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JANE EYRE. An Autobiography
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JANE EYRE. An Autobiography

By [Bronte, Charlotte]

1848. [in the original 1848 wrappers] Edited by Currer Bell [pseudonym]. New York: Harper & Brothers, n.d. [1848?]. Original orange-brown wrappers printed in black. First American Edition, later issue (printing?), of one of the greatest novels of the Nineteenth Century. The first American edition of JANE EYRE was published, in wrappers only, by Harper & Brothers on January 4, 1848, as No. 109 in their "Library of Select Novels" -- with "1848" printed on both the title page and the front cover. This is a later printing, quite possibly issued still in 1848 but with those two dates removed; otherwise it is in the same format and binding as the first.~The 1848-dated copies have several variations of inside front cover, inside rear cover, and outside rear cover, and this undated copy has pretty much the same -- "Recent Popular Productions" (various books first published in 1848) on the inside front cover, "Sterling Works for Libraries" (Smith's inside back cover "c"), and "Choice Library of Modern Romance" (Smith's back cover "b"). On the final leaf of text appears the ad for "Harper's New Catalogue" but without the first printing's "1847" after the publisher's street address (Smith says this was an intermediate state, with the final state being no such ad at all). Lastly, this copy does not have the solitary ad leaf (pages [174-175]), and therefore no list of Harper's "Library of Select Novels."~This copy is overall in good condition. The front and rear wrappers are largely present, but both have considerable edge-wear and the rear wrapper has a closed tear; the spine is rolled (as usual) and most of the wrapper there is perished. There is a water-stain at the top of the first few leaves (but not the front cover). In all, far from fine -- but this paper-bound JANE EYRE was produced to be read and discarded, not to survive for 170 years. The fact that this copy lacks the "1848" dates makes this an opportunity to acquire one of the great novels of the 19th Century, in the original binding, at a small fraction of the price that a dated copy would command. Smith pp 41-45.

$775.00

MEMOIRS OF THE LIFE OF WILLIAM COLLINS, Esq., R.A.
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MEMOIRS OF THE LIFE OF WILLIAM COLLINS, Esq., R.A.

By Collins, W. Wilkie

1848. With Selections from his Journals and Correspondence. By His Son. [in Two Volumes.] London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1848. 32 pp Vol I ads dated April 29, 1848. Original blind-stamped dark purple-brown cloth. First Edition of Wilkie Collins's first book -- a memoir of his father the landscape and genre painter, the popularity of whose works then rivaled that of J.M.W. Turner or John Constable. Though heading uncertainly toward a career as a barrister, 23-year-old Wilkie was partway through writing a classical romance to be titled ANTONINA when his father died in February 1847 -- so he paused to write this memoir (actually published in November 1848, despite the date of the ad catalogue). The work is dedicated to Sir Robert Peel, who had been the Patron of William Collins, and includes (in addition to a portrait of William) an engraved title page in each volume, each portraying a work of art by William.~This copy is still in the original delicate purple-brown cloth, with the original pale-yellow endpapers. Condition is very good (some wear at the spine and joint ends, but the volumes remain tight and quite presentable). Due to the fragility of this binding (the 1840s was the first real decade of cloth bindings in the UK), Wilkie Collins's first work usually turns up rebound in half calf -- so this is a pleasing survival. Parrish & Miller pp 6-11; Gasson pp 102-103.

$875.00

FROM THE FOUR WINDS
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FROM THE FOUR WINDS

By [Galsworthy, John]

1897. [first book, "From the Author"] By John Sinjohn. London: T. Fisher Unwin, 1897. Original olive green cloth decorated in gilt. First Edition of John Galsworthy's first book, a collection of ten tales. Only 500 copies were printed -- on a commission basis, with Galsworthy paying for the printing; in order not to bring shame upon his name, he used a pseudonym derived from the name of a college friend, St. John Hornby. Galsworthy was subsequently ashamed of this initial work: he asked friends to whom he had sent copies to burn them, he never permitted it to be reprinted, and he ultimately asked the publisher to destroy the unsold stock (in 1920! -- giving an indication of how poorly the 500 copies had been selling).~This is a nearly fine copy, with very little sign of age or wear. Marrot p. 3. Housed in a morocco-backed clamshell case.~The front flyleaf of this copy is inscribed by Galsworthy "From the Author," in his distinctive hand; since the book was pseudonymous and he was not at all proud of it -- and due to the natural humility common to many writers with their first efforts -- this was his way of inscribing his earliest books.

$775.00

YEAST: A Problem
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YEAST: A Problem

By [Kingsley, Charles]

1851. [his first and scarcest novel] Reprinted, with corrections and additions, from Fraser's Magazine. London: John W. Parker, 1851. 8 pp undated ads. Original blind-stamped rose-brown wavy-grain cloth. First Edition of Charles Kingsley's first-written (and today his scarcest) novel. It first appeared serially in Fraser's Magazine during the latter half of 1848 (the year of the "last great burst" of Chartism), but was not published in book form until 1851, as here -- "with corrections and additions"; in the meantime his second novel, ALTON LOCKE, was published slightly earlier, in 1850.~YEAST... is more of a tract than a novel, in which Kingsley described rural England in the time of the Chartist agitation. The plot describes the fate of Lancelot Smith, a wealthy young man, who changes his religious and social views under the inflence of Tregarva, a philosophical game-keeper, who acquaints Smith with the social, economic and moral conditions of the rural poor... Although poorly plotted, YEAST contains a strong social commentary... The novel ends with a utopian and religious stance because Kingsley could not provide a feasible solution to the Condition-of-England Question. A mysterious businessman Barnakill takes Lancelot to the country of mythical Prester John, where he finds answers to his social and religious doubts. [Diniejko].~YEAST is considered to be the first English novel to deal with the problem of unsanitary conditions and disease in the English countryside, as opposed to in the cities (which, for example, HARD TIMES would take up a few years later).~This is a very good copy (volume slightly askew, some wear at the binding extremities, cracking of original endpapers). Although Kingsley later became famous with the likes of WESTWARD HO! and WATER-BABIES, this earliest novel is very scarce in its fragile original cloth.~Sadleir (XIX) 1341 and p. 379 where he ranks YEAST as Kingsley's scarcest; Wolff 3814 ("not a nice copy"); NCBEL 936. Provenance: penciled signature of Walter E. Smith, bibliographer of Victorian literature.

$750.00

THE WHITE PEACOCK
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THE WHITE PEACOCK

By Lawrence, D.H.

1911. A Novel. New York: Duffield & Company, 1911. Original light blue-grey cloth decorated in white and black and with lettering in white. First Edition of D.H. Lawrence's first book, which he began in 1906 (at age 20) and rewrote several times; it is the tale of a love triangle, between Laetitia (DHL's working title for the book) and two men -- a farmer to whom she is drawn sexually, and a coal owner's son whom she marries.~This is a copy of the first issue (with integral title leaf that bears the copyright date 1910 on the verso; both issues are dated 1911 on the recto, but the cancel leaf of the second issue bears a 1911 copyright date on the verso). Duffield's first edition came out on 19 January 1911; they also printed the leaves for Heinemann's UK edition (with Heinemann preliminaries and with a different binding) -- which came out the following day, January 20th.~Another difference between the two editions is that most copies of Heinemann's edition have pp 227-230 in canceled form, due to a paragraph on p. 230 to which Heinemann objected: "... She wouldn't let me out of her sight. God! -- we were a passionate couple -- and she would have me in her bedroom while she drew... I never saw her drawings. She had her own way too much -- I let her do as she liked with me." This was Lawrence's first experience (of many) with censorship. Thus Duffield's American edition is slightly earlier, it is the publishing house that had both editions printed, and it is the edition that is truer to Lawrence's actual text.~This copy is in near-fine condition (very slight fading of the cloth, just a touch of wear at the foot of the spine, a few small instances of flaking of the white lettering) -- better than is usually encountered. This American first issue is today considerably scarcer than the Heinemann version of the same sheets. Roberts A1a(1).

$3250.00

THE CONJURE WOMAN
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THE CONJURE WOMAN

By Chesnutt, Charles W.

1899. Boston and New York: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1899. Original brown cloth decorated in black, white and orange. First Edition of this Afro-American writer's first book, a series of seven dialect stories about incidents of slavery, told as reminiscences by an old black gardener. Examples are "Po' Sandy," "Mars Jeem's Nightmare" and "Sis' Becky's Pickaninny." Later in the same year, Chesnutt's biography of Frederick Douglass was also published. Chesnutt, who grew up in Fayetteville NC and ultimately returned there as a school principal, was actually mixed-race: his paternal grandfather was a white slaveholder, and though he claimed to have more white than black ancestry (and could probably have "passed" for white), he identified himself as a black man -- or "colored" in the language of the time.~This is a near-fine copy (spine a little darkened, rear endpaper slightly cracked). Pioneer that he was, in recent years Chesnutt has become a very highly-collected author. Provenance: booklabel and signature of H[arry]. L[egare]. Watson of "Sunnyside", Greenwood SC: it was actually not until 1906 that Watson purchased this 1851 estate (named in homage to Washington Irving) -- at which time Watson was editor and publisher of Greenwood's newspaper the Index-Journal, chairman of Greenwood's public school system, and a trustee of Furman University.

$775.00

WUTHERING HEIGHTS
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WUTHERING HEIGHTS

By [Bronte, Emily]

1848. [two volumes, original wrappers] A Novel. By the Author of "Jane Eyre" [sic]. [In Two Volumes.] New York: Harper & Brothers, 1848. Original light brown printed wrappers. First American Edition of one of the greatest novels of the Nineteenth Century. Emily Brontë's ("Ellis Bell's") WUTHERING HEIGHTS was published in England in December 1847 together with her sister Anne's ("Acton Bell's") AGNES GREY. Although it was their sister Charlotte ("Currer Bell") who was the driving force behind all three sisters' simultaneous effort to publish, it was Charlotte's novel, titled THE PROFESSOR, that was rejected -- but with praise, so that she was encouraged to submit another effort that she would call JANE EYRE (which would wind up getting published a few months earlier, and by a larger publisher, than her two sisters' books).~This first American edition was published in April 1848 simultaneously in wrappers (two volumes at 25 cents each) and in cloth (one volume at 75 cents) -- "both bindings contain the original printed sheets, and copies in either binding constitute the first American edition" [Smith]. It is interesting to note that the American edition indicates that WUTHERING HEIGHTS is "by the author of JANE EYRE" -- which of course it is not (the English edition had instead used Emily's pseudonym, Ellis Bell). Whether Harper truly thought both novels were by the same writer (or were confused by the similar pseudonyms), or whether Harper sought to stimulate the sales of WUTHERING HEIGHTS by intentionally misrepresenting the author, is an intriguing question.~As Smith points out (Note 2), the two-parts issue is unusual in that Part I ends right in the middle of a sentence, and Part II takes up with the rest of that sentence, without so much as a separate title page. (Part II does, however, have its own wrapper, so identified on front wrapper and on spine.)~In this set, the rear wrapper of each volume is as described by Smith (headed "Recent Works of Fiction by Popular Authors" and "Choice Library of Modern Romance" respectively); Smith also cites a secondary rear wrapper for Part II, and we have encountered a third version.~Condition is very good, considering the fragility of these wrappered volumes. Both front wrappers have minor edge-wear, and bear the same early inscription in the upper margin, "Mrs. M. Hildreth with the respects of Miss Hall." The rear wrapper of Part I has an upper corner chipped away (affecting half of the last word in its heading; the rear wrapper of Part II is quite complete, with minimal wear. Both spines are a bit askew (as with the only other set we have had), and each lacks about one inch of wrapper at an end (not affecting print though). Inside, there is a damp-stain on the first few leaves of Part I, and the initial blank leaf in Part II is damaged; however, the textual leaves are remarkably free of wear, soil or foxing. This is only the second time we have EVER had both volumes in original wrappers, in our 35+ years in business (we also once had a Part II only) -- truly a rare edition. Now that the English first edition in original binding has surpassed $100,000 in value, this two-volume American edition in wrappers is a highly-desirable alternative at a fraction of the cost. Smith pp 70-74.

$6500.00

SENSE AND SENSIBILITY
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SENSE AND SENSIBILITY

By [Austen, Jane]

1813. A Novel. In Three Volumes. By the Author of "Pride and Prejudice." The Second Edition. London: printed for the Author, by C. Roworth... and published by T. Egerton, 1813. Original light reddish-brown muslin cloth with printed spine labels. "Second Edition" of Jane Austen's first published work, which like the first edition ("By a Lady," two years earlier in 1811), was published at her own expense. It took two years for the first edition to sell out, but in 1813 it was helped out by the popularity of PRIDE AND PREJUDICE -- with the result that the second edition of each was published in October 1813. "The text is believed to have been revised by the author; there are some major differences... and many minor changes" [Gilson] -- thus this second edition constitutes the "definitive edition," i.e. the text the way the author wanted it at the time of her death in 1817. This second edition was still being advertised by Egerton in November 1815 -- at which time Egerton was advertising a "New Edition" of this novel -- but there wasn't one; Egerton was instead being a bit "creative" in trying to unload his unsold copies, inasmuch as the author was then quitting him for the publisher John Murray. Austen received a S&S royalty payment from Egerton as late as March 1817 (she died four months later), but there was no further printing of SENSE AND SENSIBILITY until 1833, when Bentley included the novel in his series of Standard Novels.~The primary binding for these three volumes is blue-grey paper-covered boards, with printed labels that differ very slightly from those of the first edition (-- see examples in Gilson). Regarding this "second edition" Gilson states that "Copies in original boards appear for sale only very rarely," citing only two such copies in 1930 and "no record of sales of copies in original boards in recent years." This set is certainly in its original binding, and has those precise labels, but is in a light muslin cloth that is a good example of the English binding style adopted in the late 1820s and early 1830s. Since this clearly is these sheets' first binding-up, our opinion is that this constitutes a publisher's remainder binding from those first years of cloth bindings: undoubtedly there were still some sets of sheets not yet bound up after all those years, and whatever publisher then owned them wanted them gone before the arrival of some new edition (Bentley's) onto the market. So: this set is not in the primary binding of paper-covered boards with labels, but it IS in its original publisher's binding of some years later (with those same labels) -- far more desirable than volumes which were simply rebound by some owner.~Condition: First and foremost, the edges of the leaves of these volumes remain uncut (untrimmed) -- further bolstering the fact that this is the original binding-up. All three half-titles are present; the only leaf lacking (verified by a Quaritch cataloguer some time back) is the final blank leaf in Vol I. There is minor wear at the spine ends, but without any sort of repair there; the spines are a little faded (as one would expect with this color), and the original spine labels have slight edge-wear not affecting lettering. The Vol I endpapers have a thin strip of matching paper at the gutters; the endpapers in the other two volumes have only minor cracking. Glued to the Vol I front endpaper are a couple of old catalogue descriptions of other copies. For volumes still in their original binding some 190 years after the leaves were first bound up, this is remarkable condition. Gilson A2. Housed in a custom clamshell case with leather labels. Provenance: Vol I bookplate of Augustine Birrell (1850-1933), the barrister, politician, and author -- who became Chief Secretary for Ireland for the period 1907-1916 (in which post he was praised for enabling tenant farmers to own their property, and for extending university education for Catholics, but he resigned following the Easter Rising).

$9750.00

DESPERATE REMEDIES
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DESPERATE REMEDIES

By Hardy, Thomas

1898. A Novel. With an Etching by H. Macbeth-Raeburn and a Map of Wessex. (London and New York: Harper & Brothers, 1898.) Original dark green cloth with monogram device in gilt. "Wessex Novels" edition, American issue. DESPERATE REMEDIES was Hardy's first novel, first published in 1871 in three volumes; here it is Vol XII of the Wessex Novels. Osgood McIlvaine of London published this first uniform edition of Hardy's works, volume-by-volume during the period 1895-96 -- an important edition, because the text of every novel was thoroughly revised by Hardy. Sheets of this Osgood McIlvaine edition were issued in America by Harper, as here, with their own title leaf. This is a near-fine copy with very little wear. See Purdy pp 279-282.

$100.00

STRAY LEAVES FROM STRANGE LITERATURE
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STRAY LEAVES FROM STRANGE LITERATURE

By Hearn, Lafcadio

1884. Stories. Boston: James R. Osgood and Company, 1884. Original dark royal blue cloth decorated in black. First Edition of Hearn's first book (other than an 1882 translation of Gautier). This was Hearn's attempt to reconstruct "fantastically beautiful stories from the exotic literature which fascinated him" [OCAL].~Born in the Ionian Islands of Irish-Greek parents, Hearn was educated in England and then in France. (As a schoolboy in England he lost the sight of his left eye in an accident at play; constant reading overtaxed his right eye, over time greatly enlarging it. Partly for this reason, Hearn was afflicted with a morbid inferiority complex.) He emigrated to the United States in 1869, at the age of nineteen; his early years in the U.S. were spent in New York, Cincinnati and then New Orleans, where his principal success as a writer was in writing grotesque and macabre sketches for periodicals. It was not until 1890 that Hearn went to Japan, where he spent the rest of his life.~This copy is in dark royal blue cloth, one of at least seven colors that were used without precedence. It is in near-fine condition -- both endpapers have a very discreet repair at the gutter, but externally the book is essentially fine. Blanck 7912. Housed in a morocco-backed slipcase with inner chemise.

$450.00

STRAY LEAVES FROM STRANGE LITERATURE
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STRAY LEAVES FROM STRANGE LITERATURE

By Hearn, Lafcadio

1884. Stories. Boston: James R. Osgood and Company, 1884. Original dark royal blue cloth decorated in black. First Edition of Hearn's first book (other than an 1882 translation of Gautier). This was Hearn's attempt to reconstruct "fantastically beautiful stories from the exotic literature which fascinated him" [OCAL].~Born in the Ionian Islands of Irish-Greek parents, Hearn was educated in England and then in France. (As a schoolboy in England he lost the sight of his left eye in an accident at play; constant reading overtaxed his right eye, over time greatly enlarging it. Partly for this reason, Hearn was afflicted with a morbid inferiority complex.) He emigrated to the United States in 1869, at the age of nineteen; his early years in the U.S. were spent in New York, Cincinnati and then New Orleans, where his principal success as a writer was in writing grotesque and macabre sketches for periodicals. It was not until 1890 that Hearn went to Japan, where he spent the rest of his life.~This copy is in dark royal blue cloth, one of at least seven colors that were used without precedence. It is in very good-plus condition -- both endpapers are quite cracked, but externally the book is quite attractive except for very light wear at the spine ends. Blanck 7912. Housed in a cloth slipcase, this copy bears the small leather "Blairhame" bookplate of the noted collector Mrs. J. Insley Blair.

$325.00

SOME CHINESE GHOSTS
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SOME CHINESE GHOSTS

By Hearn, Lafcadio

1887. Boston: Roberts Brothers, 1887. Original bright red cloth decorated in brown. First Edition of Hearn's second book -- but his first book of "original" work (since his earliest, STRAY LEAVES FROM STRAY LITERATURE (1884), was a collection of folk tales he had "reconstructed"). This volume presents as a similar volume -- half a dozen supernatural tales from the Far East -- but is in fact from Hearn's own imagination. Written while a resident of New Orleans, SOME CHINESE GHOSTS is "a series of brilliantly polished but static sketches" [K&H] that had first appeared in Harper's Magazine. After this book was published, Hearn accused Roberts Bros. of robbing him of royalties, and the book (save a few hundred copies already sold) and printing plates were destroyed. It was not until 1890 that Hearn left for Japan, where he would settle, become a Japanese citizen, marry, and ultimately be appointed chair of English Literature at the Imperial University of Tokyo.~This copy is in bright red cloth, one of several colors used without priority; the endpapers are decorated with a pattern of leaves and flowers in olive brown, again one of several used without priority. It is in remarkably fine, bright condition -- essentially as new. Blanck 7916; Bleiler 787. This copy bears the small leather "Blairhame" bookplate of the noted collector Mrs. J. Insley Blair.

$450.00

THE GILDED AGE
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THE GILDED AGE

By Twain, Mark & Warner, Charles Dudley

1883. A Novel. With 212 Illustrations. London: George Routledge and Sons, 1883. 2 pp undated ads. Original red cloth pictorially decorated in black and lettered in gilt. First one-volume English edition of Mark Twain's first novel, written in collaboration with Charles Dudley Warner (the result of a challenge, by the two men's wives over dinner, to write a better novel than the current standard fare). This is the tale of Colonel Sellers and the Hawkins family and their determined pursuit of Wealth -- satirizing the greed, political corruption and materialism of post-Civil War America, so successfully that the entire era was named for this novel.~The first English edition, published by Routledge in three volumes, had come out a decade earlier -- in December 1873, simultaneous with the Hartford edition; that three-decker is today extremely scarce (a set recently sold at auction for 22,500 pounds, or almost $30,000).~This is an attractive, very good-plus copy (minor rubbing at the extremities, one endpaper slightly cracked); there is very little of the usual fading of the red spine. These early-1880s London books are tough to find in decent shape, because that was the very brief era when English binders tried using staples, rather than string, to bind books. See Blanck 3359.

$475.00

"How I Built Myself a House" in CHAMBERS'S JOURNAL
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"How I Built Myself a House" in CHAMBERS'S JOURNAL

By [Hardy, Thomas]

1865. of Popular Literature, Science, and Art. Fourth Series | No. 64. [London & Edinburgh:] William and Robert Chambers, March 18, 1865. Original self-wrappers, lightly bound into a later medium-brown printed folder. First Appearance of Thomas Hardy's first published piece of work, appearing anonymously. The three-page sketch is a rather amusing account of the problems endured by a young couple dealing with architects, builders and movers in building a new home -- remarkably similar to such problems today. At the time Hardy was working in an architect's office, and wrote this article for the amusement of some students in the office (though Chambers did pay him for the article).~ This is the original 16-page weekly, with Hardy's sketch leading off; the weekly was self-wrappered, which is to say there was no printed wrapper, just the decorative heading occupying the top third of the first page. Its condition is near-fine (minor damage at the spine where the weekly is lightly bound into this later printed folder). Purdy pp 293-4. Provenance: the folder bears the bookplate of renowned bibliophile B. George Ulizio (1889-1969) of Pine Valley NJ, whose initial library was sold at Anderson Galleries in 1931 and whose subsequent collection of 1500+ titles went to Kent State University; this folder was probably created by him.

$275.00

POEMS, Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect
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POEMS, Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect

By Burns, Robert

1787. [original boards, leaves uncut] The Third Edition. London: Printed for A. Strahan; T. Cadell in The Strand; and W. Creech, Edinburgh, 1787. Original blue-grey paper-covered boards with cream paper spine and printed label, page edges uncut. "The London edition," which is to say the third edition overall (so stated, unlike the prior two) -- following the rare Kilmarnock edition of 1786 and Wm. Creech's Edinburgh edition of earlier in 1787. Egerer goes to great length to explain why this edition, though promoted as coming out in mid-1787, did not in fact meet the public until November of that year (later than pirated editions in Belfast and in Dublin) -- it had a lot to do with Creech still having many copies on hand from his Edinburgh edition.~This is a remarkably fine copy, still in the original boards and label, and with the leaves uncut as issued; the spine remains atypically intact, including the printed label. The only real flaw is that the endpapers are cracked (also, leaf O3 has a two-inch tear). One could not hope for a copy in better condition. Egerer 6.

$10500.00

POEMS, Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect
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POEMS, Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect

By Burns, Robert

1787. [original boards, leaves uncut] Edinburgh: Printed for the Author, and Sold by William Creech, 1787. Original blue-grey paper-covered boards with cream paper spine and printed label, page edges uncut. The Edinburgh edition, which is to say the second edition overall, following the rare Kilmarnock edition of 1786 (and containing 22 poems that had not been in the earlier edition). Burns arranged for William Creech to print this book; there was no publisher. In a 17 April 1787 announcement in the Edinburgh Advertiser, Burns says: "N.B. As this book is published for the sole benefit of the Author, it is requested that subscribers will send for their copies, and none will be delivered without money." The Edinburgh edition includes an engraved portrait of Burns, a list of the subscribers who made the edition possible, and a glossary of Scottish dialect at the rear.~This copy has the errors "The Duke of Boxburgh" under "R" in the list of subscribers, page 232 mispaginated, and "Auld Scotland wants nae stinking ware" in the poem "To a Haggis" (it was meant to be "skinking," a Scottish-dialect word for watery or diluted). Curiously, the earlier state properly reads "skinking"; it then transformed into "stinking" for this second state -- an error that was then carried forward into the London edition.~This copy is, remarkably, still in the paper-covered boards in which the book was initially issued in 1787 -- with the leaves entirely uncut. Yes, the spine paper is worn away at the bottom two inches of the spine, and yes, the spine label is just about worn away (one can barely make out the poet's last name). It is not hard to find this edition rebound in leather, with the page edges trimmed down; however it is extremely difficult to find a copy still in the original boards, as here. Egerer 2 (who noted in 1964: "Copies of either the "skinking" or the "stinking" edition in original boards are very rare."). Provenance: contemporary armorial bookplate of [William Ogilvy, the eighth] Lord Banff -- upon whose death in 1803 the baronetcy would become extinct; although his name is not in the list of subscribers, he must have been the original owner of this copy. Housed in a cloth clamshell case.

$4950.00

ALMAYER'S FOLLY
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ALMAYER'S FOLLY

By Conrad, Joseph

1896. A Story of an Eastern River. Second Edition. London: T. Fisher Unwin, 1896. Original dark green cloth. First Edition, early printing -- of Conrad's first book. Though labeled "Second Edition" on the title page, this is actually a reprint of the first edition; all copies of this printing seem to have half-title verso ads that are colonial. The volume is printed on laid paper (forming a thicker volume than the first printing), and has the p. 110 misprints corrected. (There were two printings effected in 1895, and then two in 1896 -- this one on laid paper for the domestic market, and another on wove paper for the colonial market.) Actually it was not until 1930, for Benn's "Essex Library," that ALMAYER'S FOLLY was reset for a true "second edition."~The primary binding for this "Second Edition" is the same as for the first -- dark green cloth lettered in gilt. Condition is very good-plus (very light edge-wear, fading at the top of the rear cover). Cagle A1a (notes).

$250.00

ALMAYER'S FOLLY [Edward Garnett's copy]
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ALMAYER'S FOLLY [Edward Garnett's copy]

By Conrad, Joseph

1896. [Edward Garnett's copy] A Story of an Eastern River. Second Edition. London: T. Fisher Unwin, 1896. Original dark green cloth. First Edition, early but not first printing, of Conrad's first book. The first printing came out in 1895 (bearing that date on the title page) -- some domestic copies and some colonial; later in 1895 a second printing was issued, on thicker paper and bearing colonial ads on the half-title verso. Then there were two further printings dated 1896, one on laid paper for domestic use reading "Second Edition" (as here), and the other on wove paper reading "Colonial Edition" (but both with those colonial ads). Due to the paper used, this 1896 edition is noticeably thicker than the 1895 one; also the p. 110 missing letters are in this printing restored.~This is a near-fine copy (endpapers slightly cracked). Cagle A1a (notes).~The front endpaper of this copy bears the signature of Edward Garnett -- whose importance at this stage of Joseph Conrad's career was supreme. Conrad, after meeting the real "Olmeijer" in East Borneo in 1887, gradually produced the manuscript of this book over the six years 1889-1895. He submitted it to T. Fisher Unwin for consideration in their "Pseudonym Library", using the pseudonym "Kamudi" (Malayan for "rudder") -- enclosing the return postage, so sure was he of its rejection. However, Unwin's reader Edward Garnett saw the manuscript's promise and accepted it for non-pseudonymous publication -- and is thus credited with "discovering" Joseph Conrad the writer. By 1896, when this "second edition" came out, Garnett was actively involved with Conrad in the manuscript of Conrad's second book AN OUTCAST OF THE ISLANDS -- so much so, that some biographers have suggested that Garnett's name could have appeared as co-author on the title page.

$2250.00

DEEPHAVEN
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DEEPHAVEN

By Jewett, Sarah O[rne]

1877. Boston: James R. Osgood and Company, 1877. Original mauve cloth decorated in black and gilt, all page edges red. First Edition, first state (with "was" at the end of the 16th line on p. 65, later changed to "so"), of Sarah Orne Jewett's first book. In addition to so-stated "fourth" and "fifth" printings dated 1877, there were three earlier printings dated 1877 that do not designate the printing on the title page -- of 1280, 500 and 500 copies; whether the two p. 65 states are 1780/500 copies or 1280/1000 copies is unknown.~The author, of South Berwick, Maine, first began writing these tales sited in the imaginary "Deephaven" for the Atlantic Monthly in 1868, when she was only nineteen. The book was an immediate success; it came at just the right moment, when the rage for genre regional studies of America was at its height and when fiction in general was at a low ebb. It made her famous at a bound; it sent her to Boston and New York and Philadelphia; it made her a friend of the "Boston circle," particularly of Howells, Lowell, Whittier, and Thomas Bailey Aldrich... [K&H]~This copy is in near-fine condition, remarkably clean for this light mauve cloth: there is light wear at the spine ends, and one endpaper has some cracking. This is tough book to find in better condition, as it was cheaply produced with flexible boards. Blanck 10871 (mentioning green or mauve cloth; we have also seen terra-cotta -- no priority).

$725.00

ONE MAN'S INITIATION - 1917
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ONE MAN'S INITIATION - 1917

By Dos Passos, John

1920. London: George Allen & Unwin, (1920). Original blue cloth stamped in black, with dust jacket. First Edition of Dos Passos's first book -- a novel of soldier life during the Great War. After graduation from Harvard in 1916, he volunteered for an American ambulance corps (along with his college friend e.e. cummings), serving outside of Paris and in northern Italy. (After the war he would remain in Paris, becoming, along with Ernest Hemingway and others, one of the "Lost Generation" of American writers there.) The American edition of this book was not published until 1922, after his anti-war novel THREE SOLDIERS brought him some fame.~This copy is in the second state, with "spread flat" properly printed on page 35. The volume is in fine condition; the jacket too is just about fine, just a bit darkened on its spine.

$325.00

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