4 (January, 1915)

By [RADICAL & PROLETARIAN LITERATURE] [PERIODICALS] EASTMAN, Max (editor); DAVIS, Stuart and Cornelia Barns (cover art)

New York: The Masses Publishing Co, 1915. First Edition. Paperback. Contents include poems and articles by Louis Untermeyer, Max Eastman, Wilbur Daniel Steele, Amos Pinchot, James Henle, and Edmond McKenna, with cartoons and illustrations throughout by K.R. Chamberlain, Maurice Becker, G.S. Sparks, Art Young, John Barber, Frank Walts, Cornelia Barns, Stuart Tyson, and Stuart Davis. Front wrapper features full-page artwork by Stuart Davis, with rear wrapper illustrated by Cornelia Barns. Quarto (35cm); illustrated wrappers, stapled; 20,[2]pp; illus. Light wear to extremities, two faint vertical creases, with some mild sunning to wrappers; contents clean, complete; Very Good+.

$450.00

Original Panoramic Photograph: Delegates to the 16th National Convention of the Socialist Party, April 15, 1928

By [SOCIALIST PARTY] SPIESS, William (photographer)

New York: Spiess Studio, 1928. Ephemera. Scarce panoramic photo, captured on the third day of this momentous convention of the Socialist Party, the first to be held following the death of Eugene Debs in 1926 and the first to nominate Norman Thomas as the Party's candidate for President. Thomas (who is visible at center-right of this panorama) would be so nominated for the next five Presidential elections in a row, making him one of the most prolific also-rans in American presidential history. This convention also marked the beginning of a factional split that would greatly diminish the Party's influence through the decade to come, as a younger, "militant" wing of the Party sought increasingly to distance itself from the "Old Guard" socialists who had come to prominence during the first two decades of the century under the leadership of Debs. An excellent and uncommon photograph, capturing the Socialist Party of America in the twilight of its golden age. Original (vintage) silver-gelatin print, ca 8" x 35" (image area 6-1/2" x 33"). In contemporary (possibly original) glazed frame. Sight condition fine but for one small poorly-developed area at left side of image, partially obscuring the faces of three subjects (not examined outside of frame). Captioned in image, with studio mark in image lower right.

$500.00

The Red Book for Education and Organization. A Study Course for Party Members and Locals, Designed to Strengthen the Organization Through Education of the Membership, Upon Whose Fitness and Qualifications All Real Progress Must Depend
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The Red Book for Education and Organization. A Study Course for Party Members and Locals, Designed to Strengthen the Organization Through Education of the Membership, Upon Whose Fitness and Qualifications All Real Progress Must Depend

By [SOCIALISM - SOCIALIST PARTY OF PENNSYLVANIA] TILTON, Ira C.

Reading, PA: The Socialist Party of Pennsylvania, 1913. First Edition. Pamphlet. Scarce organizational pamphlet, intended to build on the Socialist Party's advances in the 1912 general elections. Following a general introduction to parliamentary procedure and Robert's Rules, the text is divided into 52 sections, under such headings as "The Class Struggle," "The Socialist Plan of Attack," "Poverty," "The Social Evil," etc.; with questions and answers arranged in catechism form. Text concludes with the Socialist Party platform of 1912. The author, Ira Tilton, was an Indiana socialist organizer and journalist, proprietor of the Valparaiso Social Educator from 1911-1913; his approach to social pedagogy may be summed up in this statement from the Introduction: "It is generally agreed that healthy informed minds think alike just as nearly as healthy eyes see alike." The obvious corollary is left unstated. This title uncommon; OCLC notes 5 locations. Octavo (19.5cm). Staple-bound thick paper wrappers; 72pp. Mild cover rubbing and soil; Very Good.

$150.00

A Brief History of the Amana Society 1714-1900
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A Brief History of the Amana Society 1714-1900

By [UTOPIAN COMMUNITIES - AMANA SOCIETY] NOE, Charles

Iowa City: The Iowa Journal of History and Politics, 1904. Pamphlet. Second Edition (but see note). Octavo ( 28cm). Staple-bound, printed wrappers; 28pp. Chipping to wrapper edges; text fresh and clean, mostly unopened. The "authorized" history of Amana, written by an elder of the Society. The first edition, printed on the Community's own press, appeared in 1900 and is reprinted in its entirety here. A third, textually identical printing was issued by the Society in 1909, incorrectly identified by the publisher as the Second Edition.

$60.00

A Trip to Freeland
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A Trip to Freeland

By [UTOPIAS - FREELAND] HERTZKA, Dr. T. [Theodore]

Bow, WA: The Freeland Printing and Publishing Co, 1905. First American Edition. Pamphlet. Published as a prospectus of sorts for the Freeland Colony at Bow, Whidbey Island, Washington - the first of several (and the only to survive infancy) American communities founded upon the principles outlined in Hertzka's Freeland. The text as here presented eliminates all references to the African continent (where Freeland and its sequel were originally set), perhaps to allay nativist sentiment; the wrappers give a description of the Colony, its mission and inspiration, and invite readers to subscribe to the Colony's quarterly newsletter, Freeland, as well as to help fund the Brotherhood of the Co-operative Commonwealth, the Colony's holding company. Uncommon; not generally seen in commerce; OCLC notes about fifteen locations in North America. LEWIS p.87. Not in Sargent or Negley; not in Miller, American Communes 1860-1890. First printing. Staple-bound pamphlet, 21cm x 12.5cm. Printed blue paper wrappers; 66pp. Covers and margins foxed, text age-darkened and lightly soiled; wrappers ill-fitting (as usual); a Good, complete copy. Though called the "Revised" edition, this is in fact the first American printing of Eine Reise Nach Freiland, the sequel to Hertzka's 1890 utopia , Freiland, Ein Sociales Zukunftsbild (translated as Freeland: A Social Anticipation: NY: 1891). an English edition first appeared in London in 1894 as A Visit to Freeland; the current work is an abridgement and revision of that text.

$300.00

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