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Tobaccoland USA

By [TOBACCIANA] LIGGETT & MYERS TOBACCO Co

N.p. [Richmond?]: Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co, 1940. Paperback. Pictorial souvenir issued by the Liggett & Myers Company, tracing the tobacco leaf from planting to harvest, to auction and sorting, to processing to final product. Essentially an extended infomercial for Chesterfield cigarettes, which are promoted as the "World's Finest" on nearly every page. No edition stated, but the title was reprinted periodically throghout the 1940 and we find no printing earlier than 1940. Edition not stated. Quarto (36cm). Pictorial staple-bound wrappers; 40pp; illus (mostly photographic). Mild wear to covers; Very Good.

$45.00

Richmond in By-Gone Days
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Richmond in By-Gone Days

By [VIRGINIA] MORDECAI, Samuel

Richmond, VA: The Dietz Press, Inc, 1946. Reissue. Hardcover. Biography of the capital of Virginia, republished from the second edition of 1860. Octavo (18.75cm); black cloth, with titling and decorations stamped in gilt on spine and covers; dustjacket; xvii,18-362,[6]pp. Faint dustiness to boards, light dust-soil to upper edge of textblock, else clean throughout; Very Good+ to Near Fine. Dustjacket is lightly shelfworn and dusty, with several short tears and creases; Very Good+.

$40.00

Subdued Southern Nobility: A Southern Ideal

By [CIVIL WAR] "ONE OF THE NOBILITY"

New York: Sharps Publishing Company, [1882]. First Edition. Hardcover. Novel of the Civil War in which two friends attend a Northern college together before volunteering when hosilities break out, each fighting for a different side. WRIGHT III 5314. 12mo (18.5cm.); publisher's green gilt-lettered cloth; [4],392pp. Boards a bit rubbed with exposure at corners, slight spine lean, textblock a bit finger-soiled, else Very Good and sound.

$125.00

At Anchor: A Story of Our Civil War
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At Anchor: A Story of Our Civil War

By [CIVIL WAR FICTION] "AN AMERICAN"

New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1865. First Edition. Hardcover. Pro-Union novel set in Massachusetts, South Carolina, and Richmond during the Civil War, published shortly after the end of hostilities. WRIGHT II 154. Octavo (19cm.); publisher's plum blind-ruled cloth, gilt-lettered spine; 311pp. Cloth unevenly faded, corners a bit bumped, else Very Good, internally fine.

$125.00

Créoles of New Orleans: Gens de Couleur (People of Color)
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Créoles of New Orleans: Gens de Couleur (People of Color)

By MURPHY, Owen, photographs; Lyla Hay Owen, text

New Orleans: First Quarter Publishing Company, [1987]. First Edition. Paperback. Slim quarto (28cm.); publisher's cream pictorial card wrappers; vi,[1],102pp.; photographic illus. throughout. Light wear, old price sticker to rear wrapper, else Very Good or better. "The work presents a view of the Seventh Ward, also known as The Créole Section" (title page).

$35.00

The Foundation, Vol. LXXVIII, no. 7, Spring, 1973
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The Foundation, Vol. LXXVIII, no. 7, Spring, 1973

By JONES, M.J.,ed

Atlanta: Gammon Theological Seminary, 1973. First Edition. Paperback. Octavo (24cm.); publisher's white pictorial staplebound card wrappers printed in purple; 18pp.; photographic illus. throughout. Light dust-soil, else Fine. Quarterly magazine issued by the historically African-American Gammon Theological Seminary. Opening article by L. Harold DeWolf on "The Ethics of Criminal Justice."

$45.00

Towards the Gulf: A Romance of Louisiana
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Towards the Gulf: A Romance of Louisiana

By [SOCIAL FICTION - NEW ORLEANS] [BUCKNER, Alice Morris]

New York: Harper & Brothers, 1887. First Edition. Hardcover. Tragic, anonymously-written novel set in New Orleans, an "extended apologia for anti-miscegenation theory" (KASER 66, The New Orleans of Fiction: A Research Guide). Centered around the Morants, a white family, whose son John falls in love with and marries (unknowingly) the daughter of a deceased plantation owner and one of his "octoroon" slaves. As his suspicions increase, the marriage quickly becomes loveless, and his wife commits suicide shortly after giving birth to a son. "Though just a preschooler, John's son is disturbed by his father's scrutiny and unloving attitude. While visiting the Morant plantation, the boy throws himself into a cotton gin so that he can go join his mother in heaven" (Kaser, p.36). WRIGHT III, 758. Octavo (17.5cm); sage green cloth, with titling and decorations stamped in dark green on spine and covers; [7],8-315,[4]pp ads. Scattered dust-soil and faint foxing to text edges, contemporary owners penciled name to front pastedown, else very Near Fine.

$200.00

New South. Vol. 11, no. 4 (April, 1956)
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New South. Vol. 11, no. 4 (April, 1956)

By [SOUTHERN REGIONAL COUNCIL]

Atlanta: Southern Regional Council, 1956. Pamphlet. Single octavo issue. Staple-bound pictorial paper wrappers; 17pp. Very Good, with ink pressure stamp of the Madison (Wisc) Labor Temple. Includes an article by Otis Durant Duncan on "Desegregation in Oklahoma;" William Gordon on the Montgomery Bus Boycotts and other civil rights boycotts in the South; editorial on the negative effects of racism on Southern industrial progress.

$20.00

Autograph Witness Deposition of Ethel L. Walters taken by William S. Legare, Notary Public for South Carolina [Signed by Legare]

By [AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY & LITERATURE - SOUTH CAROLINA]

Charleston, September 24, 1924. Legal deposition made by one Ethel Walters as a witness to the death of an African American man, Abel Smalls, on September 1, 1924. Walters and her young child had been riding from Charleston to Folly Island that evening when the car they were in broke down. The car was parked on the side of the road where Walters remained for the next hour while the problem was being fixed. While she was sitting in the back seat a "truck in which the Negro Abel Smalls was riding, [approached] from Charleston, [and] deponent from her own knowledge knows that none of the Negroes in the truck were hanging off of the side as there were seats in the truck and all the Negroes were seated..." As the crew passed Walters's disabled car, a bus belonging to the Thompson Transfer Company of Charleston rammed into the back of their truck, throwing off Smalls, whose head was immediately run over by the bus. Though we have been unable to trace any record of the event in contemporary news sources, the resurgence during this period of the Ku Klux Klan together with Walters's description of the event - the road was straight for at least half a mile and the bus made no effort to slow down or honk in warning -- imply that the incident could have been intentional. An advertisement for the Thompson Transfer Company in a contemporary tourist guide to Charleston stresses that the company offered "White Chauffeurs...and 8-Cylinder Cadillacs." In a sad twist of fate, William Legare (whose seal notarizes this document), who would shortly afterwards be elected to the South Carolina state senate, died himself in a car accident six years later. Six post-bound leaves (31.5x20cm.) textually used on rectos of first five leaves only; previous folds with some brief splitting, last leaf (blank) slightly torn, minor toning to extremities, else Near Very Good. Signed and pressure-stamped by Legare at end of statement.

$750.00

Loray: A Pictorial Visit to the Home of Quality Fabrics

By [LABOR - TEXTILE WORKERS - NORTH CAROLINA]

Gastonia, NC: The Loray Mill, 1929. First Edition. Paperback. Attractive promotional booklet produced by the Loray Mill, a five-story, 600,000 square foot textile center within the city limits of Gastonia, North Carolina. The contents extol the virtues of the mill's production quality, management, and personnel, describing text and photos the various processes used in the mill (carding, spinning, spooling, warping, twisting, weaving, and winding), and highlighting the beneficial aspects of the town to employees (churches, schools, recreation). While the month of publication isn't supplied, based on the cover text ("The Mill with a Purpose, Where the Boss is Your Friend"), the booklet must have been produced prior to the infamous mill strike, which began on April 1, 1929. Some 1,800 mill workers, having recently joint the National Textile Workers Union (NTWU), went on strike to demand a 40-hour work week, safer working conditions, higher weekly wages, and union recognition. The strike went on for months, when events came to a head after four armed strikers killed the chief of police and four other officers; overnight, Gastonia became a police state, with the town ransacked by deputies, people beaten, and numerous arrests made. The events of the strike and its aftermath represented a watershed moment for the American labor movement, leading to the publication of significant novels by Sherwood Anderson (Beyond Desire), Olive Tilford Dargan (Call Home the Heart), Grace Lumpkin (To Make My Bread), Myra Page (The Gathering Storm), William Rollins, Jr. (The Shadow Before), and Mary Heaton Vorse (Strike!). Scarce, with no copies for sale in the trade, and OCLC noting a single holding (UNC Chapel Hill). Oblong quarto (22cm); light gray stapled wrappers, with titling printed in black and red on front cover; 27,[1]pp; illus. Modest wear and handling to wrappers, with some toning and a few short splits along spine-fold; preliminary and terminal leaves detached from staples, but laid in; some trivial thumb-soil to margins, with contemporary holograph notes (in pencil) to front wrapper; complete - Good or better.

$450.00

The Black Homer of Jimtown
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The Black Homer of Jimtown

By [AFRICAN AMERICANA] MOTT, Ed

New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1900. First Edition. Hardcover. Collection of Gullah dialect stories and folk tales, many collected on Cape Fear, Noth Carolina, and all of which first published in "The New York Sun." LCP AFRO-AMERICANA 6905; WRIGHT III 3862; see also "American Negro Dialect Literature" in "A Bibliography of Pidgin and Creole Languages" (1975), p. 535. Octavo (19cm.); publisher's cloth with photographic lozenge mounted to upper cover, in photo-illustrated dust jacket; [2],286pp. Jacket in two pieces with spine mostly perished, (only small portion of spine laid in), though cloth still bright; Near Fine in a Good copy of the exceedingly scarce dust jacket. At head of upper jacket panel: "A Book of Real 'Coon' Stories."

$200.00

Homes of the Freed
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Homes of the Freed

By COOLEY, Rossa B[elle]. (text); LANKES, J.J. (illustrations)

New York: New Republic, Inc, 1926. First Edition. Paperback. "The oncoming of three generations of women from the plantation street of slavery days, as observed from the coign of vantage of the oldest school for Negroes in the South" (from introductory matter). Cooley (1873-1932), an educator at the Hampton Institute, moved to St. Helena Island, SC, in 1901, took over the Penn School, founded as one of the first Black schools in the South; she would go on to teach the islanders for the next 25 years, chronicling her experiences in this volume. Octavo (19cm); illustrated wrappers; xvi,199,[3]pp; illustrated with four woodcuts by J.J. Lankes. Light wear, several short tears, and attendant creases to wrapper extremities, with shallow losses to base of spine. upper right corner of front wrapper, and upper left corner of rear wrapper; contents clean, complete; Very Good or better.

$75.00

Roll, Jordan, Roll
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Roll, Jordan, Roll

By [AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY & LITERATURE] PETERKIN, Julia (text); ULMANN, Doris (photographs)

Indianapolis: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1933. Hardcover. One of the great documentary photobooks of the 1930's, examining the lives of black plantation workers in the Gullah coastal region of South Carolina. The idea for the book was originally conceived by American photographer Doris Ullman (1882-1934), who met Julia Peterkin at a literary gathering in 1929 - the same year Ullman had undertaken a project to create a volume of photographic studies of African Americans throughout the South. Ulmann's portraits of the Gullah people were taken on the Lang Syne plantation, owned by the family of Peterkin's husband; paired with text and stories written by Peterkin, Ullman's portraits of the former slaves and their descendants have long been praised for both their quality, and the sense of dignity they convey. ROTH 101. PARR-BADGER, Vol.1, p.135. Reprint, using the original Ballou sheets and bound with Bobbs-Merrill title page. Octavo (22.25cm); blue-violet cloth, with titles stamped in gilt on spine; black topstain; 251pp; illustrated with 70 full-page photographs by Doris Ulmann. Wear to spine ends and corners (with some minor board exposure), sunning to spine and covers, previous owners ink name to front endpaper, with a tiny stain to rear cover; contents clean; Very Good only.

$150.00

The Narrative of Amos Dresser, with Stone's Letters from Natchez -- An obituary notice of the writer, and two letters from Tallahassee relating to the treatment of slaves

By DRESSER, Amos and Asa A. Stone

New York: American Anti-Slavery Society, 1836. First Edition. Paperback. Account of the early career of Ohio abolitionist Amos Dresser (1812-1904), having first studied at the Oneida Institute and Oberlin. On a journey to Mississippi Dresser was arrested in Knoxville where he was publicly whipped for carrying and disseminating anti-slavery pamphlets. In the year of publication of this pamphlet Dresser accepted the position as lecturer for the American Anti-Slavery Society. Of special note are two missives (author unattributed) from an abolitionist in Florida on the conditions of the slaves in that state. LCP - AFRO-AMERICANA 3266; SABIN 20924. 12mo (17cm.); disbound; 42pp.; woodcut illus. throughout text. Brief soil to title page (serving as upper cover), a few of the terminal leaves slightly dog-eared at bottom corner, else Very Good and fresh.

$250.00

Let Us Now Praise Famous Men: Three Tenant Families
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Let Us Now Praise Famous Men: Three Tenant Families

By [GREAT DEPRESSION] AGEE, James (text); EVANS, Walker (photographs)

Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1960. Second (Revised) Edition. Hardcover. Revised edition of Agee and Evans' classic 1941 work, the product of their journalistic assignment in the summer of 1936 "to discover and disclose the actual daily lives of typical sharecropper families in the South. They found and lived with three families for one month, and put together words and photographs that were eloquent, original, and devastating" (from front flap). Second Printing. Octavo (21.5cm); black cloth, with titles stamped in silver on spine; dustjacket; xxii,471pp.; 32 leaves of photographic illustrations, almost all printed on rectos and versos. Spine ends gently nudged, contemporary owners name to front endpaper, with a tiny stain to right edge of textblock; Near Fine. Dustjacket is unclipped (priced $6.50), gently spine-sunned, with wear to spine ends and along the joints; Very Good+.

$45.00

Following the Color Line: An Account of Negro Citizenship in the American Democracy
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Following the Color Line: An Account of Negro Citizenship in the American Democracy

By BAKER, Ray Stannard

New York: Doubleday, Page & Company, 1908. First Edition. Hardcover. Considered the muckracking journalist's most controversial work, a collection of articles written during his travels through the American South, garnering praise from Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. Du Bois, Jane Addams, and others. Baker's work includes an account of the Atlanta riots of 1906, in which more than 25 African Americans were murdered by a white mob over the course of two days. Nevertheless, Baker was keen not to offend his Southern readership and the work is peppered with descriptions of "Negroes of the criminal type," while the class disparities between white and black communities are sometimes significantly down-played. Baker "ultimately concluded that only time would remedy the problems of race in America. The distancing of Baker and other progressives from racial issues shaped the conclusions of [C. Vann] Woodward and other scholars about blacks and progressivism" (Jimmie Franklin, "Blacks and the Progressive Movement: Emergence of a New Synthesis," in the "OAH Magazine of History," Vol. 13, no. 1, Spring, 1999, p. 20). Octavo (22.5cm.); publisher's dark olive green cloth lettered in gilt, top edge gilt; xii,314pp.; photographic frontispiece, 23 leaves of plates, one map in text. Light shelf wear, corners slightly bumped, spine gilt a bit dulled, contemporary bookseller ticket to front free endpaper, else Very Good or better overall.

$200.00

Macon Moore, the Southern Detective
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Macon Moore, the Southern Detective

By TAYLOR, Judson R. [pseud. Harlan Page Halsey]

New York: J.S. Ogilvie & Company, [1881]. First Edition. Hardcover. Early dime detective novel following the exploits of Macon Moore whose father had been killed while fighting for the Confederacy during the Civil War. Harlan Page Halsey's 1874 novel "Old Sleuth, the Detective," loosely based on the career of Allan Pinkerton, is considered by some scholars to be the earliest dime detective novel (see gadetective.pbworks.com). HUBIN, 398; WRIGHT III 2412. Small octavo (19cm.); publisher's black-ruled terracotta cloth, spine lettered in gilt, yellow endpapers; [15]-161,[11](ads)pp.; one plate. Light shelf wear, textblock a bit shaken in binding else Very Good or better, complete despite pagination.

$350.00

People's Cultural Heritage in Appalachia
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People's Cultural Heritage in Appalachia

By [APPALACHIA] WEST, Don

Huntington, WV: Appalachia Press, 1976. Paperback. A brief statement of the culture and history of Southern Appalachia, broken up into three parts: pre-Civil War, Civil War, and post Civil War. With a poem titled "When the Leaves Come Out" by "A Paint Creek Miner" printed on final leaf. Fourth printing. Octavo (21.5cm); yellow printed staplebound wrappers, [12]pp. Touch of oxidation and tiny price sticker to front wrapper, else Near Fine.

$15.00

A Sketch of the History of South Carolina to the Close of the Proprietary Government by the Revolution of 1719. With an appendix containing many valuable records hitherto unpublished
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A Sketch of the History of South Carolina to the Close of the Proprietary Government by the Revolution of 1719. With an appendix containing many valuable records hitherto unpublished

By [RIVERS, William J.]

Charleston: McCarter & Co, 1856. First Edition. Hardcover. Octavo (23cm.); publisher's decorative blind-embossed cloth, gilt-lettered spine, brown glazed endpapers; 470pp. Boards rubbed and rather soiled, exposure at corners, shallow loss at spine foot, spine gilt nearly effaced, shallow tide-stain to title page and first few leaves, top three-quarters of rear blank leaves torn away, front hinge cracked. A Good copy only, though internally sound. Errata slip tipped to last leaf of text. HOWES R-324; SABIN 71652.

$100.00

Letter of Governor Wise to the New York Tammany Society
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Letter of Governor Wise to the New York Tammany Society

By WISE, Henry A.

[Richmond, 1858]. First Edition. Paperback. Collection of pieces by and in response to Virginia Governor Henry A. Wise written between December 30, 1857, and October 13, 1858. Pagination continuous, though each section has separate drop title, including the four-part "Review of 'A Review of Gov. Wise's Tammany Letter, by an Eminent Virginia Statesman" (signed "A Virginia Democrat"); "Letter of Governor Wise to the Philadelphia Anti-Lecompton Meeting"; and "Letter of Governor Wise to the Central Committee Party of Illinois." Wise, though himself a slave-holder who later served as a Confederate General during the Civil War, first voiced his opposition to the proposed proslavery Lecompton Constitution for the state of Kansas in the earliest letter addressed to Tammany Hall. (See Craig M. Simpson, "A Good Southerner" (2014), p. 162.) We find one copy of this edition in OCLC as of May, 2019, at the Huntington. Octavo (22.5cm.); disbound; 67pp. Extremities a bit toned, lacking wrappers, last few leaves starting to separate, else a Good, internally sound copy.

$125.00

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