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Plate #12. The Bird-catching Spider (Aranea avicularia)

By Shaw, George, MD, FRS, and Nodder, Frederick Polydore.

Plate #12. The Bird-catching Spider (Aranea avicularia). A Fine and rare original hand-colored copperplate engraving by Frederick Polydore Nodder and/or his son Richard Polydore Nodder from The Naturalist's Miscellany. Archivally framed in one inch walnut burl moulding. Sized to 19.5 x 17 inches. Includes the original text in both English and Latin by George Shaw, MD, FRS. The Naturalist's Miscellany, distinguished by the refined hand-colored copperplate engravings and astute naturalists' observations, was aptly named as a diverse naturalists' compendium of the birds, mammals, reptiles, insects, fish and crustacean identified by seventeenth and eighteenth century naturalists spanning the globe, particularly around the South Seas. Many of nature's most fascinating and unusual creatures were discovered during this period, several of which were introduced through The Naturalist's Miscellany. Doctor George Shaw, (1751-1813), Fellow of the Royal Society, co-founder of the Linnaean Society, as well as Zoologist of the British Museum, contributed the text. Publication of the Naturalist's Miscellany ceased with his death in 1813. Upon the death of the artist FP Nodder (1770-1800), his wife Elizabeth, and their son Richard Polydore Nodder (1793-1820) contributed artistically and editorially to the publication. Indeed a family affair, both Frederick Polydore Nodder and his son Richard produced every one of the plates. A gifted and distinguished naturalist, Frederick P. Nodder was the preferred Botanical Painter to Her Majesty, Queen Charlotte. His early skills as botanical and animal draftsman and engraver were honed from his association with Sir Joseph Banks, who employed Nodder to complete and engrave the drawings from the sketchbooks of the late Sydney Parkinson. Parkinson accompanied Banks as botanical draftsman aboard Captain James Cook's The Endeavor in 1771. Parkinson died on the return of this South Seas Voyage. These engravings, along with the natural history collections of the British Museum, were the basis for the mastery of the Naturalist's Miscellany. Frederick's son, Richard P. Nodder, a gifted animal painter in his own right, was distinguished as botanic painter to King George III. At the time of its creation, The Naturalist's Miscellany was highly coveted as a definitive natural history offering, and as was the custom, the work was issued in installments between 1790 and 1813. Each volume was dedicated by permission and dutifully inscribed to the most devoted patrons and contributors of the natural historical pursuits of eighteenth and early nineteenth century Britain: Queen Charlotte, Sir Joseph Banks, Thomas Pennant, Esq. The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, The Trustees of the British Museum, to name a few. (Andrews,1986, Blunt 151,Coats, 25, Sitwell FBB 142, Wood 482). Copyright: Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books, 1/09. Archivally Framed

$495.00

Plate #684. Thick-armed Gorgonia (Gorgonia Briareus)
seller photo

Plate #684. Thick-armed Gorgonia (Gorgonia Briareus)

By Shaw, George, MD, FRS, and Nodder, Frederick Polydore.

London:: G. Shaw and F.P. & E. Nodder,, 1790-1813.. First edition. Fine in original bright hand-coloring. A Fine and rare original hand-colored copperplate engraving by Frederick Polydore Nodder and/or his son Richard Polydore Nodder from The Naturalist's Miscellany. Octavo (6 x 9.5 inches, 15.24 x 24.13 cm). Includes the original text in both English and Latin by George Shaw, MD, FRS. The Naturalist's Miscellany, distinguished by the refined hand-colored copperplate engravings and astute naturalists' observations, was aptly named as a diverse naturalists' compendium of the birds, mammals, reptiles, insects, fish and crustacean identified by seventeenth and eighteenth century naturalists spanning the globe, particularly around the South Seas. Many of nature's most fascinating and unusual creatures were discovered during this period, several of which were introduced through The Naturalist's Miscellany. Doctor George Shaw, (1751-1813), Fellow of the Royal Society, cofounder of the Linnaean Society, as well as Zoologist of the British Museum, contributed the text. Publication of the Naturalist's Miscellany ceased with his death in 1813. Upon the death of the artist FP Nodder (1770-1800), his wife Elizabeth, and their son Richard Polydore Nodder (1793-1820) contributed artistically and editorially to the publication. Indeed a family affair, both Frederick Polydore Nodder and his son Richard produced every one of the plates. A gifted and distinguished naturalist, Frederick P. Nodder was the preferred Botanical Painter to Her Majesty, Queen Charlotte. His early skills as botanical and animal draughtsman and engraver were honed from his association with Sir Joseph Banks, who employed Nodder to complete and engrave the drawings from the sketchbooks of the late Sydney Parkinson. Parkinson accompanied Banks as botanical draughtsman aboard Captain James Cook's The Endeavor in 1771. Parkinson died on the return of this South Seas Voyage. These engravings, along with the natural history collections of the British Museum, were the basis for the mastery of the Naturalist's Miscellany. Frederick's son, Richard P. Nodder, a gifted animal painter in his own right, was distinguished as botanic painter to King George III. At the time of its creation, The Naturalist's Miscellany was highly coveted as a definitive natural history offering, and as was the custom, the work was issued in installments between 1790 and 1813. Each volume was dedicated by permission and dutifully inscribed to the most devoted patrons and contributors of the natural historical pursuits of eighteenth and early nineteenth century Britain: Queen Charlotte, Sir Joseph Banks, Thomas Pennant, Esq. The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, The Trustees of the British Museum, to name a few. (Andrews,1986, Blunt 151,Coats, 25, Sitwell FBB 142, Wood 482). Copyright: Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books, 1/09.

$175.00

Plate #652. The Fan Coralline (Corallina Flabellus)
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Plate #652. The Fan Coralline (Corallina Flabellus)

By Shaw, George, MD, FRS, and Nodder, Frederick Polydore.

London:: G. Shaw and F.P. & E. Nodder,, 1790-1813.. First edition. Fine in original bright hand-coloring. A Fine and rare original hand-colored copperplate engraving by Frederick Polydore Nodder and/or his son Richard Polydore Nodder from The Naturalist's Miscellany. Octavo (6 x 9.5 inches, 15.24 x 24.13 cm). Includes the original text in both English and Latin by George Shaw, MD, FRS. The Naturalist's Miscellany, distinguished by the refined hand-colored copperplate engravings and astute naturalists' observations, was aptly named as a diverse naturalists' compendium of the birds, mammals, reptiles, insects, fish and crustacean identified by seventeenth and eighteenth century naturalists spanning the globe, particularly around the South Seas. Many of nature's most fascinating and unusual creatures were discovered during this period, several of which were introduced through The Naturalist's Miscellany. Doctor George Shaw, (1751-1813), Fellow of the Royal Society, cofounder of the Linnaean Society, as well as Zoologist of the British Museum, contributed the text. Publication of the Naturalist's Miscellany ceased with his death in 1813. Upon the death of the artist FP Nodder (1770-1800), his wife Elizabeth, and their son Richard Polydore Nodder (1793-1820) contributed artistically and editorially to the publication. Indeed a family affair, both Frederick Polydore Nodder and his son Richard produced every one of the plates. A gifted and distinguished naturalist, Frederick P. Nodder was the preferred Botanical Painter to Her Majesty, Queen Charlotte. His early skills as botanical and animal draughtsman and engraver were honed from his association with Sir Joseph Banks, who employed Nodder to complete and engrave the drawings from the sketchbooks of the late Sydney Parkinson. Parkinson accompanied Banks as botanical draughtsman aboard Captain James Cook's The Endeavor in 1771. Parkinson died on the return of this South Seas Voyage. These engravings, along with the natural history collections of the British Museum, were the basis for the mastery of the Naturalist's Miscellany. Frederick's son, Richard P. Nodder, a gifted animal painter in his own right, was distinguished as botanic painter to King George III. At the time of its creation, The Naturalist's Miscellany was highly coveted as a definitive natural history offering, and as was the custom, the work was issued in installments between 1790 and 1813. Each volume was dedicated by permission and dutifully inscribed to the most devoted patrons and contributors of the natural historical pursuits of eighteenth and early nineteenth century Britain: Queen Charlotte, Sir Joseph Banks, Thomas Pennant, Esq. The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, The Trustees of the British Museum, to name a few. (Andrews,1986, Blunt 151,Coats, 25, Sitwell FBB 142, Wood 482). Copyright: Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books, 1/09.

$175.00

Plate #671. Purple Gorgonia (Gorgonia Ceratophyta)
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Plate #671. Purple Gorgonia (Gorgonia Ceratophyta)

By Shaw, George, MD, FRS, and Nodder, Frederick Polydore.

London:: G. Shaw and F.P. & E. Nodder,, 1790-1813.. First edition. Fine in original bright hand-coloring. A Fine and rare original hand-colored copperplate engraving by Frederick Polydore Nodder and/or his son Richard Polydore Nodder from The Naturalist's Miscellany. Octavo (6 x 9.5 inches, 15.24 x 24.13 cm). Includes the original text in both English and Latin by George Shaw, MD, FRS. The Naturalist's Miscellany, distinguished by the refined hand-colored copperplate engravings and astute naturalists' observations, was aptly named as a diverse naturalists' compendium of the birds, mammals, reptiles, insects, fish and crustacean identified by seventeenth and eighteenth century naturalists spanning the globe, particularly around the South Seas. Many of nature's most fascinating and unusual creatures were discovered during this period, several of which were introduced through The Naturalist's Miscellany. Doctor George Shaw, (1751-1813), Fellow of the Royal Society, cofounder of the Linnaean Society, as well as Zoologist of the British Museum, contributed the text. Publication of the Naturalist's Miscellany ceased with his death in 1813. Upon the death of the artist FP Nodder (1770-1800), his wife Elizabeth, and their son Richard Polydore Nodder (1793-1820) contributed artistically and editorially to the publication. Indeed a family affair, both Frederick Polydore Nodder and his son Richard produced every one of the plates. A gifted and distinguished naturalist, Frederick P. Nodder was the preferred Botanical Painter to Her Majesty, Queen Charlotte. His early skills as botanical and animal draughtsman and engraver were honed from his association with Sir Joseph Banks, who employed Nodder to complete and engrave the drawings from the sketchbooks of the late Sydney Parkinson. Parkinson accompanied Banks as botanical draughtsman aboard Captain James Cook's The Endeavor in 1771. Parkinson died on the return of this South Seas Voyage. These engravings, along with the natural history collections of the British Museum, were the basis for the mastery of the Naturalist's Miscellany. Frederick's son, Richard P. Nodder, a gifted animal painter in his own right, was distinguished as botanic painter to King George III. At the time of its creation, The Naturalist's Miscellany was highly coveted as a definitive natural history offering, and as was the custom, the work was issued in installments between 1790 and 1813. Each volume was dedicated by permission and dutifully inscribed to the most devoted patrons and contributors of the natural historical pursuits of eighteenth and early nineteenth century Britain: Queen Charlotte, Sir Joseph Banks, Thomas Pennant, Esq. The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, The Trustees of the British Museum, to name a few. (Andrews,1986, Blunt 151,Coats, 25, Sitwell FBB 142, Wood 482). Copyright: Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books, 1/09. Matted in Rag Board

$175.00

Plate #791.  The Cassia Butterfly (Papilio Cassiae).
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Plate #791. The Cassia Butterfly (Papilio Cassiae).

By Shaw, George, MD, FRS, and Nodder, Frederick Polydore.

London:: George Shaw and E. Nodder,, 1809.. First edition. Fine condition with original bright hand-coloring. . A Fine and rare original hand-colored copperplate engraving by Frederick Polydore Nodder and/or his son Richard Polydore Nodder from The Naturalist's Miscellany. Octavo (6 x 9.5 inches, 15.24 x 24.13 cm). Includes the original text in both English and Latin by George Shaw, MD, FRS. The Naturalist's Miscellany, distinguished by the refined hand-colored copperplate engravings and astute naturalists' observations, was aptly named as a diverse naturalists' compendium of the birds, mammals, reptiles, insects, fish and crustacean identified by seventeenth and eighteenth century naturalists spanning the globe, particularly around the South Seas. Many of nature's most fascinating and unusual creatures were discovered during this period, several of which were introduced through The Naturalist's Miscellany. Doctor George Shaw, (1751-1813), Fellow of the Royal Society, cofounder of the Linnaean Society, as well as Zoologist of the British Museum, contributed the text. Publication of the Naturalist's Miscellany ceased with his death in 1813. Upon the death of the artist FP Nodder (1770-1800), his wife Elizabeth, and their son Richard Polydore Nodder (1793-1820) contributed artistically and editorially to the publication. Indeed a family affair, both Frederick Polydore Nodder and his son Richard produced every one of the plates. A gifted and distinguished naturalist, Frederick P. Nodder was the preferred Botanical Painter to Her Majesty, Queen Charlotte. His early skills as botanical and animal draughtsman and engraver were honed from his association with Sir Joseph Banks, who employed Nodder to complete and engrave the drawings from the sketchbooks of the late Sydney Parkinson. Parkinson accompanied Banks as botanical draughtsman aboard Captain James Cook's The Endeavor in 1771. Parkinson died on the return of this South Seas Voyage. These engravings, along with the natural history collections of the British Museum, were the basis for the mastery of the Naturalist's Miscellany. Frederick's son, Richard P. Nodder, a gifted animal painter in his own right, was distinguished as botanic painter to King George III. At the time of its creation, The Naturalist's Miscellany was highly coveted as a definitive natural history offering, and as was the custom, the work was issued in installments between 1790 and 1813. Each volume was dedicated by permission and dutifully inscribed to the most devoted patrons and contributors of the natural historical pursuits of eighteenth and early nineteenth century Britain: Queen Charlotte, Sir Joseph Banks, Thomas Pennant, Esq. The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, The Trustees of the British Museum, to name a few. (Andrews,1986, Blunt 151,Coats, 25, Sitwell FBB 142, Wood 482). Copyright: Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books, 1/09.

$150.00

Plate 682 Red-Spotted Perch (Perca Maculata)
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Plate 682 Red-Spotted Perch (Perca Maculata)

By Shaw, George, MD, FRS, and Nodder, Frederick Polydore.

London:: G. Shaw and F.P. & E. Nodder,, 1790-1813.. First edition. Fine in original bright hand-coloring. A Fine and rare original hand-colored copperplate engraving by Frederick Polydore Nodder and/or his son Richard Polydore Nodder from The Naturalist's Miscellany. Octavo (6 x 9.5 inches, 15.24 x 24.13 cm). Includes the original text in both English and Latin by George Shaw, MD, FRS. The Naturalist's Miscellany, distinguished by the refined hand-colored copperplate engravings and astute naturalists' observations, was aptly named as a diverse naturalists' compendium of the birds, mammals, reptiles, insects, fish and crustacean identified by seventeenth and eighteenth century naturalists spanning the globe, particularly around the South Seas. Many of nature's most fascinating and unusual creatures were discovered during this period, several of which were introduced through The Naturalist's Miscellany. Doctor George Shaw, (1751-1813), Fellow of the Royal Society, cofounder of the Linnaean Society, as well as Zoologist of the British Museum, contributed the text. Publication of the Naturalist's Miscellany ceased with his death in 1813. Upon the death of the artist FP Nodder (1770-1800), his wife Elizabeth, and their son Richard Polydore Nodder (1793-1820) contributed artistically and editorially to the publication. Indeed a family affair, both Frederick Polydore Nodder and his son Richard produced every one of the plates. A gifted and distinguished naturalist, Frederick P. Nodder was the preferred Botanical Painter to Her Majesty, Queen Charlotte. His early skills as botanical and animal draughtsman and engraver were honed from his association with Sir Joseph Banks, who employed Nodder to complete and engrave the drawings from the sketchbooks of the late Sydney Parkinson. Parkinson accompanied Banks as botanical draughtsman aboard Captain James Cook's The Endeavor in 1771. Parkinson died on the return of this South Seas Voyage. These engravings, along with the natural history collections of the British Museum, were the basis for the mastery of the Naturalist's Miscellany. Frederick's son, Richard P. Nodder, a gifted animal painter in his own right, was distinguished as botanic painter to King George III. At the time of its creation, The Naturalist's Miscellany was highly coveted as a definitive natural history offering, and as was the custom, the work was issued in installments between 1790 and 1813. Each volume was dedicated by permission and dutifully inscribed to the most devoted patrons and contributors of the natural historical pursuits of eighteenth and early nineteenth century Britain: Queen Charlotte, Sir Joseph Banks, Thomas Pennant, Esq. The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, The Trustees of the British Museum, to name a few. (Andrews,1986, Blunt 151,Coats, 25, Sitwell FBB 142, Wood 482). Copyright: Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books, 1/09. Matted in Rag Board

$150.00

Plate 212. The Lumbriciform Lizard (Lacerta Lumbricoides)
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Plate 212. The Lumbriciform Lizard (Lacerta Lumbricoides)

By Shaw, George, MD, FRS, and Nodder, Frederick Polydore.

London:: G. Shaw and F.P. & E. Nodder,, 1790-1813.. First edition. Fine in original bright hand-coloring. A Fine and rare original hand-colored copperplate engraving by Frederick Polydore Nodder and/or his son Richard Polydore Nodder from The Naturalist's Miscellany. Octavo (6 x 9.5 inches, 15.24 x 24.13 cm). Includes the original text in both English and Latin by George Shaw, MD, FRS. The Naturalist's Miscellany, distinguished by the refined hand-colored copperplate engravings and astute naturalists' observations, was aptly named as a diverse naturalists' compendium of the birds, mammals, reptiles, insects, fish and crustacean identified by seventeenth and eighteenth century naturalists spanning the globe, particularly around the South Seas. Many of nature's most fascinating and unusual creatures were discovered during this period, several of which were introduced through The Naturalist's Miscellany. Doctor George Shaw, (1751-1813), Fellow of the Royal Society, cofounder of the Linnaean Society, as well as Zoologist of the British Museum, contributed the text. Publication of the Naturalist's Miscellany ceased with his death in 1813. Upon the death of the artist FP Nodder (1770-1800), his wife Elizabeth, and their son Richard Polydore Nodder (1793-1820) contributed artistically and editorially to the publication. Indeed a family affair, both Frederick Polydore Nodder and his son Richard produced every one of the plates. A gifted and distinguished naturalist, Frederick P. Nodder was the preferred Botanical Painter to Her Majesty, Queen Charlotte. His early skills as botanical and animal draughtsman and engraver were honed from his association with Sir Joseph Banks, who employed Nodder to complete and engrave the drawings from the sketchbooks of the late Sydney Parkinson. Parkinson accompanied Banks as botanical draughtsman aboard Captain James Cook's The Endeavor in 1771. Parkinson died on the return of this South Seas Voyage. These engravings, along with the natural history collections of the British Museum, were the basis for the mastery of the Naturalist's Miscellany. Frederick's son, Richard P. Nodder, a gifted animal painter in his own right, was distinguished as botanic painter to King George III. At the time of its creation, The Naturalist's Miscellany was highly coveted as a definitive natural history offering, and as was the custom, the work was issued in installments between 1790 and 1813. Each volume was dedicated by permission and dutifully inscribed to the most devoted patrons and contributors of the natural historical pursuits of eighteenth and early nineteenth century Britain: Queen Charlotte, Sir Joseph Banks, Thomas Pennant, Esq. The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, The Trustees of the British Museum, to name a few. (Andrews,1986, Blunt 151,Coats, 25, Sitwell FBB 142, Wood 482). Copyright: Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books, 1/09.

$125.00

Plate 723. The Orange Carp, or Orf  (Goldfish)
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Plate 723. The Orange Carp, or Orf (Goldfish)

By Shaw, George, MD, FRS, and Nodder, Frederick Polydore.

London:: G. Shaw and F.P. & E. Nodder,, 1790-1813.. First edition. Fine in original bright hand-coloring. A Fine and rare original hand-colored copperplate engraving by Frederick Polydore Nodder and/or his son Richard Polydore Nodder from The Naturalist's Miscellany. Octavo (6 x 9.5 inches, 15.24 x 24.13 cm). Includes the original text in both English and Latin by George Shaw, MD, FRS. The Naturalist's Miscellany, distinguished by the refined hand-colored copperplate engravings and astute naturalists' observations, was aptly named as a diverse naturalists' compendium of the birds, mammals, reptiles, insects, fish and crustacean identified by seventeenth and eighteenth century naturalists spanning the globe, particularly around the South Seas. Many of nature's most fascinating and unusual creatures were discovered during this period, several of which were introduced through The Naturalist's Miscellany. Doctor George Shaw, (1751-1813), Fellow of the Royal Society, cofounder of the Linnaean Society, as well as Zoologist of the British Museum, contributed the text. Publication of the Naturalist's Miscellany ceased with his death in 1813. Upon the death of the artist FP Nodder (1770-1800), his wife Elizabeth, and their son Richard Polydore Nodder (1793-1820) contributed artistically and editorially to the publication. Indeed a family affair, both Frederick Polydore Nodder and his son Richard produced every one of the plates. A gifted and distinguished naturalist, Frederick P. Nodder was the preferred Botanical Painter to Her Majesty, Queen Charlotte. His early skills as botanical and animal draughtsman and engraver were honed from his association with Sir Joseph Banks, who employed Nodder to complete and engrave the drawings from the sketchbooks of the late Sydney Parkinson. Parkinson accompanied Banks as botanical draughtsman aboard Captain James Cook's The Endeavor in 1771. Parkinson died on the return of this South Seas Voyage. These engravings, along with the natural history collections of the British Museum, were the basis for the mastery of the Naturalist's Miscellany. Frederick's son, Richard P. Nodder, a gifted animal painter in his own right, was distinguished as botanic painter to King George III. At the time of its creation, The Naturalist's Miscellany was highly coveted as a definitive natural history offering, and as was the custom, the work was issued in installments between 1790 and 1813. Each volume was dedicated by permission and dutifully inscribed to the most devoted patrons and contributors of the natural historical pursuits of eighteenth and early nineteenth century Britain: Queen Charlotte, Sir Joseph Banks, Thomas Pennant, Esq. The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, The Trustees of the British Museum, to name a few. (Andrews,1986, Blunt 151,Coats, 25, Sitwell FBB 142, Wood 482). Copyright: Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books, 1/09. Matted in Rag Board

$150.00

Plate 663. Scaly-footed Lizard (Lacerta Lepidopus)
seller photo

Plate 663. Scaly-footed Lizard (Lacerta Lepidopus)

By Shaw, George, MD, FRS, and Nodder, Frederick Polydore.

London:: G. Shaw and F.P. & E. Nodder,, 1790-1813.. First edition. Fine in original bright hand-coloring. A Fine and rare original hand-colored copperplate engraving by Frederick Polydore Nodder and/or his son Richard Polydore Nodder from The Naturalist's Miscellany. Octavo (6 x 9.5 inches, 15.24 x 24.13 cm). Includes the original text in both English and Latin by George Shaw, MD, FRS. The Naturalist's Miscellany, distinguished by the refined hand-colored copperplate engravings and astute naturalists' observations, was aptly named as a diverse naturalists' compendium of the birds, mammals, reptiles, insects, fish and crustacean identified by seventeenth and eighteenth century naturalists spanning the globe, particularly around the South Seas. Many of nature's most fascinating and unusual creatures were discovered during this period, several of which were introduced through The Naturalist's Miscellany. Doctor George Shaw, (1751-1813), Fellow of the Royal Society, cofounder of the Linnaean Society, as well as Zoologist of the British Museum, contributed the text. Publication of the Naturalist's Miscellany ceased with his death in 1813. Upon the death of the artist FP Nodder (1770-1800), his wife Elizabeth, and their son Richard Polydore Nodder (1793-1820) contributed artistically and editorially to the publication. Indeed a family affair, both Frederick Polydore Nodder and his son Richard produced every one of the plates. A gifted and distinguished naturalist, Frederick P. Nodder was the preferred Botanical Painter to Her Majesty, Queen Charlotte. His early skills as botanical and animal draughtsman and engraver were honed from his association with Sir Joseph Banks, who employed Nodder to complete and engrave the drawings from the sketchbooks of the late Sydney Parkinson. Parkinson accompanied Banks as botanical draughtsman aboard Captain James Cook's The Endeavor in 1771. Parkinson died on the return of this South Seas Voyage. These engravings, along with the natural history collections of the British Museum, were the basis for the mastery of the Naturalist's Miscellany. Frederick's son, Richard P. Nodder, a gifted animal painter in his own right, was distinguished as botanic painter to King George III. At the time of its creation, The Naturalist's Miscellany was highly coveted as a definitive natural history offering, and as was the custom, the work was issued in installments between 1790 and 1813. Each volume was dedicated by permission and dutifully inscribed to the most devoted patrons and contributors of the natural historical pursuits of eighteenth and early nineteenth century Britain: Queen Charlotte, Sir Joseph Banks, Thomas Pennant, Esq. The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, The Trustees of the British Museum, to name a few. (Andrews,1986, Blunt 151,Coats, 25, Sitwell FBB 142, Wood 482). Copyright: Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books, 1/09.

$125.00

Plate 654. The Plumierian Mackrel. (Scomber Plumieri).
seller photo

Plate 654. The Plumierian Mackrel. (Scomber Plumieri).

By Shaw, George, MD, FRS, and Nodder, Frederick Polydore.

London:: G. Shaw and F.P. & E. Nodder,, 1790-1813.. First edition. Fine in original bright hand-coloring. A Fine and rare original hand-colored copperplate engraving by Frederick Polydore Nodder and/or his son Richard Polydore Nodder from The Naturalist's Miscellany. Octavo (6 x 9.5 inches, 15.24 x 24.13 cm). Includes the original text in both English and Latin by George Shaw, MD, FRS. The Naturalist's Miscellany, distinguished by the refined hand-colored copperplate engravings and astute naturalists' observations, was aptly named as a diverse naturalists' compendium of the birds, mammals, reptiles, insects, fish and crustacean identified by seventeenth and eighteenth century naturalists spanning the globe, particularly around the South Seas. Many of nature's most fascinating and unusual creatures were discovered during this period, several of which were introduced through The Naturalist's Miscellany. Doctor George Shaw, (1751-1813), Fellow of the Royal Society, cofounder of the Linnaean Society, as well as Zoologist of the British Museum, contributed the text. Publication of the Naturalist's Miscellany ceased with his death in 1813. Upon the death of the artist FP Nodder (1770-1800), his wife Elizabeth, and their son Richard Polydore Nodder (1793-1820) contributed artistically and editorially to the publication. Indeed a family affair, both Frederick Polydore Nodder and his son Richard produced every one of the plates. A gifted and distinguished naturalist, Frederick P. Nodder was the preferred Botanical Painter to Her Majesty, Queen Charlotte. His early skills as botanical and animal draughtsman and engraver were honed from his association with Sir Joseph Banks, who employed Nodder to complete and engrave the drawings from the sketchbooks of the late Sydney Parkinson. Parkinson accompanied Banks as botanical draughtsman aboard Captain James Cook's The Endeavor in 1771. Parkinson died on the return of this South Seas Voyage. These engravings, along with the natural history collections of the British Museum, were the basis for the mastery of the Naturalist's Miscellany. Frederick's son, Richard P. Nodder, a gifted animal painter in his own right, was distinguished as botanic painter to King George III. At the time of its creation, The Naturalist's Miscellany was highly coveted as a definitive natural history offering, and as was the custom, the work was issued in installments between 1790 and 1813. Each volume was dedicated by permission and dutifully inscribed to the most devoted patrons and contributors of the natural historical pursuits of eighteenth and early nineteenth century Britain: Queen Charlotte, Sir Joseph Banks, Thomas Pennant, Esq. The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, The Trustees of the British Museum, to name a few. (Andrews,1986, Blunt 151,Coats, 25, Sitwell FBB 142, Wood 482). Copyright: Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books, 1/09. Matted in Rag Board

$150.00

Plate 758. Scarabæus Auratus (The Golden Beetle)
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Plate 758. Scarabæus Auratus (The Golden Beetle)

By Shaw, George, MD, FRS, and Nodder, Frederick Polydore.

London:: G. Shaw and F.P. & E. Nodder,, 1790-1813.. First edition. Fine in original bright hand-coloring. A Fine and rare original hand-colored copperplate engraving by Frederick Polydore Nodder and/or his son Richard Polydore Nodder from The Naturalist's Miscellany. Octavo (6 x 9.5 inches, 15.24 x 24.13 cm). Includes the original text in both English and Latin by George Shaw, MD, FRS. The Naturalist's Miscellany, distinguished by the refined hand-colored copperplate engravings and astute naturalists' observations, was aptly named as a diverse naturalists' compendium of the birds, mammals, reptiles, insects, fish and crustacean identified by seventeenth and eighteenth century naturalists spanning the globe, particularly around the South Seas. Many of nature's most fascinating and unusual creatures were discovered during this period, several of which were introduced through The Naturalist's Miscellany. Doctor George Shaw, (1751-1813), Fellow of the Royal Society, cofounder of the Linnaean Society, as well as Zoologist of the British Museum, contributed the text. Publication of the Naturalist's Miscellany ceased with his death in 1813. Upon the death of the artist FP Nodder (1770-1800), his wife Elizabeth, and their son Richard Polydore Nodder (1793-1820) contributed artistically and editorially to the publication. Indeed a family affair, both Frederick Polydore Nodder and his son Richard produced every one of the plates. A gifted and distinguished naturalist, Frederick P. Nodder was the preferred Botanical Painter to Her Majesty, Queen Charlotte. His early skills as botanical and animal draughtsman and engraver were honed from his association with Sir Joseph Banks, who employed Nodder to complete and engrave the drawings from the sketchbooks of the late Sydney Parkinson. Parkinson accompanied Banks as botanical draughtsman aboard Captain James Cook's The Endeavor in 1771. Parkinson died on the return of this South Seas Voyage. These engravings, along with the natural history collections of the British Museum, were the basis for the mastery of the Naturalist's Miscellany. Frederick's son, Richard P. Nodder, a gifted animal painter in his own right, was distinguished as botanic painter to King George III. At the time of its creation, The Naturalist's Miscellany was highly coveted as a definitive natural history offering, and as was the custom, the work was issued in installments between 1790 and 1813. Each volume was dedicated by permission and dutifully inscribed to the most devoted patrons and contributors of the natural historical pursuits of eighteenth and early nineteenth century Britain: Queen Charlotte, Sir Joseph Banks, Thomas Pennant, Esq. The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, The Trustees of the British Museum, to name a few. (Andrews,1986, Blunt 151,Coats, 25, Sitwell FBB 142, Wood 482). Copyright: Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books, 1/09.

$150.00

Plate 750. The Pagre Sparus (Sparus Pagrus)
seller photo

Plate 750. The Pagre Sparus (Sparus Pagrus)

By Shaw, George, MD, FRS, and Nodder, Frederick Polydore.

London:: G. Shaw and F.P. & E. Nodder,, 1790-1813.. First edition. Fine in original bright hand-coloring. A Fine and rare original hand-colored copperplate engraving by Frederick Polydore Nodder and/or his son Richard Polydore Nodder from The Naturalist's Miscellany. Octavo (6 x 9.5 inches, 15.24 x 24.13 cm). Includes the original text in both English and Latin by George Shaw, MD, FRS. The Naturalist's Miscellany, distinguished by the refined hand-colored copperplate engravings and astute naturalists' observations, was aptly named as a diverse naturalists' compendium of the birds, mammals, reptiles, insects, fish and crustacean identified by seventeenth and eighteenth century naturalists spanning the globe, particularly around the South Seas. Many of nature's most fascinating and unusual creatures were discovered during this period, several of which were introduced through The Naturalist's Miscellany. Doctor George Shaw, (1751-1813), Fellow of the Royal Society, cofounder of the Linnaean Society, as well as Zoologist of the British Museum, contributed the text. Publication of the Naturalist's Miscellany ceased with his death in 1813. Upon the death of the artist FP Nodder (1770-1800), his wife Elizabeth, and their son Richard Polydore Nodder (1793-1820) contributed artistically and editorially to the publication. Indeed a family affair, both Frederick Polydore Nodder and his son Richard produced every one of the plates. A gifted and distinguished naturalist, Frederick P. Nodder was the preferred Botanical Painter to Her Majesty, Queen Charlotte. His early skills as botanical and animal draughtsman and engraver were honed from his association with Sir Joseph Banks, who employed Nodder to complete and engrave the drawings from the sketchbooks of the late Sydney Parkinson. Parkinson accompanied Banks as botanical draughtsman aboard Captain James Cook's The Endeavor in 1771. Parkinson died on the return of this South Seas Voyage. These engravings, along with the natural history collections of the British Museum, were the basis for the mastery of the Naturalist's Miscellany. Frederick's son, Richard P. Nodder, a gifted animal painter in his own right, was distinguished as botanic painter to King George III. At the time of its creation, The Naturalist's Miscellany was highly coveted as a definitive natural history offering, and as was the custom, the work was issued in installments between 1790 and 1813. Each volume was dedicated by permission and dutifully inscribed to the most devoted patrons and contributors of the natural historical pursuits of eighteenth and early nineteenth century Britain: Queen Charlotte, Sir Joseph Banks, Thomas Pennant, Esq. The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, The Trustees of the British Museum, to name a few. (Andrews,1986, Blunt 151,Coats, 25, Sitwell FBB 142, Wood 482). Copyright: Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books, 1/09. Matted in Rag Board

$150.00

Plate 700 The Bifasciated Labrus (Labrus Bifasciatus)
seller photo

Plate 700 The Bifasciated Labrus (Labrus Bifasciatus)

By Shaw, George, MD, FRS, and Nodder, Frederick Polydore.

London:: G. Shaw and F.P. & E. Nodder,, 1790-1813.. First edition. Fine in original bright hand-coloring. A Fine and rare original hand-colored copperplate engraving by Frederick Polydore Nodder and/or his son Richard Polydore Nodder from The Naturalist's Miscellany. Octavo (6 x 9.5 inches, 15.24 x 24.13 cm). Includes the original text in both English and Latin by George Shaw, MD, FRS. The Naturalist's Miscellany, distinguished by the refined hand-colored copperplate engravings and astute naturalists' observations, was aptly named as a diverse naturalists' compendium of the birds, mammals, reptiles, insects, fish and crustacean identified by seventeenth and eighteenth century naturalists spanning the globe, particularly around the South Seas. Many of nature's most fascinating and unusual creatures were discovered during this period, several of which were introduced through The Naturalist's Miscellany. Doctor George Shaw, (1751-1813), Fellow of the Royal Society, cofounder of the Linnaean Society, as well as Zoologist of the British Museum, contributed the text. Publication of the Naturalist's Miscellany ceased with his death in 1813. Upon the death of the artist FP Nodder (1770-1800), his wife Elizabeth, and their son Richard Polydore Nodder (1793-1820) contributed artistically and editorially to the publication. Indeed a family affair, both Frederick Polydore Nodder and his son Richard produced every one of the plates. A gifted and distinguished naturalist, Frederick P. Nodder was the preferred Botanical Painter to Her Majesty, Queen Charlotte. His early skills as botanical and animal draughtsman and engraver were honed from his association with Sir Joseph Banks, who employed Nodder to complete and engrave the drawings from the sketchbooks of the late Sydney Parkinson. Parkinson accompanied Banks as botanical draughtsman aboard Captain James Cook's The Endeavor in 1771. Parkinson died on the return of this South Seas Voyage. These engravings, along with the natural history collections of the British Museum, were the basis for the mastery of the Naturalist's Miscellany. Frederick's son, Richard P. Nodder, a gifted animal painter in his own right, was distinguished as botanic painter to King George III. At the time of its creation, The Naturalist's Miscellany was highly coveted as a definitive natural history offering, and as was the custom, the work was issued in installments between 1790 and 1813. Each volume was dedicated by permission and dutifully inscribed to the most devoted patrons and contributors of the natural historical pursuits of eighteenth and early nineteenth century Britain: Queen Charlotte, Sir Joseph Banks, Thomas Pennant, Esq. The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, The Trustees of the British Museum, to name a few. (Andrews,1986, Blunt 151,Coats, 25, Sitwell FBB 142, Wood 482). Copyright: Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books, 1/09. Matted in Rag Board

$150.00

Plate 762. The Brasilian Labrus. (Labrus Brasiliensis).
seller photo

Plate 762. The Brasilian Labrus. (Labrus Brasiliensis).

By Shaw, George, MD, FRS, and Nodder, Frederick Polydore.

London:: G. Shaw and F.P. & E. Nodder,, 1790-1813.. First edition. Fine in original bright hand-coloring. A Fine and rare original hand-colored copperplate engraving by Frederick Polydore Nodder and/or his son Richard Polydore Nodder from The Naturalist's Miscellany. Octavo (6 x 9.5 inches, 15.24 x 24.13 cm). Includes the original text in both English and Latin by George Shaw, MD, FRS. The Naturalist's Miscellany, distinguished by the refined hand-colored copperplate engravings and astute naturalists' observations, was aptly named as a diverse naturalists' compendium of the birds, mammals, reptiles, insects, fish and crustacean identified by seventeenth and eighteenth century naturalists spanning the globe, particularly around the South Seas. Many of nature's most fascinating and unusual creatures were discovered during this period, several of which were introduced through The Naturalist's Miscellany. Doctor George Shaw, (1751-1813), Fellow of the Royal Society, cofounder of the Linnaean Society, as well as Zoologist of the British Museum, contributed the text. Publication of the Naturalist's Miscellany ceased with his death in 1813. Upon the death of the artist FP Nodder (1770-1800), his wife Elizabeth, and their son Richard Polydore Nodder (1793-1820) contributed artistically and editorially to the publication. Indeed a family affair, both Frederick Polydore Nodder and his son Richard produced every one of the plates. A gifted and distinguished naturalist, Frederick P. Nodder was the preferred Botanical Painter to Her Majesty, Queen Charlotte. His early skills as botanical and animal draughtsman and engraver were honed from his association with Sir Joseph Banks, who employed Nodder to complete and engrave the drawings from the sketchbooks of the late Sydney Parkinson. Parkinson accompanied Banks as botanical draughtsman aboard Captain James Cook's The Endeavor in 1771. Parkinson died on the return of this South Seas Voyage. These engravings, along with the natural history collections of the British Museum, were the basis for the mastery of the Naturalist's Miscellany. Frederick's son, Richard P. Nodder, a gifted animal painter in his own right, was distinguished as botanic painter to King George III. At the time of its creation, The Naturalist's Miscellany was highly coveted as a definitive natural history offering, and as was the custom, the work was issued in installments between 1790 and 1813. Each volume was dedicated by permission and dutifully inscribed to the most devoted patrons and contributors of the natural historical pursuits of eighteenth and early nineteenth century Britain: Queen Charlotte, Sir Joseph Banks, Thomas Pennant, Esq. The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, The Trustees of the British Museum, to name a few. (Andrews,1986, Blunt 151,Coats, 25, Sitwell FBB 142, Wood 482). Copyright: Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books, 1/09. Matted in Rag Board

$150.00

Plate 755. The Fasciated Sparus (Sparus Fasciatus)
seller photo

Plate 755. The Fasciated Sparus (Sparus Fasciatus)

By Shaw, George, MD, FRS, and Nodder, Frederick Polydore.

London:: G. Shaw and F.P. & E. Nodder,, 1790-1813.. First edition. Fine in original bright hand-coloring. A Fine and rare original hand-colored copperplate engraving by Frederick Polydore Nodder and/or his son Richard Polydore Nodder from The Naturalist's Miscellany. Octavo (6 x 9.5 inches, 15.24 x 24.13 cm). Includes the original text in both English and Latin by George Shaw, MD, FRS. The Naturalist's Miscellany, distinguished by the refined hand-colored copperplate engravings and astute naturalists' observations, was aptly named as a diverse naturalists' compendium of the birds, mammals, reptiles, insects, fish and crustacean identified by seventeenth and eighteenth century naturalists spanning the globe, particularly around the South Seas. Many of nature's most fascinating and unusual creatures were discovered during this period, several of which were introduced through The Naturalist's Miscellany. Doctor George Shaw, (1751-1813), Fellow of the Royal Society, cofounder of the Linnaean Society, as well as Zoologist of the British Museum, contributed the text. Publication of the Naturalist's Miscellany ceased with his death in 1813. Upon the death of the artist FP Nodder (1770-1800), his wife Elizabeth, and their son Richard Polydore Nodder (1793-1820) contributed artistically and editorially to the publication. Indeed a family affair, both Frederick Polydore Nodder and his son Richard produced every one of the plates. A gifted and distinguished naturalist, Frederick P. Nodder was the preferred Botanical Painter to Her Majesty, Queen Charlotte. His early skills as botanical and animal draughtsman and engraver were honed from his association with Sir Joseph Banks, who employed Nodder to complete and engrave the drawings from the sketchbooks of the late Sydney Parkinson. Parkinson accompanied Banks as botanical draughtsman aboard Captain James Cook's The Endeavor in 1771. Parkinson died on the return of this South Seas Voyage. These engravings, along with the natural history collections of the British Museum, were the basis for the mastery of the Naturalist's Miscellany. Frederick's son, Richard P. Nodder, a gifted animal painter in his own right, was distinguished as botanic painter to King George III. At the time of its creation, The Naturalist's Miscellany was highly coveted as a definitive natural history offering, and as was the custom, the work was issued in installments between 1790 and 1813. Each volume was dedicated by permission and dutifully inscribed to the most devoted patrons and contributors of the natural historical pursuits of eighteenth and early nineteenth century Britain: Queen Charlotte, Sir Joseph Banks, Thomas Pennant, Esq. The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, The Trustees of the British Museum, to name a few. (Andrews,1986, Blunt 151,Coats, 25, Sitwell FBB 142, Wood 482). Copyright: Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books, 1/09. Matted in Rag Board

$150.00

Plate 778. Apua Bodian (Bodianus Apua)
seller photo

Plate 778. Apua Bodian (Bodianus Apua)

By Shaw, George, MD, FRS, and Nodder, Frederick Polydore.

London:: G. Shaw and F.P. & E. Nodder,, 1790-1813.. First edition. Fine in original bright hand-coloring. A Fine and rare original hand-colored copperplate engraving by Frederick Polydore Nodder and/or his son Richard Polydore Nodder from The Naturalist's Miscellany. Octavo (6 x 9.5 inches, 15.24 x 24.13 cm). Includes the original text in both English and Latin by George Shaw, MD, FRS. The Naturalist's Miscellany, distinguished by the refined hand-colored copperplate engravings and astute naturalists' observations, was aptly named as a diverse naturalists' compendium of the birds, mammals, reptiles, insects, fish and crustacean identified by seventeenth and eighteenth century naturalists spanning the globe, particularly around the South Seas. Many of nature's most fascinating and unusual creatures were discovered during this period, several of which were introduced through The Naturalist's Miscellany. Doctor George Shaw, (1751-1813), Fellow of the Royal Society, cofounder of the Linnaean Society, as well as Zoologist of the British Museum, contributed the text. Publication of the Naturalist's Miscellany ceased with his death in 1813. Upon the death of the artist FP Nodder (1770-1800), his wife Elizabeth, and their son Richard Polydore Nodder (1793-1820) contributed artistically and editorially to the publication. Indeed a family affair, both Frederick Polydore Nodder and his son Richard produced every one of the plates. A gifted and distinguished naturalist, Frederick P. Nodder was the preferred Botanical Painter to Her Majesty, Queen Charlotte. His early skills as botanical and animal draughtsman and engraver were honed from his association with Sir Joseph Banks, who employed Nodder to complete and engrave the drawings from the sketchbooks of the late Sydney Parkinson. Parkinson accompanied Banks as botanical draughtsman aboard Captain James Cook's The Endeavor in 1771. Parkinson died on the return of this South Seas Voyage. These engravings, along with the natural history collections of the British Museum, were the basis for the mastery of the Naturalist's Miscellany. Frederick's son, Richard P. Nodder, a gifted animal painter in his own right, was distinguished as botanic painter to King George III. At the time of its creation, The Naturalist's Miscellany was highly coveted as a definitive natural history offering, and as was the custom, the work was issued in installments between 1790 and 1813. Each volume was dedicated by permission and dutifully inscribed to the most devoted patrons and contributors of the natural historical pursuits of eighteenth and early nineteenth century Britain: Queen Charlotte, Sir Joseph Banks, Thomas Pennant, Esq. The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, The Trustees of the British Museum, to name a few. (Andrews,1986, Blunt 151,Coats, 25, Sitwell FBB 142, Wood 482). Copyright: Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books, 1/09. Matted in Rag Board

$150.00

Plate 652 The Black-Finned Sparus (Sparus Melanopterus)
seller photo

Plate 652 The Black-Finned Sparus (Sparus Melanopterus)

By Shaw, George, MD, FRS, and Nodder, Frederick Polydore.

London:: G. Shaw and F.P. & E. Nodder,, 1790-1813.. First edition. Fine in original bright hand-coloring. A Fine and rare original hand-colored copperplate engraving by Frederick Polydore Nodder and/or his son Richard Polydore Nodder from The Naturalist's Miscellany. Octavo (6 x 9.5 inches, 15.24 x 24.13 cm). Includes the original text in both English and Latin by George Shaw, MD, FRS. The Naturalist's Miscellany, distinguished by the refined hand-colored copperplate engravings and astute naturalists' observations, was aptly named as a diverse naturalists' compendium of the birds, mammals, reptiles, insects, fish and crustacean identified by seventeenth and eighteenth century naturalists spanning the globe, particularly around the South Seas. Many of nature's most fascinating and unusual creatures were discovered during this period, several of which were introduced through The Naturalist's Miscellany. Doctor George Shaw, (1751-1813), Fellow of the Royal Society, cofounder of the Linnaean Society, as well as Zoologist of the British Museum, contributed the text. Publication of the Naturalist's Miscellany ceased with his death in 1813. Upon the death of the artist FP Nodder (1770-1800), his wife Elizabeth, and their son Richard Polydore Nodder (1793-1820) contributed artistically and editorially to the publication. Indeed a family affair, both Frederick Polydore Nodder and his son Richard produced every one of the plates. A gifted and distinguished naturalist, Frederick P. Nodder was the preferred Botanical Painter to Her Majesty, Queen Charlotte. His early skills as botanical and animal draughtsman and engraver were honed from his association with Sir Joseph Banks, who employed Nodder to complete and engrave the drawings from the sketchbooks of the late Sydney Parkinson. Parkinson accompanied Banks as botanical draughtsman aboard Captain James Cook's The Endeavor in 1771. Parkinson died on the return of this South Seas Voyage. These engravings, along with the natural history collections of the British Museum, were the basis for the mastery of the Naturalist's Miscellany. Frederick's son, Richard P. Nodder, a gifted animal painter in his own right, was distinguished as botanic painter to King George III. At the time of its creation, The Naturalist's Miscellany was highly coveted as a definitive natural history offering, and as was the custom, the work was issued in installments between 1790 and 1813. Each volume was dedicated by permission and dutifully inscribed to the most devoted patrons and contributors of the natural historical pursuits of eighteenth and early nineteenth century Britain: Queen Charlotte, Sir Joseph Banks, Thomas Pennant, Esq. The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, The Trustees of the British Museum, to name a few. (Andrews,1986, Blunt 151,Coats, 25, Sitwell FBB 142, Wood 482). Copyright: Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books, 1/09. Matted in Rag Board

$150.00

Plate 746. The Spotted Surmullet (Mullus Maculatus)
seller photo

Plate 746. The Spotted Surmullet (Mullus Maculatus)

By Shaw, George, MD, FRS, and Nodder, Frederick Polydore.

London:: G. Shaw and F.P. & E. Nodder,, 1790-1813.. First edition. Fine in original bright hand-coloring. A Fine and rare original hand-colored copperplate engraving by Frederick Polydore Nodder and/or his son Richard Polydore Nodder from The Naturalist's Miscellany. Octavo (6 x 9.5 inches, 15.24 x 24.13 cm). Includes the original text in both English and Latin by George Shaw, MD, FRS. The Naturalist's Miscellany, distinguished by the refined hand-colored copperplate engravings and astute naturalists' observations, was aptly named as a diverse naturalists' compendium of the birds, mammals, reptiles, insects, fish and crustacean identified by seventeenth and eighteenth century naturalists spanning the globe, particularly around the South Seas. Many of nature's most fascinating and unusual creatures were discovered during this period, several of which were introduced through The Naturalist's Miscellany. Doctor George Shaw, (1751-1813), Fellow of the Royal Society, cofounder of the Linnaean Society, as well as Zoologist of the British Museum, contributed the text. Publication of the Naturalist's Miscellany ceased with his death in 1813. Upon the death of the artist FP Nodder (1770-1800), his wife Elizabeth, and their son Richard Polydore Nodder (1793-1820) contributed artistically and editorially to the publication. Indeed a family affair, both Frederick Polydore Nodder and his son Richard produced every one of the plates. A gifted and distinguished naturalist, Frederick P. Nodder was the preferred Botanical Painter to Her Majesty, Queen Charlotte. His early skills as botanical and animal draughtsman and engraver were honed from his association with Sir Joseph Banks, who employed Nodder to complete and engrave the drawings from the sketchbooks of the late Sydney Parkinson. Parkinson accompanied Banks as botanical draughtsman aboard Captain James Cook's The Endeavor in 1771. Parkinson died on the return of this South Seas Voyage. These engravings, along with the natural history collections of the British Museum, were the basis for the mastery of the Naturalist's Miscellany. Frederick's son, Richard P. Nodder, a gifted animal painter in his own right, was distinguished as botanic painter to King George III. At the time of its creation, The Naturalist's Miscellany was highly coveted as a definitive natural history offering, and as was the custom, the work was issued in installments between 1790 and 1813. Each volume was dedicated by permission and dutifully inscribed to the most devoted patrons and contributors of the natural historical pursuits of eighteenth and early nineteenth century Britain: Queen Charlotte, Sir Joseph Banks, Thomas Pennant, Esq. The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, The Trustees of the British Museum, to name a few. (Andrews,1986, Blunt 151,Coats, 25, Sitwell FBB 142, Wood 482). Copyright: Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books, 1/09. Matted in Rag Board

$150.00

Plate 759. The Guttulated Labrus (Labrus Guttulatus).
seller photo

Plate 759. The Guttulated Labrus (Labrus Guttulatus).

By Shaw, George, MD, FRS, and Nodder, Frederick Polydore.

London:: G. Shaw and F.P. & E. Nodder,, 1790-1813.. First edition. Fine in original bright hand-coloring. A Fine and rare original hand-colored copperplate engraving by Frederick Polydore Nodder and/or his son Richard Polydore Nodder from The Naturalist's Miscellany. Octavo (6 x 9.5 inches, 15.24 x 24.13 cm). Includes the original text in both English and Latin by George Shaw, MD, FRS. The Naturalist's Miscellany, distinguished by the refined hand-colored copperplate engravings and astute naturalists' observations, was aptly named as a diverse naturalists' compendium of the birds, mammals, reptiles, insects, fish and crustacean identified by seventeenth and eighteenth century naturalists spanning the globe, particularly around the South Seas. Many of nature's most fascinating and unusual creatures were discovered during this period, several of which were introduced through The Naturalist's Miscellany. Doctor George Shaw, (1751-1813), Fellow of the Royal Society, cofounder of the Linnaean Society, as well as Zoologist of the British Museum, contributed the text. Publication of the Naturalist's Miscellany ceased with his death in 1813. Upon the death of the artist FP Nodder (1770-1800), his wife Elizabeth, and their son Richard Polydore Nodder (1793-1820) contributed artistically and editorially to the publication. Indeed a family affair, both Frederick Polydore Nodder and his son Richard produced every one of the plates. A gifted and distinguished naturalist, Frederick P. Nodder was the preferred Botanical Painter to Her Majesty, Queen Charlotte. His early skills as botanical and animal draughtsman and engraver were honed from his association with Sir Joseph Banks, who employed Nodder to complete and engrave the drawings from the sketchbooks of the late Sydney Parkinson. Parkinson accompanied Banks as botanical draughtsman aboard Captain James Cook's The Endeavor in 1771. Parkinson died on the return of this South Seas Voyage. These engravings, along with the natural history collections of the British Museum, were the basis for the mastery of the Naturalist's Miscellany. Frederick's son, Richard P. Nodder, a gifted animal painter in his own right, was distinguished as botanic painter to King George III. At the time of its creation, The Naturalist's Miscellany was highly coveted as a definitive natural history offering, and as was the custom, the work was issued in installments between 1790 and 1813. Each volume was dedicated by permission and dutifully inscribed to the most devoted patrons and contributors of the natural historical pursuits of eighteenth and early nineteenth century Britain: Queen Charlotte, Sir Joseph Banks, Thomas Pennant, Esq. The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, The Trustees of the British Museum, to name a few. (Andrews,1986, Blunt 151,Coats, 25, Sitwell FBB 142, Wood 482). Copyright: Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books, 1/09. Matted in Rag Board

$150.00

Plate 89. The Single-striped Lizard (Lacerta Unistriata)
seller photo

Plate 89. The Single-striped Lizard (Lacerta Unistriata)

By Shaw, George, MD, FRS, and Nodder, Frederick Polydore.

London:: G. Shaw and F.P. & E. Nodder,, 1790-1813.. First edition. Fine in original bright hand-coloring. A Fine and rare original hand-colored copperplate engraving by Frederick Polydore Nodder and/or his son Richard Polydore Nodder from The Naturalist's Miscellany. Octavo (6 x 9.5 inches, 15.24 x 24.13 cm). Includes the original text in both English and Latin by George Shaw, MD, FRS. The Naturalist's Miscellany, distinguished by the refined hand-colored copperplate engravings and astute naturalists' observations, was aptly named as a diverse naturalists' compendium of the birds, mammals, reptiles, insects, fish and crustacean identified by seventeenth and eighteenth century naturalists spanning the globe, particularly around the South Seas. Many of nature's most fascinating and unusual creatures were discovered during this period, several of which were introduced through The Naturalist's Miscellany. Doctor George Shaw, (1751-1813), Fellow of the Royal Society, cofounder of the Linnaean Society, as well as Zoologist of the British Museum, contributed the text. Publication of the Naturalist's Miscellany ceased with his death in 1813. Upon the death of the artist FP Nodder (1770-1800), his wife Elizabeth, and their son Richard Polydore Nodder (1793-1820) contributed artistically and editorially to the publication. Indeed a family affair, both Frederick Polydore Nodder and his son Richard produced every one of the plates. A gifted and distinguished naturalist, Frederick P. Nodder was the preferred Botanical Painter to Her Majesty, Queen Charlotte. His early skills as botanical and animal draughtsman and engraver were honed from his association with Sir Joseph Banks, who employed Nodder to complete and engrave the drawings from the sketchbooks of the late Sydney Parkinson. Parkinson accompanied Banks as botanical draughtsman aboard Captain James Cook's The Endeavor in 1771. Parkinson died on the return of this South Seas Voyage. These engravings, along with the natural history collections of the British Museum, were the basis for the mastery of the Naturalist's Miscellany. Frederick's son, Richard P. Nodder, a gifted animal painter in his own right, was distinguished as botanic painter to King George III. At the time of its creation, The Naturalist's Miscellany was highly coveted as a definitive natural history offering, and as was the custom, the work was issued in installments between 1790 and 1813. Each volume was dedicated by permission and dutifully inscribed to the most devoted patrons and contributors of the natural historical pursuits of eighteenth and early nineteenth century Britain: Queen Charlotte, Sir Joseph Banks, Thomas Pennant, Esq. The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, The Trustees of the British Museum, to name a few. (Andrews,1986, Blunt 151,Coats, 25, Sitwell FBB 142, Wood 482). Copyright: Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books, 1/09.

$125.00

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