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The Ukraine and the Ukrainians
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The Ukraine and the Ukrainians

By RUDNITSKY, Stefan; Jacob Wittmer Hartmann, trans

Jersey City, NJ: Ukrainian National Council, 1915. First American Edition. Paperback. Octavo (23cm.); publisher's drab printed staplebound card wrappers; 36,ivpp.; three folding map plates bound in rear, one printed in color. Rear wrapper separated but present, contemporary ownership rubberstamp to upper cover, light toning to wrapper extremities, else Good or better, contents fine.

$40.00

The "Polish Corridor" - The Facts. A letter to the members of the Royal Institute of International Affairs
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The "Polish Corridor" - The Facts. A letter to the members of the Royal Institute of International Affairs

By "AUGUR" (pseud Vladimir Poliakoff)

London: Privately Printed, 1934. Pamphlet. Octavo (22cm). Printed red card wrappers; 32pp; maps; diagrams. Mild cover soil and wear; Very Good. On post-WW1 Polish-German relations and the Polish Corridor dispute.

$30.00

What War Means to the Workers. Answering the Question...will War Bring Back Prosperity
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What War Means to the Workers. Answering the Question...will War Bring Back Prosperity

By DUNN, Robert W.

New York: Workers Library, 1933. First Edition. Pamphlet. 16mo. Staple-bound pictorial paper wrappers; 23pp. Text age-toned; Very Good. Calls for payment of the Bonus and reallocation of war funds to support unemployed workers. SEIDMAN D287.

$30.00

Harvey's Weekly. Vol. 3, no. 19 (week ending May 8, 1920) - "Pass the Knox Resolution!"
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Harvey's Weekly. Vol. 3, no. 19 (week ending May 8, 1920) - "Pass the Knox Resolution!"

By [AMERICAN PERIODICALS] HARVEY, George Brinton McClellan

New York: North American Review Corporation, 1920. Paperback. Single issue of this journal of conservative opinion and politics, edited and published by the New York railway magnate and Ambassador to the United Kingdom under Harding, George B.M. Harvey. Harvey's Weekly ran from 1919-1921 as a continuation of Harvey's North American Review War Weekly, retaining the same America-first, anti-League of Nations content as its predecessor. Each issue featured a double-page cartoon at the centerfold. This issue's cartoon (unsigned), titled "Mr. Tumulty Watches Mr. Palmer Marching Through Georgia," lampoons the Wilson administration's advocacy of the Treaty of Versailles and League of Nations. Single quarto issue. Printed self-wrappers; 32pp; illus. Mild toning to text margins, else Near Fine.

$25.00

Harvey's Weekly. Vol. 3, no. 20 (week ending May 15, 1920) - "Answering the Unanswerable"
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Harvey's Weekly. Vol. 3, no. 20 (week ending May 15, 1920) - "Answering the Unanswerable"

By [AMERICAN PERIODICALS] HARVEY, George Brinton McClellan

New York: North American Review Corporation, 1920. Paperback. Single issue of this journal of conservative opinion and politics, edited and published by the New York railway magnate, staunch anti-Wilsonian, and Ambassador to the United Kingdom under Harding, George B.M. Harvey. Harvey's Weekly ran from 1919-1921 as a continuation of Harvey's North American Review War Weekly, retaining the same America-first, anti-League of Nations content as its predecessor. Each issue featured a double-page cartoon at the centerfold. This issue's cartoon (unsigned), titled "The Republican Schoolroom," caricatures the Wilson cabinet as a group of callow schoolboys. Single quarto issue. Printed self-wrappers; 16pp; illus. Mild toning to text margins, else Very Good.

$25.00

The Preparedness of America. An Address Delivered at the Meeting to Organize a League for the Limitation of Armaments Held at the Railroad Club, New York, December 18, 1914 (&c)
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The Preparedness of America. An Address Delivered at the Meeting to Organize a League for the Limitation of Armaments Held at the Railroad Club, New York, December 18, 1914 (&c)

By [NOBEL LAUREATES] BUTLER, Nicholas Murray

New York: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, N.d. [1914?]. Pamphlet. No edition stated. Printed, staple-bound cream wrappers; 18pp. Clean, sound, and unmarked; a Very Good or better copy. Three WW1-era lectures on pacifism by the President of Columbia University and Nobel Peace Prize winner.

$30.00

Marching on Tanga: with General Smuts in East Africa
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Marching on Tanga: with General Smuts in East Africa

By [WW1] YOUNG, F. Brett

New York: E.P. Dutton & Co, 1917. First Edition. Hardcover. Octavo ( 19.5cm). Cloth boards; dustjacket; 264pp; illus; folding map at rear. Speck of soil at base of front board, else a tight, Near Fine copy in the scarce pictorial dustwrapper, lightly worn and soiled with a few brief, closed tears; Very Good. Scarce thus.

$200.00

The War on Hospital Ships. From the Narratives of Eye-Witnesses
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The War on Hospital Ships. From the Narratives of Eye-Witnesses

By [WW1]

London: T. Fisher Unwin, 1917. First Edition. Pamphlet. Octavo pamphlet (ca 22cm). Mild cover soil, else Very Good or better. First World War anti-German propaganda.

$30.00

The American Peace Award, Created by Edward W. Bok. Offering One Hundred Thousand Dollars ($100,000). This award will be given to the author of the best practicable plan by thich the United States may cooperate with other nations to achieve and preserve the peace of the world
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The American Peace Award, Created by Edward W. Bok. Offering One Hundred Thousand Dollars ($100,000). This award will be given to the author of the best practicable plan by thich the United States may cooperate with other nations to achieve and preserve the peace of the world

By [PACIFISM] BOK, Edward W.

[New York: The American Peace Award, 1923]. Prospectus and invitation for submissions for Edward Bok's landmark "American Peace Award," which promised the phenomenal sum of $100,000 to the author of the best practicable plan for world peace. Judges included Judge Learned Hand, Eleanor Roosevelt, Henry L. Stimson, Melville Stone, and a number of other well known public figures. Among thousands of submissions, the prize was awarded in 1924 to Charles Herbert Levermore, former President of Adelphi College. Prospectus. Quarto bifolium, ca 12" x 10"; 4pp. Vertical and horizontal folds, else light wear; Very Good.

$45.00

Collection of Five Press Photographs and Ten Photo Post-Cards of Bonus Army Activities in Washington, D.C. and Johnstown, PA, July & August 1932

By [GREAT DEPRESSION - BONUS ARMY]

V.p., 1932. In 1924, a grateful Congress voted to give a bonus to WWI veterans, ranging from $1.00 for each day served in the U.S. to $1.25 for each day served overseas. The catch was that payment would not be made until 1945. By 1932, the nation was in the throes of the Depression, and the unemployed veterans wanted their compensation immediately. In May of that year, nearly 15,000 veterans, many unemployed, destitute, and hungry, descended on Washington, DC, to demand immediate payment of their bonuses. Led by a man named Walter Waters, the veterans called themselves the "Bonus Expeditionary Force" (B.E.F.); the media, largely sympathetic to their plight, dubbed them "The Bonus Army." At its height, approximately 17,000 veterans and their families lived in shanty towns around Washington. They built camps and roads, dug latrines, and nearly 43,000 people lived in a well-ordered mini-society. The largest of these camps was at Anacostia Flats, across the river from the Capitol, where a significant portion of the veterans, women, and children lived in shelters built from whatever scrap materials could be scavenged. As the B.E.F. settled in, they began lobbying Congress and organizing marches by day and by night; in the interim, the government became paranoid about radical elements and armed revolt--indeed, the newsprint snipe on verso of one photographs erroneously describes the B.E.F. as "communist," despite the fact that only three of the twenty-six leaders were card-carrying members of the CPUSA. According to journalist and eyewitness Joseph C. Harsch, "This was not a revolutionary situation. This was a bunch of people in great distress wanting help...These were simply veterans from World War I who were out of luck, out of money, and wanted to get their bonus--and they needed the money at that moment." The BEF's hopes rose in June when the House passed a bill allowing for early payment of the bonuses; their hopes were crushed when the Senate defeated the bill, and the marchers refused to leave. For the most part, they were peaceful and orderly, but many government officials saw them as a threat, especially when their leader, Waters, was close to openly supporting fascism. One July 28, 1932, Attorney General Mitchell ordered police to remove the marchers and things quickly deteriorated. Two veterans were shot, both later succombing to their wounds. President Hoover ordered the army to evict the marchers, so General Douglas MacArthur, with an infantry and cavalry regiment supported by six battle tanks commanded by Major George S. Patton, massed on Pennsylvania Avenue. The infantry evicted the veterans and their families, advancing upon them with fixed bayonets and tear gas. The marchers fled to their largest camp, Camp Anacostia, and while Hoover ordered the assault stopped, MacArthur ignored his directive and attacked anyway. Though it remains unclear which side was the perpetrator, the camp was set afire during the assault; the end result left 55 veterans seriously injured, one man's spouse suffered a miscarriage, and a 12-week old child died from exposure to tear-gas. Dwight Eisenhower later wrote, "the whole scene was pitiful. The veterans were ragged, ill-fed, and felt themselves badly abused. To suddenly see the whole encampment going up in flames just added to the pity." The five present photographs were taken after the events described above, at the depleted Bonus Army's "Camp McCloskey" (named after the mayor) in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, August 2-5, 1932, during a heat wave, one of the images showing men cooling off and bathing in a creek near their camp. Of the photographs in this collection, at least one made it into print, the shot showing the camp in its entirety, on the day members learned that Bonus Army member Eric Carlson had died of his wounds inflicted when the B.E.F. was ejected from Washington a few days earlier. Additional photographs show member Mike Matich, being taken away on a stretcher after collapsing from heat stroke; another shows Johnstown mayor McCloskey looking on as another member is escorted from his tent when a typhoid outbreak threatened the camp. McCloskey eventually succeeded in ordering the men out of town, offering free gas or train fare and money for food. Five original press photographs (all approx. 17.5x23cm. or the inverse); typescript snipe or newsclippings mounted to all but one verso; some cockling from exposure to damp, snipe toned, else a Very Good collection. One image has been touched up for publication, with Johnstown Mayor McCloskey, mid-speech, cirlced in black, an arrow pointing to a nurse clad in white behind him. Photographs stamped on verso by Acme Photo, Cleveland; Acme Newspictures, New York; and the Associated Press. With ten photographic postcards (9 real photo, one collotype) of Bonus Army encampments and activities in Washington, including several with "Official B.E.F. Photo" slug in image.

$1500.00

The Bonus March and the New Deal
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The Bonus March and the New Deal

By BARTLETT, John Henry

Chicago: M.A. Donohue & Company, 1937. First Edition. Hardcover. Dramatic narrative of the 15,000+ strong "Bonus Army," who in May of 1932 descended on Washington, DC to demand immediate payment of their bonuses for serving in World War I. "This book was written by former Governor John Henry Bartlett of New Hampshire, who was the donor of "Camp Barlett" (given to aid the veterans) and a participant in these tragic scenes, which shocked the world" (from rear flap). Octavo (19.5cm); blue cloth, with titling and decorations stamped in silver on spine; dustjacket; [xvi],128pp, with photographic frontispiece and 17 black and white plates. Trivial wear to spine ends and corners, else very Near Fine. Dustjacket is unclipped (priced $2.00 on rear flap), showing light wear to extremities, and a few tiny tears; Near Fine.

$125.00

The Passing Legions: How the American Red Cross Met the American Army in Great Britain, the Gateway to France
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The Passing Legions: How the American Red Cross Met the American Army in Great Britain, the Gateway to France

By FIFE, George Buchanan

New York: Macmillan Company, 1920. First Edition. Hardcover. Octavo (19.5cm.); publisher's blue buckram, upper cover lettered and double-ruled in black, gilt-lettered spine; [10],369pp.; photographic frontispiece, 7 leaves of plates. Two faint white marks across upper cover, light soil to textblock extremities, else Very Good or better.

$40.00

Cher Ami: Selections
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Cher Ami: Selections

By FARRINGTON, Harry Webb

New York: Rough and Brown Press, [1926]. First Thus. Hardcover. Octavo (21cm.); original blue blind-ruled cloth, upper cover and spine lettered in gilt; 64pp.; illus., including many photographs. Extremiteis rubbed with some old ink flecking to upper cover, corners bumped, spine gilt nearly effaced; About Very Good overall, though internally sound. Poetry and short prose pieces for children, most of which originally appeared in the author's Poems from France (1920). Title page verso states "1st Edition, illus." However, the author describes this edition in his foreword as a "special and limited edition...because both the fourth edition illustrated, and the 'Selections' from it, have been exhausted." Subsequently, this collection does include some original pieces as well as revisions.

$30.00

The Rise and Fall of Carol Banks
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The Rise and Fall of Carol Banks

By SPRINGS, Elliott White

Garden City: Doubleday, Doran & Company, 1931. First Edition. Hardcover. Octavo (21cm.); publisher's cloth in brown pictorial dust jacket, green topstain; [10],307pp. green pictorial endpapers. Jacket extremities a bit chipped with a few tiny shallow losses, spine a shade sunned, binding cloth a bit discolored, else a Very Good, internally sound copy. Romantic and military adventures of a World War I aviator. HANNA 3318.

$75.00

War and Love
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War and Love

By ALDINGTON, Richard

Boston: The Four Seas Co, 1919. First Edition. Hardcover. Octavo (19.5cm). Decorated paper-covered boards with printed paper title labels; dustjacket; 94pp. 1" x 1/4" coffee-colored stain to margin front free endpaper (and extending very faintly onto half-title); else a tight, clean and attractive copy. In original printed dustwrapper, complete and just lightly soiled and worn, but with old kraft-paper reinforcements to verso. Presumed later issue jacket, with remnants of an applied price label on spine panel. Withal, a quite pretty copy of Aldington's second published poetry collection, a cycle of imagist meditations on the First World War written while he was a lieutenant in the British Army. There was no equivalent British edition.

$75.00

Diary and Scrapbook of Dr. Thomas W. Huntington, Compiled as a Member of the Special Red Cross Commission to Italy, 1917

By [WW1 - RED CROSS] HUNTINGTON, Thomas W (Dr.)

[San Francisco: 1917 et seq]. The Special Commission to Italy was one of four such expeditions undertaken by Red Cross officials to war-ravaged nations on the Continent in the final years of the Great War; the purpose was to investigate conditions and to recommend ways in which the Red Cross could best address the suffering of the military and civilian populations. The Italian Commission took place at a particularly grisly interval in the Italian campaign, beginning with the arrival of Austro/German reinforcements on the Italian front and ending a few weeks after the horrific Battle of Caporetto in which thousands of Italian troops succumbed to poison gas attacks and German stormtroopers. The current archive, assembled by the eminent San Francisco surgeon Thomas W. Huntington (a Commission member, at this time also President of the American Surgical Association), provides a harrowing picture of conditions on the Italian Front in both word and picture. Huntington's diary offers a graphic first-hand record of hospital and battlefield conditions, including lively descriptions of battle: "...at 9:30 p.m. started for San Florino for a night view of an artillery duel; it was a wild ride...road tortuous, full of sharp curves...witnessed at a distance of less than two miles, a tremendously impressive sight...the roar of cannons was continuous, several explosions every minute; now and then star shells from one or other side would light up a large area...by the search lights we plainly saw theItalian shells burst on the side and summit of San Gabriel..." as well as extensive clinical notes and anecdotes regarding hospital visits: "...Villa Frasinetto, a hospital for the care of hopelessly mutilated; ...ten patients, seven are blind, one blind with no hands and deaf, one blind with no hands, one blind with one hand, one with one eye and one leg gone...this is a most delightful place..." as well as observations of civilian life: "...Messina. At present the natives eat no meat. Eat onions and other local vegitables [sic]." Dr. Huntington is not above indulging in the occasional bit of editorializing: "I don't care for the Italian dietary. They have the best there is in the land, but it is too smelly for my palate. Even their wines are simply unspeakable." The presentation album is likely one of several prepared as gifts for Commission members by their Italian hosts. The bulk of the album is comprised of professional photographs, including group and individual portraits of the Commission members and their Italian counterparts. These include about a dozen photographs taken at the front, including several scenes showing battles in action. Other photographs, some clearly amateur snapshots, capture hospital facilities, nurses and other medical staff, patients, and portraits of Italian dignitaries. The album also includes about twenty ephemeral items collected by Huntington on his trip, including menus, itineraries, and scenic postcards. A few items are inscribed, illegibly, to Huntington. To our knowledge, Huntington's diary has never been published, nor do we find other examples of the diary or the album in institutional collections. Provenance: By auction, from the library of a prominent collector of Red Cross memorabilia. Small archive of materials relating to the 1917 Red Cross Commission to Italy, including: (1) Original embossed leather presentation album of 26 leaves, 11" x 14", containing 79 original photographs plus approximately 20 additional pieces of ephemera; (2) Contemporary transcript (77pp) of Huntington's diary, kept during the tour, dated July 20, 1917 - Oct 31, 1917, carbon copy on yellow paper including cover letter of transmittal to a Dr. Ochsner; (3) Carbon transcripts of two lengthy letters from Huntington to his wife, dated July, 1917, describing preparations for his trip to Italy. Album slightly rubbed at joints, lacking several leaves at rear; carbons with occasional chips and tears; cover-letter torn nearly in half horizontally but all photographs well preserved and diary apparently complete; Very Good.

$2500.00

"The Enslavement of Belgians" - A Protest. Mass Meeting, Carnegie Hall, N.Y., Friday Evening, December 15, 1916
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"The Enslavement of Belgians" - A Protest. Mass Meeting, Carnegie Hall, N.Y., Friday Evening, December 15, 1916

By [WW1 - BELGIUM] PARKER, Alton B.; Theodore Roosevelt; Elihu Root (et al)

New York: The League of Nations Association, 1916. First Edition. Pamphlet. Octavo. Staple-bound, printed wrappers; 44pp. Tight, clean, unmarked copy, Near Fine. Transcript of presentations at a mass rally held to protest the German "Rape of Belgium" in 1916.

$20.00

Four Aces (Air Combat Stories, no. 2)
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Four Aces (Air Combat Stories, no. 2)

By BURTIS, Thomson

New York: Grosset and Dunlap, [1932]. Hardcover. Second issue (per Mattson), in light green cloth. With frontispiece plus three illustrations on coated paper by J. Clemens Gretta. Tight, VG copy in the original dustwrapper, slightly worn and rubbed with small splash stain at rear panel; just VG. The second book in the series. Jacket lists to "Flying Blackbirds," the fourth title in the series, also published in 1932.

$25.00

America Ascendant: from Theodore Roosevelt to FDR in the Century of American Power, 1901-1945
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America Ascendant: from Theodore Roosevelt to FDR in the Century of American Power, 1901-1945

By CASHMAN, Sean Dennis

New York: New York University Press, 1998. First Edition. Paperback. Small quarto. Printed pictorial wrappers; xii,560pp; illus. Mild soil to text block edges; faint crease to rear wrapper; still better than VG.

$25.00

Fallow Ground
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Fallow Ground

By REED, Meredith

Philadelphia: Penn Publishing Company, [1936]. First Edition. Hardcover. Octavo (20cm.); publisher's cloth in pictorial dust jacket, brown topstain; 350pp. Chipped and general wear to jacket extremities, including shallow loss at spine ends, corners slightly bumped, contemporary ownership signature to front free endpaper, else Near Fine in Near Very Good jacket. Rather uncommon novel of a young woman's hopes and dreams frustrated by poverty and World War I, happiness finally achieved with the manual labor that comes with the purchase of a farm. Not in Hanna.

$125.00

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