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Pipa D'America [Common Surinam toad]
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Pipa D'America [Common Surinam toad]

By Petraroja, Raimondo. Boschi, Giovanni .

Naples:: Napoli Presso,, 1863-79.. First Edition. Fine. Fine original hand-colored lithograph by Raimondo Petraroja after drawing by A. di Lorenzo. Folio. Sheet: 16 3/8 x 11 3/4 inches. Image size: 10 x 9 inches. Sheet: 16 3/8 x 11 3/4 inches. Image size: 10 x 9 inches. Publisher's blind stamp lower center under caption, as issued. Archivally double matted in sage green/gilt French mat sized to 16 x 20 inches. An whimsical scene displaying the reproductive habits of the female Common Surinam toad or star-fingered toad. Set on leafy shore in pursuit of a fluttering butterfly overhead multiple fully-formed toads emerge from honeycombed crevices on the mother's back. While little is known of the artist or lithographer, the editor Giovanni Boschi (1863-79), biographer of the famed French Naturalist Georges Louis LeClerc, Comte de Buffon, was clearly inspired by Buffon's encyclopedic knowledge and imaginative presentation of the natural world as well as the work of artists such as John James Audubon in the creation of his own naturalists' compendium; a massive 8 volume popular zoological atlas; a work compiled from the most recent works of Italian and foreign zoology; all set in their native surroundings. Single sheet matted in rag board

$275.00

Pasan. Antilope oryx [Antelope]
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Pasan. Antilope oryx [Antelope]

By Petraroja, Raimondo. Boschi, Giovanni (Editor).

Naples:: Napoli Presso,, 1863-79.. First Edition. Fine. Fine original hand-colored lithograph by Raimondo Petraroja after drawing by Antinori. Folio. Sheet: 16 3/8 x 11 3/4 inches. Image size: 10 x 9 inches. Sheet: 16 3/8 x 11 3/4 inches. Image size: 10 x 9 inches. Publisher's blind stamp lower center under caption, as issued. Archivally double matted in sage green/gilt French mat sized to 16 x 20 inches. A white faced, white bellied African Antelope jumping over rocky outcropping. While little is known of the artist or lithographer, the editor Giovanni Boschi (1863-79), biographer of the famed French Naturalist Georges Louis LeClerc, Comte de Buffon, was clearly inspired by Buffon's encyclopedic knowledge and imaginative presentation of the natural world as well as the work of artists such as John James Audubon in the creation of his own naturalists' compendium; a massive 8 volume popular zoological atlas; a work compiled from the most recent works of Italian and foreign zoology; all set in their native surroundings. Single sheet matted in rag board

$250.00

Botolo O Gola Rossa - Anolis bullaris [Iguana]
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Botolo O Gola Rossa - Anolis bullaris [Iguana]

By Petraroja, Raimondo. Boschi, Giovanni (Editor).

Naples:: Napoli Presso,, 1863-79.. First Edition. Fine. Fine original hand-colored lithograph by Raimondo Petraroja after drawing by A. di Lorenzo. Folio. Sheet: 16 3/8 x 11 3/4 inches. Image size: 10 x 9 inches. Sheet: 16 3/8 x 11 3/4 inches. Image size: 10 x 9 inches. Publisher's blind stamp lower center under caption, as issued. Archivally double matted in sage green/gilt French mat sized to 16 x 20 inches. A bold presentation of a male blue-rust brown spotted Iguana set in a native vegetated plateau landscape. While little is known of the artist or lithographer, the editor Giovanni Boschi (1863-79), biographer of the famed French Naturalist Georges Louis LeClerc, Comte de Buffon, was clearly inspired by Buffon's encyclopedic knowledge and imaginative presentation of the natural world as well as the work of artists such as John James Audubon in the creation of his own naturalists' compendium; a massive 8 volume popular zoological atlas; a work compiled from the most recent works of Italian and foreign zoology; all set in their native surroundings. Single sheet matted in rag board

$250.00

Antilope Araba. Antilope arabica [Gazelle]
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Antilope Araba. Antilope arabica [Gazelle]

By Petraroja, Raimondo. Boschi, Giovanni (Editor).

Naples:: Napoli Presso,, 1863-79.. First Edition. Fine. Fine original hand-colored lithograph by Raimondo Petraroja after drawing by Rispoli. Folio. Sheet: 16 3/8 x 11 3/4 inches. Image size: 10 x 9 inches. Publisher's blind stamp lower center under caption, as issued. Archivally double matted in sage green/gilt French mat sized to 16 x 20 inches. A sweet depiction of an Arabian Orxy or Gazelle in the landscape. While little is known of the artist or lithographer, the editor Giovanni Boschi (1863-79), biographer of the famed French Naturalist Georges Louis LeClerc, Comte de Buffon, was clearly inspired by Buffon's encyclopedic knowledge and imaginative presentation of the natural world as well as the work of artists such as John James Audubon in the creation of his own naturalists' compendium; a massive 8 volume popular zoological atlas; a work compiled from the most recent works of Italian and foreign zoology; all set in their native surroundings. Single sheet matted in rag board

$250.00

The Antiquities of Selborne in the County of Southampton.
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The Antiquities of Selborne in the County of Southampton.

By White, Gilbert. Scott, W. Sidney (Editor).

London:: The Falcon Press ,, 1950.. First edition. Fine in a Near Fine DJ . Fine in a Near Fine chipped, foxed DJ. Octavo (5 1/2 x 8 3/4 Inches.) Black cloth with gilt lettering set in red panel on spine. [1-12] 267 pp., 12 plates. Fully illustrated with wash drawings of Selbourne made in the year 1776 by Samuel Hieronymus Grimm. Jacket design by Charles Stewart. A separate issue of The Antiquities of Selboure- which Reverend White intended to be an integral part of his Natural History of Selboure, but was rarely published ensuite. Includes The Poetry of Gilbert White along with a historical and topographical account of Selbourne and two appendices. Cloth

$30.00

Haunts of British Divers.
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Haunts of British Divers.

By Rankin, Niall.

London:: Collins,, 1947.. First printing. Very Good + in Very Good DJ. VG+ with a VG+ unclipped DJ. Slightly toned DJ, minor chipping. Minor foxing to front board and fore-edge. Owner's name on ffl. Royal Octavo (7.25 x 9.5 in). Yellow cloth with gilt lettered spine. Pp. 96 illustrated with 82 photographs by the author and 11 pen and ink drawings by Margaret Myddelton, plus colored frontispiece by Margaret Myddelton. Explores the habitats of three divers; The Great Crested Grebe, The Black-throated Diver and the Red-throated Diver. Cloth

$48.00

Scarabaeus Atlas
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Scarabaeus Atlas

By Jardine, Sir William, FRS, FLS .

Edinburgh:: WH Lizars,, 1835.. First edition. Fine. A fine original hand-colored steel engraving with bright original hand-coloring. (6.75 x 4.25 inches, 10.8 x 17.15 cm). Beautifully framed in Malachite burl frame with deep turquoise blue-green french matting. This engraving is classified as one of the finest natural history miniatures produced during the mid-nineteenth century. A refined and intelligent work, The Naturalist's Library was created for everyone with an interest in the natural world. Sir William Jardine (1800-1847), noted Scottish Ichthyologist and Ornithologist, combined the talents of his colleagues; Edward Lear, Prideaux John Selby, William Swainson to contribute to The Naturalist's Library. The intention of the series was to create a fine yet affordable work, describing and illustrating all elements of the natural world save botany. In addition, several plates were engraved after noted artists: John James Audubon, John Gould and Maria Sibylla Merian. The success of the publication was apparent by the production of forty subsequent volumes. The engraver of the work was William H. Lizars, who at the time produced the first ten plates of John James Audubon's magnum opus, the Double Elephant Folio Edition of The Birds of America. For The Naturalist's Library, Lizars engraved the miniature plates in steel opposed to copper to render meticulously detailed settings for each described species. Traditionally only the major subject, either bird, animal, insect or fish, was individually painted with watercolor, the background remained uncolored. This work has withstood the test of time and continues to be a fine and affordable option to the lavish engraved work of many natural history masters. Archivally Framed

$325.00

Pl 282 The Spur Fish & The Indian Gattorugina
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Pl 282 The Spur Fish & The Indian Gattorugina

By Edwards, George.

London:: The Royal College of Physicians,, 1758-1764.. First edition. Fine. Pl 282 The Spur Fish & The Indian Gattorugina. Original hand-colored copperplate engraving. Quarto (9 x 12 inches). Includes text. George Edwards (London 1694-1773) was a Fellow of the Royal Society and Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in London who rejected his early formal training and potential career in business to pursue his passion in natural history. His dedication and talent as a draftsman and naturalist was evident, thus gaining the attention of Sir Hans Sloane, President of the College of Physicians and the Royal Society. Sir Hans offered Edwards the post of Librarian of the Royal College of Physicians in London, and enlisted him to draw the natural curiosities of Sloane's private museum. This connection became the inspiration for Edward's masterful achievements; A Natural History of Uncommon Birds Published between 1743 and 1751, and the subsequent work; Gleanings of Natural History which was produced between 1758 and 1764. These two works illustrated and documented many previously unrecorded specimens of birds, reptiles and insects held in England's private collections up to the mid eighteenth century. A monumental achievement, Edwards documented- in English and French-, painted, engraved and hand-colored every one of the fine compositions in this Pre-Linnaean natural history opus. Although not a field naturalist, Edwards placed many of his birds and animals in landscaped settings, which was unusual for the time. In other compositions birds are elegantly perched on stylized branches in a classic Georgian format, more decorative than realistic, charming nonetheless. A gracious and humble man, Edwards established firm and respected alliances with naturalist pioneers Carl Linnaeus (1707-78), Mark Catesby, (1683-1749) from whom he learned the art of engraving, and subsequently aided Catesby in the revision of his publication; The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands, London c.1754, as well as William Bartram, from whom he acquired several species of Pennsylvanian birds included in his volumes. As Edwards' work predates the completion of the Linnaean classification system, Linnaeus was to borrow the English names of many of Edwards species for his renowned work on classification and nomenclature. (Ref: Buchanan, Jackson, Fine Bird Books.) Matted in Rag Board

$225.00

Pl 288 The Prickled Dog or Hound-fish, with an insect called the Walking-stick
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Pl 288 The Prickled Dog or Hound-fish, with an insect called the Walking-stick

By Edwards, George.

London:: The Royal College of Physicians,, 1758-1764.. First edition. Fine . Pl 288 The Prickled Dog or Hound-fish, with an insect called the Walking-stick. Original hand-colored copperplate engraving. Quarto (9 x 12 inches). Includes text. George Edwards (London 1694-1773) was a Fellow of the Royal Society and Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in London who rejected his early formal training and potential career in business to pursue his passion in natural history. His dedication and talent as a draftsman and naturalist was evident, thus gaining the attention of Sir Hans Sloane, President of the College of Physicians and the Royal Society. Sir Hans offered Edwards the post of Librarian of the Royal College of Physicians in London, and enlisted him to draw the natural curiosities of Sloane's private museum. This connection became the inspiration for Edward's masterful achievements; A Natural History of Uncommon Birds Published between 1743 and 1751, and the subsequent work; Gleanings of Natural History which was produced between 1758 and 1764. These two works illustrated and documented many previously unrecorded specimens of birds, reptiles and insects held in England's private collections up to the mid eighteenth century. A monumental achievement, Edwards documented- in English and French-, painted, engraved and hand-colored every one of the fine compositions in this Pre-Linnaean natural history opus. Although not a field naturalist, Edwards placed many of his birds and animals in landscaped settings, which was unusual for the time. In other compositions birds are elegantly perched on stylized branches in a classic Georgian format, more decorative than realistic, charming nonetheless. A gracious and humble man, Edwards established firm and respected alliances with naturalist pioneers Carl Linnaeus (1707-78), Mark Catesby, (1683-1749) from whom he learned the art of engraving, and subsequently aided Catesby in the revision of his publication; The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands, London c.1754, as well as William Bartram, from whom he acquired several species of Pennsylvanian birds included in his volumes. As Edwards' work predates the completion of the Linnaean classification system, Linnaeus was to borrow the English names of many of Edwards species for his renowned work on classification and nomenclature. (Ref: Buchanan, Jackson, Fine Bird Books.) Matted in Rag Board

$225.00

Pl 283 Sea Bat & The Pyed Acarauana
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Pl 283 Sea Bat & The Pyed Acarauana

By Edwards, George.

London:: The Royal College of Physicians,, 1758-1764.. First edition. Fine . Pl 283 Sea Bat & The Pyed Acarauana. Original hand-colored copperplate engraving. Quarto (9 x 12 inches). Includes text. George Edwards (London 1694-1773) was a Fellow of the Royal Society and Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in London who rejected his early formal training and potential career in business to pursue his passion in natural history. His dedication and talent as a draftsman and naturalist was evident, thus gaining the attention of Sir Hans Sloane, President of the College of Physicians and the Royal Society. Sir Hans offered Edwards the post of Librarian of the Royal College of Physicians in London, and enlisted him to draw the natural curiosities of Sloane's private museum. This connection became the inspiration for Edward's masterful achievements; A Natural History of Uncommon Birds Published between 1743 and 1751, and the subsequent work; Gleanings of Natural History which was produced between 1758 and 1764. These two works illustrated and documented many previously unrecorded specimens of birds, reptiles and insects held in England's private collections up to the mid eighteenth century. A monumental achievement, Edwards documented- in English and French-, painted, engraved and hand-colored every one of the fine compositions in this Pre-Linnaean natural history opus. Although not a field naturalist, Edwards placed many of his birds and animals in landscaped settings, which was unusual for the time. In other compositions birds are elegantly perched on stylized branches in a classic Georgian format, more decorative than realistic, charming nonetheless. A gracious and humble man, Edwards established firm and respected alliances with naturalist pioneers Carl Linnaeus (1707-78), Mark Catesby, (1683-1749) from whom he learned the art of engraving, and subsequently aided Catesby in the revision of his publication; The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands, London c.1754, as well as William Bartram, from whom he acquired several species of Pennsylvanian birds included in his volumes. As Edwards' work predates the completion of the Linnaean classification system, Linnaeus was to borrow the English names of many of Edwards species for his renowned work on classification and nomenclature. (Ref: Buchanan, Jackson, Fine Bird Books.) Matted in Rag Board

$225.00

Pl 206 The Sea-tortoise
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Pl 206 The Sea-tortoise

By Edwards, George.

London:: The College of Physicians,, 1743-51.. First edition. Fine . Pl 206 The Sea-tortoise. Original hand-colored copperplate engraving. Quarto (9 x 12 inches). Includes text. George Edwards (London 1694-1773) was a Fellow of the Royal Society and Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in London who rejected his early formal training and potential career in business to pursue his passion in natural history. His dedication and talent as a draftsman and naturalist was evident, thus gaining the attention of Sir Hans Sloane, President of the College of Physicians and the Royal Society. Sir Hans offered Edwards the post of Librarian of the Royal College of Physicians in London, and enlisted him to draw the natural curiosities of Sloane's private museum. This connection became the inspiration for Edward's masterful achievements; A Natural History of Uncommon Birds Published between 1743 and 1751, and the subsequent work; Gleanings of Natural History which was produced between 1758 and 1764. These two works illustrated and documented many previously unrecorded specimens of birds, reptiles and insects held in England's private collections up to the mid eighteenth century. A monumental achievement, Edwards documented- in English and French-, painted, engraved and hand-colored every one of the fine compositions in this Pre-Linnaean natural history opus. Although not a field naturalist, Edwards placed many of his birds and animals in landscaped settings, which was unusual for the time. In other compositions birds are elegantly perched on stylized branches in a classic Georgian format, more decorative than realistic, charming nonetheless. A gracious and humble man, Edwards established firm and respected alliances with naturalist pioneers Carl Linnaeus (1707-78), Mark Catesby, (1683-1749) from whom he learned the art of engraving, and subsequently aided Catesby in the revision of his publication; The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands, London c.1754, as well as William Bartram, from whom he acquired several species of Pennsylvanian birds included in his volumes. As Edwards' work predates the completion of the Linnaean classification system, Linnaeus was to borrow the English names of many of Edwards species for his renowned work on classification and nomenclature. (Ref: Buchanan, Jackson, Fine Bird Books.) Matted in Rag Board

$225.00

Pl 203 The Great Spotted Lizard with a Forked Tail
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Pl 203 The Great Spotted Lizard with a Forked Tail

By Edwards, George.

London:: The College of Physicians,, 1743-51.. second edition. Fine . Pl 203 The Great Spotted Lizard with a Forked Tail. Original hand-colored copperplate engraving. Quarto (9 x 12 inches). Includes text. This print is from a later edition printed on J Whatman Turkey Mills paper watermarked 1836. George Edwards (London 1694-1773) was a Fellow of the Royal Society and Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in London who rejected his early formal training and potential career in business to pursue his passion in natural history. His dedication and talent as a draftsman and naturalist was evident, thus gaining the attention of Sir Hans Sloane, President of the College of Physicians and the Royal Society. Sir Hans offered Edwards the post of Librarian of the Royal College of Physicians in London, and enlisted him to draw the natural curiosities of Sloane's private museum. This connection became the inspiration for Edward's masterful achievements; A Natural History of Uncommon Birds Published between 1743 and 1751, and the subsequent work; Gleanings of Natural History which was produced between 1758 and 1764. These two works illustrated and documented many previously unrecorded specimens of birds, reptiles and insects held in England's private collections up to the mid eighteenth century. A monumental achievement, Edwards documented- in English and French-, painted, engraved and hand-colored every one of the fine compositions in this Pre-Linnaean natural history opus. Although not a field naturalist, Edwards placed many of his birds and animals in landscaped settings, which was unusual for the time. In other compositions birds are elegantly perched on stylized branches in a classic Georgian format, more decorative than realistic, charming nonetheless. A gracious and humble man, Edwards established firm and respected alliances with naturalist pioneers Carl Linnaeus (1707-78), Mark Catesby, (1683-1749) from whom he learned the art of engraving, and subsequently aided Catesby in the revision of his publication; The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands, London c.1754, as well as William Bartram, from whom he acquired several species of Pennsylvanian birds included in his volumes. As Edwards' work predates the completion of the Linnaean classification system, Linnaeus was to borrow the English names of many of Edwards species for his renowned work on classification and nomenclature. (Ref: Buchanan, Jackson, Fine Bird Books.) Matted in Rag Board

$195.00

Pl 207 Double-headed Snake & The Black Butterflies
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Pl 207 Double-headed Snake & The Black Butterflies

By Edwards, George.

London:: The College of Physicians,, 1743-51.. First edition. Fine . Pl 207 Double-headed Snake & The Black Butterflies. Original hand-colored copperplate engraving. Quarto (9 x 12 inches). Includes text. George Edwards (London 1694-1773) was a Fellow of the Royal Society and Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in London who rejected his early formal training and potential career in business to pursue his passion in natural history. His dedication and talent as a draftsman and naturalist was evident, thus gaining the attention of Sir Hans Sloane, President of the College of Physicians and the Royal Society. Sir Hans offered Edwards the post of Librarian of the Royal College of Physicians in London, and enlisted him to draw the natural curiosities of Sloane's private museum. This connection became the inspiration for Edward's masterful achievements; A Natural History of Uncommon Birds Published between 1743 and 1751, and the subsequent work; Gleanings of Natural History which was produced between 1758 and 1764. These two works illustrated and documented many previously unrecorded specimens of birds, reptiles and insects held in England's private collections up to the mid eighteenth century. A monumental achievement, Edwards documented- in English and French-, painted, engraved and hand-colored every one of the fine compositions in this Pre-Linnaean natural history opus. Although not a field naturalist, Edwards placed many of his birds and animals in landscaped settings, which was unusual for the time. In other compositions birds are elegantly perched on stylized branches in a classic Georgian format, more decorative than realistic, charming nonetheless. A gracious and humble man, Edwards established firm and respected alliances with naturalist pioneers Carl Linnaeus (1707-78), Mark Catesby, (1683-1749) from whom he learned the art of engraving, and subsequently aided Catesby in the revision of his publication; The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands, London c.1754, as well as William Bartram, from whom he acquired several species of Pennsylvanian birds included in his volumes. As Edwards' work predates the completion of the Linnaean classification system, Linnaeus was to borrow the English names of many of Edwards species for his renowned work on classification and nomenclature. (Ref: Buchanan, Jackson, Fine Bird Books.) Matted in Rag Board

$225.00

Pl 208 The Mango-fish & The Great Brown Locust
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Pl 208 The Mango-fish & The Great Brown Locust

By Edwards, George.

London:: The College of Physicians,, 1743-51.. later printing. Fine . Pl 208 The Mango-fish & The Great Brown Locust. Original hand-colored copperplate engraving. Quarto (9 x 12 inches). Includes text. This print is from a later edition printed on J Whatman Turkey Mills paper watermarked 1836. George Edwards (London 1694-1773) was a Fellow of the Royal Society and Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in London who rejected his early formal training and potential career in business to pursue his passion in natural history. His dedication and talent as a draftsman and naturalist was evident, thus gaining the attention of Sir Hans Sloane, President of the College of Physicians and the Royal Society. Sir Hans offered Edwards the post of Librarian of the Royal College of Physicians in London, and enlisted him to draw the natural curiosities of Sloane's private museum. This connection became the inspiration for Edward's masterful achievements; A Natural History of Uncommon Birds Published between 1743 and 1751, and the subsequent work; Gleanings of Natural History which was produced between 1758 and 1764. These two works illustrated and documented many previously unrecorded specimens of birds, reptiles and insects held in England's private collections up to the mid eighteenth century. A monumental achievement, Edwards documented- in English and French-, painted, engraved and hand-colored every one of the fine compositions in this Pre-Linnaean natural history opus. Although not a field naturalist, Edwards placed many of his birds and animals in landscaped settings, which was unusual for the time. In other compositions birds are elegantly perched on stylized branches in a classic Georgian format, more decorative than realistic, charming nonetheless. A gracious and humble man, Edwards established firm and respected alliances with naturalist pioneers Carl Linnaeus (1707-78), Mark Catesby, (1683-1749) from whom he learned the art of engraving, and subsequently aided Catesby in the revision of his publication; The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands, London c.1754, as well as William Bartram, from whom he acquired several species of Pennsylvanian birds included in his volumes. As Edwards' work predates the completion of the Linnaean classification system, Linnaeus was to borrow the English names of many of Edwards species for his renowned work on classification and nomenclature. (Ref: Buchanan, Jackson, Fine Bird Books.) Matted in Rag Board

$195.00

Pl 208 The Mango-fish & The Great Brown Locust
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Pl 208 The Mango-fish & The Great Brown Locust

By Edwards, George.

London:: The College of Physicians,, 1743-51.. First edition. Fine . A fine original hand-colored copperplate engraving. Quarto (9 x 12 inches). Includes text. George Edwards (London 1694-1773) was a Fellow of the Royal Society and Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in London who rejected his early formal training and potential career in business to pursue his passion in natural history. His dedication and talent as a draftsman and naturalist was evident, thus gaining the attention of Sir Hans Sloane, President of the College of Physicians and the Royal Society. Sir Hans offered Edwards the post of Librarian of the Royal College of Physicians in London, and enlisted him to draw the natural curiosities of Sloane's private museum. This connection became the inspiration for Edward's masterful achievements; A Natural History of Uncommon Birds Published between 1743 and 1751, and the subsequent work; Gleanings of Natural History which was produced between 1758 and 1764. These two works illustrated and documented many previously unrecorded specimens of birds, reptiles and insects held in England's private collections up to the mid eighteenth century. A monumental achievement, Edwards documented- in English and French-, painted, engraved and hand-colored every one of the fine compositions in this Pre-Linnaean natural history opus. Although not a field naturalist, Edwards placed many of his birds and animals in landscaped settings, which was unusual for the time. In other compositions birds are elegantly perched on stylized branches in a classic Georgian format, more decorative than realistic, charming nonetheless. A gracious and humble man, Edwards established firm and respected alliances with naturalist pioneers Carl Linnaeus (1707-78), Mark Catesby, (1683-1749) from whom he learned the art of engraving, and subsequently aided Catesby in the revision of his publication; The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands, London c.1754, as well as William Bartram, from whom he acquired several species of Pennsylvanian birds included in his volumes. As Edwards' work predates the completion of the Linnaean classification system, Linnaeus was to borrow the English names of many of Edwards species for his renowned work on classification and nomenclature. (Ref: Buchanan, Jackson, Fine Bird Books.) Matted in Rag Board

$225.00

Pl. 73 The Bustard Cock
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Pl. 73 The Bustard Cock

By Edwards, George.

London:: The College of Physicians,, 1743-51.. First edition. Fine . Pl. 73 The Bustard Cock. Original hand-colored copperplate engraving. Quarto (11.5 x 9 inches). Includes text. George Edwards (London 1694-1773) was a Fellow of the Royal Society and Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in London who rejected his early formal training and potential career in business to pursue his passion in natural history. His dedication and talent as a draftsman and naturalist was evident, thus gaining the attention of Sir Hans Sloane, President of the College of Physicians and the Royal Society. Sir Hans offered Edwards the post of Librarian of the Royal College of Physicians in London, and enlisted him to draw the natural curiosities of Sloane's private museum. This connection became the inspiration for Edward's masterful achievements; A Natural History of Uncommon Birds Published between 1743 and 1751, and the subsequent work; Gleanings of Natural History which was produced between 1758 and 1764. These two works illustrated and documented many previously unrecorded specimens of birds, reptiles and insects held in England's private collections up to the mid eighteenth century. A monumental achievement, Edwards documented- in English and French-, painted, engraved and hand-colored every one of the fine compositions in this Pre-Linnaean natural history opus. Although not a field naturalist, Edwards placed many of his birds and animals in landscaped settings, which was unusual for the time. In other compositions birds are elegantly perched on stylized branches in a classic Georgian format, more decorative than realistic, charming nonetheless. A gracious and humble man, Edwards established firm and respected alliances with naturalist pioneers Carl Linnaeus (1707-78), Mark Catesby, (1683-1749) from whom he learned the art of engraving, and subsequently aided Catesby in the revision of his publication; The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands, London c.1754, as well as William Bartram, from whom he acquired several species of Pennsylvanian birds included in his volumes. As Edwards' work predates the completion of the Linnaean classification system, Linnaeus was to borrow the English names of many of Edwards species for his renowned work on classification and nomenclature. (Ref: Buchanan, Jackson, Fine Bird Books.) Matted in Rag Board

$250.00

Pl. 71 The Brown and Spotted Heathcock
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Pl. 71 The Brown and Spotted Heathcock

By Edwards, George.

London:: The College of Physicians,, 1743-51.. First edition. Fine . Pl. 71 The Brown and Spotted Heathcock. Original hand-colored copperplate engraving. Quarto (11.5 x 9 inches). Includes text. George Edwards (London 1694-1773) was a Fellow of the Royal Society and Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in London who rejected his early formal training and potential career in business to pursue his passion in natural history. His dedication and talent as a draftsman and naturalist was evident, thus gaining the attention of Sir Hans Sloane, President of the College of Physicians and the Royal Society. Sir Hans offered Edwards the post of Librarian of the Royal College of Physicians in London, and enlisted him to draw the natural curiosities of Sloane's private museum. This connection became the inspiration for Edward's masterful achievements; A Natural History of Uncommon Birds Published between 1743 and 1751, and the subsequent work; Gleanings of Natural History which was produced between 1758 and 1764. These two works illustrated and documented many previously unrecorded specimens of birds, reptiles and insects held in England's private collections up to the mid eighteenth century. A monumental achievement, Edwards documented- in English and French-, painted, engraved and hand-colored every one of the fine compositions in this Pre-Linnaean natural history opus. Although not a field naturalist, Edwards placed many of his birds and animals in landscaped settings, which was unusual for the time. In other compositions birds are elegantly perched on stylized branches in a classic Georgian format, more decorative than realistic, charming nonetheless. A gracious and humble man, Edwards established firm and respected alliances with naturalist pioneers Carl Linnaeus (1707-78), Mark Catesby, (1683-1749) from whom he learned the art of engraving, and subsequently aided Catesby in the revision of his publication; The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands, London c.1754, as well as William Bartram, from whom he acquired several species of Pennsylvanian birds included in his volumes. As Edwards' work predates the completion of the Linnaean classification system, Linnaeus was to borrow the English names of many of Edwards species for his renowned work on classification and nomenclature. (Ref: Buchanan, Jackson, Fine Bird Books.) Matted in Rag Board

$275.00

Pl 188. The Gros-beak or Haw-finch
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Pl 188. The Gros-beak or Haw-finch

By Edwards, George.

London:: The College of Physicians,, 1743-51.. First edition. Fine . Pl 188. The Gros-beak or Haw-finch. Original hand-colored copperplate engraving. Quarto (9 x 12 inches). Includes text. George Edwards (London 1694-1773) was a Fellow of the Royal Society and Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in London who rejected his early formal training and potential career in business to pursue his passion in natural history. His dedication and talent as a draftsman and naturalist was evident, thus gaining the attention of Sir Hans Sloane, President of the College of Physicians and the Royal Society. Sir Hans offered Edwards the post of Librarian of the Royal College of Physicians in London, and enlisted him to draw the natural curiosities of Sloane's private museum. This connection became the inspiration for Edward's masterful achievements; A Natural History of Uncommon Birds Published between 1743 and 1751, and the subsequent work; Gleanings of Natural History which was produced between 1758 and 1764. These two works illustrated and documented many previously unrecorded specimens of birds, reptiles and insects held in England's private collections up to the mid eighteenth century. A monumental achievement, Edwards documented- in English and French-, painted, engraved and hand-colored every one of the fine compositions in this Pre-Linnaean natural history opus. Although not a field naturalist, Edwards placed many of his birds and animals in landscaped settings, which was unusual for the time. In other compositions birds are elegantly perched on stylized branches in a classic Georgian format, more decorative than realistic, charming nonetheless. A gracious and humble man, Edwards established firm and respected alliances with naturalist pioneers Carl Linnaeus (1707-78), Mark Catesby, (1683-1749) from whom he learned the art of engraving, and subsequently aided Catesby in the revision of his publication; The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands, London c.1754, as well as William Bartram, from whom he acquired several species of Pennsylvanian birds included in his volumes. As Edwards' work predates the completion of the Linnaean classification system, Linnaeus was to borrow the English names of many of Edwards species for his renowned work on classification and nomenclature. (Ref: Buchanan, Jackson, Fine Bird Books.) Matted in Rag Board

$275.00

Pl 124. The Greatest Bulfinch-hen
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Pl 124. The Greatest Bulfinch-hen

By Edwards, George.

London:: The College of Physicians,, 1743-51.. First edition. Fine . Pl 124. The Greatest Bulfinch-hen. Original hand-colored copperplate engraving. Quarto (9 x 12 inches). Includes text. George Edwards (London 1694-1773) was a Fellow of the Royal Society and Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in London who rejected his early formal training and potential career in business to pursue his passion in natural history. His dedication and talent as a draftsman and naturalist was evident, thus gaining the attention of Sir Hans Sloane, President of the College of Physicians and the Royal Society. Sir Hans offered Edwards the post of Librarian of the Royal College of Physicians in London, and enlisted him to draw the natural curiosities of Sloane's private museum. This connection became the inspiration for Edward's masterful achievements; A Natural History of Uncommon Birds Published between 1743 and 1751, and the subsequent work; Gleanings of Natural History which was produced between 1758 and 1764. These two works illustrated and documented many previously unrecorded specimens of birds, reptiles and insects held in England's private collections up to the mid eighteenth century. A monumental achievement, Edwards documented- in English and French-, painted, engraved and hand-colored every one of the fine compositions in this Pre-Linnaean natural history opus. Although not a field naturalist, Edwards placed many of his birds and animals in landscaped settings, which was unusual for the time. In other compositions birds are elegantly perched on stylized branches in a classic Georgian format, more decorative than realistic, charming nonetheless. A gracious and humble man, Edwards established firm and respected alliances with naturalist pioneers Carl Linnaeus (1707-78), Mark Catesby, (1683-1749) from whom he learned the art of engraving, and subsequently aided Catesby in the revision of his publication; The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands, London c.1754, as well as William Bartram, from whom he acquired several species of Pennsylvanian birds included in his volumes. As Edwards' work predates the completion of the Linnaean classification system, Linnaeus was to borrow the English names of many of Edwards species for his renowned work on classification and nomenclature. (Ref: Buchanan, Jackson, Fine Bird Books.) Matted in Rag Board

$275.00

Pl. 121 The American Nightingale & the Green Sparrow or Green (Ruby-throated) Hummingbird
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Pl. 121 The American Nightingale & the Green Sparrow or Green (Ruby-throated) Hummingbird

By Edwards, George.

London:: The College of Physicians,, 1743-51.. First edition. Fine . Pl. 121 The American Nightingale & the Green Sparrow or Green (Ruby-throated) Hummingbird. Original hand-colored copperplate engraving. Quarto (11.5 x 9 inches). Includes text. George Edwards (London 1694-1773) was a Fellow of the Royal Society and Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in London who rejected his early formal training and potential career in business to pursue his passion in natural history. His dedication and talent as a draftsman and naturalist was evident, thus gaining the attention of Sir Hans Sloane, President of the College of Physicians and the Royal Society. Sir Hans offered Edwards the post of Librarian of the Royal College of Physicians in London, and enlisted him to draw the natural curiosities of Sloane's private museum. This connection became the inspiration for Edward's masterful achievements; A Natural History of Uncommon Birds Published between 1743 and 1751, and the subsequent work; Gleanings of Natural History which was produced between 1758 and 1764. These two works illustrated and documented many previously unrecorded specimens of birds, reptiles and insects held in England's private collections up to the mid eighteenth century. A monumental achievement, Edwards documented- in English and French-, painted, engraved and hand-colored every one of the fine compositions in this Pre-Linnaean natural history opus. Although not a field naturalist, Edwards placed many of his birds and animals in landscaped settings, which was unusual for the time. In other compositions birds are elegantly perched on stylized branches in a classic Georgian format, more decorative than realistic, charming nonetheless. A gracious and humble man, Edwards established firm and respected alliances with naturalist pioneers Carl Linnaeus (1707-78), Mark Catesby, (1683-1749) from whom he learned the art of engraving, and subsequently aided Catesby in the revision of his publication; The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands, London c.1754, as well as William Bartram, from whom he acquired several species of Pennsylvanian birds included in his volumes. As Edwards' work predates the completion of the Linnaean classification system, Linnaeus was to borrow the English names of many of Edwards species for his renowned work on classification and nomenclature. (Ref: Buchanan, Jackson, Fine Bird Books.) Matted in Rag Board

$225.00

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