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[Title in Hebrew]: Tsofnat pa`neah,
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[Title in Hebrew]: Tsofnat pa`neah,

By Samuel, ha-Cohen di Pisa "Lusitano".

Venice: Giovanni Martinelli, 1655. First edition. Commentary on Ecclesiastes (and Job as well) , and on the purification rituals for those who have come into contact with the dead (the so-called "red heifer" ritual).. 20 cm; 33 [i.e. 62] pages. Title within typographical border. Woodcut "hands" device on title. Text in Hebrew. Bound in contemporary limp vellum, stained. Manuscript note in margin of f. 24r.

$1250.00

Selva rinovata di varia lettione di Pietro Messia ...

By Mexia, Pedro; Mambrino Roseo; Francesco Sansovino; Alfonso de Ulloa; Bartolommeo Dionigi.

Venice: Niccolo Pezzana, 1658. Very Good/First Pezzana edition of the popular 16th-century "forest of many stories" by Spain's Pedro Mexia. (Nicolò Pezzana purchased the famous Giunti press in 1657, making this one of the first titles issued under his name.) The book is a Spanish Renaissance entry into the genre named "Silvae" by Statius, but this text falls more into the tradition of Xenophon's Symposium, Athenaeus, Macrobius, and Aulus Gellius, that is, expansive, shapeless, episodic, with masses of detail and a stupefying variety of topics and narratives. It was incredibly popular in the 16th and 17th centuries, reprinted in something like 106 editions in every European language. It was a rich treasure chest for later Renaissance authors, such as Miguel Cervantes (whose Quixote is also a forest of many tales, several of them lifted from Mexia) and Christopher Marlowe (who pulled his Tamburlaine from its pages). It is now thoroughly obscure. . Quarto (23 cm); [50] (of 52?), 788, [8] 152 pages. Lacks half-title. Four title pages, each with Pezzana's woodcut device showing Jove, Juno, Vulcan and Neptune. Occasional woodcut initials and ornaments. Shoulder notes. Bound in marbled paper with leather backstrip; backstrip decorated and titled in gilt. Binding quite worn, with joints tender and boards scuffed, edges exposed. Text generally quite good with occasional worm trails, the most severe of them in the margins. Pages evenly toned. References: Michel, V, 161.

$400.00

Canzone a ballo composte dal magnifico Lorenzo de' Medici et da M. Agnolo Politiano, et altri autori...
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Canzone a ballo composte dal magnifico Lorenzo de' Medici et da M. Agnolo Politiano, et altri autori...

By Poliziano, Angelo; Lorenzo de' Medici; Luigi Pulci; Bartolommeo Gamba.

[Milano]: [Bartolommeo Gamba], [1812]. Facsimile of the 1568 edition.. Very Good/Based on a 1568 Giunta edition of a collection of Florentine poems that were first printed in 1533, this facsimile was issued by the great Italian bibliographer Bartolommeo Gamba in 1812. Writing in 1839, Gamba confessed "nearly thirty years have passed since the crazy idea came to me to publish this facsimile, and I printed a little over a hundred copies of it, as faithful to the original as possible, including all the errors, and even the accidental peculiarities of the press, such as the breaks in the woodcut. You can tell my counterfeit by the woodcut initial at the beginning of the Canzoni. In the original there are two figures engaged in struggle, one of them knocked down. In my facsimile it is a little landscape with a farmhouse. In a few copies I added two leaves at the end which appeared in some earlier 16th-century editions, but not in the edition of 1568." The extra two leaves are present in the copy offered here.. Quarto (23 cm); 40 (misnumbered 39), [2],[2]] leaves. Large woodcut on title page ("A ring of dancing girls before a building with the Medici arms"); woodcut initial on verso of title page. Italic type. Bound in plain paper-covered boards of the early 20th century. Boards worn, soiled, and toned. Text evenly toned but otherwise as issued. References: Gamba, 266; Hind, "An introduction to a History of Woodcut," 556-557; Kristeller, "Early Florentine Woodcuts," # 283c (1568 edition).

$800.00

[I Quattro Poeti]  Divina commedia; Orlando furioso; Canzoniere; Gerusalemme liberata.
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[I Quattro Poeti] Divina commedia; Orlando furioso; Canzoniere; Gerusalemme liberata.

By Dante Alighieri; Lodovico Ariosto; Francesco Petrarca; Torquato Tasso .

Florence: Gapero Barbèra, 1901. Collezione Diamante. Fine/Gaspero Barbèra got the idea for his celebrated "Collezione Diamante" (vest-pocket editions of classics printed in a very readable 7-point type) while browsing in a bookstore one day in 1856. He saw an out-of-print edition of "The Four Poets," Dante, Petrarch, Ariosto, and Tasso, and envisioned them printed on his newly acquired presses in the tiny diamond typeface based on Bodoni's letterforms. His edition of the Divine Comedy came out within months, followed quickly by Petrarch, Ariosto, and Tasso--the first in the series that eventually grew to 66 titles in the same format. Delighted, Barbèra had a set of "I Quattro Poeti" specially bound and housed in an inlaid ebony chest for Princess Margaret of Savoy. In her note of thanks to Barbera, Margaret called the gift "a collection of diamonds, a box of precious gems." That gift was the ancestor of the volumes offered here, also given deluxe bindings and housed in a dedicated chest. Surviving sets from the "Collezione Diamante" gift editions in their presentation boxes are few.. Six volumes in-48 (105mm). Each volume with engraved frontispiece (portrait or scene) and tissue guard. Uniformly bound in full vellum decorated in gilt with fleur-de-lis patterns on both boards and interlocking rosettes on spine. Titled in gilt on spines. Edges generously gilt. Gold ribbon placemarkers. All six volumes housed in dedicated vellum-clad chest decorated in gilt with fleurs-de-lis and vine scroll borders, and lined in cream silk moiré. (Chest is 200 x 120 x 87 mm.) All six volumes in pristine condition, as new. Vellum-clad chest somewhat soiled, with gilt decoration abraded or chipped here and there near corners. Very handsome nonetheless.

$750.00

Osservazioni sopra il libro della Felsina pittrice per difesa di Raffaello da Urbino, dei Caracci, e della loro scuola.

By [Raphael]; Vincenzo Vittoria.

Rome: Gaetano Zenobi, 1703. First edition. The author was a Spanish engraver and printer who lived and worked in Rome for part of his life. The text is a defense of Raphael and others from some dismissive remarks made by Carlo Cesare Malvasia in his promotion of the Carracci and of the Bolognese school, "La Felsina Pittrice" (1678). Vittoria wrote the material, probably in Spanish, while still living in Valencia. (In the preface, he apologizes for his Italian which "lacks purity.") The significance of the book, according to the art historian Anthony Blunt, lies in the author's descriptions of several drawings by Raphael and his contemporaries which are either lost or known only in engraved copies. Condition noted. . Octavo (23 cm); 114, [2] pages. Vignette with arms of Pope Clement XI flanked by putti on title page. LACKS FRONTISPIECE PORTRAIT. Decorated letters and ornaments in text. Bound in mottled calf, weak at joints and worn at extremities. Early inscription abraded at base of title page. Pages lightly toned, with occasional stains. References: Cicognara 2404; Anthony Blunt, "Don Vincenzo Vittoria" in The Burlington Magazine, 109:766 (1967) 31-32.

$225.00

I Lucidi. Comedia.

By Firenzuola, Agnolo (1493-1543).

Florence: Giunti, 1552. Second edition. Very Good/Second edition of this five-act comedy which Gamba notes "is held in greater esteem ... because of the beauty of the typography and the diligence of the redaction." We are grateful to our colleagues at E. K. Schreiber Books for turning up a study which notes that Firenzuola was an important influence in promoting the equality of women in the arts: "Firenzuola's dialogue emphasizes the equality of women, the reciprocity of love, and the value of sexuality independent of its reproductive function. In doing so, he provides us with important insights into contemporary values" (J. Murray, Agnolo Firenzuolo on Female Sexuality and Woman's Equality, in: "Sixteenth Century Journal", 22, 1991, pp. 207, 213). . Octavo (15 cm); 44 leaves. Woodcut printer's device on title-page with variant at the end; woodcut initials. Bound in later (c19?) plain sky-blue boards, titled in manuscript on spine. References: Gamba, 458 ("Suol tenersi in maggiore stima questa ristampa si per la leggiadria de' carratteri, che per la diligenza nella correzione"); Adams, F-496; Decia & Camerini, I Giunti di Firenze, 287; Seroni, "Firenzuola," #4.

$950.00

Check list of fifteenth century printing in the Pierpont Morgan Library.

By Thurston, Ada; Curt F. Bühler; .

New York: The Pierpont Morgan Library, 1939. First edition. 348 pages. Original gray cloth. Fine condition.

$100.00

Anton Francesco Doni: scrittore e stampatore:

By Marsili-Libelli, Cecilia Ricottini.

Florence: Sansoni Antiquariato, 1960. Very Good/Comprehensive biliography of the Renaissance polymath. . 25 cm; 401 pages. Illustrated. Handsomely if not professionally bound in quarter calf over marbled boards, leather label titled in gilt. Original wraps bound in. Binding worn at edges, and slightly bowed. Unblemished copy.

$65.00

Deutsche Buchdruckersignete des XVI. Jahrhunderts. Geschichte, Sinngehalt und Gesaltung kleiner Kulturdokumente.

By Grimm, Heinrich.

Weisbaden: Guido Pressler, 1965. German printers' devices of the 16th century.. 365 pages, with 144 illustrations of printer's devices. Bound in cloth. Ex-library with discard stamp. Library ownership stamps, card pocket. Library shelf mark removed from spine. Contents unblemished.

$25.00

Catalogue #209. Incunabula:

By H. P. Kraus.

New York: H. P. Kraus, n.d. [later 1990s]. First edition. 200 pages. Price list laid in. Original wraps. Richly illustrated. Printed at the Stinehour Press, designed by Jerry Kelly and Kit Curry. Very good, with shelf-wear only.

$55.00

Printed Books, 1471-1500; an Exhibition Commemorating the UNESCO International Book Year.

By Wahlert Memorial Library at Loras College .

Dubuque: Wahlert Memorial Library, Loras College, 1972. First edition. 72 pages. Printed wraps. #201 of 300 numbered copies. Very good, without blemish.

$12.00

A Catalogue of Incunabula and Manuscripts in the Army Medical Library.

By Schullian, Dorothy M; Francis E. Sommer.

New York: Henry Schuman, [n.d.]. First edition. 26 cm; xii, 361 pages, and 12 plates. Original black cloth. A fine copy, with the bookplate of Goodspeed's Book Shop Reference Library.

$60.00

Sonnets [de l'Olive]
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Sonnets [de l'Olive]

By Du Bellay, Joachim; Jean Berque.

Paris: Jean Berque and Philippe Gonin, 1938. Hard cover. Very Good/With this book of sweet love poems in the Italian style, Du Bellay (1522-1560) successfully promoted the sonnet form into French literary fashion. The delicate and graceful nature of the love poems are a perfect match for the 20th-century illustrator Jean Berque, who decorated the text with simple and pleasing images of rural youth. The handmade paper further compliments the sensuality of the text and illustrations. . Folio (34 cm); [iv], 127 pages, and 36 original dry-point illustrations, 20 of them printed on separate leaves laid into the text, the remaining 16 printed in text. Edition limited to 200 copies, the first 100 on vélin antique, of which this is number 92, signed in pencil by Berque on the justification page. Leaves laid in loose in original publisher's vellum-backed portfolio, preserved in pasteboard slipcase. Some light wear to slipcase, with a dampmark in its upper left corner; no other blemishes. Reference: Carteret, IV, 46.

$400.00

Sonnets.

By Magny, Olivier de (1529-1561?); René Mels, Illus (1909-1977); Fernand Verhesen, printer (1913-2009).

Brussels: Editions le Cormier, 1953. Limited edition. Wrappers. Fine/One of six copies only on vélin d'Arches, out of a total editon of only forty copies. Sonnets by the French Renaissance poet chosen and set in letterpress by the Belgian poet Fernand Verhesen, and illustrated with two drypoint engravings, one in color, by René Mels. The volume is extremely scarce, if not unobtainable.. 23 cm; 20 pages, and two engraved plates. Wraps.

$500.00

Missae episcopales pro sacris ordinibus conferendis:
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Missae episcopales pro sacris ordinibus conferendis:

By Machabaeus, Hieronymus.

Venice: Giunta (colophon: in officina haeredum Lucaeantonii Iunctae), 1563. Leather. Very Good/In the 1560s, the brothers Tommaso and Giovan Maria Giunta were trying to recover financially from the fire that destroyed their Venice workshop in 1557. Taking few chances, they relied through the decade primarily on psalters, graduals, missals, breviaries, and antiphonaries. Designing these religious texts, the brothers expanded on the model of the missal their father, Lucantonio Giunta, published in 1501. Like the earlier missal, the mass for the ordination of bishops offered here channels the look of a medieval manuscript, with its double-column text printed in a rounded variation on Gothic type, red-inked type in place of rubrication, historiated and foliated initials, floral patterns, and impressive woodcut illustrations. This medieval disguise, however, cannot hide certain Renaissance or Humanist elements that creep in, such as the graceful Roman type in the running heads throughout, and the sophisticated Venetian Renaissance woodcut renditions of the Annunciation, the Crucifixion, and the Deposition. A handsome and energetic volume.. Folio (38 cm); [2], 152, 12 leaves. Text in two columns, printed in red and black ink. Printer's device in red on title page (Camerini, I, 143, third variant). About 99 woodcut illustrations in text (some repeated), including full-page crucifixion, repeated seven times, and 10-panel historiated woodcut border to facing page, also repeated seven times. Rotunda, roman, and italic type. Music with notes in black on red staves. Bound in paneled calf, roughly contemporary, ruled in gilt with gilt fleurs-de-lis at corners. Binding worn with signs of old repairs. Text toned on some leaves, but remarkably fresh and free of blemishes overall. References: Mortimer, Italian, 304; Amiet, Repertorium, 2:101; Camerini, 673; RELICS, 2859.

$5000.00

Lettere di diversi eccellentiss[imi] huomini raccolte da diverse libri:
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Lettere di diversi eccellentiss[imi] huomini raccolte da diverse libri:

By [Dolce, Lodovico].

Venice: Gabriel Giolito de' Ferrari, 1559. soft cover. Very Good/In the context of Renaissance society, publishing a well-crafted letter was one more way for courtiers and notables to broadcast their refinement, like wearing the clothes we see in Renaissance portraiture. Private letters were indeed public matter, enthusiastically shared and discussed. Some letters became famous. Paolo Manuzio issued collections of letters, and Giolito followed. Giolito had his resident scholar, Lodovico Dolce, create a "greatest hits" volume of letters that had appeared in print in a wide variety of sources. Dolce set out to collect "the most beautiful letters and the ones of greatest value." First published in 1554, the collection became a model for Italian prose, as well as a storehouse of stories about 16th-century celebrities. The book was produced in small quantity and quickly sold out. A second edition was necessary, and Dolce prepared it with a completely new dedication, and with notable changes in content from the 1554 edition, including the addition of several letters by Giulia da Ponte. Of the two editions, Bongi writes "both are very uncommon, and highly sought by collectors. Since there are notable differences between the two, with each containing letters that are missing in the other, both would be worthy of acquisition by a true devotee." (Bongi I, 442).. Octavo (17cm); 488, [16] pages. Giolito device (phoenix atop flaming orb) on title page; alternate device (phoenix facing the sun) on colophon page. Woodcut initials and ornaments throughout. Bound for utility in contemporary flexible vellum, worn and discolored in places, and not entirely entire. Text block sound and generally in very good condition, with few stains. Early ownership inscription in ink in upper margin of title page. Notation in early hand on rear blank, later notes on last two text pages. Generally, a clean, sound copy in well-worn binding. Preserved in custom-made cloth clamshell box with title label on spine. Reference: Bongi, II,67; Gamba, 1462 (1554 ed.; also citing a 1558 edition which does not appear to have actually existed).

$1000.00

Sermoni funebri de vari authori nella morte de diversi animali.
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Sermoni funebri de vari authori nella morte de diversi animali.

By [Lando, Ortensio].

Venice: Gabriel Giolito de' Ferrari, 1558 (colophon: 1559). First edition, variant with dedication to Niccolò Alberti. Boards. Very Good/Although the title of this collection indicates funeral orations for animals by "various authors," all eleven pieces are by Ortensio Lando (1505?-1555?), the eccentric, peripatetic, uncomfortable humanist who seemed to gravitate toward the far edge of every society he entered. While many humanists traveled, Lando traveled more. A native of Milan, he can be found at various times in Rome, Venice, Naples, Lyon (where he worked for Sebastian Gryphius and alongside Etienne Dolet), Basel, Geneva, Lucca, Trento, Paris, Strasbourg, Tubingen and Augsburg, remaining in Venice after 1545 but probably in Naples when he died, sometime in the later 1550s. He changed his name more than once, and he preferred to publish pseudonymously, cryptically, or anonymously, creating a burden for his biographers. (Ironically for such an unquiet soul, he often referred to himself in print as "il Tranquillo.") He stopped short of the priesthood, flirted seriously with reformers, wrote several protestant-leaning works, yet he was present at the opening of the Council of Trent. He translated More's Utopia into Italian, and wrote a fantastical funeral oration on Erasmus, both praising and condemning him, that still puzzles Erasmus scholars. Starting with "I Paradossi" (Lyon, 1534), he published a series of learned dialogues, travelogues, and arguments, all of them characterized by an odd sense of humor, and all of them landing on the local indices in Milan and Venice, and on Pope Paul IV's first "universal index of prohibited books" in Rome. The volume offered here is a collection of supposed "funeral orations" informed by examples from Lucian and from Lando's contemporary Cornelius Agrippa. Indeed, the text confirms how brightly Lucian's peculiar star shone among thinking humanists. Each eulogy (for a cat, a flea, a cricket, an ass) is attributed to a fictional speaker (Brother Onion, Sister Flower, etc.) Lando only appears under his own name in a postscript, an apology where he admits that the "orations" are meant in fun but that they are erudite and have serious matter to them as well, intending to "reveal secrets of nature." While the Index suppressed Lando's diffusion in Italy, he was very popular in the rest of Europe. The Sermoni were translated into French and Latin, and were reprinted into the eighteenth century. A bibliographical oddity: this first edition exists in two variants, with no priority established, and neither more frequent. In one variant, the dedication epistle is addressed to Johann Jakob Fugger of Augsburg; in the copy offered here, the volume is dedicated with a slightly different text to Niccoló degli Alberti, Count of Bormo. Both variants are extremely difficult to obtain, and are held in very few collections worldwide, none located in North America (according to OCLC).. Octavo (16cm); 36 leaves. Giolito phoenix device and fleuron on title page, and smaller phoenix device on verso of last leaf. Woodcut historiated initials. Late 19th-century marbled paper over boards, with ownership inscription of Nicholas Gottfried Kraenner on front blank. Occasional minor blemishes and traces of skilled conservation contemporary with binding. References: Bongi, I, 231 f.; Adams L-122; BM Italian, 623; Melfi, III, 58.

$3000.00

Euclidis Elementorum libri XV.
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Euclidis Elementorum libri XV.

By Euclid.

Rome: Antonio Blado, 1545. soft cover. Very Good/A Greek edition of Euclid that includes, by design, the Propositions only (without proofs or diagrams). The Sixteenth Century believed that the Demonstrations were the work of a later commentator, a belief that was disproved by Henry Savile early in the 1600s. In true Humanist fashion, the editor of this text, Angelo Caiano, sought to pare away later accretions considered extraneous to the original text, leaving the Propositions only. The printer, Antonio Blado, has not inherited the popular recognition that fell to his contemporary peers, Paolo Manuzio and Bernardo and Benedetto Giunta. This repressed fame is due in part to Blado's onerous obligations as printer to the Apostolic Camera. Nevertheless, he took initiative, under patronage of Cardinals Farnese and Cervini, to produce fine humanist editions of Greek texts, both classical and patristic, from manuscripts in the Vatican Library. For this project, he studied Greek typography with Paolo Manuzio, gathered an impressive working group of Greek scholars, and entered into a sort of partnership with the Giunta. The venture ran out of money after only a few remarkable and high-priced editions. In order to bring matters under control, Blado commissioned a smaller Greek font from Giovanni Onorio Magliese, head of the Vatican Library's Greek division. The new Greek types make their debut in this volume of Euclid, which Blado struck of his own accord apart from the larger project. He called in the humanist Angelo Caiano to prepare the Greek text and produce an Italian translation, published as a "companion volume" (Thomas-Stanford) the same year. The volume was dedicated to the 24-year-old Antonio Altoviti, later Bishop of Florence and secretary to Pope Paul III. The result is the first Greek edition of a Euclidian text printed in Italy, preceded only by the Basel editio princeps of 1533 and the Paris edition of 1536. . 14cm; [109], [3 blank] pages. Text in Greek (except the dedicatory epistle from Angelo Caiano to Antonio Altoviti, in Latin). Woodcut portrait figure on title page; woodcut historiated initial. Bound in contemporary flexible vellum with overlapping fore-edges. Binding quite soiled with long split along upper joint, peeling a bit onto spine. Text clean, bright, with good margins and no blemishes. References: Thomas-Stanford, #26; Adams, E-996.

$6500.00

De gli elementi d'Euclide libri quindici.  Con gli scholii antichi
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De gli elementi d'Euclide libri quindici. Con gli scholii antichi

By Euclid.; Valerio Spacciuoli; Federico Commandino .

Urbino: Domenico Frisolino, 1575. Hard cover. Very Good/The first book printed in Urbino in the 16th century, and only the fourth overall. Urbino's presses lagged behind those of other Italian cities, due in part to Duke Federico's predilection for manuscripts. It seems Federico Commandino, the foremost mathematician of the generation before Galileo, had a press set up in his house. He hired in a printer, Domenico Frisolino, and there he published his translation into Italian of Euclid, based on his own Latin translation of 1572. Commandino died just as the sheets were coming off the press. His brother-in-law hastily attached a dedicatory letter (to Francesco Maria II della Rovere) explaining that Commandino wanted the text to be available to "all who are served by mathematics," that is, even those who do not understand classical languages. Euclid's text is glossed by Commandino's running commentary, and illustrated with figures. . Folio; [16], 278 pages. Title page and all text pages ruled in typographic border. Typographic ornament on title page, 18 historiated initials (some duplicates) showing putti with geometer's instruments against a background of Italian hill towns. Numerous geometric figures in text. Bound in c19 (?) full mint green sheep, with red leather title label lettered and tooled in gilt. Edges stained indigo. Binding somewhat scuffed, with upper joint cracked; spine darkened and scuffed. Early ownership inscription on title page, later bookplate on front pastedown. Few marginal notes in contemporary hand. Very light occasional foxing present. References: Moranti, #4 ("un vero capolavoro tipografico" p.14); Gamba 1386 ("Nobile edizione"); Adams, E-995;; Brunet, II, 1090; Graesse, II, 513; Thomas-Stanford, 42; Olschki, Choix, 6539 ("Traduction très estimée").

$2500.00

Rime e prose :
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Rime e prose :

By Achillini, Claudio (1574-1640).

Venice: Zaccaria Conzatti, 1662. Hard cover. Very Good/All of the defining characteristics of baroque poetry are shown to their best advantage in this collection by Marino's friend and follower. Several of Achillini's poems (according to a note at the end of the text) had been erroneously attributed to Marino. This collection also includes an essay, and Achillini's correspondence (including the letter on the plague that Manzoni incorporated sarcastically into I Promessi Sposi, and the description of a monk that Croce called "not only significant, but beautiful"). First published in 1656.. 12mo (14 cm); 346, [2 blank] pages. Extra engraved title page. Typographic and woodcut ornaments. Bound in contemporary vellum. Binding sound and entire. Pages bright and clean, in very good condition. References: Vinciana 2281; BL Italian 17th century, 4.

$225.00

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