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Plate LXV. Little Harvest Mouse. Mus Minimus, Aud. & Bach. Males & Females. Natural Size.
seller photo

Plate LXV. Little Harvest Mouse. Mus Minimus, Aud. & Bach. Males & Females. Natural Size.

By Audubon, John James & Bachman, Rev. John .

Philadelphia:: Audubon, J.J.,, 1845.. Imperial Folio Edition. Very Good Condition with original hand-coloring. . Original hand-colored lithograph by JT Bowen after painting by John James Audubon., FRS, FLS. Imperial Folio Edition. 21 3/8 x 27 3/8 inches. Very Good condition. Toning to extreme edges of sheet. 1/2 x 1/4 inch chip on top edge. Uniformily toned- otherwise fine. A charming composition of two pair of mice nibbling a corncob in a harvested field. A classic Audubon still life. The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America (Philadelphia c.1845-48) represents the culmination of a lifelong dream held by America's most prominent naturalist and visionary, John James Audubon (1785-1851). Following the completion of his magnum opus, the Double Elephant Folio Edition of Birds of America, c. 1824-38, Audubon was at liberty to pursue a project close to his heart, large scale portraits of all of North America's native animals. Audubon's effort to render America four-legged (thus quadruped) mammals in their natural settings pioneered the way for an entire culture of naturalist artists and engravers. Once the animals were placed within their native habitat, inspired by Audubon's classical composition and watchful eye, most subsequent naturalist painters rarely presented animals and birds void of a full botanical perch, landscaped setting, or woodland background. Very few, if any naturalist artists returned to the solo vignette so commonly found in most natural history works from the previous three centuries. Audubon's dream to complete this monumental work was made manifest through the artistic and clerical assistance of his two sons, John Woodhouse and Victor Gifford, as well as the Reverend John Bachman, who contributed the excellent text for the production. Today, the tale of Audubon's westward journey to hunt and gather skins and specimens and thus inspiration to complete the 155 paintings for the Quadrupeds is common enough. The story of how he sold his work through subscription format and created a smaller (Royal Octavo Edition) as a more democratic and affordable option to the production has been told religiously, and in great detail, by anyone reviewing these masterpieces once again. Yet through these critiques, America's premier ornithologist, painter and naturalist has gained his rightful place among the masters of Animal Portraiture, painters like Edwin Landseer and George Stubbs. Regardless of any criticism his artistic practices and personal affairs may have encountered, Audubon's legacy has enriched our understanding and appreciation of America's native species, both birds and animals. In addition, through Audubon's paintings we are offered the very first glimpses of the American landscape west of the Mississippi, as his work predates that of the Hudson River Artists. Matted in Rag Board

$3400.00

Pl 122 Canada Otter
seller photo

Pl 122 Canada Otter

By Audubon, John James & Bachman, Rev. John .

New York:: V.G. Audubon,, 1849-54.. First Royal Octavo Edition. Fine with original hand-coloring. A fine original hand-colored lithograph on paper. Royal Octavo (10.5 x 7 inches). Drawn from nature by John Audubon, drawn on stone by William E. Hitchcock and lithographed, printed and colored by JT Bowen, Philadelphia. Accompanied by the original text written by the Reverend John Bachman, DD. The Quadrupeds of North America; portrayals of 155 four-legged mammals native to North America depicted in their natural environment, was a collaborative effort between the premier nineteenth century American Ornithologist, Naturalist, Artist and Frontiersman, John James Audubon (1785-1851), his sons John Woodhouse Audubon and Victor Gifford Audubon and the Naturalist Reverend John Bachman. The four men were unified in their desire to document and portray what they recognized as a dwindling resource; America's native animals amidst the natural beauty of the untouched American landscape. Their collective wisdom predicted the impending effects of Manifest Destiny- man's encroachment on the wilderness and natural landscape of North America- and as such was the impetus for the journey. To document and then portray America's native animals in the splendor and majesty of the uninhabited North American landscape, the team traveled westward from Audubon's home in Mill Grove, Pennsylvania up the Missouri River and through territory just previously explored by Lewis and Clark; from the Canadian border of the Northern Russian Territories- now Alaska- then southward to Mexico. Arduous and monumental, the journey is recognised in the pathos of the compositions. However, the true legacy of the work rests on John James Audubon's prolific vision and mastery of his subject and medium. Heretofore unseen, The Quadrupeds of North American is a wildlife classic: an essential and timeless contribution to both American Culture and the Art of American Wildlife Painting. The American Review, a Whig journal, heralded the national origin of the Quadrupeds: "We have at last have a Great National Work, originated and completed among us- authors, artists and artisans of which are our own citizens, the Bible of Nature!" (John James Audubon in the West. New York: Henry H. Abrams, 2000). Sabin 2368. Wood 208. Archivally matted and framed.

$750.00

Plate CVIII Bachman\'s Hare. Lepus Bachmani, Waterhouse  (natural size)
seller photo

Plate CVIII Bachman's Hare. Lepus Bachmani, Waterhouse (natural size)

By Audubon, John James & Bachman, Rev. John .

Philadelphia:: Audubon, J.J.,, 1844.. Imperial Folio Edition. Fine with rich original hand-coloring.. Plate CVIII. Lepus Bachmani, Waterhouse (Bachman's Hare, natural size). Original and rare hand-colored lithograph (22 x 28 inches, 558.8 x 711.2 mm) by JT Bowen after painting by John Woodhouse Audubon, for the Imperial Folio Edition of the Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America. Very Fine condition with bright and rich original hand-coloring. The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America (Philadelphia c.1845-48) represents the culmination of a lifelong dream held by America's most prominent naturalist and visionary, John James Audubon (1785-1851). Following the completion of his magnum opus, the Double Elephant Folio Edition of Birds of America, c. 1824-38, Audubon was at liberty to pursue a project close to his heart, large scale portraits of all of North America's native animals. Audubon's effort to render America four-legged (thus quadruped) mammals in their natural settings pioneered the way for an entire culture of naturalist artists and engravers. Once the animals were placed within their native habitat, inspired by Audubon's classical composition and watchful eye, most subsequent naturalist painters rarely presented animals and birds void of a full botanical perch, landscaped setting, or woodland background. Very few, if any naturalist artists returned to the solo vignette so commonly found in most natural history works from the previous three centuries. Audubon's dream to complete this monumental work was made manifest through the artistic and clerical assistance of his two sons, John Woodhouse and Victor Gifford, as well as the Reverend John Bachman, who contributed the excellent text for the production.Today, the tale of Audubon's westward journey to hunt and gather skins and specimens and thus inspiration to complete the 155 paintings for the Quadrupeds is common enough. The story of how he sold his work through subscription format and created a smaller (Royal Octavo Edition) as a more democratic and affordable option to the production has been told religiously, and in great detail, by anyone reviewing these masterpieces once again. Yet through these critiques, America's premier ornithologist, painter and naturalist has gained his rightful place among the masters of Animal Portraiture, painters like Edwin Landseer and George Stubbs.Regardless of any criticism his artistic practices and personal affairs may have encountered, Audubon's legacy has enriched our understanding and appreciation of America's native species, both birds and animals. In addition, through Audubon's paintings we are offered the very first glimpses of the American landscape west of the Mississippi, as his work predates that of the Hudson River Artists. Although Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books has featured the monumental edition of Audubon's work since 1989, this new collection of plates is the strongest body of mammals we have has the good fortune to acquire. These plates have not seen the light of day, thus the coloring of each of the plates is strong and rich, hand-painted with a multitude of subtle colors which are often lost to fading. In a word, these prints are the finest Audubon animals available, and must been seen. (Blum, Picturing Nature, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1993. Sabin 2367, Wood 208).

$5200.00

Plate XLI Pennant\'s Marten or Fisher. Mustela Canadensis, Linn.
seller photo

Plate XLI Pennant's Marten or Fisher. Mustela Canadensis, Linn.

By Audubon, John James & Bachman, Rev. John .

Philadelphia:: Audubon, J.J.,, 1844.. Imperial Folio Edition. Near Fine condition. . Original and rare hand-colored lithograph by JT Bowen after painting by John James Audubon. (1785-1851). Near Fine condition with rich original color and full margins. Imperial Folio (22 x 28 inches) framed to 28.75 x 35.25 inches. Archivally framed in wheat linen with gold leaf bevel and 2" gold leaf & burl Neoclassical frame by Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books. The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America (Philadelphia c.1845-48) represents the culmination of a lifelong dream held by America's most prominent naturalist and visionary, John James Audubon (1785-1851). Following the completion of his magnum opus, the Double Elephant Folio Edition of Birds of America, c. 1824-38, Audubon was at liberty to pursue a project close to his heart, large scale portraits of all of North America's native animals. Audubon's effort to render America four-legged (thus quadruped) mammals in their natural settings pioneered the way for an entire culture of naturalist artists and engravers. Once the animals were placed within their native habitat, inspired by Audubon's classical composition and watchful eye, most subsequent naturalist painters rarely presented animals and birds void of a full botanical perch, landscaped setting, or woodland background. Very few, if any naturalist artists returned to the solo vignette so commonly found in most natural history works from the previous three centuries. Audubon's dream to complete this monumental work was made manifest through the artistic and clerical assistance of his two sons, John Woodhouse and Victor Gifford, as well as the Reverend John Bachman, who contributed the excellent text for the production. Today, the tale of Audubon's westward journey to hunt and gather skins and specimens and thus inspiration to complete the 155 paintings for the Quadrupeds is common enough. The story of how he sold his work through subscription format and created a smaller (Royal Octavo Edition) as a more democratic and affordable option to the production has been told religiously, and in great detail, by anyone reviewing these masterpieces once again. Yet through these critiques, America's premier ornithologist, painter and naturalist has gained his rightful place among the masters of Animal Portraiture, painters like Edwin Landseer and George Stubbs. Regardless of any criticism his artistic practices and personal affairs may have encountered, Audubon's legacy has enriched our understanding and appreciation of America's native species, both birds and animals. In addition, through Audubon's paintings we are offered the very first glimpses of the American landscape west of the Mississippi, as his work predates that of the Hudson River Artists. Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books has featured the monumental edition of Audubon's work since 1989.

$6500.00

Plate XII Swift Fox.
seller photo

Plate XII Swift Fox.

By Audubon, John James & Bachman, Rev. John .

Philadelphia:: Audubon, J.J.,, 1844.. Imperial Folio Edition. Fine with bright original hand-coloring. . Original and rare hand-colored lithograph by JT Bowen after painting by John James Audubon, FRS, FLS for the Imperial Folio Edition of the Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America. 22 x 28 inches. This Swift Fox is in Fine condition with rich original hand-coloring. Custom framed in conservation materials, as shown, by Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books, ABAA, ILAB. Framed size is 34 x 29.5 inches. The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America (Philadelphia c.1845-48) represents the culmination of a lifelong dream held by America's most prominent naturalist and visionary, John James Audubon (1785-1851). Following the completion of his magnum opus, the Double Elephant Folio Edition of Birds of America, c. 1824-38, Audubon was at liberty to pursue a project close to his heart, large scale portraits of all of North America's native animals. Audubon's effort to render America four-legged (thus quadruped) mammals in their natural settings pioneered the way for an entire culture of naturalist artists and engravers. Once the animals were placed within their native habitat, inspired by Audubon's classical composition and watchful eye, most subsequent naturalist painters rarely presented animals and birds void of a full botanical perch, landscaped setting, or woodland background. Very few, if any naturalist artists returned to the solo vignette so commonly found in most natural history works from the previous three centuries. Audubon's dream to complete this monumental work was made manifest through the artistic and clerical assistance of his two sons, John Woodhouse and Victor Gifford, as well as the Reverend John Bachman, who contributed the excellent text for the production.Today, the tale of Audubon's westward journey to hunt and gather skins and specimens and thus inspiration to complete the 155 paintings for the Quadrupeds is common enough. The story of how he sold his work through subscription format and created a smaller (Royal Octavo Edition) as a more democratic and affordable option to the production has been told religiously, and in great detail, by anyone reviewing these masterpieces once again. Yet through these critiques, America's premier ornithologist, painter and naturalist has gained his rightful place among the masters of Animal Portraiture, painters like Edwin Landseer and George Stubbs.Regardless of any criticism his artistic practices and personal affairs may have encountered, Audubon's legacy has enriched our understanding and appreciation of America's native species, both birds and animals. In addition, through Audubon's paintings we are offered the very first glimpses of the American landscape west of the Mississippi, as his work predates that of the Hudson River Artists. Although Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books has featured the monumental edition of Audubon's work since 1989, this new collection of plates is the strongest body of mammals we have has the good fortune to acquire. These plates have not seen the light of day, thus the coloring of each of the plates is strong and rich, hand-painted with a multitude of subtle colors which are often lost to fading. In a word, these prints are the finest Audubon animals available, and must been seen. (Blum, Picturing Nature, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1993. Sabin 2367, Wood 208). Full Leather

$19000.00

Plate XLIX  Douglass\' Spermophile
seller photo

Plate XLIX Douglass' Spermophile

By Audubon, John James & Bachman, Rev. John .

Philadelphia:: Audubon, J.J.,, 1844.. Imperial Folio Edition. Near Fine with rich original hand-coloring.. A Fine original hand-colored lithographed plate, archivally matted and accompanied by original text. First Royal Octavo Edition. (10.5 x 7 inches). Drawn from nature by John Woodhouse Audubon, drawn on stone by William E. Hitchcock and lithographed, printed and colored by JT Bowen, Philadelphia. The Quadrupeds of North America, which encompassed a total of 155 native American four-legged (thus quadruped) mammals individually documented and portrayed in their landscape and natural settings, was a collaborative effort between premier Nineteenth Century American naturalist painters: John James, his sons John Woodhouse and Victor Gifford Audubon and the naturalist Reverend John Bachman. To document and portray what Audubon considered a dwindling resource; the native mammals set among the splendor and majesty of the uninhabited America landscape, the team traveled westward from Audubon's home in Mill Grove, Pennsylvania up the Missouri River and through territory just previously explored by Lewis and Clark, from the Canadian border of the Northern Russian Territories, now Alaska, southward to Mexico. Arduous and monumental, the journey influenced the pathos of the compositions, however, the true legacy of the work rests on John James Audubon's prolific vision and mastery of his subject and medium. Heretofore unseen, The Quadrupeds of North American is a wildlife classic: an essential and timeless contribution to both American Culture and the Art of American Wildlife Painting. The American Review, a Whig journal, heralded the national origin of the Quadrupeds: "We have at last have a Great National Work, originated and completed among us- authors, artists and artisans of which are our own citizens.. the Bible of Nature!" (John James Audubon in the West. New York: Henry H. Abrams, 2000)

$2500.00

Plate XXVI Wolverine. Gulo Luscus, Lin (Linnaeus).
seller photo

Plate XXVI Wolverine. Gulo Luscus, Lin (Linnaeus).

By Audubon, John James & Bachman, Rev. John .

Philadelphia:: Audubon, J.J.,, 1843.. Imperial Folio Edition. Near Fine Condition with rich original hand-coloring. . A Near Fine orginal hand-colored lithograph by JT Bowen after painting by John James Audubon. (1785-1851). Near Fine condition with a few light foxing spots at edge, not effecting the image. Rich original color, full margins. Imperial Folio (22 x 28 inches) framed to 33.75 x 29.25 inches. Archivally framed in Ecru pongee with goldleaf bevel and 2" gold leaf & burl Neoclassical frame by Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books. The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America (Philadelphia c.1845-48) represents the culmination of a lifelong dream held by America's most prominent naturalist and visionary, John James Audubon (1785-1851). Following the completion of his magnum opus, the Double Elephant Folio Edition of Birds of America, c. 1824-38, Audubon was at liberty to pursue a project close to his heart, large scale portraits of all of North America's native animals. Audubon's effort to render America four-legged (thus quadruped) mammals in their natural settings pioneered the way for an entire culture of naturalist artists and engravers. Once the animals were placed within their native habitat, inspired by Audubon's classical composition and watchful eye, most subsequent naturalist painters rarely presented animals and birds void of a full botanical perch, landscaped setting, or woodland background. Very few, if any naturalist artists returned to the solo vignette so commonly found in most natural history works from the previous three centuries. Audubon's dream to complete this monumental work was made manifest through the artistic and clerical assistance of his two sons, John Woodhouse and Victor Gifford, as well as the Reverend John Bachman, who contributed the excellent text for the production. Today, the tale of Audubon's westward journey to hunt and gather skins and specimens and thus inspiration to complete the 155 paintings for the Quadrupeds is common enough. The story of how he sold his work through subscription format and created a smaller (Royal Octavo Edition) as a more democratic and affordable option to the production has been told religiously, and in great detail, by anyone reviewing these masterpieces once again. Yet through these critiques, America's premier ornithologist, painter and naturalist has gained his rightful place among the masters of Animal Portraiture, painters like Edwin Landseer and George Stubbs. Regardless of any criticism his artistic practices and personal affairs may have encountered, Audubon's legacy has enriched our understanding and appreciation of America's native species, both birds and animals. In addition, through Audubon's paintings we are offered the very first glimpses of the American landscape west of the Mississippi, as his work predates that of the Hudson River Artists. Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books has featured the monumental edition of Audubon's work since 1989.

$15000.00

Pl 125 American Marsh Shrew
seller photo

Pl 125 American Marsh Shrew

By Audubon, John James & Bachman, Rev. John .

New York:: V.G. Audubon,, 1849-54.. Second Royal Octavo Edition. Fine with original hand-coloring. A Fine original hand-colored lithograph on rag stock. Royal Octavo (10.5 x 7 inches). Drawn from nature by John Woodhouse Audubon, drawn on stone by William E. Hitchcock and lithographed, printed and colored by JT Bowen, Philadelphia. This print is accompanied by the original scientific text about the animal written by Rev. John Bachman. The Quadrupeds of North America, which encompassed a total of 155 native American four-legged (thus quadruped) mammals individually documented and portrayed in their landscape and natural settings, was a collaborative effort between premier Nineteenth Century American wildlife painters: John James Audubon, his sons John Woodhouse and Victor Gifford Audubon and the naturalist Reverend John Bachman. To document and portray what John James Audubon considered a dwindling resource; the native mammals set among the splendor and majesty of the uninhabited American landscape, the team traveled westward from Audubon's home in Mill Grove, Pennsylvania up the Missouri River and through territory just previously explored by Lewis and Clark, from the Canadian border of the Northern Russian Territories, now Alaska, southward to Mexico. Arduous and monumental, the journey influenced the pathos of the compositions, however, the true legacy of the work rests on John James Audubon's prolific vision and mastery of his subject and medium. Heretofore unseen, The Quadrupeds of North American is a wildlife classic: an essential and timeless reflection of Nineteenth Century American Culture and contribution to American Wildlife Art. The American Review, a Whig journal, heralded the national origin of the Quadrupeds: "We have at last a Great National Work, originated and completed among us- authors, artists and artisans of which are our own citizens.. the Bible of Nature!" (John James Audubon in the West. New York: Henry H. Abrams, 2000) Matted in Ivory Rag Board, 12 x 16 inches.

$125.00

Pl 9. Parry's Marmot Squirrel
seller photo

Pl 9. Parry's Marmot Squirrel

By Audubon, John James & Bachman, Rev. John .

New York:: V.G. Audubon,, 1849-54.. First Royal Octavo Edition. Fine condition with original hand-coloring . A fine original hand-colored lithograph on paper. Royal Octavo (10.5 x 7 inches). Drawn from nature by John Audubon, drawn on stone by William E. Hitchcock and lithographed, printed and colored by JT Bowen, Philadelphia. Accompanied by the original text written by the Reverend John Bachman, DD. The Quadrupeds of North America; portrayals of 155 four-legged mammals native to North America depicted in their natural environment, was a collaborative effort between the premier nineteenth century American Ornithologist, Naturalist, Artist and Frontiersman, John James Audubon (1785-1851), his sons John Woodhouse Audubon and Victor Gifford Audubon and the Naturalist Reverend John Bachman. The four men were unified in their desire to document and portray what they recognized as a dwindling resource; America's native animals amidst the natural beauty of the untouched American landscape. Their collective wisdom predicted the impending effects of Manifest Destiny- man's encroachment on the wilderness and natural landscape of North America- and as such was the impetus for the journey. To document and then portray America's native animals in the splendor and majesty of the uninhabited North American landscape, the team traveled westward from Audubon's home in Mill Grove, Pennsylvania up the Missouri River and through territory just previously explored by Lewis and Clark; from the Canadian border of the Northern Russian Territories- now Alaska- then southward to Mexico. Arduous and monumental, the journey is recognised in the pathos of the compositions. However, the true legacy of the work rests on John James Audubon's prolific vision and mastery of his subject and medium. Heretofore unseen, The Quadrupeds of North American is a wildlife classic: an essential and timeless contribution to both American Culture and the Art of American Wildlife Painting. The American Review, a Whig journal, heralded the national origin of the Quadrupeds: "We have at last have a Great National Work, originated and completed among us- authors, artists and artisans of which are our own citizens, the Bible of Nature!" (John James Audubon in the West. New York: Henry H. Abrams, 2000). Sabin 2368. Wood 208. Matted in Ivory Rag Board, 12 x 16 inches.

$95.00

Pl 155 Crab-eating Raccoon
seller photo

Pl 155 Crab-eating Raccoon

By Audubon, John James & Bachman, Rev. John .

New York:: V.G. Audubon,, 1849-54.. First Royal Octavo Edition. Fine with original hand-coloring. A fine original hand-colored lithograph on paper. Royal Octavo (10.5 x 7 inches). Drawn from nature by John Audubon, drawn on stone by William E. Hitchcock and lithographed, printed and colored by JT Bowen, Philadelphia. Accompanied by the original text written by the Reverend John Bachman, DD. The Quadrupeds of North America; portrayals of 155 four-legged mammals native to North America depicted in their natural environment, was a collaborative effort between the premier nineteenth century American Ornithologist, Naturalist, Artist and Frontiersman, John James Audubon (1785-1851), his sons John Woodhouse Audubon and Victor Gifford Audubon and the Naturalist Reverend John Bachman. The four men were unified in their desire to document and portray what they recognized as a dwindling resource; America's native animals amidst the natural beauty of the untouched American landscape. Their collective wisdom predicted the impending effects of Manifest Destiny- man's encroachment on the wilderness and natural landscape of North America- and as such was the impetus for the journey. To document and then portray America's native animals in the splendor and majesty of the uninhabited North American landscape, the team traveled westward from Audubon's home in Mill Grove, Pennsylvania up the Missouri River and through territory just previously explored by Lewis and Clark; from the Canadian border of the Northern Russian Territories- now Alaska- then southward to Mexico. Arduous and monumental, the journey is recognised in the pathos of the compositions. However, the true legacy of the work rests on John James Audubon's prolific vision and mastery of his subject and medium. Heretofore unseen, The Quadrupeds of North American is a wildlife classic: an essential and timeless contribution to both American Culture and the Art of American Wildlife Painting. The American Review, a Whig journal, heralded the national origin of the Quadrupeds: "We have at last have a Great National Work, originated and completed among us- authors, artists and artisans of which are our own citizens, the Bible of Nature!" (John James Audubon in the West. New York: Henry H. Abrams, 2000). Sabin 2368. Wood 208. Matted in Ivory Rag Board, 12 x 16 inches.

$350.00

Pl 66. Virginian Opossum
seller photo

Pl 66. Virginian Opossum

By Audubon, John James & Bachman, Rev. John .

New York:: V.G. Audubon,, 1849.. First Royal Octavo Edition. Fine with original hand-coloring. A fine original hand-colored lithograph on paper. Royal Octavo (10.5 x 7 inches). Drawn from nature by John Audubon, drawn on stone by William E. Hitchcock and lithographed, printed and colored by JT Bowen, Philadelphia. Accompanied by the original text written by the Reverend John Bachman, DD. The Quadrupeds of North America; portrayals of 155 four-legged mammals native to North America depicted in their natural environment, was a collaborative effort between the premier nineteenth century American Ornithologist, Naturalist, Artist and Frontiersman, John James Audubon (1785-1851), his sons John Woodhouse Audubon and Victor Gifford Audubon and the Naturalist Reverend John Bachman. The four men were unified in their desire to document and portray what they recognized as a dwindling resource; America's native animals amidst the natural beauty of the untouched American landscape. Their collective wisdom predicted the impending effects of Manifest Destiny- man's encroachment on the wilderness and natural landscape of North America- and as such was the impetus for the journey. To document and then portray America's native animals in the splendor and majesty of the uninhabited North American landscape, the team traveled westward from Audubon's home in Mill Grove, Pennsylvania up the Missouri River and through territory just previously explored by Lewis and Clark; from the Canadian border of the Northern Russian Territories- now Alaska- then southward to Mexico. Arduous and monumental, the journey is recognised in the pathos of the compositions. However, the true legacy of the work rests on John James Audubon's prolific vision and mastery of his subject and medium. Heretofore unseen, The Quadrupeds of North American is a wildlife classic: an essential and timeless contribution to both American Culture and the Art of American Wildlife Painting. The American Review, a Whig journal, heralded the national origin of the Quadrupeds: "We have at last have a Great National Work, originated and completed among us- authors, artists and artisans of which are our own citizens, the Bible of Nature!" (John James Audubon in the West. New York: Henry H. Abrams, 2000). Sabin 2368. Wood 208. Matted in Ivory Rag Board, 12 x 16 inches.

$1200.00

Pl. 38 Red-bellied Squirrel
seller photo

Pl. 38 Red-bellied Squirrel

By Audubon, John James & Bachman, Rev. John .

New York:: V.G. Audubon,, 1849-54.. First Royal Octavo Edition. Fine with original hand-coloring. A fine original hand-colored lithograph on paper. Royal Octavo (10.5 x 7 inches). Drawn from nature by John Audubon, drawn on stone by William E. Hitchcock and lithographed, printed and colored by JT Bowen, Philadelphia. Accompanied by the original text written by the Reverend John Bachman, DD. The Quadrupeds of North America; portrayals of 155 four-legged mammals native to North America depicted in their natural environment, was a collaborative effort between the premier nineteenth century American Ornithologist, Naturalist, Artist and Frontiersman, John James Audubon (1785-1851), his sons John Woodhouse Audubon and Victor Gifford Audubon and the Naturalist Reverend John Bachman. The four men were unified in their desire to document and portray what they recognized as a dwindling resource; America's native animals amidst the natural beauty of the untouched American landscape. Their collective wisdom predicted the impending effects of Manifest Destiny- man's encroachment on the wilderness and natural landscape of North America- and as such was the impetus for the journey. To document and then portray America's native animals in the splendor and majesty of the uninhabited North American landscape, the team traveled westward from Audubon's home in Mill Grove, Pennsylvania up the Missouri River and through territory just previously explored by Lewis and Clark; from the Canadian border of the Northern Russian Territories- now Alaska- then southward to Mexico. Arduous and monumental, the journey is recognised in the pathos of the compositions. However, the true legacy of the work rests on John James Audubon's prolific vision and mastery of his subject and medium. Heretofore unseen, The Quadrupeds of North American is a wildlife classic: an essential and timeless contribution to both American Culture and the Art of American Wildlife Painting. The American Review, a Whig journal, heralded the national origin of the Quadrupeds: "We have at last have a Great National Work, originated and completed among us- authors, artists and artisans of which are our own citizens, the Bible of Nature!" (John James Audubon in the West. New York: Henry H. Abrams, 2000). Sabin 2368. Wood 208. Matted in Ivory Rag Board, 12 x 16 inches.

$225.00

Pl 150 Southern Pouched Rat, Dekay's Shrew
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Pl 150 Southern Pouched Rat, Dekay's Shrew

By Audubon, John James & Bachman, Rev. John .

New York:: V.G. Audubon,, 1849-54.. First Royal Octavo Edition. Fine with original hand-coloring. A fine original hand-colored lithograph on paper. Royal Octavo (10.5 x 7 inches). Drawn from nature by John Audubon, drawn on stone by William E. Hitchcock and lithographed, printed and colored by JT Bowen, Philadelphia. Accompanied by the original text written by the Reverend John Bachman, DD. The Quadrupeds of North America; portrayals of 155 four-legged mammals native to North America depicted in their natural environment, was a collaborative effort between the premier nineteenth century American Ornithologist, Naturalist, Artist and Frontiersman, John James Audubon (1785-1851), his sons John Woodhouse Audubon and Victor Gifford Audubon and the Naturalist Reverend John Bachman. The four men were unified in their desire to document and portray what they recognized as a dwindling resource; America's native animals amidst the natural beauty of the untouched American landscape. Their collective wisdom predicted the impending effects of Manifest Destiny- man's encroachment on the wilderness and natural landscape of North America- and as such was the impetus for the journey. To document and then portray America's native animals in the splendor and majesty of the uninhabited North American landscape, the team traveled westward from Audubon's home in Mill Grove, Pennsylvania up the Missouri River and through territory just previously explored by Lewis and Clark; from the Canadian border of the Northern Russian Territories- now Alaska- then southward to Mexico. Arduous and monumental, the journey is recognised in the pathos of the compositions. However, the true legacy of the work rests on John James Audubon's prolific vision and mastery of his subject and medium. Heretofore unseen, The Quadrupeds of North American is a wildlife classic: an essential and timeless contribution to both American Culture and the Art of American Wildlife Painting. The American Review, a Whig journal, heralded the national origin of the Quadrupeds: "We have at last have a Great National Work, originated and completed among us- authors, artists and artisans of which are our own citizens, the Bible of Nature!" (John James Audubon in the West. New York: Henry H. Abrams, 2000). Sabin 2368. Wood 208. Matted in Ivory Rag Board, 12 x 16 inches.

$75.00

Pl 142 The Camas Rat
seller photo

Pl 142 The Camas Rat

By Audubon, John James & Bachman, Rev. John .

New York:: V.G. Audubon,, 1849-54.. First Royal Octavo Edition. Fine with original hand-coloring. A fine original hand-colored lithograph on paper. Royal Octavo (10.5 x 7 inches). Drawn from nature by John Audubon, drawn on stone by William E. Hitchcock and lithographed, printed and colored by JT Bowen, Philadelphia. Accompanied by the original text written by the Reverend John Bachman, DD. The Quadrupeds of North America; portrayals of 155 four-legged mammals native to North America depicted in their natural environment, was a collaborative effort between the premier nineteenth century American Ornithologist, Naturalist, Artist and Frontiersman, John James Audubon (1785-1851), his sons John Woodhouse Audubon and Victor Gifford Audubon and the Naturalist Reverend John Bachman. The four men were unified in their desire to document and portray what they recognized as a dwindling resource; America's native animals amidst the natural beauty of the untouched American landscape. Their collective wisdom predicted the impending effects of Manifest Destiny- man's encroachment on the wilderness and natural landscape of North America- and as such was the impetus for the journey. To document and then portray America's native animals in the splendor and majesty of the uninhabited North American landscape, the team traveled westward from Audubon's home in Mill Grove, Pennsylvania up the Missouri River and through territory just previously explored by Lewis and Clark; from the Canadian border of the Northern Russian Territories- now Alaska- then southward to Mexico. Arduous and monumental, the journey is recognised in the pathos of the compositions. However, the true legacy of the work rests on John James Audubon's prolific vision and mastery of his subject and medium. Heretofore unseen, The Quadrupeds of North American is a wildlife classic: an essential and timeless contribution to both American Culture and the Art of American Wildlife Painting. The American Review, a Whig journal, heralded the national origin of the Quadrupeds: "We have at last have a Great National Work, originated and completed among us- authors, artists and artisans of which are our own citizens, the Bible of Nature!" (John James Audubon in the West. New York: Henry H. Abrams, 2000). Sabin 2368. Wood 208. Matted in Ivory Rag Board, 12 x 16 inches.

$75.00

Pl 29 Rocky Mountain Neotoma
seller photo

Pl 29 Rocky Mountain Neotoma

By Audubon, John James & Bachman, Rev. John .

New York:: V.G. Audubon,, 1849-54.. First Royal Octavo Edition. Fine with original hand-coloring. A fine original hand-colored lithograph on paper. Royal Octavo (10.5 x 7 inches). Drawn from nature by John Audubon, drawn on stone by William E. Hitchcock and lithographed, printed and colored by JT Bowen, Philadelphia. Accompanied by the original text written by the Reverend John Bachman, DD. The Quadrupeds of North America; portrayals of 155 four-legged mammals native to North America depicted in their natural environment, was a collaborative effort between the premier nineteenth century American Ornithologist, Naturalist, Artist and Frontiersman, John James Audubon (1785-1851), his sons John Woodhouse Audubon and Victor Gifford Audubon and the Naturalist Reverend John Bachman. The four men were unified in their desire to document and portray what they recognized as a dwindling resource; America's native animals amidst the natural beauty of the untouched American landscape. Their collective wisdom predicted the impending effects of Manifest Destiny- man's encroachment on the wilderness and natural landscape of North America- and as such was the impetus for the journey. To document and then portray America's native animals in the splendor and majesty of the uninhabited North American landscape, the team traveled westward from Audubon's home in Mill Grove, Pennsylvania up the Missouri River and through territory just previously explored by Lewis and Clark; from the Canadian border of the Northern Russian Territories- now Alaska- then southward to Mexico. Arduous and monumental, the journey is recognised in the pathos of the compositions. However, the true legacy of the work rests on John James Audubon's prolific vision and mastery of his subject and medium. Heretofore unseen, The Quadrupeds of North American is a wildlife classic: an essential and timeless contribution to both American Culture and the Art of American Wildlife Painting. The American Review, a Whig journal, heralded the national origin of the Quadrupeds: "We have at last have a Great National Work, originated and completed among us- authors, artists and artisans of which are our own citizens, the Bible of Nature!" (John James Audubon in the West. New York: Henry H. Abrams, 2000). Sabin 2368. Wood 208. Matted in Ivory Rag Board, 12 x 16 inches.

$95.00

Pl 120 Tawny Lemming, Back's Lemming
seller photo

Pl 120 Tawny Lemming, Back's Lemming

By Audubon, John James & Bachman, Rev. John .

New York:: V.G. Audubon,, 1849-54.. First Royal Octavo Edition. Fine with original hand-coloring. A fine original hand-colored lithograph on paper. Royal Octavo (10.5 x 7 inches). Drawn from nature by John Audubon, drawn on stone by William E. Hitchcock and lithographed, printed and colored by JT Bowen, Philadelphia. Accompanied by the original text written by the Reverend John Bachman, DD. The Quadrupeds of North America; portrayals of 155 four-legged mammals native to North America depicted in their natural environment, was a collaborative effort between the premier nineteenth century American Ornithologist, Naturalist, Artist and Frontiersman, John James Audubon (1785-1851), his sons John Woodhouse Audubon and Victor Gifford Audubon and the Naturalist Reverend John Bachman. The four men were unified in their desire to document and portray what they recognized as a dwindling resource; America's native animals amidst the natural beauty of the untouched American landscape. Their collective wisdom predicted the impending effects of Manifest Destiny- man's encroachment on the wilderness and natural landscape of North America- and as such was the impetus for the journey. To document and then portray America's native animals in the splendor and majesty of the uninhabited North American landscape, the team traveled westward from Audubon's home in Mill Grove, Pennsylvania up the Missouri River and through territory just previously explored by Lewis and Clark; from the Canadian border of the Northern Russian Territories- now Alaska- then southward to Mexico. Arduous and monumental, the journey is recognised in the pathos of the compositions. However, the true legacy of the work rests on John James Audubon's prolific vision and mastery of his subject and medium. Heretofore unseen, The Quadrupeds of North American is a wildlife classic: an essential and timeless contribution to both American Culture and the Art of American Wildlife Painting. The American Review, a Whig journal, heralded the national origin of the Quadrupeds: "We have at last have a Great National Work, originated and completed among us- authors, artists and artisans of which are our own citizens, the Bible of Nature!" (John James Audubon in the West. New York: Henry H. Abrams, 2000). Sabin 2368. Wood 208. Matted in Ivory Rag Board, 12 x 16 inches.

$75.00

Pl. 75 Carolina Shrew
seller photo

Pl. 75 Carolina Shrew

By Audubon, John James & Bachman, Rev. John .

New York:: V.G. Audubon,, 1849-54.. First Royal Octavo Edition. Fine with original hand-coloring. A fine original hand-colored lithograph on paper. Royal Octavo (10.5 x 7 inches). Drawn from nature by John Audubon, drawn on stone by William E. Hitchcock and lithographed, printed and colored by JT Bowen, Philadelphia. Accompanied by the original text written by the Reverend John Bachman, DD. The Quadrupeds of North America; portrayals of 155 four-legged mammals native to North America depicted in their natural environment, was a collaborative effort between the premier nineteenth century American Ornithologist, Naturalist, Artist and Frontiersman, John James Audubon (1785-1851), his sons John Woodhouse Audubon and Victor Gifford Audubon and the Naturalist Reverend John Bachman. The four men were unified in their desire to document and portray what they recognized as a dwindling resource; America's native animals amidst the natural beauty of the untouched American landscape. Their collective wisdom predicted the impending effects of Manifest Destiny- man's encroachment on the wilderness and natural landscape of North America- and as such was the impetus for the journey. To document and then portray America's native animals in the splendor and majesty of the uninhabited North American landscape, the team traveled westward from Audubon's home in Mill Grove, Pennsylvania up the Missouri River and through territory just previously explored by Lewis and Clark; from the Canadian border of the Northern Russian Territories- now Alaska- then southward to Mexico. Arduous and monumental, the journey is recognised in the pathos of the compositions. However, the true legacy of the work rests on John James Audubon's prolific vision and mastery of his subject and medium. Heretofore unseen, The Quadrupeds of North American is a wildlife classic: an essential and timeless contribution to both American Culture and the Art of American Wildlife Painting. The American Review, a Whig journal, heralded the national origin of the Quadrupeds: "We have at last have a Great National Work, originated and completed among us- authors, artists and artisans of which are our own citizens, the Bible of Nature!" (John James Audubon in the West. New York: Henry H. Abrams, 2000). Sabin 2368. Wood 208. Matted in Ivory Rag Board, 12 x 16 inches.

$150.00

Pl 148 Tawny Weasel
seller photo

Pl 148 Tawny Weasel

By Audubon, John James & Bachman, Rev. John .

New York:: V.G. Audubon,, 1856.. Second Royal Octavo Edition. Fine with original hand-coloring. A Fine original hand-colored lithograph on rag stock. Royal Octavo (10.5 x 7 inches). Drawn from nature by John Woodhouse Audubon, drawn on stone by William E. Hitchcock and lithographed, printed and colored by JT Bowen, Philadelphia. This print is accompanied by the original scientific text about the animal written by Rev. John Bachman. The Quadrupeds of North America, which encompassed a total of 155 native American four-legged (thus quadruped) mammals individually documented and portrayed in their landscape and natural settings, was a collaborative effort between premier Nineteenth Century American wildlife painters: John James Audubon, his sons John Woodhouse and Victor Gifford Audubon and the naturalist Reverend John Bachman. To document and portray what John James Audubon considered a dwindling resource; the native mammals set among the splendor and majesty of the uninhabited American landscape, the team traveled westward from Audubon's home in Mill Grove, Pennsylvania up the Missouri River and through territory just previously explored by Lewis and Clark, from the Canadian border of the Northern Russian Territories, now Alaska, southward to Mexico. Arduous and monumental, the journey influenced the pathos of the compositions, however, the true legacy of the work rests on John James Audubon's prolific vision and mastery of his subject and medium. Heretofore unseen, The Quadrupeds of North American is a wildlife classic: an essential and timeless reflection of Nineteenth Century American Culture and contribution to American Wildlife Art. The American Review, a Whig journal, heralded the national origin of the Quadrupeds: "We have at last a Great National Work, originated and completed among us- authors, artists and artisans of which are our own citizens.. the Bible of Nature!" (John James Audubon in the West. New York: Henry H. Abrams, 2000) Matted in Ivory Rag Board, 12 x 16 inches.

$125.00

Pl. 55 Red-tailed Squirrel
seller photo

Pl. 55 Red-tailed Squirrel

By Audubon, John James & Bachman, Rev. John .

New York:: V.G. Audubon,, 1856.. Second Royal Octavo Edition. Fine with original hand-coloring. A Fine original hand-colored lithograph on rag stock. Royal Octavo (10.5 x 7 inches). Drawn from nature by John James Audubon, drawn on stone by William E. Hitchcock and lithographed, printed and colored by JT Bowen, Philadelphia. This print is accompanied by the original scientific text about the animal written by Rev. John Bachman. The Quadrupeds of North America, which encompassed a total of 155 native American four-legged (thus quadruped) mammals individually documented and portrayed in their landscape and natural settings, was a collaborative effort between premier Nineteenth Century American naturalist painters: John James, his sons John Woodhouse and Victor Gifford Audubon and the naturalist Reverend John Bachman. To document and portray what Audubon considered a dwindling resource; the native mammals set among the splendor and majesty of the uninhabited American landscape, the team traveled westward from Audubon's home in Mill Grove, Pennsylvania up the Missouri River and through territory just previously explored by Lewis and Clark, from the Canadian border of the Northern Russian Territories, now Alaska, southward to Mexico. Arduous and monumental, the journey influenced the pathos of the compositions, however, the true legacy of the work rests on John James Audubon's prolific vision and mastery of his subject and medium. Heretofore unseen, The Quadrupeds of North American is a wildlife classic: an essential and timeless reflection of Nineteenth Century American Culture and contribution to the American Wildlife Art. The American Review, a Whig journal, heralded the national origin of the Quadrupeds: "We have at last a Great National Work, originated and completed among us- authors, artists and artisans of which are our own citizens.. the Bible of Nature!" (John James Audubon in the West. New York: Henry H. Abrams, 2000) Matted in Ivory Rag Board, 12 x 16 inches.

$95.00

Pl 126. Caribou or American Rein-deer
seller photo

Pl 126. Caribou or American Rein-deer

By Audubon, John James & Bachman, Rev. John .

New York:: V.G. Audubon,, 1849-54.. First Royal Octavo Edition. Fine with original hand-coloring. A fine original hand-colored lithograph on paper. Royal Octavo (10.5 x 7 inches). Drawn from nature by John Audubon, drawn on stone by William E. Hitchcock and lithographed, printed and colored by JT Bowen, Philadelphia. Accompanied by the original text written by the Reverend John Bachman, DD. The Quadrupeds of North America; portrayals of 155 four-legged mammals native to North America depicted in their natural environment, was a collaborative effort between the premier nineteenth century American Ornithologist, Naturalist, Artist and Frontiersman, John James Audubon (1785-1851), his sons John Woodhouse Audubon and Victor Gifford Audubon and the Naturalist Reverend John Bachman. The four men were unified in their desire to document and portray what they recognized as a dwindling resource; America's native animals amidst the natural beauty of the untouched American landscape. Their collective wisdom predicted the impending effects of Manifest Destiny- man's encroachment on the wilderness and natural landscape of North America- and as such was the impetus for the journey. To document and then portray America's native animals in the splendor and majesty of the uninhabited North American landscape, the team traveled westward from Audubon's home in Mill Grove, Pennsylvania up the Missouri River and through territory just previously explored by Lewis and Clark; from the Canadian border of the Northern Russian Territories- now Alaska- then southward to Mexico. Arduous and monumental, the journey is recognised in the pathos of the compositions. However, the true legacy of the work rests on John James Audubon's prolific vision and mastery of his subject and medium. Heretofore unseen, The Quadrupeds of North American is a wildlife classic: an essential and timeless contribution to both American Culture and the Art of American Wildlife Painting. The American Review, a Whig journal, heralded the national origin of the Quadrupeds: "We have at last have a Great National Work, originated and completed among us- authors, artists and artisans of which are our own citizens, the Bible of Nature!" (John James Audubon in the West. New York: Henry H. Abrams, 2000). Sabin 2368. Wood 208. Matted in Ivory Rag Board, 12 x 16 inches.

$950.00

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