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Pl. 6 Common Buzzard (Swainson\'s Hawk)  The Birds of America
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Pl. 6 Common Buzzard (Swainson's Hawk) The Birds of America

By Audubon, John James .

No. 2 Pl. 6 Common Buzzard. Swainson's Hawk in pursuit of a Swamp Hare. *Note: Image shown in cropped detail. Actual print is unaltered with title* A Fine original hand-colored lithograph on paper. 6.5 x 10.5 inches. Drawn from nature by J.J. Audubon, FRS FLS (Fellow of the Royal Society, Fellow of the Linnaean Society). Lithographed, printed and colored by J.T. Bowen, Philadelphia for the First Royal Octavo Edition of John James Audubon's The Birds of America. Includes the text from Audubon's Ornithological Biography. The Royal Octavo Edition represents John James Audubon's (1785-1851) desire to create an affordable work based on his magnum opus; the Double Elephant Folio Edition of The Birds of America. London: Published by the Author, 1827-38, with 435 engravings produced by William H. Lizars and Robert Havell, Jr. after Audubon's dramatic life-sized portraits of North American birds set in native foliage and surroundings. For this new Royal Octavo Edition, Audubon and his assistants drew 500 unique compositions inspired by the original engravings for the grand Double Elephant Folio Edition. During the mid-nineteenth century, there were no photo-mechanical means of reproduction. To create a smaller format work, every composition was drawn by hand with the aid of the Camera Lucida. Each bird was now rendered according to species; and portrayed on a new botanical perch or landscape. With this new envisioning Audubon created a perfected composition: a charming vignette of the bird- or family of birds- in natural settings now sized to scale in the smaller format. For the illustrations of the Royal Octavo Edition of The Birds of America, Audubon enlisted the talents of America's premier lithographers and printers: the JT Bowen and Company in Philadelphia and Endicott in New York. Each composition was drawn on a limestone tablet, inked and then printed. Once dried, the print of the bird and setting was faithfully handpainted in splendid array of lifelike tones. In this smaller format Audubon presented ten unique compositions of birds recently discovered during his explorations into the American West, and not included in the Folio edition. As with the Folio Edition, the Royal Octavo Edition was sold by subscription, and issued twice monthly between 1840 and 44; and contained 100 packets of five hand-painted lithographs of birds and their accompanying text: The Ornithological Biography which included Audubon's scientific and characteristic descriptions of the birds along with his observations of the robust beauty of the Early American landscape. True nature writing at its finest. The popularity and success of the Royal Octavo Edition of Audubon's Birds of America is apparent from the production of seven edition; with the final edition issued in 1870 by George Lockwood, New York. (Nissen 51, Sabin: H.2364, Tyler, Ron. Audubon's Great National Work. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1993. Wood, C.. An Introduction to the Literature of Vertebrate Literature. London: Oxford University Press, 1931.)

$375.00

Pl. 30 Columbian Day Owl  The Birds of America,
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Pl. 30 Columbian Day Owl The Birds of America,

By Audubon, John James .

No. 6 Pl. 30 Columbian Day Owl Pair of Columbian Day Owls of a Crag. *Note: Image shown in cropped detail. Actual print is unaltered with title* A Fine original hand-colored lithograph on paper. 6.5 x 10.25 inches. Drawn from nature by J.J. Audubon, FRS FLS (Fellow of the Royal Society, Fellow of the Linnaean Society). Drawn on stone by Ralph Trembly. Lithographed, printed and colored by J.T. Bowen, Philadelphia for the First Royal Octavo Edition of John James Audubon's The Birds of America. Includes the text from Audubon's Ornithological Biography. The Royal Octavo Edition represents John James Audubon's (1785-1851) desire to create an affordable work based on his magnum opus; the Double Elephant Folio Edition of The Birds of America. London: Published by the Author, 1827-38, with 435 engravings produced by William H. Lizars and Robert Havell, Jr. after Audubon's dramatic life-sized portraits of North American birds set in native foliage and surroundings. For this new Royal Octavo Edition, Audubon and his assistants drew 500 unique compositions inspired by the original engravings for the grand Double Elephant Folio Edition. During the mid-nineteenth century, there were no photo-mechanical means of reproduction. To create a smaller format work, every composition was drawn by hand with the aid of the Camera Lucida. Each bird was now rendered according to species; and portrayed on a new botanical perch or landscape. With this new envisioning Audubon created a perfected composition: a charming vignette of the bird- or family of birds- in natural settings now sized to scale in the smaller format. For the illustrations of the Royal Octavo Edition of The Birds of America, Audubon enlisted the talents of America's premier lithographers and printers: the JT Bowen and Company in Philadelphia and Endicott in New York. Each composition was drawn on a limestone tablet, inked and then printed. Once dried, the print of the bird and setting was faithfully handpainted in splendid array of lifelike tones. In this smaller format Audubon presented ten unique compositions of birds recently discovered during his explorations into the American West, and not included in the Folio edition. As with the Folio Edition, the Royal Octavo Edition was sold by subscription, and issued twice monthly between 1840 and 44; and contained 100 packets of five hand-painted lithographs of birds and their accompanying text: The Ornithological Biography which included Audubon's scientific and characteristic descriptions of the birds along with his observations of the robust beauty of the Early American landscape. True nature writing at its finest. The popularity and success of the Royal Octavo Edition of Audubon's Birds of America is apparent from the production of seven edition; with the final edition issued in 1870 by George Lockwood, New York. (Nissen 51, Sabin: H.2364, Tyler, Ron. Audubon's Great National Work. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1993. Wood, C.. An Introduction to the Literature of Vertebrate Literature. London: Oxford University Press, 1931.)Vertebrate Literature. London: Oxford University Press, 1931.)

$250.00

Pl. 1  Californian Turkey Vulture (Californian Condor)
seller photo

Pl. 1 Californian Turkey Vulture (Californian Condor)

By Audubon, John James

Pl. 1 Californian Turkey Vulture (Californian Condor) *Note: Image shown in cropped detail. Actual print is unaltered with title* A Fine original hand-colored lithograph on paper. 6.5 x 10.25 inches. Drawn from nature by J.J. Audubon, FRS FLS (Fellow of the Royal Society, Fellow of the Linnaean Society). Drawn on stone by Ralph Trembly. Lithographed, printed and colored by J.T. Bowen, Philadelphia for the First Royal Octavo Edition of John James Audubon's The Birds of America. Includes the text from Audubon's Ornithological Biography. The Royal Octavo Edition represents John James Audubon's (1785-1851) desire to create an affordable work based on his magnum opus; the Double Elephant Folio Edition of The Birds of America. London: Published by the Author, 1827-38, with 435 engravings produced by William H. Lizars and Robert Havell, Jr. after Audubon's dramatic life-sized portraits of North American birds set in native foliage and surroundings. For this new Royal Octavo Edition, Audubon and his assistants drew 500 unique compositions inspired by the original engravings for the grand Double Elephant Folio Edition. During the mid-nineteenth century, there were no photo-mechanical means of reproduction. To create a smaller format work, every composition was drawn by hand with the aid of the Camera Lucida. Each bird was now rendered according to species; and portrayed on a new botanical perch or landscape. With this new envisioning Audubon created a perfected composition: a charming vignette of the bird- or family of birds- in natural settings now sized to scale in the smaller format. For the illustrations of the Royal Octavo Edition of The Birds of America, Audubon enlisted the talents of America's premier lithographers and printers: the JT Bowen and Company in Philadelphia and Endicott in New York. Each composition was drawn on a limestone tablet, inked and then printed. Once dried, the print of the bird and setting was faithfully handpainted in splendid array of lifelike tones. In this smaller format Audubon presented ten unique compositions of birds recently discovered during his explorations into the American West, and not included in the Folio edition. As with the Folio Edition, the Royal Octavo Edition was sold by subscription, and issued twice monthly between 1840 and 44; and contained 100 packets of five hand-painted lithographs of birds and their accompanying text: The Ornithological Biography which included Audubon's scientific and characteristic descriptions of the birds along with his observations of the robust beauty of the Early American landscape. True nature writing at its finest. The popularity and success of the Royal Octavo Edition of Audubon's Birds of America is apparent from the production of seven edition; with the final edition issued in 1870 by George Lockwood, New York. (Nissen 51, Sabin: H.2364, Tyler, Ron. Audubon's Great National Work. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1993. Wood, C.. An Introduction to the Literature of Vertebrate Literature. London: Oxford University Press, 1931.)Vertebrate Literature. London: Oxford University Press, 1931.)

$525.00

Pl. 59 Say\'s Flycatcher  The Birds of America,
seller photo

Pl. 59 Say's Flycatcher The Birds of America,

By Audubon, John James .

No. 12. Pl. 59. Say's Flycatcher Male & Female on delicately leaved branch with insect. *Note: Image shown in cropped detail. Actual print is unaltered with title* A Fine original hand-colored lithograph on paper. 6.5 x 10.25 inches. Drawn from nature by J.J. Audubon, FRS FLS (Fellow of the Royal Society, Fellow of the Linnaean Society). Drawn on stone by Ralph Trembly. Lithographed, printed and colored by J.T. Bowen, Philadelphia for the First Royal Octavo Edition of John James Audubon's The Birds of America. Includes the text from Audubon's Ornithological Biography. The Royal Octavo Edition represents John James Audubon's (1785-1851) desire to create an affordable work based on his magnum opus; the Double Elephant Folio Edition of The Birds of America. London: Published by the Author, 1827-38, with 435 engravings produced by William H. Lizars and Robert Havell, Jr. after Audubon's dramatic life-sized portraits of North American birds set in native foliage and surroundings. For this new Royal Octavo Edition, Audubon and his assistants drew 500 unique compositions inspired by the original engravings for the grand Double Elephant Folio Edition. During the mid-nineteenth century, there were no photo-mechanical means of reproduction. To create a smaller format work, every composition was drawn by hand with the aid of the Camera Lucida. Each bird was now rendered according to species; and portrayed on a new botanical perch or landscape. With this new envisioning Audubon created a perfected composition: a charming vignette of the bird- or family of birds- in natural settings now sized to scale in the smaller format. For the illustrations of the Royal Octavo Edition of The Birds of America, Audubon enlisted the talents of America's premier lithographers and printers: the JT Bowen and Company in Philadelphia and Endicott in New York. Each composition was drawn on a limestone tablet, inked and then printed. Once dried, the print of the bird and setting was faithfully handpainted in splendid array of lifelike tones. In this smaller format Audubon presented ten unique compositions of birds recently discovered during his explorations into the American West, and not included in the Folio edition. As with the Folio Edition, the Royal Octavo Edition was sold by subscription, and issued twice monthly between 1840 and 44; and contained 100 packets of five hand-painted lithographs of birds and their accompanying text: The Ornithological Biography which included Audubon's scientific and characteristic descriptions of the birds along with his observations of the robust beauty of the Early American landscape. True nature writing at its finest. The popularity and success of the Royal Octavo Edition of Audubon's Birds of America is apparent from the production of seven edition; with the final edition issued in 1870 by George Lockwood, New York. (Nissen 51, Sabin: H.2364, Tyler, Ron. Audubon's Great National Work. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1993. Wood, C.. An Introduction to the Literature of Vertebrate Literature. London: Oxford University Press, 1931.)Vertebrate Literature. London: Oxford University Press, 1931.)

$250.00

Pl. 69 Townsend\'s Ptilogonys (Female)  The Birds of America,
seller photo

Pl. 69 Townsend's Ptilogonys (Female) The Birds of America,

By Audubon, John James .

No. 14. Pl. 69 Townsend's Ptilogonys (Female) Single female Flycatcher on fruited branch. *Note: Image shown in cropped detail. Actual print is unaltered with title* A Fine original hand-colored lithograph on paper. 6.5 x 10 inches. Drawn from nature by J.J. Audubon, FRS FLS (Fellow of the Royal Society, Fellow of the Linnaean Society). Drawn on stone by Ralph Trembly. Lithographed, printed and colored by J.T. Bowen, Philadelphia for the First Royal Octavo Edition of John James Audubon's The Birds of America. Includes the text from Audubon's Ornithological Biography. The Royal Octavo Edition represents John James Audubon's (1785-1851) desire to create an affordable work based on his magnum opus; the Double Elephant Folio Edition of The Birds of America. London: Published by the Author, 1827-38, with 435 engravings produced by William H. Lizars and Robert Havell, Jr. after Audubon's dramatic life-sized portraits of North American birds set in native foliage and surroundings. For this new Royal Octavo Edition, Audubon and his assistants drew 500 unique compositions inspired by the original engravings for the grand Double Elephant Folio Edition. During the mid-nineteenth century, there were no photo-mechanical means of reproduction. To create a smaller format work, every composition was drawn by hand with the aid of the Camera Lucida. Each bird was now rendered according to species; and portrayed on a new botanical perch or landscape. With this new envisioning Audubon created a perfected composition: a charming vignette of the bird- or family of birds- in natural settings now sized to scale in the smaller format. For the illustrations of the Royal Octavo Edition of The Birds of America, Audubon enlisted the talents of America's premier lithographers and printers: the JT Bowen and Company in Philadelphia and Endicott in New York. Each composition was drawn on a limestone tablet, inked and then printed. Once dried, the print of the bird and setting was faithfully handpainted in splendid array of lifelike tones. In this smaller format Audubon presented ten unique compositions of birds recently discovered during his explorations into the American West, and not included in the Folio edition. As with the Folio Edition, the Royal Octavo Edition was sold by subscription, and issued twice monthly between 1840 and 44; and contained 100 packets of five hand-painted lithographs of birds and their accompanying text: The Ornithological Biography which included Audubon's scientific and characteristic descriptions of the birds along with his observations of the robust beauty of the Early American landscape. True nature writing at its finest. The popularity and success of the Royal Octavo Edition of Audubon's Birds of America is apparent from the production of seven edition; with the final edition issued in 1870 by George Lockwood, New York. (Nissen 51, Sabin: H.2364, Tyler, Ron. Audubon's Great National Work. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1993. Wood, C.. An Introduction to the Literature of Vertebrate Literature. London: Oxford University Press, 1931.)Vertebrate Literature. London: Oxford University Press, 1931.)

$325.00

Pl. 18 Swallow-tailed Hawk  The Birds of America,
seller photo

Pl. 18 Swallow-tailed Hawk The Birds of America,

By Audubon, John James .

No. 4 Pl. 18 Swallow-tailed Hawk Swallow-tailed Hawk in flight. Snake in its tallons. *Note: Image shown in cropped detail. Actual print is unaltered with title* A Near Fine original hand-colored lithograph on paper. 6.5 x 10.25 inches. Drawn from nature by J.J. Audubon, FRS FLS (Fellow of the Royal Society, Fellow of the Linnaean Society). Drawn on stone by Ralph Trembly. Lithographed, printed and colored by J.T. Bowen, Philadelphia for the First Royal Octavo Edition of John James Audubon's The Birds of America. Includes the text from Audubon's Ornithological Biography. The Royal Octavo Edition represents John James Audubon's (1785-1851) desire to create an affordable work based on his magnum opus; the Double Elephant Folio Edition of The Birds of America. London: Published by the Author, 1827-38, with 435 engravings produced by William H. Lizars and Robert Havell, Jr. after Audubon's dramatic life-sized portraits of North American birds set in native foliage and surroundings. For this new Royal Octavo Edition, Audubon and his assistants drew 500 unique compositions inspired by the original engravings for the grand Double Elephant Folio Edition. During the mid-nineteenth century, there were no photo-mechanical means of reproduction. To create a smaller format work, every composition was drawn by hand with the aid of the Camera Lucida. Each bird was now rendered according to species; and portrayed on a new botanical perch or landscape. With this new envisioning Audubon created a perfected composition: a charming vignette of the bird- or family of birds- in natural settings now sized to scale in the smaller format. For the illustrations of the Royal Octavo Edition of The Birds of America, Audubon enlisted the talents of America's premier lithographers and printers: the JT Bowen and Company in Philadelphia and Endicott in New York. Each composition was drawn on a limestone tablet, inked and then printed. Once dried, the print of the bird and setting was faithfully handpainted in splendid array of lifelike tones. In this smaller format Audubon presented ten unique compositions of birds recently discovered during his explorations into the American West, and not included in the Folio edition. As with the Folio Edition, the Royal Octavo Edition was sold by subscription, and issued twice monthly between 1840 and 44; and contained 100 packets of five hand-painted lithographs of birds and their accompanying text: The Ornithological Biography which included Audubon's scientific and characteristic descriptions of the birds along with his observations of the robust beauty of the Early American landscape. True nature writing at its finest. The popularity and success of the Royal Octavo Edition of Audubon's Birds of America is apparent from the production of seven edition; with the final edition issued in 1870 by George Lockwood, New York. (Nissen 51, Sabin: H.2364, Tyler, Ron. Audubon's Great National Work. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1993. Wood, C.. An Introduction to the Literature of Vertebrate Literature. London: Oxford University Press, 1931.)Vertebrate Literature. London: Oxford University Press, 1931.)

$400.00

Pl. 57 Great Crested Flycatcher  The Birds of America,
seller photo

Pl. 57 Great Crested Flycatcher The Birds of America,

By Audubon, John James .

No. 12. Pl. 57 Great Crested Flycatcher Pair of Great Crested Flycatchers; one on a slender branch, the other attacking from above. Feathers afloat. *Note: Image shown in cropped detail. Actual print is unaltered with title* A Fine original hand-colored lithograph on paper. 6.5 x 10.25 inches. Drawn from nature by J.J. Audubon, FRS FLS (Fellow of the Royal Society, Fellow of the Linnaean Society). Drawn on stone by Ralph Trembly. Lithographed, printed and colored by J.T. Bowen, Philadelphia for the First Royal Octavo Edition of John James Audubon's The Birds of America. Includes the text from Audubon's Ornithological Biography. The Royal Octavo Edition represents John James Audubon's (1785-1851) desire to create an affordable work based on his magnum opus; the Double Elephant Folio Edition of The Birds of America. London: Published by the Author, 1827-38, with 435 engravings produced by William H. Lizars and Robert Havell, Jr. after Audubon's dramatic life-sized portraits of North American birds set in native foliage and surroundings. For this new Royal Octavo Edition, Audubon and his assistants drew 500 unique compositions inspired by the original engravings for the grand Double Elephant Folio Edition. During the mid-nineteenth century, there were no photo-mechanical means of reproduction. To create a smaller format work, every composition was drawn by hand with the aid of the Camera Lucida. Each bird was now rendered according to species; and portrayed on a new botanical perch or landscape. With this new envisioning Audubon created a perfected composition: a charming vignette of the bird- or family of birds- in natural settings now sized to scale in the smaller format. For the illustrations of the Royal Octavo Edition of The Birds of America, Audubon enlisted the talents of America's premier lithographers and printers: the JT Bowen and Company in Philadelphia and Endicott in New York. Each composition was drawn on a limestone tablet, inked and then printed. Once dried, the print of the bird and setting was faithfully handpainted in splendid array of lifelike tones. In this smaller format Audubon presented ten unique compositions of birds recently discovered during his explorations into the American West, and not included in the Folio edition. As with the Folio Edition, the Royal Octavo Edition was sold by subscription, and issued twice monthly between 1840 and 44; and contained 100 packets of five hand-painted lithographs of birds and their accompanying text: The Ornithological Biography which included Audubon's scientific and characteristic descriptions of the birds along with his observations of the robust beauty of the Early American landscape. True nature writing at its finest. The popularity and success of the Royal Octavo Edition of Audubon's Birds of America is apparent from the production of seven edition; with the final edition issued in 1870 by George Lockwood, New York. (Nissen 51, Sabin: H.2364, Tyler, Ron. Audubon's Great National Work. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1993. Wood, C.. An Introduction to the Literature of Vertebrate Literature. London: Oxford University Press, 1931.)Vertebrate Literature. London: Oxford University Press, 1931.)

$350.00

Pl. 3 Black Vulture or Carrion Crow  The Birds of America,
seller photo

Pl. 3 Black Vulture or Carrion Crow The Birds of America,

By Audubon, John James .

Pl. 3 Black Vulture or Carrion Crow. Dramatic composition of two Black Vultures feeding on a Deer head on the ground. *Note: Image shown in cropped detail. Actual print is unaltered with title* A Fine original hand-colored lithograph on paper. 6.5 x 10.5 inches. Drawn from nature by J.J. Audubon, FRS FLS (Fellow of the Royal Society, Fellow of the Linnaean Society). Lithographed, printed and colored by J.T. Bowen, Philadelphia for the First Royal Octavo Edition of John James Audubon's The Birds of America. Includes the text from Audubon's Ornithological Biography. The Royal Octavo Edition represents John James Audubon's (1785-1851) desire to create an affordable work based on his magnum opus; the Double Elephant Folio Edition of The Birds of America. London: Published by the Author, 1827-38, with 435 engravings produced by William H. Lizars and Robert Havell, Jr. after Audubon's dramatic life-sized portraits of North American birds set in native foliage and surroundings. For this new Royal Octavo Edition, Audubon and his assistants drew 500 unique compositions inspired by the original engravings for the grand Double Elephant Folio Edition. During the mid-nineteenth century, there were no photo-mechanical means of reproduction. To create a smaller format work, every composition was drawn by hand with the aid of the Camera Lucida. Each bird was now rendered according to species; and portrayed on a new botanical perch or landscape. With this new envisioning Audubon created a perfected composition: a charming vignette of the bird- or family of birds- in natural settings now sized to scale in the smaller format. For the illustrations of the Royal Octavo Edition of The Birds of America, Audubon enlisted the talents of America's premier lithographers and printers: the JT Bowen and Company in Philadelphia and Endicott in New York. Each composition was drawn on a limestone tablet, inked and then printed. Once dried, the print of the bird and setting was faithfully handpainted in splendid array of lifelike tones. In this smaller format Audubon presented ten unique compositions of birds recently discovered during his explorations into the American West, and not included in the Folio edition. As with the Folio Edition, the Royal Octavo Edition was sold by subscription, and issued twice monthly between 1840 and 44; and contained 100 packets of five hand-painted lithographs of birds and their accompanying text: The Ornithological Biography which included Audubon's scientific and characteristic descriptions of the birds along with his observations of the robust beauty of the Early American landscape. True nature writing at its finest. The popularity and success of the Royal Octavo Edition of Audubon's Birds of America is apparent from the production of seven edition; with the final edition issued in 1870 by George Lockwood, New York. (Nissen 51, Sabin: H.2364, Tyler, Ron. Audubon's Great National Work. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1993. Wood, C.. An Introduction to the Literature of Vertebrate Literature. London: Oxford University Press, 1931.)

$275.00

Pl. 21 Pigeon Falcon (Merlin) The Birds of America,
seller photo

Pl. 21 Pigeon Falcon (Merlin) The Birds of America,

By Audubon, John James .

No 5 Pl. 21 Pigeon Falcon Pair of Pigeon Falcons (Merlin): one in profile on a stump, one showing underside of plummage. *Note: Image shown in cropped detail. Actual print is unaltered with title* A Fine original hand-colored lithograph on paper. 6.5 x 10.25 inches. Drawn from nature by J.J. Audubon, FRS FLS (Fellow of the Royal Society, Fellow of the Linnaean Society). Drawn on stone by Ralph Trembly. Lithographed, printed and colored by J.T. Bowen, Philadelphia for the First Royal Octavo Edition of John James Audubon's The Birds of America. Includes the text from Audubon's Ornithological Biography. The Royal Octavo Edition represents John James Audubon's (1785-1851) desire to create an affordable work based on his magnum opus; the Double Elephant Folio Edition of The Birds of America. London: Published by the Author, 1827-38, with 435 engravings produced by William H. Lizars and Robert Havell, Jr. after Audubon's dramatic life-sized portraits of North American birds set in native foliage and surroundings. For this new Royal Octavo Edition, Audubon and his assistants drew 500 unique compositions inspired by the original engravings for the grand Double Elephant Folio Edition. During the mid-nineteenth century, there were no photo-mechanical means of reproduction. To create a smaller format work, every composition was drawn by hand with the aid of the Camera Lucida. Each bird was now rendered according to species; and portrayed on a new botanical perch or landscape. With this new envisioning Audubon created a perfected composition: a charming vignette of the bird- or family of birds- in natural settings now sized to scale in the smaller format. For the illustrations of the Royal Octavo Edition of The Birds of America, Audubon enlisted the talents of America's premier lithographers and printers: the JT Bowen and Company in Philadelphia and Endicott in New York. Each composition was drawn on a limestone tablet, inked and then printed. Once dried, the print of the bird and setting was faithfully handpainted in splendid array of lifelike tones. In this smaller format Audubon presented ten unique compositions of birds recently discovered during his explorations into the American West, and not included in the Folio edition. As with the Folio Edition, the Royal Octavo Edition was sold by subscription, and issued twice monthly between 1840 and 44; and contained 100 packets of five hand-painted lithographs of birds and their accompanying text: The Ornithological Biography which included Audubon's scientific and characteristic descriptions of the birds along with his observations of the robust beauty of the Early American landscape. True nature writing at its finest. The popularity and success of the Royal Octavo Edition of Audubon's Birds of America is apparent from the production of seven edition; with the final edition issued in 1870 by George Lockwood, New York. (Nissen 51, Sabin: H.2364, Tyler, Ron. Audubon's Great National Work. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1993. Wood, C.. An Introduction to the Literature of Vertebrate Literature. London: Oxford University Press, 1931.)Vertebrate Literature. London: Oxford University Press, 1931.)

$250.00

Pl. 63 Pewee Flycatcher, Cotton Plant; Gossypium Herbaceum  The Birds of America,
seller photo

Pl. 63 Pewee Flycatcher, Cotton Plant; Gossypium Herbaceum The Birds of America,

By Audubon, John James .

No. 13. Pl. 63 Pewee Flycatcher, Cotton Plant; Gossypium Herbaceum Pair of male and female Pewee Flycathcers on flowering stem of Cotton plant. *Note: Image shown in cropped detail. Actual print is unaltered with title* A Near Fine (faint offset) original hand-colored lithograph on paper. 6.5 x 10 inches. Drawn from nature by J.J. Audubon, FRS FLS (Fellow of the Royal Society, Fellow of the Linnaean Society). Drawn on stone by Ralph Trembly. Lithographed, printed and colored by J.T. Bowen, Philadelphia for the First Royal Octavo Edition of John James Audubon's The Birds of America. Includes the text from Audubon's Ornithological Biography. The Royal Octavo Edition represents John James Audubon's (1785-1851) desire to create an affordable work based on his magnum opus; the Double Elephant Folio Edition of The Birds of America. London: Published by the Author, 1827-38, with 435 engravings produced by William H. Lizars and Robert Havell, Jr. after Audubon's dramatic life-sized portraits of North American birds set in native foliage and surroundings. For this new Royal Octavo Edition, Audubon and his assistants drew 500 unique compositions inspired by the original engravings for the grand Double Elephant Folio Edition. During the mid-nineteenth century, there were no photo-mechanical means of reproduction. To create a smaller format work, every composition was drawn by hand with the aid of the Camera Lucida. Each bird was now rendered according to species; and portrayed on a new botanical perch or landscape. With this new envisioning Audubon created a perfected composition: a charming vignette of the bird- or family of birds- in natural settings now sized to scale in the smaller format. For the illustrations of the Royal Octavo Edition of The Birds of America, Audubon enlisted the talents of America's premier lithographers and printers: the JT Bowen and Company in Philadelphia and Endicott in New York. Each composition was drawn on a limestone tablet, inked and then printed. Once dried, the print of the bird and setting was faithfully handpainted in splendid array of lifelike tones. In this smaller format Audubon presented ten unique compositions of birds recently discovered during his explorations into the American West, and not included in the Folio edition. As with the Folio Edition, the Royal Octavo Edition was sold by subscription, and issued twice monthly between 1840 and 44; and contained 100 packets of five hand-painted lithographs of birds and their accompanying text: The Ornithological Biography which included Audubon's scientific and characteristic descriptions of the birds along with his observations of the robust beauty of the Early American landscape. True nature writing at its finest. The popularity and success of the Royal Octavo Edition of Audubon's Birds of America is apparent from the production of seven edition; with the final edition issued in 1870 by George Lockwood, New York. (Nissen 51, Sabin: H.2364, Tyler, Ron. Audubon's Great National Work. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1993. Wood, C.. An Introduction to the Literature of Vertebrate Literature. London: Oxford University Press, 1931.)Vertebrate Literature. London: Oxford University Press, 1931.)

$375.00

Pl. 16 Black-shouldered Elanus (White-tailed Kite or Black-shouldered Kite)  The Birds of America,
seller photo

Pl. 16 Black-shouldered Elanus (White-tailed Kite or Black-shouldered Kite) The Birds of America,

By Audubon, John James .

Pl. 16 Black-shouldered Elanus (White-tailed Kite or Black-shouldered Kite) Two Kites: one on a perch, the other soaring above. *Note: Image shown in cropped detail. Actual print is unaltered with title* A Fine original hand-colored lithograph on paper. 6.5 x 10.25 inches. Drawn from nature by J.J. Audubon, FRS FLS (Fellow of the Royal Society, Fellow of the Linnaean Society). Drawn on stone by Ralph Trembly. Lithographed, printed and colored by J.T. Bowen, Philadelphia for the First Royal Octavo Edition of John James Audubon's The Birds of America. Includes the text from Audubon's Ornithological Biography. The Royal Octavo Edition represents John James Audubon's (1785-1851) desire to create an affordable work based on his magnum opus; the Double Elephant Folio Edition of The Birds of America. London: Published by the Author, 1827-38, with 435 engravings produced by William H. Lizars and Robert Havell, Jr. after Audubon's dramatic life-sized portraits of North American birds set in native foliage and surroundings. For this new Royal Octavo Edition, Audubon and his assistants drew 500 unique compositions inspired by the original engravings for the grand Double Elephant Folio Edition. During the mid-nineteenth century, there were no photo-mechanical means of reproduction. To create a smaller format work, every composition was drawn by hand with the aid of the Camera Lucida. Each bird was now rendered according to species; and portrayed on a new botanical perch or landscape. With this new envisioning Audubon created a perfected composition: a charming vignette of the bird- or family of birds- in natural settings now sized to scale in the smaller format. For the illustrations of the Royal Octavo Edition of The Birds of America, Audubon enlisted the talents of America's premier lithographers and printers: the JT Bowen and Company in Philadelphia and Endicott in New York. Each composition was drawn on a limestone tablet, inked and then printed. Once dried, the print of the bird and setting was faithfully handpainted in splendid array of lifelike tones. In this smaller format Audubon presented ten unique compositions of birds recently discovered during his explorations into the American West, and not included in the Folio edition. As with the Folio Edition, the Royal Octavo Edition was sold by subscription, and issued twice monthly between 1840 and 44; and contained 100 packets of five hand-painted lithographs of birds and their accompanying text: The Ornithological Biography which included Audubon's scientific and characteristic descriptions of the birds along with his observations of the robust beauty of the Early American landscape. True nature writing at its finest. The popularity and success of the Royal Octavo Edition of Audubon's Birds of America is apparent from the production of seven edition; with the final edition issued in 1870 by George Lockwood, New York. (Nissen 51, Sabin: H.2364, Tyler, Ron. Audubon's Great National Work. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1993. Wood, C.. An Introduction to the Literature of Vertebrate Literature. London: Oxford University Press, 1931.)Vertebrate Literature. London: Oxford University Press, 1931.)

$225.00

Wild Boar, Sheep & Butcher
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Wild Boar, Sheep & Butcher

By Howitt, Samuel.

London:: Edward Orme,, 1810.. First Edition. Fine Condition. A fine original etching on wove paper, drawn from life and etched by Samuel Howitt, and published and sold by Edward Orme, Printseller to the King [George IV]. Quarto (11.25 x 8.25 inches, 285 x 209 mm). Very light toning to margins otherwise clean. Samuel Howitt (1756-1822) was a talented self-trained painter and etcher of animals whose work enhanced British animal portraiture and sporting art of the late Georgian Era. As a young man familiar with the ancient woodlands and royal hunting grounds of Epping Forest, Howitt was able to capture the refined essence of the British landscape as a setting in which to render his charming depictions of animals; both wild and tame, foreign and domestic. In addition; inspired by his experiences as a field sportsman, Howitt excelled at the spirited depiction of the hunt. Although Howitt was a close friend and brother-in-law of the celebrated English artist Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827), Howitt developed and refined his artistic style as a realistic tribute to the animal and nature kingdoms, and remained wholly uninfluenced by the witty, sardonic and bawdy executions of the noted caricaturist Rowlandson. Howitt's compositions have a singular charm, yet they do reflect a hint of stylistic influence of his esteemed colleague; English wood-engraver Thomas Bewick (1753-1828). Several of Howitt's scenes contain vignettes of common rural life hidden within the composition; a maid feeding hens in the poultry yard, lovely details of staid Georgian cottages and castle ruins in the receding landscape: details which have become hallmarks of Bewick's craft. It is interesting to note Thomas Bewick began work on his final collection of engravings in 1811 (Fables of Aesop and Others, Pub: 1818) which was the year of publication for this collection of Howitt's etchings of the Fables of Aesop, Gay and Phaedrus. Perhaps a case of mutual inspiration between Bewick and Howitt did exist after all.Howitt's expressive animal portraits for the fables of Aesop, Phaedrus and Gay are among the finest examples of the earnest personification of animals; with guilt, anger, envy and fear emanating from the incensed Drake, arrogant Baboon and radiant Peacock alike. From ancient times, the fable was a way of imparting challenging yet well-intentioned advice to your fellow man. If a significant lesson of human vice, virtue or folly was delivered under the guise of an animal action or attribute, it was more likely received, and respected. Even today, Howitt's etchings of these classic fables remain a gentle yet poignant tribute to life's many heartfelt lessons; either anticipated or experienced. Like much of Howitt's work, these etchings were originally offered both as complete sets and as individual plates without accompanying text, We have nonetheless researched and identified each fable, and here offer the etching and fable complete. (A Hundred Fables of Aesop by Sir Richard L'Estrange. New York: Dodd, Mead & Company, 1922. Siltzer. British Sporting Prints.160-165. Casey Wood, The Literature of Vertebrate Zoology, 392. DNB) single sheet

$150.00

Wolf & Porcupine
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Wolf & Porcupine

By Howitt, Samuel.

London:: Edward Orme,, 1810.. First Edition. Fine Condition. A fine original etching on wove paper, drawn from life and etched by Samuel Howitt, and published and sold by Edward Orme, Printseller to the King [George IV]. Quarto (11.25 x 8.25 inches, 285 x 209 mm). Very light toning to margins otherwise clean. Samuel Howitt (1756-1822) was a talented self-trained painter and etcher of animals whose work enhanced British animal portraiture and sporting art of the late Georgian Era. As a young man familiar with the ancient woodlands and royal hunting grounds of Epping Forest, Howitt was able to capture the refined essence of the British landscape as a setting in which to render his charming depictions of animals; both wild and tame, foreign and domestic. In addition; inspired by his experiences as a field sportsman, Howitt excelled at the spirited depiction of the hunt. Although Howitt was a close friend and brother-in-law of the celebrated English artist Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827), Howitt developed and refined his artistic style as a realistic tribute to the animal and nature kingdoms, and remained wholly uninfluenced by the witty, sardonic and bawdy executions of the noted caricaturist Rowlandson. Howitt's compositions have a singular charm, yet they do reflect a hint of stylistic influence of his esteemed colleague; English wood-engraver Thomas Bewick (1753-1828). Several of Howitt's scenes contain vignettes of common rural life hidden within the composition; a maid feeding hens in the poultry yard, lovely details of staid Georgian cottages and castle ruins in the receding landscape: details which have become hallmarks of Bewick's craft. It is interesting to note Thomas Bewick began work on his final collection of engravings in 1811 (Fables of Aesop and Others, Pub: 1818) which was the year of publication for this collection of Howitt's etchings of the Fables of Aesop, Gay and Phaedrus. Perhaps a case of mutual inspiration between Bewick and Howitt did exist after all. Howitt's expressive animal portraits for the fables of Aesop, Phaedrus and Gay are among the finest examples of the earnest personification of animals; with guilt, anger, envy and fear emanating from the incensed Drake, arrogant Baboon and radiant Peacock alike. From ancient times, the fable was a way of imparting challenging yet well-intentioned advice to your fellow man. If a significant lesson of human vice, virtue or folly was delivered under the guise of an animal action or attribute, it was more likely received, and respected. Even today, Howitt's etchings of these classic fables remain a gentle yet poignant tribute to life's many heartfelt lessons; either anticipated or experienced. Like much of Howitt's work, these etchings were originally offered both as complete sets and as individual plates without accompanying text, We have nonetheless researched and identified each fable, and here offer the etching and fable complete. (A Hundred Fables of Aesop by Sir Richard L'Estrange. New York: Dodd, Mead & Company, 1922. Siltzer. British Sporting Prints.160-165. Casey Wood, The Literature of Vertebrate Zoology, 392. DNB) single sheet

$150.00

Dog and the Wolf
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Dog and the Wolf

By Howitt, Samuel.

London:: Edward Orme,, 1810.. First Edition. Fine Condition. A fine original etching on wove paper, drawn from life and etched by Samuel Howitt, and published and sold by Edward Orme, Printseller to the King [George IV]. Quarto (11.25 x 8.25 inches, 285 x 209 mm). Very light toning to margins otherwise clean. Samuel Howitt (1756-1822) was a talented self-trained painter and etcher of animals whose work enhanced British animal portraiture and sporting art of the late Georgian Era. As a young man familiar with the ancient woodlands and royal hunting grounds of Epping Forest, Howitt was able to capture the refined essence of the British landscape as a setting in which to render his charming depictions of animals; both wild and tame, foreign and domestic. In addition; inspired by his experiences as a field sportsman, Howitt excelled at the spirited depiction of the hunt. Although Howitt was a close friend and brother-in-law of the celebrated English artist Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827), Howitt developed and refined his artistic style as a realistic tribute to the animal and nature kingdoms, and remained wholly uninfluenced by the witty, sardonic and bawdy executions of the noted caricaturist Rowlandson. Howitt's compositions have a singular charm, yet they do reflect a hint of stylistic influence of his esteemed colleague; English wood-engraver Thomas Bewick (1753-1828). Several of Howitt's scenes contain vignettes of common rural life hidden within the composition; a maid feeding hens in the poultry yard, lovely details of staid Georgian cottages and castle ruins in the receding landscape: details which have become hallmarks of Bewick's craft. It is interesting to note Thomas Bewick began work on his final collection of engravings in 1811 (Fables of Aesop and Others, Pub: 1818) which was the year of publication for this collection of Howitt's etchings of the Fables of Aesop, Gay and Phaedrus. Perhaps a case of mutual inspiration between Bewick and Howitt did exist after all. Howitt's expressive animal portraits for the fables of Aesop, Phaedrus and Gay are among the finest examples of the earnest personification of animals; with guilt, anger, envy and fear emanating from the incensed Drake, arrogant Baboon and radiant Peacock alike. From ancient times, the fable was a way of imparting challenging yet well-intentioned advice to your fellow man. If a significant lesson of human vice, virtue or folly was delivered under the guise of an animal action or attribute, it was more likely received, and respected. Even today, Howitt's etchings of these classic fables remain a gentle yet poignant tribute to life's many heartfelt lessons; either anticipated or experienced. Like much of Howitt's work, these etchings were originally offered both as complete sets and as individual plates without accompanying text, We have nonetheless researched and identified each fable, and here offer the etching and fable complete. (A Hundred Fables of Aesop by Sir Richard L'Estrange. New York: Dodd, Mead & Company, 1922. Siltzer. British Sporting Prints.160-165. Casey Wood, The Literature of Vertebrate Zoology, 392. DNB) single sheet

$150.00

Dog, Cock and Fox
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Dog, Cock and Fox

By Howitt, Samuel.

London:: Edward Orme,, 1810.. First Edition. Fine Condition. A fine original etching on wove paper, drawn from life and etched by Samuel Howitt, and published and sold by Edward Orme, Printseller to the King [George IV]. Quarto (11.25 x 8.25 inches, 285 x 209 mm). Very light toning to margins otherwise clean. Samuel Howitt (1756-1822) was a talented self-trained painter and etcher of animals whose work enhanced British animal portraiture and sporting art of the late Georgian Era. As a young man familiar with the ancient woodlands and royal hunting grounds of Epping Forest, Howitt was able to capture the refined essence of the British landscape as a setting in which to render his charming depictions of animals; both wild and tame, foreign and domestic. In addition; inspired by his experiences as a field sportsman, Howitt excelled at the spirited depiction of the hunt. Although Howitt was a close friend and brother-in-law of the celebrated English artist Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827), Howitt developed and refined his artistic style as a realistic tribute to the animal and nature kingdoms, and remained wholly uninfluenced by the witty, sardonic and bawdy executions of the noted caricaturist Rowlandson. Howitt's compositions have a singular charm, yet they do reflect a hint of stylistic influence of his esteemed colleague; English wood-engraver Thomas Bewick (1753-1828). Several of Howitt's scenes contain vignettes of common rural life hidden within the composition; a maid feeding hens in the poultry yard, lovely details of staid Georgian cottages and castle ruins in the receding landscape: details which have become hallmarks of Bewick's craft. It is interesting to note Thomas Bewick began work on his final collection of engravings in 1811 (Fables of Aesop and Others, Pub: 1818) which was the year of publication for this collection of Howitt's etchings of the Fables of Aesop, Gay and Phaedrus. Perhaps a case of mutual inspiration between Bewick and Howitt did exist after all. Howitt's expressive animal portraits for the fables of Aesop, Phaedrus and Gay are among the finest examples of the earnest personification of animals; with guilt, anger, envy and fear emanating from the incensed Drake, arrogant Baboon and radiant Peacock alike. From ancient times, the fable was a way of imparting challenging yet well-intentioned advice to your fellow man. If a significant lesson of human vice, virtue or folly was delivered under the guise of an animal action or attribute, it was more likely received, and respected. Even today, Howitt's etchings of these classic fables remain a gentle yet poignant tribute to life's many heartfelt lessons; either anticipated or experienced. Like much of Howitt's work, these etchings were originally offered both as complete sets and as individual plates without accompanying text, We have nonetheless researched and identified each fable, and here offer the etching and fable complete. (A Hundred Fables of Aesop by Sir Richard L'Estrange. New York: Dodd, Mead & Company, 1922. Siltzer. British Sporting Prints.160-165. Casey Wood, The Literature of Vertebrate Zoology, 392. DNB) single sheet

$150.00

Dog with a Bell
seller photo

Dog with a Bell

By Howitt, Samuel.

London:: Edward Orme,, 1810.. First Edition. Fine Condition. A fine original etching on wove paper, drawn from life and etched by Samuel Howitt, and published and sold by Edward Orme, Printseller to the King [George IV]. Quarto (11.25 x 8.25 inches, 285 x 209 mm). Very light toning to margins otherwise clean. Samuel Howitt (1756-1822) was a talented self-trained painter and etcher of animals whose work enhanced British animal portraiture and sporting art of the late Georgian Era. As a young man familiar with the ancient woodlands and royal hunting grounds of Epping Forest, Howitt was able to capture the refined essence of the British landscape as a setting in which to render his charming depictions of animals; both wild and tame, foreign and domestic. In addition; inspired by his experiences as a field sportsman, Howitt excelled at the spirited depiction of the hunt. Although Howitt was a close friend and brother-in-law of the celebrated English artist Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827), Howitt developed and refined his artistic style as a realistic tribute to the animal and nature kingdoms, and remained wholly uninfluenced by the witty, sardonic and bawdy executions of the noted caricaturist Rowlandson. Howitt's compositions have a singular charm, yet they do reflect a hint of stylistic influence of his esteemed colleague; English wood-engraver Thomas Bewick (1753-1828). Several of Howitt's scenes contain vignettes of common rural life hidden within the composition; a maid feeding hens in the poultry yard, lovely details of staid Georgian cottages and castle ruins in the receding landscape: details which have become hallmarks of Bewick's craft. It is interesting to note Thomas Bewick began work on his final collection of engravings in 1811 (Fables of Aesop and Others, Pub: 1818) which was the year of publication for this collection of Howitt's etchings of the Fables of Aesop, Gay and Phaedrus. Perhaps a case of mutual inspiration between Bewick and Howitt did exist after all. Howitt's expressive animal portraits for the fables of Aesop, Phaedrus and Gay are among the finest examples of the earnest personification of animals; with guilt, anger, envy and fear emanating from the incensed Drake, arrogant Baboon and radiant Peacock alike. From ancient times, the fable was a way of imparting challenging yet well-intentioned advice to your fellow man. If a significant lesson of human vice, virtue or folly was delivered under the guise of an animal action or attribute, it was more likely received, and respected. Even today, Howitt's etchings of these classic fables remain a gentle yet poignant tribute to life's many heartfelt lessons; either anticipated or experienced. Like much of Howitt's work, these etchings were originally offered both as complete sets and as individual plates without accompanying text, We have nonetheless researched and identified each fable, and here offer the etching and fable complete. (A Hundred Fables of Aesop by Sir Richard L'Estrange. New York: Dodd, Mead & Company, 1922. Siltzer. British Sporting Prints.160-165. Casey Wood, The Literature of Vertebrate Zoology, 392. DNB) single sheet

$150.00

Sheep and Hunted Wolf
seller photo

Sheep and Hunted Wolf

By Howitt, Samuel.

London:: Edward Orme,, 1810.. First Edition. Fine Condition. A fine original etching on wove paper, drawn from life and etched by Samuel Howitt, and published and sold by Edward Orme, Printseller to the King [George IV]. Quarto (11.25 x 8.25 inches, 285 x 209 mm). Very light toning to margins otherwise clean. Samuel Howitt (1756-1822) was a talented self-trained painter and etcher of animals whose work enhanced British animal portraiture and sporting art of the late Georgian Era. As a young man familiar with the ancient woodlands and royal hunting grounds of Epping Forest, Howitt was able to capture the refined essence of the British landscape as a setting in which to render his charming depictions of animals; both wild and tame, foreign and domestic. In addition; inspired by his experiences as a field sportsman, Howitt excelled at the spirited depiction of the hunt. Although Howitt was a close friend and brother-in-law of the celebrated English artist Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827), Howitt developed and refined his artistic style as a realistic tribute to the animal and nature kingdoms, and remained wholly uninfluenced by the witty, sardonic and bawdy executions of the noted caricaturist Rowlandson. Howitt's compositions have a singular charm, yet they do reflect a hint of stylistic influence of his esteemed colleague; English wood-engraver Thomas Bewick (1753-1828). Several of Howitt's scenes contain vignettes of common rural life hidden within the composition; a maid feeding hens in the poultry yard, lovely details of staid Georgian cottages and castle ruins in the receding landscape: details which have become hallmarks of Bewick's craft. It is interesting to note Thomas Bewick began work on his final collection of engravings in 1811 (Fables of Aesop and Others, Pub: 1818) which was the year of publication for this collection of Howitt's etchings of the Fables of Aesop, Gay and Phaedrus. Perhaps a case of mutual inspiration between Bewick and Howitt did exist after all. Howitt's expressive animal portraits for the fables of Aesop, Phaedrus and Gay are among the finest examples of the earnest personification of animals; with guilt, anger, envy and fear emanating from the incensed Drake, arrogant Baboon and radiant Peacock alike. From ancient times, the fable was a way of imparting challenging yet well-intentioned advice to your fellow man. If a significant lesson of human vice, virtue or folly was delivered under the guise of an animal action or attribute, it was more likely received, and respected. Even today, Howitt's etchings of these classic fables remain a gentle yet poignant tribute to life's many heartfelt lessons; either anticipated or experienced. Like much of Howitt's work, these etchings were originally offered both as complete sets and as individual plates without accompanying text, We have nonetheless researched and identified each fable, and here offer the etching and fable complete. (A Hundred Fables of Aesop by Sir Richard L'Estrange. New York: Dodd, Mead & Company, 1922. Siltzer. British Sporting Prints.160-165. Casey Wood, The Literature of Vertebrate Zoology, 392. DNB) single sheet

$150.00

Mastiff and Hound
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Mastiff and Hound

By Howitt, Samuel.

London:: Edward Orme,, 1810.. First Edition. Fine Condition. A fine original etching on wove paper, drawn from life and etched by Samuel Howitt, and published and sold by Edward Orme, Printseller to the King [George IV]. Quarto (11.25 x 8.25 inches, 285 x 209 mm). Very light toning to margins otherwise clean. Samuel Howitt (1756-1822) was a talented self-trained painter and etcher of animals whose work enhanced British animal portraiture and sporting art of the late Georgian Era. As a young man familiar with the ancient woodlands and royal hunting grounds of Epping Forest, Howitt was able to capture the refined essence of the British landscape as a setting in which to render his charming depictions of animals; both wild and tame, foreign and domestic. In addition; inspired by his experiences as a field sportsman, Howitt excelled at the spirited depiction of the hunt. Although Howitt was a close friend and brother-in-law of the celebrated English artist Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827), Howitt developed and refined his artistic style as a realistic tribute to the animal and nature kingdoms, and remained wholly uninfluenced by the witty, sardonic and bawdy executions of the noted caricaturist Rowlandson. Howitt's compositions have a singular charm, yet they do reflect a hint of stylistic influence of his esteemed colleague; English wood-engraver Thomas Bewick (1753-1828). Several of Howitt's scenes contain vignettes of common rural life hidden within the composition; a maid feeding hens in the poultry yard, lovely details of staid Georgian cottages and castle ruins in the receding landscape: details which have become hallmarks of Bewick's craft. It is interesting to note Thomas Bewick began work on his final collection of engravings in 1811 (Fables of Aesop and Others, Pub: 1818) which was the year of publication for this collection of Howitt's etchings of the Fables of Aesop, Gay and Phaedrus. Perhaps a case of mutual inspiration between Bewick and Howitt did exist after all. Howitt's expressive animal portraits for the fables of Aesop, Phaedrus and Gay are among the finest examples of the earnest personification of animals; with guilt, anger, envy and fear emanating from the incensed Drake, arrogant Baboon and radiant Peacock alike. From ancient times, the fable was a way of imparting challenging yet well-intentioned advice to your fellow man. If a significant lesson of human vice, virtue or folly was delivered under the guise of an animal action or attribute, it was more likely received, and respected. Even today, Howitt's etchings of these classic fables remain a gentle yet poignant tribute to life's many heartfelt lessons; either anticipated or experienced. Like much of Howitt's work, these etchings were originally offered both as complete sets and as individual plates without accompanying text, We have nonetheless researched and identified each fable, and here offer the etching and fable complete. (A Hundred Fables of Aesop by Sir Richard L'Estrange. New York: Dodd, Mead & Company, 1922. Siltzer. British Sporting Prints.160-165. Casey Wood, The Literature of Vertebrate Zoology, 392. DNB) single sheet

$150.00

Wolf and the Lamb
seller photo

Wolf and the Lamb

By Howitt, Samuel.

London:: Edward Orme,, 1810.. First Edition. Fine Condition. A fine original etching on wove paper, drawn from life and etched by Samuel Howitt, and published and sold by Edward Orme, Printseller to the King [George IV]. Quarto (11.25 x 8.25 inches, 285 x 209 mm). Very light toning to margins otherwise clean. Samuel Howitt (1756-1822) was a talented self-trained painter and etcher of animals whose work enhanced British animal portraiture and sporting art of the late Georgian Era. As a young man familiar with the ancient woodlands and royal hunting grounds of Epping Forest, Howitt was able to capture the refined essence of the British landscape as a setting in which to render his charming depictions of animals; both wild and tame, foreign and domestic. In addition; inspired by his experiences as a field sportsman, Howitt excelled at the spirited depiction of the hunt. Although Howitt was a close friend and brother-in-law of the celebrated English artist Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827), Howitt developed and refined his artistic style as a realistic tribute to the animal and nature kingdoms, and remained wholly uninfluenced by the witty, sardonic and bawdy executions of the noted caricaturist Rowlandson. Howitt's compositions have a singular charm, yet they do reflect a hint of stylistic influence of his esteemed colleague; English wood-engraver Thomas Bewick (1753-1828). Several of Howitt's scenes contain vignettes of common rural life hidden within the composition; a maid feeding hens in the poultry yard, lovely details of staid Georgian cottages and castle ruins in the receding landscape: details which have become hallmarks of Bewick's craft. It is interesting to note Thomas Bewick began work on his final collection of engravings in 1811 (Fables of Aesop and Others, Pub: 1818) which was the year of publication for this collection of Howitt's etchings of the Fables of Aesop, Gay and Phaedrus. Perhaps a case of mutual inspiration between Bewick and Howitt did exist after all. Howitt's expressive animal portraits for the fables of Aesop, Phaedrus and Gay are among the finest examples of the earnest personification of animals; with guilt, anger, envy and fear emanating from the incensed Drake, arrogant Baboon and radiant Peacock alike. From ancient times, the fable was a way of imparting challenging yet well-intentioned advice to your fellow man. If a significant lesson of human vice, virtue or folly was delivered under the guise of an animal action or attribute, it was more likely received, and respected. Even today, Howitt's etchings of these classic fables remain a gentle yet poignant tribute to life's many heartfelt lessons; either anticipated or experienced. Like much of Howitt's work, these etchings were originally offered both as complete sets and as individual plates without accompanying text, We have nonetheless researched and identified each fable, and here offer the etching and fable complete. (A Hundred Fables of Aesop by Sir Richard L'Estrange. New York: Dodd, Mead & Company, 1922. Siltzer. British Sporting Prints.160-165. Casey Wood, The Literature of Vertebrate Zoology, 392. DNB) single sheet

$150.00

The Stag Entangled by his Horns
seller photo

The Stag Entangled by his Horns

By Howitt, Samuel.

London:: Edward Orme,, 1810.. First Edition. Fine Condition. A fine original etching on wove paper, drawn from life and etched by Samuel Howitt, and published and sold by Edward Orme, Printseller to the King [George IV]. Quarto (11.25 x 8.25 inches, 285 x 209 mm). Very light toning to margins otherwise clean. Samuel Howitt (1756-1822) was a talented self-trained painter and etcher of animals whose work enhanced British animal portraiture and sporting art of the late Georgian Era. As a young man familiar with the ancient woodlands and royal hunting grounds of Epping Forest, Howitt was able to capture the refined essence of the British landscape as a setting in which to render his charming depictions of animals; both wild and tame, foreign and domestic. In addition; inspired by his experiences as a field sportsman, Howitt excelled at the spirited depiction of the hunt. Although Howitt was a close friend and brother-in-law of the celebrated English artist Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827), Howitt developed and refined his artistic style as a realistic tribute to the animal and nature kingdoms, and remained wholly uninfluenced by the witty, sardonic and bawdy executions of the noted caricaturist Rowlandson. Howitt's compositions have a singular charm, yet they do reflect a hint of stylistic influence of his esteemed colleague; English wood-engraver Thomas Bewick (1753-1828). Several of Howitt's scenes contain vignettes of common rural life hidden within the composition; a maid feeding hens in the poultry yard, lovely details of staid Georgian cottages and castle ruins in the receding landscape: details which have become hallmarks of Bewick's craft. It is interesting to note Thomas Bewick began work on his final collection of engravings in 1811 (Fables of Aesop and Others, Pub: 1818) which was the year of publication for this collection of Howitt's etchings of the Fables of Aesop, Gay and Phaedrus. Perhaps a case of mutual inspiration between Bewick and Howitt did exist after all. Howitt's expressive animal portraits for the fables of Aesop, Phaedrus and Gay are among the finest examples of the earnest personification of animals; with guilt, anger, envy and fear emanating from the incensed Drake, arrogant Baboon and radiant Peacock alike. From ancient times, the fable was a way of imparting challenging yet well-intentioned advice to your fellow man. If a significant lesson of human vice, virtue or folly was delivered under the guise of an animal action or attribute, it was more likely received, and respected. Even today, Howitt's etchings of these classic fables remain a gentle yet poignant tribute to life's many heartfelt lessons; either anticipated or experienced. Like much of Howitt's work, these etchings were originally offered both as complete sets and as individual plates without accompanying text, We have nonetheless researched and identified each fable, and here offer the etching and fable complete. (A Hundred Fables of Aesop by Sir Richard L'Estrange. New York: Dodd, Mead & Company, 1922. Siltzer. British Sporting Prints.160-165. Casey Wood, The Literature of Vertebrate Zoology, 392. DNB) single sheet

$150.00

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