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A Dictionary of Theatre Anthropology: The Secret Art of the Performer
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A Dictionary of Theatre Anthropology: The Secret Art of the Performer

By Eugenio Barba; Nicola Savarese

Routledge, 2005. Has a couple of labels on the cover, otherwise in very nice condition.. 2nd. Soft Cover. Very Good +.

$36.95

Theater. Gustav Gründgens Inszeniert

By Rosemarie Clausen

Hamburg: Christian Wegener, 1960. Some sunning on cover, otherwise in nice condition.. Not Indicated. Hard Cover. Very Good. Illus. by b/w Photos.

$39.95

Sweet Chariot

By Margaret Barton Driggs

Palmetto Play Service, 1997. First Edition. Soft Cover. Fine.

$47.95

Grandma, Pray for Me

By Nishan Parlakian

Council on Natl Literature, 1990. Some light sunning on cover, otherwise in very nice condition.. Not Indicated. Soft Cover. Near Fine +.

$21.95

Rodgers & Hammerstein's Cinderella: Libretto - Vocal Book

By Richard Rodgers / Oscar Hammerstein

NY: R & H Theatricals, 1981. Not Indicated. Soft Cover. Fine.

$39.95

Yours, Anne: Libretto - Vocal Book

By Enid Futterman & Michael Cohen

NY: R & H Theatricals, 1980. Not Indicated. Spiral Bound. Very Good.

$39.95

Jerome Robbins' Broadway Souvenir Program

By No Author

NY: Dewynters , 1989. Not Indicated. Soft Cover. Near Fine. Illus. by Color Photos.

$24.95

Into the Woods Souvenir Program

By No Author

NY: David Strong Warner, 1987. Includes page of Into the Woods stickers. Some minor creases on cover, otherwise in nice condition.. Not Indicated. Soft Cover. Very Good. Illus. by Color & b/w Photos.

$39.95

Benefactors: A Play in Two Acts

By Frayn, Michael

Methuen, 1986. Book Club (BCE/BOMC) edition. Synopsis: won the Standard, Plays and Players and Laurence Olivier awards for the Best Play of 1984. Spanning fifteen years this complex, well-structured play traces the story of the destruction of David's architectural dream by the embittered Colin and Colin's marriage to the inept Sheila, contrasting those who help and those who are helped; those who create and those who destroy. '. . . a beautifully crafted play, economically written.' Time Out. Not Indicated. Hard Cover. Fine/Fine.

$14.95

Single Spies and Talking Heads

By Bennet, Alan

Summit Books, 1990. Not Indicated. Hard Cover. Fine/Near Fine.

$19.95

Home

By Williams, Samm-Art

Garden City, New York: Nelson Doubleday, Inc., 1978. Synopsis: The action begins on the small farm in South Carolina that Cephus Miles, an orphan, has inherited from his family. Young and strong, he is content to work the landuntil his childhood sweetheart rejects him and goes off to college. Not believing in the Vietnam war, Cephus is imprisoned as a draft evader for refusing to serve. By the time he is released, Cephus has lost his land to the tax collector so he heads north to build a new life. With a good job and a slinky new girlfriend, he finds the big city exciting and rewarding. But soon after, the dream begins to fadeCephus loses his job and becomes involved in drugs and prostitution. Pulling himself together, he returns to South Carolina and settles back on the land with his old sweetheart. Despite all, he has never lost his joyous goodwill, his indomitable spirit and the conviction that one day his quest for fulfillment will be rewarded.. Book Club (BCE/BOMC). Hard Cover. Fine/Fine.

$14.95

Frankie and Johnny in the Clair De Lune

By McNally, Terrence

Garden City, New York: The Fireside Theatre, 1988. By FRANK RICH Published: October 28, 1987, Wednesday LEAD: WHEN we first meet the title characters of Terrence McNally's provocative new play, ''Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune,'' they are grunting through an orgasm on a Murphy bed in a dreary Hell's Kitchen walk-up. But Frankie (Kathy Bates) and Johnny (Kenneth Welsh) are hardly sweethearts. They are fellow employees of a greasy spoon -she a waitress, he a recently hired short-order cook - and this is their first and quite possibly their last date. WHEN we first meet the title characters of Terrence McNally's provocative new play, ''Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune,'' they are grunting through an orgasm on a Murphy bed in a dreary Hell's Kitchen walk-up. But Frankie (Kathy Bates) and Johnny (Kenneth Welsh) are hardly sweethearts. They are fellow employees of a greasy spoon -she a waitress, he a recently hired short-order cook - and this is their first and quite possibly their last date. They've been to a movie. They've made small talk. Now they've had sex. What else can they give one another? As the couple's panting subsides, Frankie hopes only that Johnny will get dressed and get out so she can resume her usual nightly ritual of watching television and eating ice cream in peace. Yet Johnny refuses to leave. A nonstop talker and meddler, he repeatedly proclaims his undying love for the dumpy, sarcastic waitress even as she rudely mocks his ludicrously overblown compliments and points him toward the door. The exasperated Frankie thinks Johnny is ''too needy'' and worries he may be a creep. ''You just don't decide to fall in love with people out of the blue,'' she says. Johnny argues back that Frankie, much wounded by other men, is simply too fearful of rejection to accept true affection when it comes her way. ''Pretend we're the only two people in the world,'' he says, insisting that he and Frankie, both middle-aged and ''not beautiful,'' have only this one last chance ''to connect.'' Should they fail to seize the moment, they'll never know more than the isolation and loneliness that already is their lot - a life of merely ''bumping into bodies.'' ''Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune,'' which opens the main-stage season of the Manhattan Theater Club, has the timeless structure of romantic comedies: Will there be a second night to this odd couple's problematic one-night-stand? As one expects from Mr. McNally, the author of ''Bad Habits'' and ''It's Only a Play,'' the evening often floats by on bright and funny conversation, some of it dotted, however parenthetically, with jaundiced references to show business (''The Sound of Music,'' ''Looking for Mr. Goodbar,'' Kathleen Turner). But there has always been another side to Mr. McNally's highly lacquered sophistication: even his raucous gay-bath sex farce, ''The Ritz,'' had something poignant to say about transitory romantic attachments. In ''Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune,'' the playwright examines his characters' connections with a new forthrightness and maturity, and it's just possible that, in the process, he's written the most serious play yet about intimacy in the age of AIDS. To be sure, ''Frankie and Johnny'' is not about AIDS per se. There is only one vague reference to the disease, and its characters do not belong to high-risk groups. Still, there's a pointed end-of-the-world feel to James Noone's drab tenement set and to the blank, Edward Hopper-esque solitude of the couple's existence. Mr. McNally seems to be taking stock of what's really important in a society where life can be ''cheap and short,'' where sexual marauding can no longer pass as its own reward, where emotional defenses are so well fortified that human contact is harder to achieve than ever. The persistent, nosy Johnny is as obnoxious a suitor as Frankie says he is - he's the kind of guy who picks at any visible scab - but his relentless battering does make her and us think about how much of love is fleeting chemistry and how much is merely a willingness to overcome the inertia of detachment and engage in hard work. Perhaps Johnny is right when he says his and Frankie's only hope is that they somehow forget ''the million reasons they don't love each other'' and build instead on the few reasons that did bring them together, if only for an hour and by chance, on one desperate moonlit night. Perhaps, too, the durability of their bond will have less to do with their various similarities and differences of personality than with their ability to remember the ''music'' of their first, hungry romantic passion. Music - from that alluded to in the title to bits of Bach, Wagner and Frederick Loewe - figures throughout ''Frankie and Johnny.'' The play's offstage third character is a pretentious FM disk jockey who would ''still like to believe in love.'' Mr. McNally may or may not still believe in love himself, but he has dexterously managed to avoid the tragic denouement of folklore's Frankie and Johnny (and of his last and thematically related play, ''The Lisbon Traviata'') as well as the guaranteed happy endings of boulevard comedies. In ''Frankie and Johnny,'' it's enough of a victory for the hero and heroine to share un-self-consciously the intimate domestic activity of brushing their teeth. But if the playwright avoids the trap of reaching for a definitive final curtain, he sometimes exerts too firm a controlling hand along the way. The hash-slinging characters both seem like second-hand William Inge-style Middle Americans - as if they were archetypal figures contrived to enact a parable rather than people drawn freely from life. Sometimes their credibility is further compromised by their slips into knowing badinage reminiscent of Mr. McNally's upscale Manhattanites. Under the fine direction of Paul Benedict, two excellent actors supply the spontaneity and conviction needed to override the moments of contrivance in their roles. Mr. Welsh keeps us guessing as to whether Johnny is merely sickeningly sincere or a weirdo, finally allowing us to see and understand all the pieces of a complex, damaged man. While Ms. Bates's Frankie superficially resembles the suicidal daughter she played in '' 'Night, Mother,'' the actress creates a wholly new character - a tough waitress whose wisecracks mask not a sentimental heart but an unsparing vision of the world. When Johnny tells her that he's a romantic who likes seeing things in a shadowy light, she typically snaps back that his idea of romance is her idea of ''hiding something.'' As it happens, we can understand both points of view in a play that brings fresh illumination to the latest phases of that old lovers' moon. AFTER SEX, WHAT? - FRANKIE AND JOHNNY IN THE CLAIR DE LUNE, by Terrence McNally; directed by Paul Benedict; sets by James Noone; costumes by David Woolard; lighting by David Noling; sound by John Gromada; production stage manager, Pamela Singer. Presented by the Manhattan Theater Club, Lynne Meadow, artistic director; Barry Grove, managing director. At Stage 1, City Center, 131 West 55th Street. Frankie...Kathy Bates Johnny...Kenneth Welsh . Book Club (BCE/BOMC). Hard Cover. Fine/Fine. Illus. by Some B/W Photos.

$8.95

Theatre World Season 1946-1947

By Daniel Blum

Chilton Book Company, 1947. Biographies of 1946-1947 casts, obituaries, Tony awards, Theatre World award winning promising personalities of the year. Index, profusely illustrated b/w photos. Details of plays, casts. Some edge tears on jacket, otherwise in nice condition.. Not Indicated. Hard Cover. Very Good +/Very Good -. Illus. by b/w Photos.

$29.95

The American Stage: Social and Economic Issues from the Colonial Period to the Present
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The American Stage: Social and Economic Issues from the Colonial Period to the Present

By Engle, Ron

Cambridge Univ Pr, 1993. Review "As we contend with the impending death of the NEA and NEH, The American Stage becomes a timely and telling collection of essays. As these authors cogently demonstrate, theatre is neither "a plaything of the elite" nor a product of a select group of artists who want to parade around the stage to live out their darkest fantasies." Theatre Survey Volume 36:2 "...not only a valuable resource for students interested in 'how economic and social forces have shaped the American theatre in its 250-year history' but a fascinating historical document in its own right." Richard Wattenberg, Essays in Theatre "...informative collection of 20 essays, written by some of the eminent authorities in various fields...a book that students of theater and popular culture in general will want to read." Ray Browne, Journal of American Culture "...a fascinating volume in its diversity of subject and approach and one that every serious student of American theatre should read and every library should own." Mary Henderson, Broadside Newsletter "All in all, The American Stage is an enjoyable read whether taken as a whole or taken chapter-by-chapter according to interest. Recommended for all who are involved in serious theatre research or simply curious about the colorful history of the American theatre." Alma J. Bennett, Journal of American Culture Product Description This is the first book to focus on the economic and social forces that shaped American theater throughout its two hundred and fifty year history. The collection of essays, written by leading theater historians and critics of American theater, represent a variety of methodologies and approaches. Arranged chronologically, the volume explores such topics as anti-theatrical legislation in Colonial America; the theater's response to slavery, prostitution, alcoholism, and women's rights; the significance of Black American musical comedy; women managers in nineteenth-century American theater; economic welfare in the Federal Theater Project; theater nostalgia during the Reagan era; and contemporary issues of multiculturalism in today's theater. This book will be of interest to scholars and students of American theater and social and cultural history. A few tears on jacket, otherwise in very nice conditron.. First Edition.. Hard Cover. Fine/Very Good -.

$21.95

Plays by Tom Robertson
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Plays by Tom Robertson

By Tydeman, William

Cambridge Univ Pr, 1982. 'After years of sham heroics and superhuman balderdash, Caste delighted everyone by its freshness, its nature, its humanity.' Thus, after watching a revival in 1897, did Shaw generously recognize the impact made thirty years earlier by Tom Robertson's best-known play. Yet, in spite of the acknowledged importance of these seminal dramas, they are not easily accessible in print, and this edition therefore comprises four of Robertson's most successful comedies: Society (1865), Ours (1866), Caste (1867) and School (1869). Beginning his career as a theatrical hack-of-all-trades, Robertson ultimately found his niche with the Bancrofts at the Prince of Wales's Theatre, establishing a vogue for comedies of everyday Victorian life, and creating vehicles for casts whose particular talents he learnt to exploit. The playwright's distinctive trademarks - fairytale contrivance and domestic realism, tender romance and mild debunking of convention - offered a refreshing change from the prevailing genres of burlesque and melodrama. William Tydeman's substantial introduction follows each phase of Robertson's creative development, stressing the historical significance of his works as well as their intrinsic merits as drama. Book Description This edition comprises four of Robertson's most successful comedies: Society (1865), Ours (1866), Caste (1867) and School (1869). Beginning his career as a theatrical hack-of-all-trades, Robertson ultimately found his niche with the Bancrofts at the Prince of Wales's Theatre, establishing a vogue for comedies of everyday Victorian life, and creating vehicles for casts whose particular talents he learnt to exploit. . First Edition.. Hard Cover. Fine/Near Fine.

$99.95

Sojourner

By Sternberg, Pat & Beechman, Dolly

New Orleans: Anchorage Pr Plays, 1989. Some sunning on cover, otherwise in nice condition.. Not Indicated. Soft Cover. Very Good +.

$18.95

The Common Pursuit - Scenes from the Literary Life

By Gray, Simon

Metheun, 1986. Book Club (BCE/BOMC). Hard Cover. Fine/Near Fine +.

$19.95

Telemachus Clay: (revised version) A Collage for Sounds and Voices in Two Acts

By Lewis John Carlino

Dramatists Play Service, 1967. Not Indicated. Soft Cover. Near Fine.

$29.95

V & V Only : A Play in Two Acts

By Leonard, Jim, Jr.

Samuel French Inc, 1989. Small book store label on back cover, otherwise in very nice condition.. Not Indicated. Soft Cover. Fine.

$23.95

Best Student One Acts 1997 Best of Regions Volume 3 Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival

By Freisen, Lauren (ed.)

Washingtin DC: The Kennedy Center, 1997. Not Indicated. Soft Cover. Very Good.

$34.95

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