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A SON AT THE FRONT
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A SON AT THE FRONT

By Wharton, Edith

1923. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1923. Original red cloth. First Edition of this novel sited in France during the Great War. Edith Wharton lived in France when war broke out, and rather than flee, remained there to help the French effort -- even traveling to the front in order to write articles (collected as FIGHTING FRANCE, 1915) designed to prompt America to join in. The depiction of wartime Paris and the forward areas... is done with a sure hand, and gives those memorable scenes a kind of permanence. [Lewis] Because George Campton and his parents, Americans all, happened to be in Paris on the day war broke out, he is called to duty in the French Army; the main theme of the novel is the extreme effort by the father (a renowned portrait painter) to prevent his son and only child from being sent to the battle area -- and his son's resistance to that effort. This is a near-fine copy (essentially no wear or soil, but spine gilt dull as usual). Garrison A32.I.a. Provenance: ownership inscription of "Charles J. & Rose S. Scofield | Carthage, Illinois | October 29, 1923"; Charles (1853-1953) was a country lawyer in Carthage for 78 of his almost-100 years.

$125.00

FIGHTING FRANCE. From Dunkerque to Belfort
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FIGHTING FRANCE. From Dunkerque to Belfort

By Wharton, Edith

1915. Illustrated [with photographs]. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1915. Original red cloth First and Only Edition, first printing, first (American) issue -- the rest of the first printing formed the Canadian edition, and the second and last printing formed the UK edition, all in 1915. After Wharton's 1913 divorce, she moved permanently to France, and did not flee when war broke out a year later; indeed she became highly involved in the French war effort, setting up women's workrooms and raising funds for Belgian refugees. Through her various connections, Wharton was one of few foreigners allowed to visit the front lines in France. She made five separate trips in 1915, which were later published as articles and then compiled together in Fighting France, which became an American bestseller. Wharton's writing on the bleak realities of war was on its own in America, when the nation was attempting to keep its distance from the war, and Wharton was determined to shed light on the consequences being suffered by countries who needed help [Redwood]. Though a "bestseller," there were just two printings divided up for the US, Canada and the UK -- making this one of Edith Wharton's scarcer books. Included are thirteen photographs, one of which (the frontispiece) shows the author, armed with a parasol, at a French palisade on the front. Condition is very good-plus (front cover quite clean and bright, spine a little faded as usual, dent-mark across the rear cover). Garrison A23.I.a.

$100.00

EPISODES OF THE GREAT WAR
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EPISODES OF THE GREAT WAR

By Buchan, John

1936. Illustrated. London [etc.]: Thomas Nelson and Sons, (1936). Original blue-grey cloth, with dust jacket. First Edition. This volume is a selection of extracts from Buchan's monumental A HISTORY OF THE GREAT WAR (four volumes, 1921-1922) -- published at a time when Britain was bracing for the next war. Included are eight maps, plus nine plates containing numerous photographs. Two years later this volume was followed up with a companion volume, NAVAL EPISODES OF THE GREAT WAR.~This is a fine copy in a near-fine pictorial jacket (unnecessarily reinforced inside at some edges). Blanchard A117.

$200.00

A PRINCE OF THE CAPTIVITY
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A PRINCE OF THE CAPTIVITY

By Buchan, John

1933. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1933. Original green cloth lettered in gilt, with dust jacket. First Edition. In this novel the hero, Adam Melfort, is convicted of forgery, is drummed out of his regiment, and is sentenced to two years in prison -- for a crime his wife actually had committed. Upon release he embarks upon a series of adventurous causes in an effort to regain his reputation -- taking him into the secret service in the Great War, to the Greenland ice-cap, to the industrial Midlands and ultimately to Germany, where after the Great War he foils the attempts by a German faction to bring down the country's leader. (This was published, of course, just before one Adolf Hitler became that country's leader.) Though based on a curious premise, the tale is full of typically thrilling Buchan adventure -- climaxing in a man-hunt in the Italian Alps in which Melfort brings down his enemies with a rockslide.~This copy is in the primary binding (there are several secondary bindings, including this green cloth lettered in black). The volume is in fine condition; the pictorial dust jacket is very good-plus (slightly soiled, with reinforcement at the ends of the folds on the back-side). Blanchard A99.

$325.00

THE BATTLE OF THE SOMME. [First AND Second Phases.]
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THE BATTLE OF THE SOMME. [First AND Second Phases.]

By Buchan, John

1916. [Together, two volumes.] London: Thomas Nelson & Sons, n.d. [1916 & 1917]. Original paper-covered boards and original wrappers, respectively. First Editions of Buchan's account of the war effort. Buchan had joined the Nelson publishing firm as literary adviser in 1905 (due in large part to his friendship with Oxford classmate Tommy Nelson -- killed in action in April 1917). These volumes are filled with maps and also with photographs of the Somme battle sites, including a number of action ones showing British soldiers "crossing the parapets," tanks overrunning obstacles, mines exploding, etc.~The first volume was bound in paper-covered heavy boards; the second was available (without priority) in either paper-covered thin boards or, as here, heavy wrappers. These are very good copies, with some edge-wear as would be expected on these fragile volumes; typically, both volumes are found with most of their spine paper lacking, but here most of it is present. Blanchard A40 & A41.

$325.00

THE AFRICAN COLONY. Studies in the Reconstruction

By Buchan, John

1903. Edinburgh and London: William Blackwood and Sons, 1903. Original dark blue cloth. First Edition, first binding (some copies were put up in a green Times Book Club binding). As the Boer War wound down in 1901, Buchan received a two-year appointment to assist Lord Milner in the reconstruction of the Colony.~Buchan, who had not been enthusiastic about the war, believing that the British, on balance, 'were only just in the right,' was enthusiastic about the reconstruction and entirely in sympathy with Milner's objectives. [Smith]~This is Buchan's survey of the situation in South Africa after the war, with his thoughts about what should be done next. Included are two large foldout color maps -- one of "South Africa" and one of "The New Colonies." The volume is bright and near-fine (very slightly rubbed at the extremities). Blanchard A15 (citing only one foldout map, not two).

$375.00

"A Commission in the British Army." In The Independent
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"A Commission in the British Army." In The Independent

By Henty, G.A.

1900. [the only appearance?] Published Weekly. Vol LII / No. 2713. New York: Thursday, November 29, 1900 ("the last Thanksgiving of the nineteenth century"). 20 pp preliminary ads (paginated i-xx), plus 16 pp terminal ads (paginated xxi-xxxvi). Original white wrappers stamped in yellow-orange. First (and only?) appearance of this four-page double-column article on the granting of British officers' commissions, written during the Boer War. Henty reviews the history of how officers' commissions were bought and sold over past centuries (a practice ended in 1871) -- though he says there were benefits to that system, such as a retiring officer being able to sell his commission to someone else, "a sort of bounty to induce him to get out!" [Dartt]. Henty also argues for abolishing the Victoria Cross (or at least limiting it to non-commissioned ranks), because too many officers are dying in heroic but ill-advised efforts to earn it.~This is a near-fine copy of this weekly issue of The Independent (a couple of cover creases, one small worn spot on the spine wrapper). This piece is not cited in Newbolt -- neither the article nor the periodical; Newbolt does not include American publications, but the absence of the article in Newbolt implies that there was no appearance in the UK. It is likewise not mentioned in Sandler's 1992 Henty Collector's Ready Reference. However this issue of The Independent is noted by Dartt (pp 39-40), who goes on to write six paragraphs describing Henty's argument -- though here again, no appearance in the UK is cited. Quite a scarce piece.

$675.00

CAMPS AND QUARTERS. Military Sketches and Stories
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CAMPS AND QUARTERS. Military Sketches and Stories

By (Henty, G.A.)

1889. [a Henty rarity] By Archibald Forbes, George Henty and Charles Williams. New York: Ward, Lock and Co., 1889. Printed light brown wrappers. First Edition (American issue) of "probably the rarest of all Henty items" (quote from Sotheby's, February 1972, when the last copy appeared at auction -- it sold for 380 pounds, or about $1,000). When Farmer did his account of Henty books decades ago, he noted that "We have been unable to secure a copy of this book, nor personally to inspect one. The British Museum copy was destroyed in the bombing of London." (Farmer ultimately gleaned information from a rebound copy in Scotland.)~According to Henty's own copy (now at the Lilly Library), Henty wrote the Introduction plus four of the ten tales: "A Passing Face," "Faithful to the Death," "Turning the Tables" and "Out with the Redshirts." (Henty is also believed to have written the brief interludes that connect the ten tales.) One reason CAMPS AND QUARTERS is so sought-after, in addition to its inherent rarity, is that none of these Henty tales has since been reprinted (except in 50 facsimile copies of this book, once created from this very original).~This wrappered volume was advertised as an "annual," but no further years' volumes were issued. The British and American issues differ only in their wrappers and title pages (the British version indicates this was to be "An Annual"; also it has a different Ward Lock imprint, has some leaves of inserted ads, and of course has a sterling price and different ads on the wrapper).~Condition is very good-plus (spine wrapper replaced with archival paper, a few small chips in the edge of the front and rear wrappers, professional repair to a wrapper corner and the inner front hinge). Newbolt 138.1 (U.K. issue); Dartt pp 31-32 (U.S. issue). Provenance: this copy previously belonged to the U.S. Library of Congress: on the title page is a purple ink-stamp "Library of Congress | Copyright | May 18, 1889 | Washington", over which is a black ink-stamp "Library of Congress - 4 | Surplus Duplicate"; along with these is their penciled file number 14004 U2 (also appearing on the front wrapper). We don't often use the word "rarity," but it applies in this instance.

$3750.00

THE GREAT BOER WAR [inscribed by Doyle, plus letter]
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THE GREAT BOER WAR [inscribed by Doyle, plus letter]

By Doyle, A. Conan

1902. [inscribed plus autograph letter] Revised and Enlarged Edition. New York: McClure, Phillips & Company, 1902. Original dark blue cloth lettered in gilt. "Revised and Enlarged Edition," which consisted of only 1,005 copies. This was Doyle's first volume of non-fiction: the outbreak of war occupied Doyle's mind so utterly that he could write nothing literary, so he went to South Africa as a physician and wrote of the war instead. (The term "Great, incidentally, is used only to distinguish it from the smaller 1881 Boer War.) McClure Phillips published the first American edition in 1900, the same year as the UK edition; there followed four subsequent US impressions between 1900 and 1902 (listed on the title verso). Then this enlarged edition came out -- for which Doyle wrote a "Preface to the Final Edition" dated September 1902; this is a taller volume than the earlier impressions, and was priced at $2.50 compared to $1.50.~This copy includes, in the pocket at the rear, a total of five maps printed on two folded sheets of paper (the first US edition had five maps, though its title page said "six"). The book's condition is near-fine, with the gilt unusually bright; the endpapers of this hefty volume are cracked. Green & Gibson B1c.i. Housed in a felt-lined morocco-backed clamshell case.~This copy is inscribed and initialed by the author at the top of the title page, "With all remembrance ACD". Also, tipped in is a one-page undated letter on Doyle's "Undershaw" stationery, which undoubtedly accompanied this gift of a book:~My dear Russell~It is not fair to judge my book by the first out of twenty drafts. I send you the last. I don't know that Stormburg [sic] is much changed.~Yours ACD~The front paste-down also bears the armorial bookplate of "Major General John Cecil Russell | Colonel 12th Royal Lancers." Major-General John Cecil Russell [1839-1909], a keen supporter of the use of mounted cavalry, was a veteran of many late nineteenth century African wars, having served during the Third Ashanti War (1873), the Ninth Cape Frontiers War (1878-1879), and the Zulu War (1879). By the time of this presentation, 63-year-old Russell was semi-retired as an equerry to King Edward VII. "Stormburg" refers to the Battle of Stormberg of 10 December 1899 ("one of the more embarrassing British defeats of the Boer War in which a British army got lost and marched into an unintentional ambush" [Rickard]). The letter is in fine condition; Doyle's inscription on the title page has "bled" somewhat into the paper.

$2650.00

THE MARACOT DEEP and Other Stories
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THE MARACOT DEEP and Other Stories

By Doyle, A. Conan

1929. Garden City NY: Doubleday, Doran & Company, 1929. Original black cloth decorated in yellow, with dust jacket. First American Edition of the last volume of fiction to be published during Doyle's lifetime. The title tale is Doyle's great science fiction adventure in which Professor Maracot leads an expedition to the floor of the Atlantic Ocean and encounters an ancient submarine civilization -- illustrating Doyle's long-time interest in the Atlantis legend. Two of the other three tales are Professor Challenger science fiction stories -- "The Disintegration Machine" and "When the World Screamed." The other one, "The Story of Spedegue's Dropper," is a World War I tale in which a cricket bowler's lob technique is adapted for hurling grenades in trench warfare.~The very uncommon dust jacket is a color pictorial one, designed by Fay Turpin, showing a battle between man and shark in front of undersea buildings. The volume is in fine condition; the jacket is near-fine, with the red spine lettering a little faded, and a few tiny tears (but nothing is lacking). Green & Gibson A47c. Housed in a felt-lined morocco-backed clamshell case.

$775.00

GREAT BRITAIN AND THE NEXT WAR
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GREAT BRITAIN AND THE NEXT WAR

By Doyle, A. Conan

1914. [in original glassine] Boston: Small, Maynard & Company, 1914. Original rose paper-covered boards pictorially decorated in black, with original plain glassine wrapper. First Edition (there was no British edition). Doyle wrote this in 1913 (at which time it appeared in the Fortnightly Review), but it was not published in book form (as here) until September 1914 -- the month after "The Guns of August." Doyle wrote this in response to Bernhardi's "Germany and the Next War," in which Bernhardi laid out Germany's plans for conquest.~[Doyle] argued the need for a Channel tunnel to keep the supply lines open in the event of a submarine blockade -- a threat which he described in vivid detail in 'Danger!'. After the war, when the need [for a tunnel] had diminished, he was satisfied that his argument had been vindicated... 'When our descendants compute the sums spent in shipping and transshipping in the great war, the waste of merchant ships and convoys, the sufferings of the wounded, the delay in reinforcements, the dependence upon the weather, they will agree that our sin had found us out and that we paid a fitting price for our stupidity.' [THE WANDERINGS OF A SPIRITUALIST, quoted in G&G]~This is a fine copy, without wear (spine slightly faded as always); included is the original plain glassine wrapper, which lacks a large corner of its rear panel but is otherwise intact. Green & Gibson B13. Housed in a felt-lined clamshell case with leather label.

$425.00

THE STORY OF BRITISH PRISONERS
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THE STORY OF BRITISH PRISONERS

By Doyle, A. Conan ("prefaced and annotated by")

1915. London: Central Committee for National Patriotic Organizations, n.d. [1915]. Original light brown wrappers. First Edition. This propaganda pamphlet, describing the Germans' treatment of British prisoners of war, was circulated in an effort to win over countries remaining neutral. Included are many specific examples. Doyle observes in his Foreword,~Never again in our time will a German visitor be welcome to our country... A deep fissure will divide the two races, and this fissure will be kept open by our abiding remembrance of the foul methods by which the Germans have conducted the war... These methods can only be characterised as methods of systematic murder.~This copy is near-fine (a trace of wear along the spine, and as usual a vertical crease that reflects its original mailing). Green & Gibson C19.

$375.00

THE SURRENDER OF SANTIAGO
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THE SURRENDER OF SANTIAGO

By Norris, Frank

1917. An Account of the Historic Surrender of Santiago to General Shafter, July 17, 1898. San Francisco: Paul Elder and Company, 1917. Original tan wrappers pictorially decorated in black and orange. First Edition in book form (having originally appeared in The Sun); included is a frontispiece portrait of "Pecos Bill" Shafter, with his printed facsimile signature. Norris had gone to Cuba in 1898 to report on the Spanish-American War, where he covered the Siege of Santiago; this wrappered volume was issued during the next war, to benefit the Red Cross Funds. Fine condition. Blanck 15047; also see Gaer, p. 9.

$85.00

"1914." Five Sonnets
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"1914." Five Sonnets

By Brooke, Rupert

1915. London: Sidgwick & Jackson, 1915. Original grey printed wrappers. First Separate Edition, published five months after 1914 AND OTHER POEMS (which included these sonnets). Included is "The Soldier," beginning with Brooke's famous lines~If I should die, think only this of me:~That there's some corner of a foreign field~ That is for ever England.~Brooke had in fact died in a corner of a foreign field by the time this was published. This is a near-fine copy (very light soil, a couple of faint creases). Keynes 28.

$225.00

THE COPPERHEAD
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THE COPPERHEAD

By Frederic, Harold

1893. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1893. Original terra-cotta cloth decorated in red and black. First Edition of Frederic's novel sited during the American Civil War. "Copperhead" was the reproachful term for Northerners who sympathized with Southern whites -- mostly Democrats in Illinois, Indiana and Ohio who were opposed to the policies of the Lincoln administration; their secret society, called the Knights of the Golden Circle, sought to assist Southerners and the expansion of slavery. In this book an upstate New York farmer (Frederic himself was from Utica) is branded a "Copperhead" by his neighbors for believing that the war was futile and that the Northern states should negotiate a peace treaty with the South. It was filmed both in 1920 (starring Lionel Barrymore) and again in 2013.~This is a fine copy; the binding design (unsigned) is by Margaret Armstrong. Blanck 6278; Gullans & Espey 101. Provenance: bookplate of the noted collector Frederick B. Adams Jr.

$375.00

THE WAR IN THE AIR
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THE WAR IN THE AIR

By Wells, H.G.

1908. And particularly how Mr. Bert Smallways fared while it lasted. With Illustrations by A.C. Michael. London: George Bell and Sons, 1908. 2 pp undated ads. Original blue cloth decorated in gilt. First Edition of this extraordinary tale of a Cockney cycle mechanic who is carried off by a drifting balloon and is then caught up in a surprise German air attack on New York City -- which in turn precipitates the collapse of civilization. Though this book typifies Wells's fantastic "fiction about the future" (and includes a remarkable forecast of aerial warfare), it is perhaps more noteworthy as one of his earliest warnings about "the German menace" -- a topic to which he would devote increased attention over the coming years.~This copy is in Currey's binding "A" (with lettering in gilt on both the front cover and the spine, and with no mounted color plate). This is a bright copy, fine except for one slightly cracked endpaper (free endpapers browned, as always). Wells Soc. 36; Hammond B11; Currey p. 526.

$875.00

MICHAEL STROGOFF, The Courier of the Czar
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MICHAEL STROGOFF, The Courier of the Czar

By Verne, Jules

1877. Verne, Jules. MICHAEL STROGOFF. Translated by W.H.G. Kingston. Revised by Julius Chambers. With Ninety Full-Page Illustrations. New York: Scribner, Armstrong & Company, 1877. 6 pp undated ads. Original green cloth pictorially decorated in black and gilt, beveled. First American Edition of this historical tale of adventure taking place during a Siberian revolt by the Tartars. The czar must get a message to his brother the arch-duke, in Irkutsk, for which he chooses his best courier, Michael Strogoff.~The first publication in English, in October 1876, was in a wrappered American edition by Frank Leslie; Sampson Low's U.K. edition came out two months later (in December 1876, despite the 1877 date on the title page). This Scribner Armstrong edition came out a few weeks later, in January 1877; it sold so well that by February a third edition was being advertised.~This is a near-fine copy, with minor rubbing at the extremities but otherwise scarcely any external wear or soil (a few leaves stand slightly proud). This highly-sought Verne tale seldom turns up in any better condition. Taves & Michaluk V015; Edwards 15.

$1650.00

THE POINT OF HONOR [in 1908 dust jacket]
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THE POINT OF HONOR [in 1908 dust jacket]

By Conrad, Joseph

1908. [with 1908 dust jacket] A Military Tale. Illustrations by Dan Sayre Groesbeck. New York: The McClure Company, 1908. Original green cloth pictorially decorated in white, with dust jacket. First Separate (and First Illustrated, and First American) Edition. Earlier in 1908 this tale was published in England (as "The Duel") with five others in A SET OF SIX; it was this McClure publication that caused the delay in the publication of the American edition of the entire A SET OF SIX until 1915. (Also, no publisher was in a hurry to do so: in 1908 Conrad's career was at its nadir, but his star rose again after CHANCE hit it big in 1914.)~This copy is in the first and usual binding, with "McClure" at the foot of the spine. (THE POINT OF HONOR was published in September 1908; by November, the publisher McClure was forced to sell his assets to Doubleday Page, and subsequently-bound copies bear the new publisher's name at the foot of the spine.)~This is a fine, bright copy. Included is the very scarce color-pictorial dust jacket (reproducing the volume's frontispiece plate; the rear panel promotes a Booth Tarkington novel that was likewise published in 1908). The jacket is in near-fine condition, with very little soil (a few short edge-tears but only one shallow chip, at the top of the front panel partially impinging on the title's "NT"). We have seen only one Conrad dust jacket earlier than this (the American YOUTH, 1902). Cagle A13c.

$3950.00

THE MOON IS DOWN
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THE MOON IS DOWN

By Steinbeck, John

1942. A Novel. New York: The Viking Press, 1942. Original blue cloth lettered in silver, with dust jacket. First Edition, clothbound issue (there were also 700 copies in wrappers). This is a tale of an invading army's occupation of a small town in Northern Europe -- written (with an adaptation for the theatre in mind) at the request of the OSS, with the aim of motivating resistance movements across Europe. (The country occupied is not named, but for this book Steinbeck received from the King of Norway the King Haakon VII Freedom Cross; the book was quickly translated and published in many countries, including an illegal edition by the French Resistance.)~This is a standard Viking Press copy, with no mention of other presses on the copyright page, and with the extra period on page 112. The volume is in fine condition; the pictorial dust jacket is very good-plus, with very minor wear and darkening. Goldstone & Payne A16b.

$350.00

ONE MAN'S INITIATION - 1917
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ONE MAN'S INITIATION - 1917

By Dos Passos, John

1920. London: George Allen & Unwin, (1920). Original blue cloth stamped in black, with dust jacket. First Edition of Dos Passos's first book -- a novel of soldier life during the Great War. After graduation from Harvard in 1916, he volunteered for an American ambulance corps (along with his college friend e.e. cummings), serving outside of Paris and in northern Italy. (After the war he would remain in Paris, becoming, along with Ernest Hemingway and others, one of the "Lost Generation" of American writers there.) The American edition of this book was not published until 1922, after his anti-war novel THREE SOLDIERS brought him some fame.~This copy is in the second state, with "spread flat" properly printed on page 35. The volume is in fine condition; the jacket too is just about fine, just a bit darkened on its spine.

$325.00

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