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STALKY & CO
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STALKY & CO

By Kipling, Rudyard

1899. [the Publisher to Major Pond] Toronto: George N. Morang & Co., 1899. Original dark green cloth with Viking longboat design in black. First Canadian Edition -- technically, the Canadian issue of the first American edition, which was published in this binding by Doubleday & McClure ten days before Macmillan's UK edition. These nine hilarious tales of school life (of the mischievous Stalky, Beetle and McTurk) are based on Kipling's own days at the United Services College. Included are eight illustrations by L. Raven Hill, which are not in the UK edition. American sheets were bound up with a Morang title leaf, and the binding was altered only to read "MORANG" at the foot of the spine (some Canadian copies were put up in red wrappers). One little oddity of this Canadian edition is that Kipling's prefatory poem here follows the Contents and Illustrations leaves, whereas in the American edition (and in the UK edition), the poem precedes those leaves. This is a bright copy, fine except for very light rubbing at the corners. Richards A144 (note). Provenance: this is an inscribed presentation copy from the publisher to the American literary agent and lecture-tour impresario, ["Major"] James P. Pond. The front free endpaper bears the inked inscription "Mr J. B. Pond With the kind regards of the Publishers Geo N. Morang & Co.", and the opposing paste-down bears Pond's less-than-modest bookplate. Pond was the "major" American literary agent of that era.

$275.00

THE THIRD VIOLET
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THE THIRD VIOLET

By Crane, Stephen

1897. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1897. Original tan cloth decorated in red, black and gilt. First Edition of Crane's sixth book, a romance about young impoverished artists. It was not long after he finished writing this, and before it was published, that Crane was ship­wrecked near Jacksonville, as he was headed off to cover the war in Cuba (Crane had to spend three days in an "open boat"). THE THIRD VIOLET was something of a success, but artistically it seemed a distinct blot on Crane's reputation... [One reviewer observed,] "We hope that THE THIRD VIOLET, which is a hopelessly scentless one, will be the last of its kind, and that instead of violets Mr. Crane will give us war -- war -- war." [Stallman] This was to be the last of Crane's four Appleton books to appear in this tan binding. This copy is in fine condition, with very little of the cover soil and darkening that is typical for this light-colored binding. Williams & Starrett 13; Blanck 4078.

$475.00

UNCLE REMUS. His Songs and Sayings
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UNCLE REMUS. His Songs and Sayings

By Harris, Joel Chandler

1881. The Folk­Lore of the Old Plantation. With Illustrations by Frederick S. Church and James H. Moser. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1881. 8 pp undated ads. Original light blue cloth pictorially decorated in black and gilt. First Edition of Joel Chandler Harris's first and most beloved book, featuring Brer Rabbit, Brer Fox and Brer Bear (with occasional appearances by Brer Terrapin). In addition to 34 such "Legends of the Old Plantation" (including "The Tar-Baby"), the volume includes "Plantation Proverbs" plus Uncle Remus's "Songs" and "Sayings." At the time he wrote these, Harris (who was white) was on the staff of the Atlanta Constitution -- in which newspaper the tales had first begun appearing in 1879. These works were among the first, and remain the greatest, in the school of Negro folk literature. Uncle Remus is both typical and strongly individual, and his tales, based on native legends, are told with a simple humor and authentic dialect that is in perfect harmony with the thing said and the way of saying it" [OCAL]. "Negro folk literature" or not, Harris's tales are today rather politically incorrect, as he portrays the life of a slave as hard but rewarding and enjoyable. This copy is in the first of the three states, with "presumptive" (later changed to the correct "presumptuous") in the last line of page 9. The cloth color is light blue (one of numerous colors used without priority). Condition is very good -- minor wear at the spine ends, a few small splash-marks on the rear cover, fore-corners bumped, spine darkened as usual with this color, small marginal mark on the corner of the first leaves; still, the cover gilt remains quite bright, and the original patterned endpapers remain intact. Blanck 7100.

$975.00

GREAT EXPECTATIONS
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GREAT EXPECTATIONS

By Dickens, Charles

1861. Works of Charles Dickens. Household Edition. [In Two Volumes.] Illustrated from Drawings by F.O.C. Darley and John Gilbert. New York: James G. Gregory, 1861. Original dark green cloth. Very early American Edition -- the first to deposit copies at the Library of Congress -- of one of Dickens's most-loved novels (being volumes of the "Household Edition"). There has been much controversy over which is the first American edition -- this edition by Gregory, or Peterson's edition. This Gregory edition was long regarded as the first American edition, but Walter Smith's 2012 bibliography of Dickens's American editions gives the nod to Peterson's, with considerable information on this controversy. In the meantime here is the brief known history... On November 15, 1860, Harper entered a copyright for the book, and then serialized the tale in Harper's Weekly beginning on November 24 and ending on August 3, 1861 (however, there is no book edition published by Harper in 1861, as they sold the book rights to Peterson). On August 26, barely three weeks later (and about seven weeks after the English three-decker was published), James Gregory of New York entered a two volume set for copyright (having undoubtedly set the type from the Harper serialization). Peterson of Philadelphia did not enter his one-volume edition at the LofC until November 8th, almost three months later. But, according to Smith, Peterson's edition was actually out in the public's hand by the month of July, while Gregory's did not actually hit the streets until September. So although Gregory's was the first edition to deposit copies at the Library of Congress, Peterson's was the first "published" -- put into the hands of the public. The earliest Gregory volumes (as here) bear only his name as publisher on the title pages; on later copies this was replaced by the imprint of Sheldon and Company. Each volume includes a frontispiece plate by F.O.C. Darley, with protective tissue (the UK edition was not illustrated). These volumes are bright and in close-to-fine condition (scarcely any of the usual mottling and bubbling of the cloth, frequently a problem with these Household Edition volumes, and virtually no wear). Smith pp 379-380; also see Podeschi (Gimbel) D38. Housed in an open-back slipcase.

$1250.00

"Public Life of Mr. Tulrumble, once Mayor of Mudfog."
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"Public Life of Mr. Tulrumble, once Mayor of Mudfog."

By [Dickens, Charles]

1837. By Boz. With Other Tales and Sketches [by other authors], from Bentley's Miscellany and The Library of Fiction. Philadelphia: Carey, Lea and Blanchard, 1837. Original drab boards with rose cloth spine and printed label. First Edition of this early collection of tales by various authors -- which constitutes one of Dickens's earliest American appearances in book form. According to Podeschi, 2,000 copies were printed in April 1837. This Dickens tale was not collected in an all-Dickens volume until ten years after his death -- in THE MUDFOG PAPERS (1880). Also included in this volume is "An Evening of Visits" by "J. Fennimore Cooper Esq. [sic]". This volume is in very good-plus condition (closed tear in front free endpaper, rose cloth faded as always, slight rubbing of the spine label); one cannot encounter these Philadelphia volumes from the 1830s in much better condition. Podeschi (Yale) B44; Carr (U of Texas) B551.

$975.00

IS SHE HIS WIFE
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IS SHE HIS WIFE

By Dickens, Charles

1877. or, Something Singular. A Comic Burletta in One Act. Boston: James R. Osgood and Company, 1877. Original green cloth decorated in black. First "Collectible" Edition, being a volume in Osgood's diminutive "Vest-Pocket Series." We say first "collectible" edition of this play first performed in 1837, because the only known copy of the first edition (from which Osgood printed this edition) was destroyed in the Boston fire of 1879, and there are only five known copies (three of which are in institutions) of the wrappered second edition (London circa 1869-1871). This copy is in bright green cloth; others are in terra-cotta cloth, without priority. It is a fine, bright copy -- the only flaw being a short closed tear in the edge of the front free endpaper (the front paste-down bears the armorial bookplate of Courtenay F. Wilson [1841-1915]). Podeschi (Yale) B62; Eckel pp 159-161. Housed in a magnificent full-morocco clamshell case, lined in velvet and silk moiré, that bears the gilt monogram S&S (the binder Sangorski & Sutcliffe?).

$1250.00

"The Tuggs's at Ramsgate" and "A Little Talk about Spring, and the Sweeps," by "Boz."  In: THE LIBRARY OF FICTION
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"The Tuggs's at Ramsgate" and "A Little Talk about Spring, and the Sweeps," by "Boz." In: THE LIBRARY OF FICTION

By [Dickens, Charles]

1836. [monthly issues in wrappers] Family Story-Teller; consisting of Tales, Essays, and Sketches of Character, Original and Selected. London: Chapman and Hall, n.d. [1836]. Six issues (including everything Dickens contributed) of the original fourteen, in original printed wrappers. First Appearances of two of Dickens's very earliest stories. Dickens contributed only these two sketches (by "Boz") to this monthly literary periodical. The first issue, undated but April 1836, included his "The Tuggs's at Ramsgate"; also included are two plates by Robert Seymour illustrating this story. The third issue, two months later, included his "A Little Talk about Spring, and the Sweeps"; one of the two plates in this issue, by R.W. Buss, relates to this story. (In mid-1837 all fourteen of the monthly issues would be published as the two-volume anthology titled THE LIBRARY OF FICTION.) These were the only two "sketches by Boz" that appeared in this periodical, but many others appeared in half a dozen other periodicals. In February 1836, Dickens's first book, the two-volume SKETCHES BY BOZ, was published by John Macrone -- containing 37 "Sketches" but not, of course, these two (as they had not yet appeared). In December 1836, the "Second Series" of SKETCHES BY BOZ was published in one volume, 21 more which included "A Little Talk about Spring, and the Sweeps" but re-titled "The First of May." With the book publication of both Series of SKETCHES BY BOZ, all of Dickens's periodical appearances had been published -- with the sole exception of "The Tuggs's at Ramsgate." SKETCHES BY BOZ was issued in monthly parts after book publication, at which time this oversight was corrected -- as "The Tuggs's at Ramsgate" was added in (Parts XV-XVI). This is actually a group of six of the fourteen original issues -- the first four, plus the sixth and eighth ("Boz" is represented in only the first and third; other writers include G.P.R. James, Edward Mayhew and Douglas Jerrold). As an aside, the monthly issues of THE LIBRARY OF FICTION started up the same month as the serialization of Dickens's next book, PICKWICK PAPERS -- so the rear covers of these LIBRARY issues advertise that book, with its two initial illustrators Seymour and Buss (Seymour would soon be dead and Buss would soon be fired -- opening the door for Hablot K. Browne a.k.a. "Phiz"). Speaking of "Phiz," accompanying a Mayhew tale in the sixth monthly issue is his depiction of "that notorious and daring burglar, by name John Smith": Phiz's depiction of Smith, dressed in a striped waistcoat, has been identified as the visual prototype of the character about to join the cast of PICKWICK PAPERS -- Tony Weller -- who overnight would turn that serial from a dismal failure into a huge success (see Kitton, Dickens and His Illustrators, p. 62). Condition is very good to near-fine (minor edge-wear, spines slightly rolled, but the wrappers are clean and whole, and the plates -- two per issue -- are sharp and bright). Although the two-volume THE LIBRARY OF FICTION is not overly scarce, especially rebound, these individual wrappered issues are not just scarce but rare. Podeschi E121; see Smith I p. 15; Eckel pp 137-139 (who noted in 1932 "the excessive scarcity of a complete run of the original fourteen parts is well known"). This is the Sherwood / Davies / Drizen copy, housed in a handsome morocco-backed clamshell case with inner chemise, by The Chelsea Bindery.

$8750.00

MEMOIRS OF SHERLOCK HOLMES
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MEMOIRS OF SHERLOCK HOLMES

By Doyle, A. Conan

1894. Paget, Sidney. Illustrated. New and Revised Edition. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1894. 4 pp undated ads. Original light blue cloth decorated in black. "New and Revised" American edition (-- which is to say the second issue of the first American edition). These eleven tales conclude with "The Final Problem," with Sherlock's apparent death in a struggle with Professor Moriarty at Reichenbach Falls (as shown in the frontispiece illustration by Sidney Paget). The London edition, published in December 1893, consisted of the same eleven memoirs that appear here -- "The Adventure of the Cardboard Box" having been excluded after its Strand Magazine appearance, due to its portrayal of either an illicit love affair or the mailing of two severed ears in a cardboard box. The first American edition, published in February 1894, did include this tale. This "new and revised edition," published in the same binding in September 1894, has this tale deleted, as in the London edition. Doyle so liked his Strand "Cardboard Box" beginning -- in which Holmes breaks into the thoughts of Watson -- that for this book he transferred it to "The Case of the Resident Patient." This is a near-fine copy, unusually clean for this light-colored binding, with quite minor wear at the ends of the spine (which as usual is slightly sunned); the front endpaper bears the ink-stamp of the Book Department of the Herz' Ladies Bazar in Terre Haute, as well as the signature of this book's probable first buyer, J.F.W. Harris, who was a mechanical engineer connected with the Rose Polytechnic Institute there in Terre Haute. Green & Gibson A14c.

$475.00

MEMOIRS OF SHERLOCK HOLMES
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MEMOIRS OF SHERLOCK HOLMES

By Doyle, A. Conan

1894. Illustrated. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1894. 6 pp undated ads. Original light blue mottled cloth decorated in black. First American Edition -- which includes one case excluded from the U.K. edition. In 1892, the first twelve Sherlock Holmes cases to have appeared in The Strand Magazine were published, by Newnes in the U.K. and by Harper in the U.S., as ADVENTURES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES. Two years later there were another twelve cases, so here are the MEMOIRS. Included are such renowned cases as "Silver Blaze," "The Yellow Face," "The Musgrave Ritual," "The Crooked Man" and "The Final Problem" -- this last one being the tale in which Doyle apparently killed off Holmes at Reichenbach Falls, at the hands of Professor Moriarty. (Doyle wanted to rid himself of Holmes so that he could revert to more serious subject matter -- but ultimately the public would not allow Holmes to remain dead.) The volume includes 27 illustrations -- 22 by W.H. Hyde and the other five (one of which is not listed) by Sidney Paget who had done the original Strand ones. Most important, however, is the presence of "The Cardboard Box" in this first American edition, for it had NOT appeared in the London edition seven weeks earlier, nor would it (and its three illustrations) appear in Harper's "New and Revised Edition" seven months later. "The Cardboard Box" was removed either because of its illicit love affair, because of its double murder, or because of the gruesomeness of a severed ear being mailed in a cardboard box. (Doyle so liked his beginning to "The Cardboard Box," in which Holmes breaks into Watson's thoughts, that he transferred that beginning to "The Resident Patient" for the London edition and the later American edition.) In any event the American edition of MEMOIRS is very highly sought-after, since it includes "The Cardboard Box," its three illustrations, and also Doyle's original beginning for "The Resident Patient." This copy is a bright, just-about-fine copy: there are a few minor wrinkles in the spine cloth and there is just a hint of a crack in the front endpaper gutter, but the cloth is clean, the gilt is bright, and the spine does not have any of the usual browning. These Harper volumes are tough to find in any better condition, due to the pale blue mottled cloth used. Green & Gibson A14b.

$1475.00

THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD, and Some Uncollected Pieces
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THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD, and Some Uncollected Pieces

By Dickens, Charles

1870. With Illustrations. Boston: Fields, Osgood, & Co., 1870. Original green cloth. First American Edition, second and usual issue with added material -- of the tale left unfinished at the time of Dickens's death in June 1870. The scarce earlier issue, withOUT the "Uncollected Pieces," was bound only in wrappers; furthermore, the subsequent additions are just that -- the text of DROOD is exactly the same in both issues. This has led some bibliographers to speculate that the two issues may be from the same printing, with only a change in the title page: Smith, noting that he could not find a publication date for the first issue, says "Perhaps such copies represent a prepublication state rather than an issue and were published simultaneously with copies which had the uncollected pieces...". The "Uncollected Pieces" consist of James T. Fields's introductory "Some Memories of Charles Dickens," plus Dickens's "George Silverman's Explanation," "Holiday Romance," "Sketches of Young Couples," and "New Uncommercial Samples," plus "The Will of Charles Dickens." Since 1867, Ticknor & Fields (and then Fields Osgood) had been Dickens's authorized publisher in America; they had serialized DROOD in their weekly Every Saturday, and then published this book in early September. (Ticknor & Fields had specifically commissioned Dickens to write "Holiday Romance," so that it could appear in their children's periodical Our Young Folks in 1868.) Harper also serialized DROOD in a monthly Dickens supplement to Harper's Weekly, but did not get their book edition out until late September. This copy is in the primary binding state with the FO&Co emblem on the covers and at the foot of the spine -- and it is green (one of three colors without priority). The volume is in near-fine condition (very minor wear at the spine ends). Smith pp 412-416; Podeschi (Yale) A156; Carr (UTexas) B278; Wilkins p. 35.

$375.00

ALMAYER'S FOLLY
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ALMAYER'S FOLLY

By Conrad, Joseph

1895. A Story of an Eastern River. London: T. Fisher Unwin, 1895. Original dark olive green cloth. First Edition of Joseph Conrad's first book, an edition believed to have consisted of 1000-1250 copies. Conrad, after meeting the real "Olmeijer" in East Borneo in 1887, gradually produced the manuscript of this book over the six years 1889-1895. He submitted it to Unwin for consideration in their "Pseudonym Library", using the pseudonym "Kamudi" (Malayan for "rudder") -- enclosing the return postage, so sure was he of its rejection. However, Unwin's reader Edward Garnett saw the manuscript's promise and accepted it for non-pseudonymous publication. This copy is in the first state (as are most copies), with the letters missing from the last two lines of page 110. Condition is very good-plus, perhaps near-fine: there is a touch of wear at the spine ends, but the original endpapers remain intact, there is very little of the usual foxing, and the spine gilt remains bright. Cagle A1a.1.

$1250.00

THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD
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THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD

By Dickens, Charles

1870. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1870. 2 pp preliminary ads plus 4+4 pp terminal ads dated Oct 1870. Original yellow-brown pictorial wrappers. Early (second) American edition, published in late September, about three weeks after Fields Osgood's edition -- and about three months after Dickens's death in June left this tale unfinished. The front cover illustration, the same as appeared on the six UK parts, was the work of Charles A. Collins -- Dickens's son-in-law, and Wilkie's brother; the scenes shown formed the basis for the numerous attempts, after Dickens's death, to complete or "solve" the mystery. Harper had been serializing DROOD in parts, as a monthly Dickens supplement to their Harper's Weekly (but Fields Osgood had earlier paid Dickens an advance for book publication). The Harper serialization -- as well as the fact that this Harper edition came out only in wrappers -- probably explains why Harper's edition is so scarce today: many of their readers had already read the tale serially. This copy does bear the (earliest and usual) date October 1870 on both the ads and rear cover, and the preliminary list of titles properly ends with No. 349. This copy does NOT have the Dickens portrait leaf, which Smith notes is true with some copies. Copies without that leaf may be a later state, but possibly copies WITH it may be a later state; a third possibility is that some initial buyers removed that leaf (for framing?) in honor of the author who had just died. Condition is very good, with very little of the wrapper lacking but with a couple of dampstains affecting the front cover and first leaves. This Harper edition is MUCH scarcer than the Fields Osgood edition, for the reasons cited above; this is the first time in 40 years that we have offered it in original wrappers. Smith pp 417-418; curiously not in Podeschi (Yale); Carr (UTexas) B279.

$675.00

THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD. COMPLETE
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THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD. COMPLETE

By Dickens, Charles [sic]

1873. Brattleboro [Vermont]: published by T[homas]. P. James, 1873. Original brown cloth. First Edition of one of the earliest -- and certainly most curious -- sequels/solutions to Charles Dickens's THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD, published in Vermont only three years after the mystery was left unfinished when Dickens died in June 1870. It occupies a considerable 488 pages. According to the "Medium's Preface" written by James (a Vermont clairvoyant), the spirit of Charles Dickens wrote this book, completing the tale by communicating with James while the latter slept. (Thus James himself has no recollection of having written it...); there is also an "Author's Preface" written by Dickens from beyond the grave. This is a tight, near-fine copy, with only quite minor wear at the extremities. Carr (UTexas) B291.

$275.00

THE CHILDREN OF THE SEA [C. W. Stoddard copy]
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THE CHILDREN OF THE SEA [C. W. Stoddard copy]

By Conrad, Joseph

1897. A Tale of the Forecastle. New York: Dodd, Mead and Company, 1897. Original pictorial light blue-grey mottled cloth. First Edition, first issue, of the tale subsequently published as THE NIGGER OF THE "NARCISSUS." Conrad wrote this story with the "Nigger" title, but consented to change the title for the American edition (which preceded the English); the publisher's argument was not that the "Nigger" title might be offensive, but rather that the white American book-buying public would not buy the book if they knew it was about a black man. Nonetheless, the original title was restored for all subsequent editions, making this variant-titled edition one of the more sought-after of Conrad's works. In late 1897, Dodd Mead had a first edition of 1000 copies printed; because the book was scheduled for publication late in the fall season, the printers were instructed to print both 1897 and 1898 title pages. The number printed with each date is not recorded... It was re-introduced in the spring and listed in Publisher's Weekly on March 12th among the spring publications... Copies of the spring issue were supplied with the 1898 title page [Cagle]. This copy is from the first issue, with an 1897 title page. It is in near-fine condition (spine slightly sunned, but there is scarcely any wear and the endpapers are atypically intact). Cagle A3b. Provenance: the front free endpaper bears the ownership inscription "Chas. Warren Stoddard | Washington D.C. | April/98." Stoddard (1843-1909) was an American author and editor, best known for his books about the people of the islands of Polynesia, throughout which he had traveled as a young man; in 1867 he converted to Catholicism, and subsequently served as chairman of the English literature department first at the University of Notre Dame and then (beginning in 1889) at Catholic University of America in Washington DC -- from which, four years after signing this book, he would resign in 1902 due to the Catholic Church's position on homosexuality.

$875.00

THE CELEBRATED JUMPING FROG OF CALAVERAS COUNTY
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THE CELEBRATED JUMPING FROG OF CALAVERAS COUNTY

By Twain, Mark

1867. [Twain's first book] And other Sketches. Edited by John Paul. New-York: C.H. Webb, 1867. Original brown cloth, beveled, with gilt frog in lower left corner of front cover (and in blind on rear cover). First Edition, second printing, of Mark Twain's first book -- a collection of anecdotes and sketches that features the title story, a highly-anthologized milestone in American humor. The "editor," "John Paul," was actually the publisher Charles Henry Webb. Around this title still clings the romance of the great author and world-figure that was to be; the actual jump of the frog was to be measured in inches -- the leap of its historian was to be measured not merely on physical earth, but in spirit, fame and whatever we credit as the essence of human achievement [Johnson]. The first printing (1000 copies) is identifiable primarily by the presence of a preliminary ad leaf, here absent; there are also several instances where type is unbroken in the first issue but is broken in the second (this second printing of 552 more copies came just twenty days after the first). Copies were issued in seven different colors, without known precedence -- blue, brown, green, lavender, plum, red, and terra-cotta; also, on some copies the gilt frog is in the center, rather than the lower left corner, of the front cover ("The frog has a peculiar habit of jumping in various positions but it invariably faces the fore-edge" - Johnson). This copy, in brown cloth, is bright and near-fine, with only light wear at the binding extremities; atypically, the original chocolate-brown endpapers remain firm and uncracked. Copies in this condition but with the ad leaf now demand a five-figure price. Blanck 3310; McBride p. 2; Johnson pp 3-9; Zamarano 80 #17;.

$3250.00

SKETCHES OF YOUNG GENTLEMEN
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SKETCHES OF YOUNG GENTLEMEN

By [Dickens, Charles]

1838. Dedicated to Young Ladies. Philadelphia: Carey, Lea and Blanchard, 1838. Original dark green cloth with front cover label. First American Edition. Dickens wrote this as a protest against SKETCHES OF YOUNG LADIES, pseudonymously written by "Quiz" (subsequently attributed to Rev. Edward Caswall) the year before. That volume classified these "interesting members of the animal kingdom" in such groups as "Lazy Young Lady," "Stupid Young Lady," "Petting Young Lady" and "Manly Young Lady." To quote from Dickens's "Dedication to the Young Ladies": Your Dedicator is humbly of opinion that so many libels, upon your Honourable sex, were never contained in any previously published work... Although your Dedicator is not at present prepared to deny that you are animals, still he humbly submits that it is not polite to call you so... Your Dedicator humbly suggests, that such of your Honourable sex as purchased the bane should possess themselves of the antidote, and that those of your Honourable sex who were not rash enough to take the first, should lose no time in swallowing the last, -- prevention being in all cases better than cure... This Philadelphia volume contains first Caswall's LADIES (by "Quiz") and then Dickens's GENTLEMEN (anonymous -- no "Boz"), each with its own title page dated 1838 and reading "from the last London edition." The front cover label does attribute the second piece -- to "Quiz, Junior"; the half-title at the beginning of the volume reads "Sketches of Young Ladies" and then, in a different (i.e. added) font, "and Young Gentlemen." This is a very good copy of this delicate volume, still in its original two-in-one binding with front cover label. There is a damp-mark ("tide-line") about a quarter-inch up on all leaves (in the margin only), and on the blank dark green cloth spine is faintly inked the title. This is a scarce book in original state. Smith pp 1-4 (wherein he notes that this edition was published in mid-March 1838, and Wiley & Putnam's on June 15th); no American edition is cited for Yale in Podeschi (see B63); not cited for Univ. of Texas in Carr (but see the Wiley & Putnam edition at B473; not cited in Wilkins. Provenance: signed in pencil by bibliographer Walter Smith, this is the copy described and photographed in his 2019 book.

$1450.00

SKETCHES OF YOUNG COUPLES, YOUNG LADIES, YOUNG GENTLEMEN
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SKETCHES OF YOUNG COUPLES, YOUNG LADIES, YOUNG GENTLEMEN

By [Dickens, Charles]

1869. By Quiz [sic]. Illustrated by Phiz. London: Cassell, Petter, and Galpin; and 596 Broadway, New York, n.d. [1869]. 2 pp undated ads. Original bright green cloth decorated in gilt, black and red, beveled. First American Collected Edition of all three "Sketches" -- two of which actually were written by Charles Dickens. In 1837 SKETCHES OF YOUNG LADIES had been pseudonomously written by "Quiz" (actually Rev. Edward Caswall) -- classifying these "members of the animal kingdom" into such categories as "Lazy Young Ladies," "Stupid Young Ladies," "Petting Young Ladies" and "Manly Young Ladies." The following year Dickens wrote SKETCHES OF YOUNG GENTLEMEN (anonymously -- not even using his pseudonym "Boz") as a protest against the earlier book -- in fact urging women to read his book on men as the "antidote" for Caswall's earlier one. Finally, Dickens also wrote SKETCHES OF YOUNG COUPLES, published anonymously in 1840, and in England all three were published together in 1843. The first two titles (LADIES and GENTLEMEN) were in 1838 collected in one volume both by Carey Lea & Blanchard and by Wiley & Putnam, but this 1869 volume was the first American to collect all three -- albeit inaccurately ascribing them all to "Quiz." This copy, with the American address added to the title page, is what Smith calls a "subsidiary edition," or "the American issue of the English impression." This is a handsomely bound book, with binding design (initialed "WR") by the Scottish binding designer William Ralston. It is in very good-plus condition (minor wear at the extremities, endpapers cracked). Smith pp 5-8; Podeschi/Gimbel (Yale) D56; not in Carr (UTexas). Provenance: signed in pencil by Walter Smith, this is the copy described and photographed in his 2019 bibliography.

$450.00

MERIDIANA: The Adventures of Three Englishmen and Three Russians in South Africa
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MERIDIANA: The Adventures of Three Englishmen and Three Russians in South Africa

By Verne, Jules

1873. [a handsome copy] Translated from the French. With Numerous Illustrations. London: Sampson Low, Marston, Low, & Searle, 1873. 32 pp ads dated October 1872. Original green cloth pictorially decorated in black and gilt, beveled, all edges gilt. First British Edition, also the first edition in the English language. Three Englishmen... and three Russians... and their guide, a bushman named Mokoum, set out to measure the arc of a meridian in the Kalahari Desert of South Africa. Everything is going well, until war is declared between England and Russia. [Kytasaari] This tale was initially published in the original French in 1872, as AVENTURES DE TROIS RUSSES ET DE TROIS ANGLAIS DANS L'AFRIQUE AUSTRALE. Sampson Low's English edition, titled MERIDIANA (with the subtitle's nationalities reversed in favor of the Englishmen), was issued in November 1872 but was dated 1873 (as here). In the same month, some of these copies (printed and bound in England) were exported to the U.S. and equipped with the title page of Scribner's import house, Scribner, Welford and Armstrong (likewise dated 1873) -- technically the American issue of the first English edition, and extremely scarce today. Scribner Armstrong (sans Welford) then published the first edition actually produced in America; there was also an unauthorized American edition by Shepard, titled ADVENTURES IN THE LAND OF THE BEHEMOTH, with an altered translation and fewer illustrations, published on the very same day. This edition has one of the great Verne pictorial bindings: a phalanx of crocodiles hungrily approaches an oblivious man holding a parasol. This copy is in green cloth (one of several colors used, without priority), and has an ad catalogue dated October 1872 -- which we think is the earliest date (we have also seen October 1873). The volume is just a little askew (as always) and a few gatherings stand slightly proud, but this is a fine, bright copy, without any restoration or "improvement" of any kind. An early Verne edition that is quite scarce in this condition. Taves & Michaluk V009; Myers 39.

$4500.00

THE AWKWARD AGE
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THE AWKWARD AGE

By James, Henry

1899. London: William Heinemann, 1899. 2 pp undated ads. Original blind-stamped blue cloth. First Edition of this novel, written almost entirely in dialogue, of Nanda Brookenham's "awkward age" of transition away from her mother's marriage-marketing and toward taking charge of her own life. This appears to have been a colonial copy that was transferred back for domestic use (according to E&L, 475 copies were so transferred): the book is in the second binding state (with nine tulip buds rather than four irises on the front cover), is printed on smooth wove paper, and has a title page that is printed all in black and is dated in Arabic numbers -- all aspects denoting colonial copies. The half-title, which would have identified this as a copy meant for the colonies, was excised by the publisher when it was re-designated for domestic use; most such copies do not have the final ad leaf either, but this one does. On the front cover, "THE AWKWARD AGE" measures 2-7/8" across (shorter than on all three copies cited by Supino); on the spine, "AWKWARD AGE" (all in one line) is in a much narrower font than the other four lines of print. This is a near-fine copy, slightly darkened on the spine and with very minor rubbing at the extremities. See Supino 53.3.0 + 53.4.0 + 53.5.0 (all variations of colonial sheets redirected to the domestic market, none of them quite the same as this); Edel & Laurence A53a.

$395.00

TERMINATIONS
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TERMINATIONS

By James, Henry

1895. The Death of the Lion | The Coxon Fund | The Middle Years | The Altar of the Dead. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1895. 6 pp undated ads. Original light green cloth decorated in dark green and gilt. First American Edition of this collection of four tales, published a month after the London edition. The first two had appeared in "The Yellow Book," and the third in "Scribner's Magazine," but "The Altar of the Dead" had not appeared in periodical form. This copy is in the primary binding, with the green flower-and-leaf ornament on the spine (as well as on the front cover). The pale cloth is unusually clean -- making the volume just about fine (the gilt lettering never stands out well against such light-colored cloth). Supino 45.6.0; Edel & Laurence A45b. Provenance: large paste-down bookplate of Eleanor Cochrane Sears (one of the Boston Cochrane family, who married Richard Dudley Sears, grandson of the Massachusetts senator who developed what is now Brookline; Richard won seven consecutive U.S. national singles tennis championships in 1881-1887 -- still a record; the couple built a 9000-sq-ft mansion off the coast of Maine, on Islesboro).

$225.00

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